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September, 2018

  • Governor Baker visits QCC to discuss MassGrant Plus
  • Governor Charlie Baker meets with QCC students Shantel Rutherford and Oliver Dogma.
  • QCC student Jennifer Bemis greets Governor Charlie Baker prior to a roundtable discussion on the MassGrant Plus program.
  • President Luis Pedraja welcomes Lt. Governor Karyn Polito to QCC.
  • Commissioner Santiago discusses the impact MassGrant Plus will have on part-time students at a press conference at QCC.
  • From left: Governor Charlie Baker, QCC President Luis Pedraja and Secretary of Education James Peyser
September, 2018

On September 24, Quinsigamond Community College set the stage for Governor Charlie Baker and Lt. Governor Karyn Polito to formally announced the state’s new MassGrant Plus program, a $7.1 million expansion of the existing MassGrant Program developed for part-time, degree-seeking students. This represents the first significant expansion of the state’s financial aid program in more than two decades....

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On September 24, Quinsigamond Community College set the stage for Governor Charlie Baker and Lt. Governor Karyn Polito to formally announced the state’s new MassGrant Plus program, a $7.1 million expansion of the existing MassGrant Program developed for part-time, degree-seeking students. This represents the first significant expansion of the state’s financial aid program in more than two decades.

Governor Baker and Lt. Governor Polito, along with Secretary of Education James Peyser and Commissioner of Higher Education Dr. Carlos Santiago, visited the college’s Quinsigamond Engineering, Science, and Technology (QuEST) Center for an informal roundtable discussion with part-time QCC students Jennifer Bemis, Oliver Dogma and Shantel Rutherford, to learn how this program will benefit community college students. Ms. Rutherford and Ms. Bemis discussed the struggles of being single parents, while also working and attending college, while Mr. Dogma shared his challenges of being an immigrant from Ghana and coming to a new country. Each student shared how the MassGrant Plus program would positively impact them.

“I want to start by thanking the students who did a terrific job of representing the point of view of those who are juggling a lot of balls in life to find a way to pursue a degree in higher education,” Gov. Baker said, in a formal program after the roundtable discussion.

The Governor said the MassGrant Plus program was developed based on the recognition that more and more people have other things going on in their lives and there is a need to “be able to straddle more than one world.”

“For us it was important to use this program to not just expand it on traditional terms, but also make it available to part-time students, because it’s very clear to us – if you just look at higher education trends in general – they show us that more and more of the folks that are in higher ed are also working or they have other obligations they need to deal with,” said Baker.

Lt. Governor Polito also added that often students start college only to find they can’t finish due to financial struggles that include needing to buy such staples as food, childcare and fuel.

“By taking advantage of this, it closes that gap,” she said.

At QCC, 67 percent of students attended on a part-time basis during the Spring 2018 semester.

“We thank the Baker-Polito Administration for creating the MASSGrant Plus that will benefit community college students. We know that up to 1,000 of our students, will benefit directly from this program. We have students who are working multiple jobs, and single parents trying to cobble together an education while raising children. This is a game changer,” QCC President Luis Pedraja said.

“We’re pleased QCC is playing big in this space,” Gov. Baker said. “We’re very excited about the potential of this program and we look forward to working on it in the coming years."

  • President Blackstone Chamber of Commerce, Jeannie Hebert, QCC President Luis Pedraja and Congressman James McGovern
  • From left: Lt. Governor Karyn Polito, QCC President Dr. Luis Pedraja and Former State Senator Richard Moore.
  • Ribbon-Cutting Ceremony for the new Blackstone Valley Education Hub.
  • From left: Lt. Governor Karyn Polito, Congressman McGovern and QCC President Dr. Luis Pedraja.
September, 2018

On September 18, Quinsigamond Community College became part of Blackstone Valley history when the Blackstone Valley Chamber of Commerce held an official ribbon-cutting ceremony to open its new Blackstone Valley Education Hub, an advanced manufacturing training center developed for students to get hands-on training in the manufacturing and technology field. The new education hub, located in the renovated Linwood...

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On September 18, Quinsigamond Community College became part of Blackstone Valley history when the Blackstone Valley Chamber of Commerce held an official ribbon-cutting ceremony to open its new Blackstone Valley Education Hub, an advanced manufacturing training center developed for students to get hands-on training in the manufacturing and technology field. The new education hub, located in the renovated Linwood Mill in Northbridge, is part of the Blackstone Valley Chamber of Commerce’s nonprofit organization, the Center for Business and Enterprise. QCC, along with Benjamin Franklin Institute of Technology and Worcester State University have partnered with the Chamber to help make the education hub a reality. The Blackstone Valley Education Hub houses three classrooms, a skilled learning and performance center offering state-of-the-art technology, machines, computers and a design lab that focuses on 3D design and printing. The education hub is designed to teach advanced manufacturing skills to students and adults, in an effort to fill the current gap in the manufacturing workforce, a gap that has expanded as people age out of the industry.

Attending the event was Lt. Governor Karyn Polito, Congressman James McGovern, as well as a multitude of local legislators, business and civic leaders. Students from the region, including the Grafton Job Corps and Uxbridge High School demonstrated some of the technologies available at the Education Hub.

“Today manufacturing isn’t like what it was in my dad’s generation,” Congressman McGovern said.

Lt. Governor Polito, who is the Massachusetts STEM Advisory Council Co-Chair, acknowledged the amazing manufacturing advances that have been happening in the Commonwealth.

“We are the envy of a lot of other states and around the world,” she said.

President and CEO of Blackstone Chamber of Commerce, Jeannie Hebert said students will be work-ready after their training at the Education Hub.

“Our higher learning partners Quinsigamond Community College and Worcester State University are going to be teaching these kids,” she noted.

 “We have to think ahead and teach to the jobs of tomorrow, not today,” QCC President Dr. Luis Pedraja added.

In addition to teaching, QCC has also provided the financial support for the equipment and furniture.

“QCC’s Foundation has financially been at the table for years and we appreciate the commitment…” Congressman McGovern said, adding, “This is the future of Blackstone.“

  • From left: QCC and PTK students Ashley Forhan and Jen Brevik.
  • QCC President Dr. Luis Pedraja shares a laugh with PTK student Dan Underwood.
  • QCC Wyverns get ready for one of their preliminary heats.
  • The QCC Wyverns took third place overall in the Academic portion of the 2018 Dragon Boat race.
  • QCC students enjoy a day on the water during the Dragon Boat Races.
  • The QCC Wyverns Captain, Bonnie Coleman and Wyvern team members check on their next race time.
  • The 2018 QCC Wyverns with President Pedraja.
  • QCC students were on hand at the Dragon Boat Festival to inform people about the college.
September, 2018

The QCC Wyverns, a team of dedicated Quinsigamond Community College students, Phi Theta Kappa (PTK) students, ACC alumni and PTK Advisor Bonnie Coleman, rowed their way to the finals at the second annual Worcester Dragon Boat Festival, held at DCR Regatta Point and Lake Quinsigamond, Worcester. This is the second time QCC has been in the dragon boat races. This year’s race featured 40 community...

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The QCC Wyverns, a team of dedicated Quinsigamond Community College students, Phi Theta Kappa (PTK) students, ACC alumni and PTK Advisor Bonnie Coleman, rowed their way to the finals at the second annual Worcester Dragon Boat Festival, held at DCR Regatta Point and Lake Quinsigamond, Worcester. This is the second time QCC has been in the dragon boat races. This year’s race featured 40 community and club boats, up from last year’s 25 dragon boats. The daylong event featured three teams that raced against each other in separate heats for the best overall time. The top-timed finishers were in the finals.

 Dragon boat teams consist of 20 paddlers and one drummer who sits at the front of the boat and keeps the beat for the rowers.

“Being drummer this year was amazing," said PTK President Jen Brevik. "Not only did we make new friendships, enjoy this different experience, and enjoy a beautiful Saturday on Lake Quinsigamond, but we came together as a team.” 

The QCC Wyverns shined in their two preliminary heats on a day that was picture-perfect. After anxiously awaiting their results, the Wyverns learned they were in the finals.

“We pushed through the people who thought we stood no chance and we did it, we actually got to the finals! As drummer of the QCC Wyverns' team, it was an awesome experience but more than anything it was really great to see our team come together the way we did, and to pull through with commitment, perseverance and pride,” Ms. Brevik continued.

The Wyverns placed ninth out of 40 teams and were elated with their performance.

“Our students were amazing. They showed what a true ‘Wyvern’ really is - fierce, loyal, intelligent, strong and resourceful,” Ms. Coleman said.

This year’s Dragon Boat participants included:

  • Bianca Almeida
  • Leandro Araujo
  • Benjamin Aryeh 
  • Ashley Blackman      
  • Jennifer Brevik
  • Elizabeth Burgos
  • Jason Butler
  • Sarah Charles
  • Ashley Diaz
  • Rose Duchemin
  • Ashley Forhan  
  • Vanessa Hanger
  • Sthuar Molina
  • Johnny Nunez
  • Emma O’ Brien
  • Kayla Paterson
  • Natasha Prokopowich
  • Leslie Romero
  • Maia Shalev​
  • Stephanie Teixeira​
  • Heath Tisdale, Jr.   
  • Vinny Tran
  • Thomas Tribandis
  •  Daniel Underwood         
  • Joshua Vazquez-Soto

QCC Wyverns came away with a medal in the 2018 Dragon Boat Festival.

  • QCC President Dr. Luis Pedraja and Professor Dahbeh Bigonahy
  • All College Day, Fall 2018
September, 2018

The importance of working together has never been more pronounced than it was at the recent All College Day at Quinsigamond Community College. Faculty and staff gathered together to learn about all the amazing changes being implemented at the college. To kick off the half day event, guest speaker Attorney Valerie Zolezzi Wyndham presented a program, “Inclusion Ignites Success.” She discussed...

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The importance of working together has never been more pronounced than it was at the recent All College Day at Quinsigamond Community College. Faculty and staff gathered together to learn about all the amazing changes being implemented at the college. To kick off the half day event, guest speaker Attorney Valerie Zolezzi Wyndham presented a program, “Inclusion Ignites Success.” She discussed her own personal journey as being both Mexican and American and addressed the misconceptions she has personally encountered, as well as the racism and diversity in today’s world.

Ms. Zolezzy Wyndham told the QCC Community that it was important to “approach others with humility,” and to assume goodness and good intent when people make mistakes.

“Learn, inquire, explore and broaden networks. Be open and make opportunities happen,” she said.

QCC President Dr. Luis Pedraja discussed the remarkable changes that have been taking place in the year since he had taken over as the college’s sixth president, noting that the entire QCC community has risen to the goal he set for 100 percent student success.

Those changes include a Welcome Center, Student Success Center, a new Strategic Plan, a new mentoring initiative, food pantry, community learning hubs located at Great Brook Valley and Catholic Charities, new and improved signage and an updated website. These are all designed to reduce the obstacles that students have faced in coming to college. 

Dr. Pedraja noted that these changes have not been without challenges and struggles that have included increased competition both locally and nationally, but that the college has persevered.

“We had limited resources and lost some people we could not replace. We had to do more with less. However, all the challenges we face pale in comparison in light of what our students face. The challenges are but an opportunity for us to overcome and be better and make a difference,” Dr. Pedraja said. “We’ve come a long way and we should be pleased by what we’ve accomplished.”

Dean of Students Terry Vecchio, along with Director of Mentoring for Perkins Programs Gabe Santner and TRIO Counselor Ricky Frazier discussed the new mentoring program and how it amplify the previous mentoring programs of Brothers and Keepers and S.H.E., which are now clubs.

“We’re expanding our mentoring program to the community. Every person and business I met has been so excited about the program,” said Mr. Santner. “We’ve got 130 students signed up and about 75 mentors.”

Mr. Santner said the target for this initial start was 100 mentees and 100 mentors. He said they are still looking for more mentors and encouraged faculty and staff to consider being a mentor. Dean Vecchio also discussed the college’s new QCC Food Pantry, established to address food insecurities on campus, and the CARE Team, developed to provide support for students who are struggling. The CARE Team meets weekly to stay current and informed about potential behavior concerns and situations. CARE Team members include Dean Vecchio, Assistant Dean of Students Jason Kurland, Director of Disability Services Kristie Proctor, Chief of Police Kevin Ritacco, Social Worker/Mental Health Counselor Tina Wells and Dean of Compliance Liz Woods.

Interim Vice President of Student Success Michelle Tufau Afriyie and Dean of Academic Planning Liza Smith updated faculty and staff on the Student Success Center, noting this is the first iteration of the Center and it will continue to evolve as they learn more.

Kathy Rentch, Assistant Vice President for Workforce Readiness and Innovation and Dean, Institutional Research and Planning Ingrid Skadberg updated the college on the Strategic Plan.

“This sets the roadmap for the future and is a commitment to student success,” Dr. Pedraja said. “I’m humbled and honored to work with all of you. When we work together there is no limit to what we can achieve.”

  • QCC student and veteran Kyle Nash.
September, 2018

As the first one in his family to join the military, QCC student Kyle Nash has a plan that he is working hard to make a reality. A naval reservist and 2017 graduate of Auburn High School, Mr. Nash began he educational career at Quinsigamond Community College this fall looking to earn his associate degree in Electrical Engineering Technology, Mechatronics option, after spending his last year at the U.S...

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As the first one in his family to join the military, QCC student Kyle Nash has a plan that he is working hard to make a reality. A naval reservist and 2017 graduate of Auburn High School, Mr. Nash began he educational career at Quinsigamond Community College this fall looking to earn his associate degree in Electrical Engineering Technology, Mechatronics option, after spending his last year at the U.S. Navy Boot Camp in Great Lakes, Illinois. He came home in mid-July  of this year after attending technical training, as well as Apprentice Technical Training School with the goal of attending college in the fall.

While at technical training school in Illinois, Mr. Nash learned from his instructors that he could obtain college credit for some of the classes he was taking.

“I looked at other state schools that related to what I was doing, but they didn’t have what I was into and what I had knowledge in. I had already been thinking about attending QCC. It was affordable and since I was paying out of pocket (reservists are not eligible for the G.I. Bill for three years) and QCC had the program I wanted, it was the right choice for me,” he said, adding that he checked out what other schools cost to attend and realized that QCC was a much more affordable way to go.

At QCC, Mr. Nash was able to obtain prior learning credit for five courses, the equivalent of an entire semester.

“I did radar and computer system training in Illinois, and some of what I did was pertinent to what I’m going to school for here,” he continued. “This is a lot of money that I now don’t have to spend.”

Credit for Prior Learning (CPL) provides opportunities for students enrolled in QCC’s degree or certificate programs, to earn academic credit for prior learning. There are numerous ways in which students can obtain CPL that includes competency exams, challenge exams, credentialing and portfolio assessment.

Mr. Nash is currently taking three courses, while working part-time doing auto body work. He said he also is also required to do monthly drills for the Navy Reserves.

“I’m going to college just for me and my plan is to be active duty after I get my associate degree.This way I will have an associate to help me in my career when I get out of the military,” he said.

Mr. Nash said that while he was made aware of earning college credit for life experience through his instructors in the Navy, some people may not know about this.

“At QCC, CPL provides opportunities to earn credit for learning acquired through life experiences such as military training programs. If you were in the United States Army, United States Marine Corps., Department of the Navy or the United States Coast Guard, you can request official transcripts through the American Council of Education then contact the Career Services and CPL office. If you attended the Community College of the Air Force (CCAF), you should request CCAF transcript sent to the Registrar’s Office,” said QCC Career Development Counselor Joseph Whitney, adding that there are no costs associated with all military CPL credit.

 “I encourage any veteran, active or in the reserves, who doesn’t have college experience, to use this opportunity. Use your training and your military career to go to college,” Mr. Nash added.

  • Associate Professor Sheiba Mas-Oud explains a mathematics problem to student Bethany Bailey.
September, 2018

As of September 13, placement testing at Quinsigamond Community College has changed.The college has previously used the Accuplacer tests in both Math and English (an requirement for enrollment) but is now using its own math test, the QMAT and the new Next Generation Accuplacer English tests.

While the English tests are still Accuplacer tests, the mathematics test is unique to the college. The impetus for...

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As of September 13, placement testing at Quinsigamond Community College has changed.The college has previously used the Accuplacer tests in both Math and English (an requirement for enrollment) but is now using its own math test, the QMAT and the new Next Generation Accuplacer English tests.

While the English tests are still Accuplacer tests, the mathematics test is unique to the college. The impetus for the new test was to create a math placement test that was more appropriate for placement into QCC mathematics courses.

“We are using a homegrown math test, and so far, it is working well. The test runs through Blackboard, so it is a totally different look and ‘feel’ from the former Accuplacer test,” said QCC’s Director of Testing Laura Tino. “Students start with a beginning algebra section and move through sections until they have placed into a class.” 

Once students complete the test they will receive a score 0-61, which then corresponds to a QCC math class. Previous math test Accuplacer scores are valid for two years; however, students who are interested may retest with the new math test. Math study booklets are available in the test room (s), at the math tutoring center and at advising in the Student Success Center.

For English, QCC is using the new multiple-choice Accuplacer sections, as well as the essay section, which has not changed. The two multiple-choice sections are scored along with the essay section.  The scores are then combined to generate placement into the appropriate English class. Placement in a Developmental English class is based on the Reading score alone.

In most cases, students who wish to retake the English placement tests will be taking the new test in its entirety. Those students who are already enrolled, or those who have questions about their placement and process, should speak to an Academic Advisor.

Testing is held not only on QCC’s main campus, but also at QCC Southbridge and QCC's Healthcare and Workforce Development Center.  Testing is not timed; it takes approximately three to four hours to complete both the math and English portions. Students should bring a picture ID, such as a QCC ID, school ID, passport, license or state ID and know their social security number to enter the tests.

Students are advised to study before they take the placement tests. Math and English study booklets are available in the test room, at the math tutoring center, the writing center and at advising as well as online.

For information and hours to take the placement tests, visit placement testing.

  • Senior nursing students in the Advanced Placement Nurse Education Program teach hand-only CPR.
  • When performing Hands-Only CPR use the rhythm of the song "Staying Alive" for the chest compressions.
  • Officer Dixon demonstrates how to "Stop the Bleed."
September, 2018

So what do you do in the event of a life threatening emergency? First and foremost, always call 911, but after that do you know what to do? The first care someone gets requires no special skills and can potentially be the difference between life and death. Are you ready to make a difference? 

At Quinsigamond Community College, the senior nursing students in the Advanced Placement Nurse Education...

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So what do you do in the event of a life threatening emergency? First and foremost, always call 911, but after that do you know what to do? The first care someone gets requires no special skills and can potentially be the difference between life and death. Are you ready to make a difference? 

At Quinsigamond Community College, the senior nursing students in the Advanced Placement Nurse Education Program have been offering free demonstrations of basic, life-saving techniques in CPR and life-threatening bleeding following an emergency during the months of September and October. The college is asking everyone in the QCC community to take a few minutes of their day to make a difference by learning these valuable skills. Learning these skills could make YOU the difference in an emergency

Today, the leading cause of death is sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) and with nearly 400,000 out of hospital cardiac arrests occurring annually in the United States, survival depends on getting immediate Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR). Trauma is also an epidemic in the U.S. A person can bleed to death in less than five minutes, which makes it difficult for emergency medical responders to arrive fast enough to control bleeding and save lives. Did you know that in a cardiac arrest, every second counts and a person who is bleeding can die from blood loss within five minutes?

The nursing students will be teaching Hands-Only CPR, which is CPR without mouth-to-mouth breaths. It is recommended for use by people who see a teen or adult suddenly collapse in an “out-of-hospital” setting. According to the American Heart Association, 89 percent of people who suffer an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest die because they don’t receive immediate CPR from someone on the scene.

Incidents where victims have had a cardiac arrest or bled out and died before first-responders got to them are becoming more frequent. In an emergency situation, no matter how quick the arrival of emergency professionals, bystanders will always be the first on the scene. The only thing more tragic than a death, is a death that could have been prevented.

“We are pleased to support the American Heart Association, the American College of Surgeons, the Department of Defense and the Department of Homeland Security’s important missions to raise awareness of basic actions to increase survival from cardiac arrest and life threatening bleeding following everyday emergencies,” said Susan Johnson, Professor of Nurse Education ADN Program. “Our goal is to train as many members as possible within our community to learn these lifesaving steps to make a difference in a life-threatening emergency and save lives. “

Make this the year that you plan to make a difference in someone’s life and if you haven’t already learned these life-saving techniques, stop by the Quad & Administration Building (at the revolving doors) on QCC’s main campus or at the Athletic Center (Upper Exercise Area) on Monday, October 15 from 3:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m., from 3:00 p.m.- 6:00 p.m. and learn how you can make a difference.

  • QCC student Nichole Halbert gets to know "Star,'' a 2 and a half year old alpaca.
  • QCC student Andy Phan makes a new friend on his way to class.
  • From left: "Millie" and "Star' of Angel Hair Alpacas, visit QCC.
  • QCC students enjoy a moment with "Star."
  • Cheryl Pike, of QCC's Student Life helps with "Star" during a visit to campus by Angel Hair Alpacas of Grafton.
September, 2018

Two furry friend alpacas with doe eyes and a gentle demeanor visited Quinsigamond Community College’s main campus earlier this month, bringing a bit of happiness and a lot of smiles to the faces of students, faculty and staff. The Angel Hair Alpacas have become a staple at QCC, often visiting during the start of a semester and during exam times. Owned by Jay Cohen and Maureen Agley, of Angel Hair Alpacas of...

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Two furry friend alpacas with doe eyes and a gentle demeanor visited Quinsigamond Community College’s main campus earlier this month, bringing a bit of happiness and a lot of smiles to the faces of students, faculty and staff. The Angel Hair Alpacas have become a staple at QCC, often visiting during the start of a semester and during exam times. Owned by Jay Cohen and Maureen Agley, of Angel Hair Alpacas of North Grafton, “Star” and “Millie,” although young (Star is 2 ½ and Millie is 1  ½) these two are already well-season show veterans and have been around people since they were three months old.

The alpacas were brought on campus through Disability Services which hosts numerous events throughout the year that offer ways for students to deal with some of their stress during peak stress times such as during exams. Mr. Cohen, whose son Jamie attends QCC, said there is always a positive response to the alpacas.

“They’re very sweet and expressive. They’re nice animals and I think people take to them,” he said.

According to Mr. Cohen, alpacas stay relatively small; weighing under 200 lbs. They are vegetarians mainly eat grass. Alpaca is a species of South American camelid, similar to, and sometimes confused with the llama.

Nichole Halbert was one of the many students who came out to visit with the alpacas. Ms. Halbert is in the college’s Phlebotomy/EKG Technician Certificate program. She said this was her first semester, after deciding to go back to college after 10 years.

“I look at other colleges but they didn’t have the support I needed,” she said, adding, “I feel loved here.”

  • Students enjoy some snow cones with QCC Community Outreach Officer Catherine Dixon.
  • Free snow cones were one of the hits during the 2018 Fall Welcome Fair.
  • From left: QCC Director of Veteran Affairs Paula Ogden and student veteran Desiree Vinson.
  • Everyone enjoyed QCC's Welcome Fair, including Lakyra Thompson's dog Curry.
  • QCC Students try to sweeten the pot and get students to join the Student Senate
  • The Chess Club is a popular club on campus.
  • Brothers & Keepers Mentoring Club
  • The Anime & Gaming Club
September, 2018

The beginning of the Fall 2018 semester shined brightly for new and returning QCC students with perfect weather and lots of fun during the College’s Welcome Fair in early September. Students enjoyed food, free snow cones, games, music, an inflatable obstacle course that was courtesy of the Massachusetts National Guard, and a variety of local vendors.  It was the perfect way to start the semester off!

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The beginning of the Fall 2018 semester shined brightly for new and returning QCC students with perfect weather and lots of fun during the College’s Welcome Fair in early September. Students enjoyed food, free snow cones, games, music, an inflatable obstacle course that was courtesy of the Massachusetts National Guard, and a variety of local vendors.  It was the perfect way to start the semester off!

In mid-September QCC also held its annual Club Rush Days and students once again had the opportunity to learn about the different clubs available on campus and sign up for any that were of interest.

Club life is an integral part of QCC's community and helps students form new friendships and leadership skills. Over the years many new clubs have formed at QCC. Those who are interested in starting a new club should contact Director of Student Life and Leadership, Michael Beane at mbeane [at] qcc.mass.edu.

  • October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month
September, 2018

Making a commitment to promote safe and healthy behaviors is the premise behind October’s Domestic Violence Awareness Month.  According to the Center for Disease Controls and Prevention (CDC), domestic violence (also called intimate partner violence (IPV), domestic abuse or relationship abuse) is a pattern of behaviors used by one partner to maintain power and control over another...

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Making a commitment to promote safe and healthy behaviors is the premise behind October’s Domestic Violence Awareness Month.  According to the Center for Disease Controls and Prevention (CDC), domestic violence (also called intimate partner violence (IPV), domestic abuse or relationship abuse) is a pattern of behaviors used by one partner to maintain power and control over another partner in an intimate relationship. In fact, one in four women and one in seven men will experience severe physical violence by an intimate partner in their lifetime.

At Quinsigamond Community College, the safety of our students, faculty and staff is paramount today and every day. Throughout the month of October, the college will be hosting events geared to inform and bring awareness to the issue of domestic violence.  

Events include:

Empty Place at the Table - Domestic Violence ScenariosEmpty Place at the Table is a powerful display to women in Massachusetts who have lost their lives to domestic violence in the past year. Compelling, moving and poignant, this is a display that shouldn’t be missed. The display will stay up until approximately 2:00 p.m. on the last day at each QCC location.

  • October 1, 2, 3 at QCC’s Healthcare & Workforce Development Center, 25 Federal Street, Worcester
  • October 22, 23, 24 at QCC Southbridge 5 Optical Drive, Southbridge
  • October 29, 30, 31 at QCC 670 West Boylston Street, Worcester

Healthy Relationship Photo Booth: students will have the opportunity to get their photo taken holding up words that reflect their ideas of healthy relationships.The Healthy Relationship Photo Booth will be located on QCC’s Worcester campus, 670 West Boylston, Worcester.  

  • October 15 in the Fuller Student Center from 10:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.
  • October 16 in the Harrington Learning Center from 10:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.
  • October 17 in the Surprenant Hall Lobby from 10:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.

One Love Escalation Film Event: Escalation is a film about Yardley Love, a college student who was killed by her ex-boyfriend. This event invites participants to define warning signs in the relationship that signal unhealthy relationship issues. Mental health professionals from Pathways for Change and The YWCA will be here to assist members of the community who find the film challenging or mirroring of some issues in their own lives. For more information, visit Joinonelove.

The showing of the film will take place at QCC’s Worcester campus, 670 West Boylston, Worcester Hebert Auditorium in the Hebert Auditorium on Tuesday, October 30 from 11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.

For additional information, contact Elizabeth “Liz” Woods, Dean for Compliance and Education at LWoods [at] qcc.mass.edu.

  • It was a hot and steamy first day of classes at QCC.
September, 2018

Wednesday, October 3: Get to know the officers in our community! Stop by the QCC cafeteria from 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. during Coffee with a Cop. This is a chance to ask questions, voice concerns and learn more about the officers who protect and serve our community.

Thursday, October 4: Stop by the Harrington Learning Center, Room 109A&B from 2:...

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Wednesday, October 3: Get to know the officers in our community! Stop by the QCC cafeteria from 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. during Coffee with a Cop. This is a chance to ask questions, voice concerns and learn more about the officers who protect and serve our community.

Thursday, October 4: Stop by the Harrington Learning Center, Room 109A&B from 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. for a Panel Discussion -Careers for Women in Biotech. QCC students, faculty and staff are invited to listen to the panelists as they share their personal journeys on their way to their current positions at Sanofi Genzyme. Come with questions for the panelists.

Monday, October 8: Columbus Day – the college is closed.

Saturday, October 13: The Quinsigamond Community College Alumni Association Advisory Board is hosting a Mystery Dinner Theater, “Haunted by Murder,” featuring the Comical Mystery Players. The event will take place at the Worcester Senior Center, 128 Providence Street, Worcester. Dinner will be served at 6:30 p.m. Proceeds will benefit the QCC Alumni Scholarship Fund.

For more information or to buy tickets visit www.qcc.edu/mystery dinner.  Deadline for Registration is Saturday, Oct. 6.

Tuesday, October 16: The Psi Beta Honor Society and Psychology Club will be hosting John Pratico, Psy.D. from 12:30 p.m. - 1:30 p.m. in the Harrington Learning Center, Room 109B for a talk on "Positive Psychology: An Overview."

Wednesday, October 17: Liberal Arts Distinguished Lecture - From "Reefer Madness" to "Pineapple Express":  A History of Stoner Films and the War on Drugs, from 2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. in Room 109 in the Harrington Learning Center. This talk by Dr. Seth Blumenthal, of Boston University, uses “stoner films” to explain how and why popular portrayals of pot and its users changed to resonate with different audiences’ that either revered or reviled weed before and during the War on Drugs.

October Spotlight: Get ready for food, music and most of all fun at the Annual Phi Theta Kappa (PTK) Fall Cookout on Wednesday, Oct. 10, from 11:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Stop by the Fuller Center lawn and grotto for delicious food and a chance to win prizes TONS of raffle prizes! Raffle tickets are $1 each and can be purchased in advance in room 349A or at tables set up on the Fuller center Lawn from Oct. 1 – Oct. 10 (excluding weekends). Over 40 prizes including a $500 tuition waiver, 4 passes to Laser Quest, brunch for two at the Beechwood, and much more! The drawings will be held on the afternoon of Oct. 10. You do not need to be present to win.

  • QCC's Transfer Fairs offer students a way to learn the transfer options available to them.
September, 2018

Feeling a bit spooked by the thought of transferring? Make Wednesday, October 31 a way to exorcise those fears and attend the 2018 Fall Transfer Fair. The fair is an opportunity to meet and learn about the different colleges and transfer options available to students. Students are advised to bring their unofficial QCC transcript to learn how their classes will transfer into a bachelor degree.

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Feeling a bit spooked by the thought of transferring? Make Wednesday, October 31 a way to exorcise those fears and attend the 2018 Fall Transfer Fair. The fair is an opportunity to meet and learn about the different colleges and transfer options available to students. Students are advised to bring their unofficial QCC transcript to learn how their classes will transfer into a bachelor degree.

The fair will take place from 10:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. in the Harrington Learning Center in Room 109 A&B.

Colleges and universities in attendance will include:

  • Anna Maria College
  •  Assumption College
  • Bay Path University
  • Becker College
  • Bentley University
  • Boston University
  • Bridgewater State University
  • Bryant University
  • Emerson College
  • Fitchburg State University
  • Framingham State University
  • Johnson & Wales University
  • Lesley University
  • Mass College of Art & Design
  • Mass College of Liberal Arts
  • Mass College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences
  • Mass Maritime Academy
  • Nichols College
  • Northeastern University
  • Plymouth State University
  • Providence College
  • Salem State University
  • Springfield College
  • St. Anselm College
  •  Suffolk University
  • Northeastern University
  • University of Connecticut
  • University of Maine
  • University of New England
  •  UMASS-Amherst
  • UMASS-Boston
  • UMASS-Dartmouth
  • UMASS-Lowell
  • Westfield State University
  • Worcester State University
  • Western New England University
  • Worcester Polytechnic Institute

For questions, email transfer [at] qcc.edu (QCC Transfer Services) call 508.854.4404.

  • Make sure to check out the exciting demonstrations during Manufacturing & Technology Day and STEM week.
September, 2018

Did you know that October is Manufacturing Month? On Friday, October 19, QCC will host a day of exciting manufacturing and technology programs and demonstrations at its Manufacturing and Technology Day. The day begins with a program in the Hebert Auditorium at 9:00 am, followed by program demonstrations starting at 9:30 in labs at the college’s state-of-the-art QuEST Center...

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Did you know that October is Manufacturing Month? On Friday, October 19, QCC will host a day of exciting manufacturing and technology programs and demonstrations at its Manufacturing and Technology Day. The day begins with a program in the Hebert Auditorium at 9:00 am, followed by program demonstrations starting at 9:30 in labs at the college’s state-of-the-art QuEST Center, the Harrington Learning Center (Room 109A&B) and  in the Interactive Media lab located in Room 372A. Nine different programs will be featured throughout the day that support Manufacturing, Electronics Engineering, Information Technology and Interactive Media. Companies such as Wakefly and Accuity will also be on-hand. This is the perfect way to learn about the outstanding manufacturing and technology programs available at QCC. All QCC students and faculty are invited to attend.

STEM Week Monday, October 22 – Friday, October 26

The Governor and Lt. Governor, in collaboration with the state’s STEM Advisory Council have declared a statewide STEM week across the Commonwealth, and QCC is excited to be part of the efforts to help showcase STEM across the region.

Ever wonder why there’s so much buzz about “STEM”? QCC faculty and staff will be doing interesting demos and sharing information about STEM programs at QCC all week long to get you engaged and informed. You will find STEM demos Monday - Friday in the Harrington Learning Center near Room 109A&B, as well as an information table on the ground floor of the Administration building (at the revolving doors) that highlights STEM. Hours and demos will vary. See why STEM is cool, and learn about the great career opportunities awaiting you.

To learn more or for questions, call QCC Program Administrator, STEM Initiatives Adrienne Linnell at 508.854.2782 or email her at alinnell [at] qcc.mass.edu.

  • QCC Career Development Counselor Nicole Wheeler helps students get workforce ready.
September, 2018

As students get ready to enter the workforce, one of the things that can sometimes fall between the cracks is simple workplace etiquette. Do you know the dos and don’ts of workplace etiquette? They are the skills and qualities that future employers look for and that help to make you a standout job candidate and a good employee.

On Friday, Oct. 12 from 12:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. in Room...

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As students get ready to enter the workforce, one of the things that can sometimes fall between the cracks is simple workplace etiquette. Do you know the dos and don’ts of workplace etiquette? They are the skills and qualities that future employers look for and that help to make you a standout job candidate and a good employee.

On Friday, Oct. 12 from 12:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. in Room 109A&B of the Harrington Learning Center, students can learn what employers are looking for from actual employers who will offer their thoughts on what they want to see in a potential job candidate.

This is a perfect workshop to attend prior to QCC’s Job Fair, which will be happening later in the month  on Oct. 24 from 10:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. at the Harrington Learning Center, Room 109A&B.

Professional Dress is required and students must register as space is limited. Lunch will be provided. To register visit Purple Briefcase, sign in and go to the “my events” tab and look for the workplace etiquette luncheon. For question call QCC Career Development Counselor Nicole Wheeler at 508.854.7476 or email her at nwheeler [at] qcc.mass.edu .

  • QCC Police Pink Patch Project
  • QCC Police display their pink patches
September, 2018

Be Part of the Pink Patch Project

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, an annual international health campaign organized by breast cancer charities every October to increase awareness and raise funds for breast cancer research and prevention. The Quinsigamond Community College Campus Police Department is joining other public safety officials across the country in an effort to...

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Be Part of the Pink Patch Project

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, an annual international health campaign organized by breast cancer charities every October to increase awareness and raise funds for breast cancer research and prevention. The Quinsigamond Community College Campus Police Department is joining other public safety officials across the country in an effort to bring awareness in the fight against cancer by being a part of the Pink Patch Project (#PinkPatchProject).

The Pink Patch Project is an innovative public awareness campaign designed to bring attention to the fight against breast cancer and to support breast cancer research organizations. Each public safety agency has partnered with a cancer research organization or support group in their communities, with all proceeds going to their chosen organization. QCC Campus Police have chosen Cops for Kids with Cancer and have designed a pink Quinsigamond Police patch that's for sale to the general public. Cost of the patch is $5 and all proceeds will go to Cops for Kids with Cancer.

"We are a community college and thought education," said Officer Catherine Dixon. "So we looked for a children's cancer charity site and found 'Cops for Kids with Cancer.'"

The non-profit has given to over 510 families in need, totaling more than $2.5 million in and around the New England area. The goal of Cops for Kids with Cancer is to remove some financial burden for the family of the child with cancer, so that their energies can go toward helping their child beat cancer and live a healthy life.

According to Deputy Chief of Operations Stephen DiGiovanni, all QCC police officers will be wearing the patches for the month of October.

"We received great backing from the Chief Ritacco on this, which was paramount," Deputy Chief DiGiovanni said, adding that this is the first year the QCC Police have done the Pink Patch Project. He said they plan to continue this each year.

Patches are currently for sale at the QCC Police Department (Room 136AC) and at the QCC Bookstore on the College’s main campus. To date over 100 patches have been sold and more than $525 has been raised. For more information, contact the QCC Campus Police at  508.854.4221. 

  • A house in St. Catherine, Jamaica
September, 2018

Beginning this month, in each edition of the Wyvern Guardian we will feature a student written article, A Student Perspective.This is a way for the QCC community to experience the amazing talent of our students and a perfect way for our students to gain exposure in writing for a broader audience.

Interested in writing an article for the newsletter? Pitch your story idea to Karen...

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Beginning this month, in each edition of the Wyvern Guardian we will feature a student written article, A Student Perspective.This is a way for the QCC community to experience the amazing talent of our students and a perfect way for our students to gain exposure in writing for a broader audience.

Interested in writing an article for the newsletter? Pitch your story idea to Karen Hutner at khutner [at] qcc.mass.edu and maybe you’ll be featured in the next Wyvern newsletter!

This month’s article is from QCC student Reneasia Love. Ms. Love wrote about her trip to Jamaica over the summer. Her article and photos also were featured in the September edition of the Open Door student newspaper. 

My Trip to Jamaica

During summer vacation my sister and I traveled to Jamaica to visit our family. We stayed in our family home in Spanish Town, the capital of St. Catherine and one of the largest parishes in Jamaica. Organic coconut trees, fruits, and vegetables surround our family home. The garden is brimming with beautiful and exotic flowers that fills the area with a wonderful scent.

My family and I traveled to various parts in Jamaica. One town we went to was Ocho Rios, a port town on the north coast of Jamaica that is a well-known tourist area. Aside from the luxurious resorts, cruise ships, and entertainment, Ocho Rios surrounds itself with beautiful rainforests, rivers, and waterfalls. Little Dun's Waterfall is a peaceful getaway from the busy town of Ocho Rios. The waterfall surrounds itself with tropical plants and trees that leaves you in a place of tranquility. 

Visit My Trip to Jamaica for the complete article.

  • From left: Donna Harvey, Lucinda Costa and Selena Boria at the ReStore.
  • From left: QCC Executive Director of Advancement Karen Rucks and QCC Community Connections staff members.
September, 2018

On September 13, Quinsigamond Community College provided approximately 20 volunteers to work on five projects across the City of Worcester, during the United Way of Central Massachusetts Day of Caring.  Each year the event draws hundreds of volunteers, who help local nonprofit organizations with service projects.

The QCC volunteers painted porches, a teen center, cleaned out the basement at...

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On September 13, Quinsigamond Community College provided approximately 20 volunteers to work on five projects across the City of Worcester, during the United Way of Central Massachusetts Day of Caring.  Each year the event draws hundreds of volunteers, who help local nonprofit organizations with service projects.

The QCC volunteers painted porches, a teen center, cleaned out the basement at Elm Park Center and worked on pricing and stocking at the ReStore.

QCC staff members Selina Boria, Donna Harvey and Lucinda Costa served at the ReStore, which is run exclusively by volunteers. It was the first time any of them had participated in the event.

“We worked from 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. pricing and stocking two pallets of lightbulbs. We worked really hard and had a good time,” Ms. Costa said. “Selina and I may see about going back on a regular basis. The ReStore is for Habitat for Humanity and that is something that I can get behind.”

  • Officer Kate Dixon receives the Chief's Award from QCC Police Chief Kevin Ritacco.
  • Officer Nicholas Yacuzzi received the Medal of Merit Award from QCC Police Chief Kevin Ritacco.
  • Officer Todd LaBranche received both the Leadership Award and the Good Conduct Medal from QCC Police Chief Kevin Ritacco.
September, 2018

Did you know Quinsigamond Community College has some pretty amazing police officers who keep us safe and make our lives better each and every day? Recently four police officers were honored with some awards and we couldn’t wait to share the news! Take a moment to learn more about the four officers who were honored and if you happen to see them on campus, take a moment and congratulate them and thank...

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Did you know Quinsigamond Community College has some pretty amazing police officers who keep us safe and make our lives better each and every day? Recently four police officers were honored with some awards and we couldn’t wait to share the news! Take a moment to learn more about the four officers who were honored and if you happen to see them on campus, take a moment and congratulate them and thank them for all they do!

  • Officer Catherine Dixon received the Chief’s Award – This is an annual award given to a QCC police officer for an outstanding act that brings credit to the police department and is highly recognized by other employees and citizens. Officer Dixon is the college’s Community Outreach Officer and is a familiar face on QCC’s campus.
  • Officer Nicholas Yacuzzi received the Medal of Merit Award. This award, also known as the Officer of the Year award, is given annually to a non-supervisory QCC officer who distinguishes him or herself by performing his/her duties in a manner that clearly exceeds what is normally required or expected, or a highly credible police accomplishment. Officer Yacuzzi is also a former Rookie of the Year recipient.
  • Officer Dillon George received the Rookie of the Year Award. This honor is awarded a QCC police officer who has less than two years of service with the department and who has consistently demonstrated exceptional competency and job performance ability within their first two year.
  • Officer Todd LaBranche received both the Leadership Award and the Good Conduct Medal. The Leadership Award is presented to a QCC police officer who exemplifies the department’s values and embodies a commitment to the mission of QCC’s Police Department through a conspicuous, positive mindset and inclusive decision making, both within and outside the department. Recommendations for this award are given from both within and outside the department.
  • The Police Citizen Award is awarded to a citizen who performs some heroic act not normally expected of a citizen, as well as outstanding service for the QCC Police Department. 

During the award Commendation Letters were given to Officer George, Officer LaBranche, Officer Cecchi, Officer Yacuzzi, Officer Dixon, Officer Flowers and Sergeant Litchfield. Certificates of Recognition was also given to Sergeant Cecchi, Sergeant Litchfield, Officer LaBranche, Deputy Chief Rodriguez, Chief Ritacco and Officer Dixon for their participation in No Shave November, during which participants forgo shaving and grooming in order to raise awareness of men’s health issues, such as cancer.

  • QCC Coordinator of Library Reference and Instruction Tiger Swan, with QCC History Professor Lisa Cook.
September, 2018

On September 17, the third floor at the Harrington Learning Center, now home to QCC’s Alden Library, became the place for students, faculty and staff to go and learn more about their constitutional rights during Constitution Day.  On this day in 1787, 39 delegates signed the U.S. Constitution on September 17, 1787. Each year since 2004, the country has commemorated this day by and in recognition of...

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On September 17, the third floor at the Harrington Learning Center, now home to QCC’s Alden Library, became the place for students, faculty and staff to go and learn more about their constitutional rights during Constitution Day.  On this day in 1787, 39 delegates signed the U.S. Constitution on September 17, 1787. Each year since 2004, the country has commemorated this day by and in recognition of all who were born in the United States or have become U.S. citizens.

All publicly funded educational institutions, and all federal agencies pay tribute to this day by providing educational programming on the history of the American Constitution. At QCC, free pocket-sized copies of the Constitution of the United States were handed out during the day.

  • Join the PSI BETA National Psychology Honor Society or Psychology Club.
September, 2018

Do you ever wonder how the mind works or why people do what they do? Psychology is the science of the mind and human behavior. If learning what makes people tick interests you, consider joining the PSI BETA National Psychology Honor Society or Psychology Club.

To be considered for the PSI BETA National Psychology Honor Society, a strong interest in psychology IS required; however, students do NOT...

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Do you ever wonder how the mind works or why people do what they do? Psychology is the science of the mind and human behavior. If learning what makes people tick interests you, consider joining the PSI BETA National Psychology Honor Society or Psychology Club.

To be considered for the PSI BETA National Psychology Honor Society, a strong interest in psychology IS required; however, students do NOT need to be psychology majors to be considered. You can be considered for induction if you have:

  • Completed at least one psychology course
  • A “B” average in any psychology course taken and an overall 3.25 GPA
  • Completed at least 12 credits

The deadline for applications is October 14.

If you believe that you meet the Psi Beta Induction membership requirements, please complete this form and email it to QCC Professor of Psychology Dr. Valarie Clemente, vclemente [at] qcc.mass.edu .  If you are accepted for induction, there is a one-time induction fee of $50 payable to the national organization. The induction ceremony will take place on Monday, November 26, 2018 at 12:00 p.m . - 1:00 p.m. in 109B HLC. Friends and family are welcome to attend.

The Psi Beta Honor Society and QCC Psychology Club meets every other Wednesday, from noon to 1:00 p.m. in the Harrington Learning Center, Room 239. For more information visit Psychology. For questions, vclemente [at] qcc.mass.edu (contact Advisor Dr. Valarie Clemente) .

  • The Wyverns Men's and Women's Basketball teams will be holding tryouts Oct. 1.
September, 2018

Make a Fast Break and Join One of QCC’s Basketball Teams This Season

The QCC Wyvern Basketball teams will be holding tryouts on Monday, October 1.Women’s tryout are from 4:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. and Men’s tryouts are from 7:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m.

In order to be eligible to play, you must be full-time QCC student (12 credits or more)...

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Make a Fast Break and Join One of QCC’s Basketball Teams This Season

The QCC Wyvern Basketball teams will be holding tryouts on Monday, October 1.Women’s tryout are from 4:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. and Men’s tryouts are from 7:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m.

In order to be eligible to play, you must be full-time QCC student (12 credits or more) and bring a valid physical, clearing you for college sports.Those interested in playing can contact Women’s Basketball - Coach Gabe Santner at gsantner [at] qcc.mass.edu, or Men’s Basketball - Coach Tishaun Jenkins at tajenkins [at] qcc.mass.edu

Wyverns Baseball

The QCC Wyverns Baseball has already played three scrimmage games this fall and they’re looking great! Interested in playing in Spring 2019 baseball? Contact Coach John McLaughlin; jmclaughlin [at] qcc.mass.edu

Women’s Soccer is Kicking Into High Gear

Four games into the season, and the women are still making progress and holding strong. Interested in playing in Fall 2019? Coach Josh Cole, jcole [at] qcc.mass.edu

  • From left: Catholic Charities Executive Director Tim McMahon and QCC President Dr. Luis Pedraja
  • From left: Director of Family & Resident Services at Great Book Valley Carlton Watson and QCC President Dr. Luis Pedraja.
September, 2018

Earlier this summer an exciting initiative came to fruition when Quinsigamond Community College opened three Community Learning Hubs within the City of Worcester.

These Community Learning Hubs are in prime locations throughout Worcester; at Great Brook Valley Apartments, Catholic Charities and at QCC’s Healthcare and Workforce Development Center on 25 Federal in Worcester. The Community Learning...

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Earlier this summer an exciting initiative came to fruition when Quinsigamond Community College opened three Community Learning Hubs within the City of Worcester.

These Community Learning Hubs are in prime locations throughout Worcester; at Great Brook Valley Apartments, Catholic Charities and at QCC’s Healthcare and Workforce Development Center on 25 Federal in Worcester. The Community Learning Hubs are places where current QCC students can go to study, have access to computers, a Wi-Fi connection and printers.

Current hours for the hubs are:

  • Great Brook Valley at 35 Freedom Way:  Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Sundays from 3:00 p.m.- 8:00 p.m.
  • Catholic Charities at 10 Hammond Street: Monday, Tuesdays, Thursday from 8:30 a.m. -5:30 p.m. and Wednesdays from 8:30 a.m.- 8:00 p.m.
  • QCC's Healthcare and Workforce Development Center (Room 007D) at 25 Federal Street: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Sundays from 3:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.
September, 2018

We are very pleased to announce the addition of the following new full-time staff members to Quinsigamond Community College:

On September 4, 2018, Academic Affairs welcomed Jacqueline Clark into her new role as Clerk III – Evening Nurse Education Department. Jacqueline brings over 15 years of experience to this position. Most recently, she was the Project Coordinator at the Center...

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We are very pleased to announce the addition of the following new full-time staff members to Quinsigamond Community College:

On September 4, 2018, Academic Affairs welcomed Jacqueline Clark into her new role as Clerk III – Evening Nurse Education Department. Jacqueline brings over 15 years of experience to this position. Most recently, she was the Project Coordinator at the Center for Mindfulness at UMass Medical School Previous to this role, she served as a Project Coordinator at the Office of Undergraduate Medical Education also at UMass Medical School. Jacqueline earned a Bachelor’s of Science in General Studies from Georgia Southern University.

On September 9, 2018, The Adult Community Learning Center welcomed Kimberly White into her new role as Program Director- Adult Community Learning Center. Kimberly brings over 25 years of experience to this position. Most recently, she was the Interim Program Director of the Adult Learning Center here at Quinsigamond Community College. Previous to this role, she served as an Interim Assistant Director at QCC. Kimberly earned a Bachelor’s of Science in Business Management from Keene State College.

 Please join us in welcoming Jacqueline and Kimberly to their new roles at QCC.

August, 2018

  • Keianti Smith attends the GBV Block Party with his family and QCC Director of College and Career Pathways Carol King.
  • QCC is awarded the Community Partner of the Year
  • QCC Staff stand with Worcester officials after they accept the WHA Community Partner of the Year Award.
August, 2018

On August 25, Quinsigamond Community College was honored by the Worcester Housing Authority (WHA) as the Agency’s Community Partner of the Year at the 2018 Great Brook Valley Block Party, held at the Worcester apartment complex. On hand to accept the award was QCC Assistant Vice President for Workforce Readiness and Innovation Kathy RentschQCC Director of Community...

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On August 25, Quinsigamond Community College was honored by the Worcester Housing Authority (WHA) as the Agency’s Community Partner of the Year at the 2018 Great Brook Valley Block Party, held at the Worcester apartment complex. On hand to accept the award was QCC Assistant Vice President for Workforce Readiness and Innovation Kathy RentschQCC Director of Community Bridges Dr. Deborah Gonzalez and QCC Director of College and Career Pathways Carol King

“We are honored to have been chosen to receive this prestigious award. We recognize that higher education is the pathway to self-sufficiency and have taken a proactive approach to helping those who are historically under-served in our communities,” said QCC President Dr. Luis G. Pedraja. “We are thrilled this partnership with the WHA has been so successful. Learning of the positive changes that residents are making in their lives by utilizing our programs and support services is gratifying.”

For the past two years QCC has worked to help support WHA residents in obtaining their High School Equivalency Test (HiSET), helping them become more proficient through English as Second language (ESOL) classes. In addition, last month the college opened a Community Learning Hub at 35 Freedom Way in Great Brook Valley, where current QCC students can go to study, have access to computers, a Wi-Fi connection and printers. QCC Community Learning Hubs are an initiative by QCC President Dr. Luis G. Pedraja to bring the college to the communities it serves.

“We are very appreciative of QCC’s willingness to partner with us to create a better life for our residents by assisting them in their education and employment goals, thereby enabling them to be self-sufficient,” said WHA Alex Corrales. “We look forward to our continued partnership and our work together to make possible that our residents can obtain a world-class education that will enable them to provide a better life for themselves and their families.”

 “Our collaboration with the WHA providing pathways to careers, job training, higher education and student support is a win-win for everyone. This is a perfect example of what the mission of Quinsigamond Community College is - access to higher education for every resident in this thriving City,” said Dr. Gonzalez.

  • QCC Nursing Student Kim Grant works on her schedule with Senior Enrollment Counselor Rebecca Brownstein .
August, 2018

Welcome Back to Quinsigamond Community College - Home of the Wyverns! We’re excited to welcome you to a new semester at QCC and our goal is for your experience to be the best it can be.

Below are several tips to help make your time at QCC as productive and enjoyable as possible.                    

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Welcome Back to Quinsigamond Community College - Home of the Wyverns! We’re excited to welcome you to a new semester at QCC and our goal is for your experience to be the best it can be.

Below are several tips to help make your time at QCC as productive and enjoyable as possible.                    

  • Utilize the Student Success Center located at the Welcome Center on QCC’s main campus in at the Harrington Learning Center. The Student Success Center provides you with all the support services you need in order to succeed at the college. The Center offers you a way to find whatever you need easily, and quickly all in the same location. From financial aid, admissions to advising and transfer services the Student Success Center is the go-to place for all your college needs. Unsure where to go on your first few days on campus? Go to the Welcome Center where a friendly face will greet you and help you find your way.
  • Become empowered in your education with a little help from QCC’s Tutoring Center, which features both a Math and a Writing Center. There is no need to go it alone; help is always available.
  • Take a break and become part of student life at QCC. The college offers a robust student life at the Fuller Student Center. Stop by to connect with other students, contribute to the student newspaper, join a special interest club or maybe you might even want to get involved in the Student Senate. A wide-range of student activities, both on and off-campus, give you a chance to expand your horizons, build leadership skills, share ideas and meet new people. There’s always something going on at the Fuller Student Center, so make sure to stop by.
  • Whether or not you are a STEM (that’s Science, Technology Engineering and Math) major, the college’s QuEST Center is one location every student at QCC should check out. The QuEST Center features a high-tech CAD/CAM studio, classroom space and cutting edge labs, as well as the only Fab Lab at a Massachusetts community college. QCC’s Fab Lab enables students to use a vast array of high tech tools; from digital 3D printers, laser cutters to CAD design software and an industrial embroidery machine. During open lab space hours QCC students, faculty and staff are given the opportunity to stop by and make a project. It’s the perfect way to be creative and learn more about all that the lab has to offer!
  • Download QCC’s Mobile App to get all the latest information right to your phone! The QCC Mobile App offers you access to course information, grades, and online resources. You can make bookstore purchases, utilize QCC Library services, campus maps, and much more.
  • Having your student ID is important when it comes to campus events, checking out library books, using the gym and other services. Returning students who need an ID or new students who were unable to attend an orientation should visit the Athletic Center. The Athletic Center is located on QCC's main campus. Stop by during one of the following dates and times to get your ID:
    • September 4 from 12:00 p.m.- 4:00 p.m.
    • September 5-6 from 10:00 a.m.- 6:00 p.m.
    • September 7 from 10:00 a.m.- 4:00 p.m.
    • September 10-13 from 10:00 a.m.- 2:00 p.m. and 4:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m.
    • September 14 from 10:00 a.m.- 2:00 p.m.

Whether this is your first time on a college campus or you are a seasoned college student, QCC has all the resources you need to succeed. To learn more about what QCC, visit Quinsigamond Community College.

  • QCC Enrollment Counselor Eduardo Rivas speaks to Worcester high school students at the Early College Program Orientation.
August, 2018

Over 100 Worcester public high school seniors and juniors converged on Quinsigamond Community College’s main campus on August 29 to participate in an Early College Program Orientation. The Early College Program is a collaborative effort with QCC, Worcester Public Schools and Worcester State University to establish college pathways for high school students in all seven Worcester high schools.

QCC...

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Over 100 Worcester public high school seniors and juniors converged on Quinsigamond Community College’s main campus on August 29 to participate in an Early College Program Orientation. The Early College Program is a collaborative effort with QCC, Worcester Public Schools and Worcester State University to establish college pathways for high school students in all seven Worcester high schools.

QCC President Luis Pedraja welcomed the students at the Harrington Learning Center and Christina Hebert, Director of Educational Partnerships and Early College Initiatives provided the students with information on the advantages of participating in the Worcester Early College Program.

Students learned about course information, including attendance requirements, withdrawals, grades and homework. They were given information on support services such as English Language Learner (ELL) classes, tutoring and mentoring and received a campus tour given by QCC guides and student mentors.

“I had the privilege of interacting with the students during the Orientation and was so impressed not only with their enthusiasm; but also with the resourceful questions they asked about the Early College Program,” Ms. Hebert said. “The energy in the room was tremendous. At one point, they began cheering when they were told about getting a ‘jump start’ on attending college by participating in the program.”

  • Megan Romero and her two children.
  • QCC's Respiratory Care program offers student Megan Romero hands-on training
  • Megan Romero works with a fellow Respiratory Care student.
August, 2018

In one brief moment in 2014, Megan Romero’s life was forever changed. She woke up to find her husband, who had been suffering with severe pneumonia, unresponsive. Fast forward to days spent in the Cardiac Care Unit, followed by a rehab facility where he learned how to breathe again through a tracheostomy. After being discharged and sent home, two months later additional medical issues forced him...

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In one brief moment in 2014, Megan Romero’s life was forever changed. She woke up to find her husband, who had been suffering with severe pneumonia, unresponsive. Fast forward to days spent in the Cardiac Care Unit, followed by a rehab facility where he learned how to breathe again through a tracheostomy. After being discharged and sent home, two months later additional medical issues forced him back to the hospital once again fighting for his life. A fight he did not win.

Ms. Romero was now a widow with a 3 and a half year old daughter, in addition to being almost nine months pregnant with her son. For many, this would seem to be an insurmountable hardship, but Ms. Romero decided she would not let the pain of her loss define her.

“I knew after my husband passed away that I needed to get into the medical field. Nursing was not my forte as they deal with some things my stomach just could not handle. I decided to go QCC’s open house in Southbridge during the fall of 2015 to look at the programs that were offered,” she said.

Ms. Romero said she remembered all of the echocardiograms and x-rays that her husband had during his illness, and decided to sign up to attend a seminar that was required at the time for all QCC students who were interested in a medical major.

“When I went to the seminar, the instructors discussed all of the different medical fields that QCC covered. When they discussed respiratory, a light bulb just went off. I knew at that moment that was the direction I needed to go,” she said. “During the whole six months of this experience with my husband, the team that was best able to explain what was going on and make me feel comfortable was the respiratory team. They were the most knowledgeable when my husband was going through everything.”

Ms. Romero said she had incorrectly assumed respiratory therapy was a specialty that a person went into after either nursing or additional education. After learning this was not the case, she signed up to take the prerequisites to begin her respiratory care career. An additional draw of the program for Ms. Romero was that she could apply for her student license after her first year and begin working as a therapist even before she graduated.

“Not only is that a foot in the door career-wise, but you get that immediate hands-on real life experience. No other major offers this,” she said. “The program is a great program. The professors are thorough and passionate about the program and about making sure you learn. The lab is equipped with real life tools used in the hospital and new items are purchased every year to stay up-to-date and increase learning.”

Along with working in the lab (where there is a simulation room set up with a hospital bed and various equipment that is used depending on the type of emergency situation), there is a clinical aspect to the program.

“What a phenomenal tool clinical is. From the very first week you work hands-on with actual patients and equipment, which again is unlike many programs. Respiratory is also the only program that is allowed to take part in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) at UMass Memorial Hospital,” Ms. Romero said. “I also like that we get to experience a little bit of every field included in the respiratory therapist title. You take part in a sleep lab, pulmonary function lab, NICU, Intensive Care Unit (ICU,) regular floors and even rehab facilities. You also leave the program with your Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS), Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS) and Neonatal Resuscitation Program (NRP) certifications, yet another unique gain with program.”

When asked how she has been able to raise an active family while working and attending school, she acknowledged that it has “taken a village” - from her parents, in-laws, family and friends, to Amy Hogan, Assistant Professor of Respiratory Care and Director of Clinical Instruction and Karen Dufault, Professor of Respiratory Care/Coordinator of the Respiratory Care Program, who are her mentors in the program.

In 2017, Ms. Romero was nominated by Ms. Hogan and was named one of QCC’s Rising Stars.

“My favorite saying is ‘Onward and up.’ I would tell any students trying to better themselves, who keep hitting obstacle after obstacle, to just keep pushing forward. Every step no matter how big or small is further than you were just a minute ago. Don't let these obstacles define you. Use them to help build you to who you are meant to be,” she said.

In June, Ms. Romero received her student license and is in the process of applying for student positions at area hospitals. She is expected to graduate in May 2019. Her long-term goals are to one day work at Boston’s Children Hospital and to be in a position where she can help others in similar situations to attend school and be a support for their success. She’d also like to one day create a scholarship in her husband’s name.

“I want people to know that your life isn’t defined or limited by the events that happen, but by what you do and how you handle them,” she said. “I have seen many people who have been in similar situations where they just crash and become isolated from the world. I've seen kids go into foster care because the parent left loses him or herself in the tragedy of their situation. Don’t let that be you. You don’t have to be perfect, but you have to keep trying.”

Visit Respiratory Care to learn more about QCC’s program.

  • PTK student and a 2018 Coca-Cola Leaders of Promise Scholar, Connor Nowlan​
August, 2018

Quinsigamond Community College  Phi Theta Kappa (PTK) student Connor Nowlan has been named a 2018 Coca-Cola Leaders of Promise Scholar and will receive a $1,000 scholarship through the Coca-Cola Leaders of Promise Scholarship Program. Mr. Nowlan was one of 207 PTK students chosen from a national pool of over 1,200 applicants.The Coca-Cola Leaders of Promise Scholarship Program helps new PTK...

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Quinsigamond Community College  Phi Theta Kappa (PTK) student Connor Nowlan has been named a 2018 Coca-Cola Leaders of Promise Scholar and will receive a $1,000 scholarship through the Coca-Cola Leaders of Promise Scholarship Program. Mr. Nowlan was one of 207 PTK students chosen from a national pool of over 1,200 applicants.The Coca-Cola Leaders of Promise Scholarship Program helps new PTK members defray educational expenses, while enrolled in associate degree programs. Scholars are also encouraged to assume leadership roles by participating in PTK programs and are selected based on scholastic achievement, community service, and leadership potential.

"I am often promoting PTK to my friends and the high school students I know. PTK is a great resource that I was unaware of in high school. I feel if more people knew about PTK when they were in high school, they would have been more likely to consider community colleges,” Mr. Nowlan said.

Mr. Nowlan is currently attending QCC’s Business Administration Transfer program and taking online classes, while also working full-time.

"This scholarship is a massive help to me. It allows me to save more of my personal income for my future goals and spend this scholarship on tuition and textbooks. This scholarship makes my future goals more obtainable by assisting me with savings,” he continued.

“Research shows that PTK members are four times more likely to complete a college degree than their peers,” said Dr. Monica Marlowe, Executive Director of the Phi Theta Kappa Foundation. “The Leaders of Promise Scholarships recognize students for what they have achieved already and assure that financial need is not an obstacle to achieving their academic goals.”

Mr. Nowlan said QCC's online Business Administration Transfer program was the perfect fit for him and hopes to transfer to the UMass Isenberg School of Management to obtain his bachelor’s degree.

“This program has allowed me to work full-time and go to college full-time, allowing me to pay for it as I go and minimize my student loan debt. I think community colleges are fantastic and wished more people considered them prior to making the jump into a four-year school.  All my professors at QCC have been wonderful and I have learned a lot in my time here,” he said.

  • At the QCC Food Pantry buttons are placed on the refrigerator telling people what fresh produce is available that day.
August, 2018

QCC is looking for a catchy name that will represent its new food pantry and we need your help! Beginning on September 4, the QCC Food Pantry will be hosting a Name the Food Pantry Contest. Students, faculty and staff are invited to send in a suggested name for the pantry. The winner will not only receive bragging rights, he or she will also win a Farberware 10 piece...

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QCC is looking for a catchy name that will represent its new food pantry and we need your help! Beginning on September 4, the QCC Food Pantry will be hosting a Name the Food Pantry Contest. Students, faculty and staff are invited to send in a suggested name for the pantry. The winner will not only receive bragging rights, he or she will also win a Farberware 10 piece Blender set! 

To enter the contest, please send your name, your suggested name for the pantry,email address and a phone number. Entries can be dropped off at the QCC Food Pantry in room 351A during normal business hours, or email your entry to foodpantry [at] qmail.qcc.edu .There will also be a box to drop off your entries at the upcoming Phi Theta Kappa (PTK) Annual Cookout on October 10. Deadline for submissions is October 22. 

The winning name will be chosen on November 7.

The QCC Food Pantry was developed to help address food insecurities on campus, with the goal of helping those in the QCC community who are hungry. The pantry is stocked with non-perishables and a limited amount of fresh produce grown by PTK students in the college’s PTK Live & Learn Greenhouse and is completely funded through donations.

The new food pantry hours of operation are:

  • Monday               2:00 p.m. –   5:00 p.m.
  • Tuesday              8:00 a.m. –  12:00 p.m.
  • Wednesday        4:00 p.m. –    7:00 p.m.
  • Thursday           12:00 a.m. –  5:00 p.m.
  • Friday                  8:00 a.m. - 10:00 a.m. 
  • QCC Director of Mentoring for Perkins Programs, Gabriel “Gabe” Santner
August, 2018

As the QCC Director of Mentoring for Perkins Programs, Gabriel “Gabe” Santner has already made his presence felt in the short time he has been at the college. Coming from a family of educators, helping others advance their future through education is just second nature to him. As someone who believes being involved in the community is vital to student success, he has...

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As the QCC Director of Mentoring for Perkins Programs, Gabriel “Gabe” Santner has already made his presence felt in the short time he has been at the college. Coming from a family of educators, helping others advance their future through education is just second nature to him. As someone who believes being involved in the community is vital to student success, he has taken the lead in helping to shape QCC’s new mentoring program.

QCC’s existing mentoring programs, Brothers & Keepers and S.H.E. are now being combined into one inclusive program that connects QCC students with staff, faculty, industry, and community members, creating one-on-one mentoring relationships. This unique program provides extensive benefits to students, as well as professional development and networking opportunities for mentors.

“I’ve been interested in college success since I was in college at Clark University and been interested in helping underserved students succeed in college,” he said, adding that it’s not always academic barriers that prevent a student from success, but often it can be logistical barriers.

Mr. Santner, who has a Bachelor’s of Arts degree in Communication and Culture from the Clark University and a Masters in Arts in Urban Education Policy from Brown University, was most recently the project coordinator for grants in the Worcester Public Schools (WPS). In that role he saw how a lack of funding was the biggest challenge to the school system and how grant writing helped to obtain funds that made positive changes within the schools.  In the WPS, he worked on many grants that were geared to post-secondary success and was interested in the high school/college connection. When the QCC position for the Director of Mentoring for Perkins Programs was posted, he said he jumped at the opportunity to combine his interests with his experience.

The new QCC mentoring program actively involves and encourages community members to become mentors, something that Mr. Santner feels is a win-win for everyone. He is working closely with Ricky Fraizer, Counselor of the TRIO Student Support Services Program and Dean of Students Terry Vecchio to expand the mentoring program into the community.

President Pedraja is also very interested in this program and its success, which is rare for a college and very powerful,” he added.

The mentoring program is designed to provide a way for QCC students to connect with mentors and build positive relationships to support their college experience. Students will develop employer-desired skills and gain an understanding of workplace expectations and networking to increase their likelihood of finding a rewarding career.

While the rewards of being a mentee are vast, being a mentor is also just as rewarding.

“Why sign up to be a mentor? People may have had a mentor in their life, often in a work environment after college, but may have wanted that mentor sooner,” Mr. Santner said. 

Mentoring can also enhance a person’s own professional skills and also create a legacy by paying it forward.

The QCC Mentoring program will offer a wide set of support services to both mentors and mentees. There will be monthly workshops and social events for mentors and mentees throughout the academic year, and mentors will have access to QCC professional development, complimentary gym membership at QCC, as well as the Fab Lab, library and additional on-campus resources. The program will run a full academic year beginning with a kickoff event on October 11 where mentors and mentees will meet for the first time.

Anyone who is interested in being a mentor or a mentee can visit QCC Mentoring.