Search form

You are here

Newsletter Archive

Newsletter Banner

March, 2021

  • QCC plans to welcome back students to campus in the fall.
March, 2021

Given current progress in the fight against the pandemic, Quinsigamond Community College is planning to resume in-person services for the Fall 2021 semester to the extent that it is safe and permissible.

Last year, to ensure the safety of its community, QCC made the difficult decision to significantly limit in-person services and, with the exception of clinical courses and a few labs, pivoted to remote...

More...

Given current progress in the fight against the pandemic, Quinsigamond Community College is planning to resume in-person services for the Fall 2021 semester to the extent that it is safe and permissible.

Last year, to ensure the safety of its community, QCC made the difficult decision to significantly limit in-person services and, with the exception of clinical courses and a few labs, pivoted to remote learning.  The College is exploring logistics and will continue to make decisions to help ensure the safety of its students, faculty, staff and community.  

“At QCC, we are committed to student success. We know that many of our students benefit from in-person classes and services, while others take advantage of the flexibility of online courses,” said QCC President Luis G. Pedraja, Ph.D.

Prior to the pandemic, approximately 20% of QCC’s courses were already held online. The pandemic allowed the College to increase its capacity to serve students through online and remote services.

“We hope to build on our experience in these areas to provide more services and flexibility for our students,” President Pedraja continued. “While we believe that we will have a robust in-person presence this fall, we are constantly monitoring the situation, and will continue to follow the best advice available and adapt accordingly.”

Additionally, QCC has significantly increased financial support to its students through $2.4 million in federal emergency funds from the Higher Education Emergency Relief Fund II, authorized by the Coronavirus Response and Relief Supplemental Appropriations Act (CRRSAA), and an additional $1 million in institutional funds. The College’s Student Emergency Fund is also available for students in significant hardship due to the pandemic, who are exempt from receiving certain federal aid due to citizenship, residency or enrollment status.

“No one should be barred from attending college this fall due to scheduling issues or financial hardships. At QCC, we have worked tirelessly to eliminate those barriers and make higher education accessible for everyone,” President Pedraja said.

VIP registration for returning and active students is underway, with new student registration beginning on April 12. Register Today! 

  • QCC freezes tuition and fees for 2021.
March, 2021

Quinsigamond Community College announced it would freeze its tuition and fees in 2021.

“We are committed to making college affordable for anyone who wants to better their lives through higher education,” said President Luis G. Pedraja, Ph.D. “We want to remain the most cost-effective higher education option in our area, which is why we are proactively keeping our tuition...

More...

Quinsigamond Community College announced it would freeze its tuition and fees in 2021.

“We are committed to making college affordable for anyone who wants to better their lives through higher education,” said President Luis G. Pedraja, Ph.D. “We want to remain the most cost-effective higher education option in our area, which is why we are proactively keeping our tuition rates the same for our students.”

Recognizing the Coronavirus/COVID-19 pandemic has affected many students and their families who lost jobs or had their hours reduced, QCC has also made emergency funds available. These funds can assist students in paying bills, obtaining laptops, Wi-Fi and other basic life and educational necessities, to help offset some of the financial burdens brought on by the pandemic. Since the pandemic began last March, QCC has worked on innovative ways to help its students with the new financial challenges they faced that included increasing financial aid through state, federal and institutional funds, as well as a Student Emergency Fund available to all current students in immediate hardship due to the effects of the pandemic.

“Attaining a higher education has positive, lifelong implications to students and their families. Higher education can rise people from poverty, improve our economy and make our nation stronger,” Dr. Pedraja said, adding, “Higher education is a right of all.”

QCC’s online associate degree programs were ranked in the top five for best return on investment by OnlineU.com, an unbiased rankings organization that compares all online colleges and universities in the country.

Registration for Summer/Fall begins on March 29 for returning students and April 12 for new students.

  • QCC's Food Pantry volunteers add a little St. Patrick's Day cheer to the weekly curbside food service for students in need.
March, 2021

Quinsigamond Community College has received $2.4 million in federal emergency funds from the Higher Education Emergency Relief Fund II, authorized by the Coronavirus Response and Relief Supplemental Appropriations Act (CRRSAA), to support students. The College has also allocated an additional $1 million in institutional funds to assist students during the Coronavirus/COVID-19 pandemic.

“This...

More...

Quinsigamond Community College has received $2.4 million in federal emergency funds from the Higher Education Emergency Relief Fund II, authorized by the Coronavirus Response and Relief Supplemental Appropriations Act (CRRSAA), to support students. The College has also allocated an additional $1 million in institutional funds to assist students during the Coronavirus/COVID-19 pandemic.

“This unprecedented time in our history requires us to dig deep and support our students in every possible way. This funding will go a long way in helping students realize their dreams of a better life,” said President Luis G. Pedraja, Ph.D. “QCC is the first choice for many students in our region, from traditional high school students, non-traditional students, and students interested in beginning their education to transfer to a 4-year college or university.”

QCC has continued to increase its support services since the onset of the Coronavirus/COVID-19 pandemic, recognizing the financial challenges many students are currently facing.

“Students have lost jobs, or had their hours decreased, and are now facing emergency expenses. Yet they continue to persevere in their quest for a better life through higher education. Our goal is to make sure that every student who has a dream for a quality education can obtain one,” Dr. Pedraja said.

The College instituted a Student Emergency Fund for students in significant hardship at the onset of the pandemic. These funds are also available to students exempt from receiving certain federal aid due to citizenship, residency or enrollment status. Thanks to the Student Emergency Fund, 571 students have received emergency aid to date.  

“It is imperative we do everything we can to help our students mitigate the cost of higher education. In today’s economy, people are realizing that minimizing debt through affordable college options is a smarter decision that will have positive and far-reaching implications,” Dr. Pedraja said.

  • QCC President Luis G. Pedraja, Ph.D. was honored as one of 50 Most Influential People of Color in Higher Education.
March, 2021

In just a few short years Quinsigamond Community College’s sixth president, Luis G. Pedraja, Ph.D., has made an indelible impression on the College, the City and the Commonwealth. Dr. Pedraja is a staunch advocate for social justice and has been outspoken on issues of racial inequity. 

His steadfast leadership during the coronavirus/COVID-19 pandemic, coupled with advocacy for...

More...

In just a few short years Quinsigamond Community College’s sixth president, Luis G. Pedraja, Ph.D., has made an indelible impression on the College, the City and the Commonwealth. Dr. Pedraja is a staunch advocate for social justice and has been outspoken on issues of racial inequity. 

His steadfast leadership during the coronavirus/COVID-19 pandemic, coupled with advocacy for the underserved earned him the title of 2021 Innovative Business Leader of the Year by Worcester Business Journal.  

“I am honored to receive this award. Innovation takes more than one person and I could not have accomplished what we did as a college without an excellent team, committed faculty, and staff,” Dr. Pedraja said.

Dr. Pedraja was also named as one of the 50 Most Influential People of Color in Higher Education by Get Konnected!, a cross-cultural professional organization. Dr. Pedraja joined other honorees on March 30 for a virtual celebration that included a panel of educators, who discussed diversity and equity in higher education, leadership, and what the future will hold for the higher education.

“It is an honor to be recognized with such an impressive group of educators. We all strive to ensure higher education is an inclusive community committed to equity, and together, we will continue to breakdown the barriers of systemic racism that have plagued our higher educational system,” Dr. Pedraja said.

  • QCC's 2021 Commencement Ceremony will be held virtually.
March, 2021

Quinsigamond Community College has announced its May 21, 2021 Commencement Ceremony will be held virtually.

“The College came to this difficult decision after a review of current public health advice and the many unknown factors of the Coronavirus/COVID-19 pandemic’s course over the next months.  Our first and foremost commitment is to the safety of our faculty, staff, students and their...

More...

Quinsigamond Community College has announced its May 21, 2021 Commencement Ceremony will be held virtually.

“The College came to this difficult decision after a review of current public health advice and the many unknown factors of the Coronavirus/COVID-19 pandemic’s course over the next months.  Our first and foremost commitment is to the safety of our faculty, staff, students and their families,” said President Luis G. Pedraja, Ph.D. “We are encouraged by the rollout of vaccines; however, with many still waiting to be vaccinated, we are unable to ensure a safe in-person ceremony.”

QCC is working to ensure its 2021 Virtual Commencement Ceremony is extra special. All August 2020, December 2020, and May 2021 graduates are invited to order their caps, gowns and tassels free of charge, as a keepsake of this momentous occasion.

Graduates will also have the opportunity to come to QCC's main campus to receive a professional commencement photo on May 6, 7, or 8, by appointment only. All safety protocols will be in place on campus for the photography sessions. Additional information will be emailed to students shortly with links to sign up for a photography session. 

To guarantee that caps and gowns arrive in time for the photography sessions, they must ordered by Monday, April 5. If a graduate doesn’t have a cap or gown, pictures can still be taken (also by appointment only). Business casual attire is suggested. All cap and gown orders will be shipped directly to students' homes.  

Graduates can still order caps and gowns until April 19; however, if they are ordered after April 5, there is no guarantee they will arrive for the photo shoots.

"I am excited to welcome the Class of 2021 into the esteemed group of QCC alumni who have done so much for our community," Dr. Pedraja said. 

Visit Commencement 2021 to order regalia.  Graduates should continue to check the graduation page on The Q for updated commencement information.

  • President Luis G. Pedraja, Ph.D. signs articulation agreement with Becker College.
March, 2021

Quinsigamond Community College is opening its doors to Becker College students after learning of the College’s closing at the end of the Spring 2021 semester.

“It is with a heavy heart that we learned of the impending closing of Becker College, one of the oldest institutions of higher education in our region. Becker has made a profound and lasting impression on our community and many QCC transfer...

More...

Quinsigamond Community College is opening its doors to Becker College students after learning of the College’s closing at the end of the Spring 2021 semester.

“It is with a heavy heart that we learned of the impending closing of Becker College, one of the oldest institutions of higher education in our region. Becker has made a profound and lasting impression on our community and many QCC transfer students,” said President Luis G. Pedraja, Ph.D.

QCC has developed a transfer agreement and memorandum of understanding (MOU) with Becker College to assist current Becker students in seamlessly continuing their education. This agreement is for all current Becker students in programs transferrable into QCC’s comparable programs that include:

  • Associate Degree in Business Administration Transfer
  • Associate Degree in Criminal Justice
  • Associate Degree in Early Childhood Education
  • Associate Degree in Early Childhood Education Birth – Eight Years Old
  • Associate Degree Nurse Education
  • Associate Degree Nurse Education – Evening

“We are here to offer Becker College students a way to achieve their higher education dreams,” President Pedraja said. “We want to ensure that no one is left behind because of circumstances beyond their control. We worked diligently on this transfer/MOU agreement and while this agreement does not include all programs at Becker, we will endeavor to enroll and support all transfer students and those who were considering Becker in the fall.”

In addition to the programs listed in the MOU, many of Becker’s programs can easily transfer to QCC, such as its well-known video-game design program. QCC already has a robust gaming program, as well as an esports team, formed during the start of the pandemic.

QCC offers strong financial support to its students and many attend for free by qualifying for financial aid. Since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, the College has increased its financial support to students, by way of $2.4 million in federal emergency funds from the Higher Education Emergency Relief Fund II, authorized by the Coronavirus Response and Relief Supplemental Appropriations Act (CRRSAA), and $1 million in institutional funds. QCC also has a Student Emergency Fund available to current students in significant hardship due to the pandemic, regardless of citizenship, residency or enrollment status. All current and prospective Becker students will be offered the same financial supports and services, and will have the ability to transfer to other four-year institutions once they complete their education at QCC.

“Becker students and their families are not without options and we will be here to support them every step of the way,” President Pedraja said.

For more information, visit https://www.QCC.edu/becker.

  • QCC student Vincent Strzelecki was named 2021 New Century Workforce Pathway Scholar.
March, 2021

Quinsigamond Community College student Vincent Strzelecki, of North Oxford, has been named a 2021 New Century Workforce Pathway Scholar and will receive a $1,250 scholarship.

Only one New Century Workforce Pathway Scholar was selected from each state. Over 2,000 students were nominated from more than 1,200 college campuses across the country. Students were evaluated on academic achievement,...

More...

Quinsigamond Community College student Vincent Strzelecki, of North Oxford, has been named a 2021 New Century Workforce Pathway Scholar and will receive a $1,250 scholarship.

Only one New Century Workforce Pathway Scholar was selected from each state. Over 2,000 students were nominated from more than 1,200 college campuses across the country. Students were evaluated on academic achievement, leadership, service, and significant endeavors. Mr. Strzelecki received the highest score in Massachusetts.

“I’m proud to congratulate Vincent for this great accomplishment. He is an example of the many QCC students who enter the workforce with the high-caliber skill sets they need to be successful,” said QCC President Luis G. Pedraja, Ph.D. “Computer scientists like Vincent are helping to transform our world, which is especially evident today, as the pandemic has shown just how much we rely on technology to live our day-to-day lives.”

This national scholarship is the first of its kind to support students at associate degree-granting institutions who plan to enter the workforce after completion of a degree or certificate. The program is sponsored by The Coca-Cola Foundation and the Phi Theta Kappa Honor (PTK) Society.

Mr. Strzelecki is a member of QCC’s PTK Alpha Theta Zeta Chapter, and is currently completing his Computer Science-Transfer Associate Degree. His goal after graduating is to become a video game software engineer for a well-known video game developer.

“I want to create a future where anyone can play video games, beyond any barriers of wealth, mental capacity, and coordination,” he said.

“We congratulate Vincent for receiving this prestigious scholarship, and we are honored to partner with The Coca-Cola Foundation to recognize his outstanding achievements,” said PTK’s President and CEO Dr. Lynn Tincher-Ladner. “Scholarship programs like this are integral for creating opportunities for students to succeed as they prepare to enter the workforce and for putting college completion within reach.”

The New Century Workforce Pathway Scholars will be recognized in the fall.

  • The Worcester County Bar Association is a core partner of QCC's Mentoring Program.
March, 2021

The Worcester County Bar Association (WCBA) is the first professional organization to join as a core partner of QCC’s Mentoring program. The WCBA partnership with the College’s mentoring program aligns with the mission of WCBA’s Committee for Anti- Racism and Equality (CARE), which formed in 2020 to advance social justice.  The mentoring partnership advances that mission by creating pathways for...

More...

The Worcester County Bar Association (WCBA) is the first professional organization to join as a core partner of QCC’s Mentoring program. The WCBA partnership with the College’s mentoring program aligns with the mission of WCBA’s Committee for Anti- Racism and Equality (CARE), which formed in 2020 to advance social justice.  The mentoring partnership advances that mission by creating pathways for QCC students to learn about careers in the law through relationships with legal professionals.

“Countless community college students would make excellent lawyers. But many are first generation college students, who may not have family or friends working in the law. The WCBA/QCC core partnership is a path to build relationships with lawyers and learn about legal careers,” said Attorney Leigh Woodruff. “Plus, no matter what career a person chooses, mentor relationships are invaluable for personal and professional development. Imagine if we all worked together to help everyone reach their full potential in whatever field a person chooses.  Can you imagine where we would be?”

The WCBA currently has 15 mentors who are part of QCC’s Mentoring program. According to Ms. Woodruff, the hope is to expand its mentor-mentee partnership with QCC in future years.

Core partners with QCC’s Mentoring program are organizations that have sent 10 or more mentors to the program. Mentors and mentees tour core partner organizations, and offer mentees a pipeline of opportunities and supports to help them be successful in college and in their future careers.

The Worcester County Bar Association is a voluntary association of over 1,000 members, serving Worcester County lawyers and the Worcester County community since 1887.

To learn more about QCC’s Mentoring program, visit www.QCC.edu/mentoring .

March, 2021

It will take all of us, but together, we can beat COVID-19. The new COVID-19 vaccines are safe, effective, and free. Vaccination clinic sites are available throughout the Commonwealth. QCC has set up an informational vaccination website that includes public service announcements from students to help inform and engage the community to get vaccinated. Videos in English, Spanish, Arabic, Russian,...

More...

It will take all of us, but together, we can beat COVID-19. The new COVID-19 vaccines are safe, effective, and free. Vaccination clinic sites are available throughout the Commonwealth. QCC has set up an informational vaccination website that includes public service announcements from students to help inform and engage the community to get vaccinated. Videos in English, Spanish, Arabic, Russian, Vietnamese, and Albanian are posted to the website.

Let’s all get vaccinated as soon as we are eligible. The faster we get vaccinated, the faster we can see our friends, our advisors and our professors. We can have in-person classes, sporting events, clubs, study times and we can get back to living our lives, on our terms.

To learn more about the vaccine and clinic locations visit VaxFacts

  • QCC's Online Business Administration Associate Degree Programs earned top ranking.
March, 2021

Quinsigamond Community College has earned top ranking for Best Online Business Administration Associate Degree Programs, with a unique distinction for Best Skills-Based Curriculum by Intelligent.com, an online rankings site.  Intelligent.com analyzed 224 schools, on a scale of 0 to 100, with only 67 making it to the final list.

Each program is evaluated based on curriculum quality, graduation rate,...

More...

Quinsigamond Community College has earned top ranking for Best Online Business Administration Associate Degree Programs, with a unique distinction for Best Skills-Based Curriculum by Intelligent.com, an online rankings site.  Intelligent.com analyzed 224 schools, on a scale of 0 to 100, with only 67 making it to the final list.

Each program is evaluated based on curriculum quality, graduation rate, reputation, and post-graduate employment. The 2021 rankings are then calculated through a unique scoring system, which includes student engagement, potential return on investment and leading third-party evaluations.

Congratulations to QCC’s Business Administration faculty who prove why QCC is College. Made Smarter.

  • QCC's Director of Mentoring and Perkins Gabe Santner
March, 2021

Quinsigamond Community College Mentoring program has earned Mass Mentoring Partnership’s highest level of certification: Partner Level Quality-Based Membership (QBM). Quality-Based Membership is a first-in-the-nation process created to promote high-quality best practices among Massachusetts youth mentoring programs. Now being replicated nationally, membership components are based on The Elements of...

More...

Quinsigamond Community College Mentoring program has earned Mass Mentoring Partnership’s highest level of certification: Partner Level Quality-Based Membership (QBM). Quality-Based Membership is a first-in-the-nation process created to promote high-quality best practices among Massachusetts youth mentoring programs. Now being replicated nationally, membership components are based on The Elements of Effective Practice, the national standard for mentoring programs.

QBM is a process that assesses a program’s strengths and offers guidance on areas where they may need additional training or technical assistance.  There are many benefits to QBM: It provides a meaningful “indicator of quality”; it benchmarks program practices against national standards of excellence; and it demonstrates a program’s commitment to excellence to potential mentors, funders, parents, and community partners.

QCC's Mentoring joins 43 Mass Mentoring Partnership QBM certified mentoring programs in Massachusetts. The program connects QCC students with staff, faculty, industry, and community members to create one-on-one mentoring relationships. This unique program provides extensive benefits to students, as well as professional development and networking opportunities for mentors.

“Our students will greatly benefit from this certification. Mentors can have a lifelong, positive and profound effect on student mentees. Our mentoring program provides a way for students to connect with mentors and build positive relationships to support their college experience. Students also develop employer- desired skills, gain an understanding of workplace expectations and networking to increase their likelihood of finding a rewarding career,” said QCC President Luis G. Pedraja, Ph.D. “The program has become an integral component of student success.”

“We commend Quinsigamond Community College as a partner in the QBM program and look forward to working with them to help amplify mentoring relationships in central Massachusetts,” shared Lily Mendez, President and CEO, Mass Mentoring Partnership.

  • QCC Alumna Felicia Agbanyo
March, 2021

Service before self seems to be the mantra for alumna Felicia Agbanyo, of Gardner. Ms. Agbanyo graduated from Quinsigamond Community College with an Associate Degree of Liberal Arts, Psychology Option in 2020, and today is attending William James College, a graduate school of psychology located in Newton.

She was recently named a 2020-2021 Child and Adolescent Mental Health Initiative (...

More...

Service before self seems to be the mantra for alumna Felicia Agbanyo, of Gardner. Ms. Agbanyo graduated from Quinsigamond Community College with an Associate Degree of Liberal Arts, Psychology Option in 2020, and today is attending William James College, a graduate school of psychology located in Newton.

She was recently named a 2020-2021 Child and Adolescent Mental Health Initiative (CAMHI) scholar, at William James and received a $15,000 scholarship, funded by a grant awarded from the Boston Children's Collaboration for Community Health. She also serves on the Council of Inclusive Excellence at William James College and is an active member in the Diversity and Inclusion Council at Seven Hills Foundation, a health and human services agency based in Worcester.

Recently the Wyvern Guardian had an opportunity to speak with Ms. Agbanyo.

Can you describe how you are serving children and families in the Behavioral Health Field?

I currently work with women who have developmental disabilities. In this position, I work collaboratively with the women's families and care team to provide support on their terms while taking into account their cultural needs. 

How did you become interested this field?

I became interested in the field of psychology after the death of two close family members. I was actually attending QCC at the time of their passing. During this period of my life, my family, friends, classmates and professors helped me heal after going an unthinkable loss. After having that experience, I wanted to show others kindness, compassion, and support in the same ways it was shown to me.

Why did you choose to attend QCC?

I chose to attend QCC for many reasons, but the three reasons I initially chose QCC were proximity, cost, and class size. QCC was close by and I lived within 25 minutes of the Worcester campus. QCC was affordable for me, I could go to school and still continue to afford the life I lived. I took advantage of the great financial aid benefits while I attended the College.

Class size was also an important factor for me attending QCC. I wanted to go to a college where I knew my professors and my professors knew me. I think knowing my professors was key in my success. I was able to ask questions about the material in my classes and get direct help and feedback about how I was doing. The professors I had also helped me grow professionally. When I reached out to my past professors at QCC for letters of recommendations, each professor that I reached out to was willing to write one on my behalf. 

What stood out for you during your time at QCC?

Something that stood out for me while attending the College was the supportive environment. There were so many free resources that I used to help me achieve success. Writing has always been a strength of mine, but it was great to know I could go to the Student Writing Center and get feedback on how I could further strengthen my writing. I have always had to work harder in math, and while I was at QCC, I took full advantage of the Student Math Center and free math tutoring that was offered. Many of my professors also counted my seeking out extra help toward my grade in their class. Every professor there wants you to be successful.

I understand you worked full-time while attending QCC. Can you tell me a bit about this, as well as how you balanced both working and college?

I was able to work full-time while attending QCC. As my work schedule and life changed throughout my time attending the College, I was also able to adapt my course schedule. When I worked a second shift (3:00 p.m. -11:00 p.m.) position, I attended school in the morning and afternoons. When my schedule changed to working a first shift (8:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.) schedule, I started taking evening, night, and online courses. I am also a single mom and had to factor in my child's schedule, along with my work and college schedule. I balanced this all by setting up a good schedule for myself, while still being flexible to life's changes. I also made sure I communicated my needs and life changes to my advisors and professors, who were always willing to work with me in order for me to be successful.

What would you tell someone who was considering attending QCC?

I would tell someone who is considering attending QCC to take the steps and just do it. It’s a choice you won’t regret. You do not have to know what your end goal or profession will be to start attending college. I am still not sure what my profession will be even while in my last year of my bachelor's degree, but I do know that I will be successful in whatever I do. QCC has so many resources that are set up for student success. College does take work and effort, but QCC is setup in a way that you will feel supported through your academic journey and if I could do it, you can too!

What are your goals after graduating from William James College?

After graduating from William James College, I want to be of service to people. I am still not sure what career path I will end up in, and that is OK. A large part of my college experience has been learning about the many different career options that are available. I have not let a lack of not knowing my end goal deter me from attending college.

 

  • Cityblock Health becomes a QCC Mentoring core partner.
March, 2021

QCC’s Mentoring Program is making lasting and life-long changes for student mentees and the mentors who support them. Today the program has become a staple at Quinsigamond Community College thanks in part to the companies and organizations that have chosen to become core partners. A QCC Mentoring core partner has 10 or more company employees volunteer to be mentors.

One of the newest core partners is...

More...

QCC’s Mentoring Program is making lasting and life-long changes for student mentees and the mentors who support them. Today the program has become a staple at Quinsigamond Community College thanks in part to the companies and organizations that have chosen to become core partners. A QCC Mentoring core partner has 10 or more company employees volunteer to be mentors.

One of the newest core partners is Cityblock Health.  The company partners with community-based organizations and health plans to deliver medical care, behavioral health, and social services virtually, in-home, and in their community-based clinics. A total of 16 new mentors from Cityblock, including the medical director, are taking part in QCC’s program.

“The QCC Mentoring Program offers extraordinary opportunities to QCC students. We are glad to be able to contribute our time to serve more students,” said Cityblock Community Partnerships Manager, Kerri Sandberg.

The company became a core partner with the QCC Mentoring Program when it was just launching its business in Massachusetts, and finding meaningful ways to engage its employees was a priority.

“We know QCC has robust nursing and human services programs, and those are exactly the type of individuals we want to recruit when they’re ready to enter the job market,” Ms. Sandberg said. “We believe that we can achieve health equity in this country -- but it’s going to take leaders who understand it’s possible. This mentorship program offers opportunities to have deep, meaningful discussions with future changemakers who will go on to influence our society. We welcome that opportunity.”

Cityblock and QCC Mentoring will be holding a Virtual Career Panel on Wednesday, April 14 at 4:00 p.m. for QCC students.

“This virtual event is a great way for students to network with industry professionals who can offer insights into Cityblock, as well as the workforce as a whole since the pandemic. We are excited to have Cityblock as a core partner,” said QCC’s Director of Mentoring and Perkins, Gabriel Santner.

Visit www.QCC.edu/mentoring to learn more.

  • Students can learn about exciting job opportunites and meet with potential employers at the upcoming virtual job fair.
March, 2021

While the format may be different, the opportunity to meet employers is still the same at QCC’s Career Services Virtual Career Fair. Held on Wednesday, April 7, 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. through Zoom, students can meet virtually with employers, hear about job opportunities and upload resumes directly to employers. This is the perfect way for students to get a head start on the career of...

More...

While the format may be different, the opportunity to meet employers is still the same at QCC’s Career Services Virtual Career Fair. Held on Wednesday, April 7, 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. through Zoom, students can meet virtually with employers, hear about job opportunities and upload resumes directly to employers. This is the perfect way for students to get a head start on the career of their dreams.

Companies in attendance include:

  • Agiliti
  • Arbor Associates
  • EATON
  • IPG Photonics
  • JABIL
  • KARL STORZ
  • Machado Consulting
  • Mondelēz International
  • PMG
  • The Lighthouse Inn
  • TRC
  • UMass Memorial Health Care

Registration is required. Students can register by logging onto Purple Briefcase in the events tab, prior to the event. Log onto the Zoom link  to join the event. 

Students are reminded to dress professionally and bring their resumes to make a good impression on local companies looking to hire!

  • Quinsigamond Community College assists thousands of students annually in realizing their dreams of higher education.
March, 2021

April Is Community College Month!

Tuesday, April 6: Career Services and Credit for Prior Learning is hosting a virtual information session on career opportunities with the United States Secret Service from 11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. Learn what career opportunities are available, what qualifications you need and how to apply for a variety of jobs. The Secret Service offers Veterans...

More...

April Is Community College Month!

Tuesday, April 6: Career Services and Credit for Prior Learning is hosting a virtual information session on career opportunities with the United States Secret Service from 11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. Learn what career opportunities are available, what qualifications you need and how to apply for a variety of jobs. The Secret Service offers Veterans priority interviewing. Register for this event on Purple Briefcase. Visit Secret Service Event to join the session.

Thursday, April 8: Becker College Students Information Session, 4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m. The session offers current Becker students information on how to transfer in to QCC. Prospective Becker students are also invited to join. Registration is required. Visit Becker College students to learn more. 

Friday, April 9: 2021 TLSD Conference hosted virtually by QCC. Keynote Speaker is Senior Vice President and Chief Policy Officer of the Lumina Foundation, Dr. Danette Howard. Welcome and keynote begin at 9:00 a.m. To learn more and register for the Conference, visit 2021 TLSD Conference .

Monday, April 12: New student registration begins. 

Thursday, April 15: Virtual Admissions Information Session from 4:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.  During this comprehensive event, students, families, and community members will have the opportunity to learn about QCC’s student support services, academic divisions, and student life. This is the perfect way to learn more about how a college degree can change your life, all from the comfort of your home! Visit Information Session to register for this event.

Monday, April 19: Patriots' Day - no classes. 

Tuesday, April 27: QCC’s Career Services and Credit for Prior Learning is hosting a Virtual Healthcare Fair from 2:00 p.m. -3:30 p.m. on Zoom. Students have the opportunity to virtually meet with employers, learn about open opportunities, ask questions, and upload their resumes directly to employers. While the Fair focuses on healthcare organizations, there are jobs in many areas outside of healthcare. Companies in attendance include: Agiliti, Arbor Associates, Christopher House, Holy Trinity Nursing and Rehabilitation, Reliant Medical Group, Salmon Health and Retirement, UMass Memorial Healthcare, and Worcester Public Schools. Students are asked to register on Purple Briefcase.

Join the Healthcare Fair through Zoom: https://zoom.us/j/91563524134?pwd=Z2xsUnM3a3E3LzF5K2tkYmtGanhLZz09 

 Meeting ID: 915 6352 4134 Passcode: 225009

Friday, April 30: Olga Lopez-Hill Scholarship application deadline. This $600 scholarship is available to QCC students who plan to either continue their education at QCC or transfer to another higher institution. Olga Lopez-Hill graduated from QCC in 1990 and worked at the College for over 20 years, advocating for students and inspiring them to continue their efforts to further their education. To apply students need to submit an essay demonstrating how their activities and future goals reflect the importance of education, diversity and service to your community. Response is limited to two pages, and must include your contact information (Previous scholarship winners are ineligible). Send completed applications to dgonzalez [at] qcc.mass.edu by the end of day on 4/30.

April Spotlight: The Diversity Caucus is excited to announce some great virtual events for the month of April. Visit Diversity Caucus Events to learn more.

Thursday, April 15: A Human Touch to Recovery: Hector Reyes House presented by Dr. Aaron M. Mendel from 12:30 p.m. - 1:30 p.m.

Friday, April 16: Crocodile River Music Presentation, Part of the Social Justice Speaker Series, a project of QCC’s Sociology Department. This family event includes a performance by Crocodile River Music and a discussion of the role of the arts in social justice. 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.

Wednesday, April 21: Sankofa Lecture Series - Talk by Dr. Lorelle Semley, College of the Holy Cross, from 1:00 p.m. -2:00 pm. Save the date.

Thursday, April 22: Combined Earth Day and Stand Against Racism Webinar- 8 Billion Angels, a Global Documentary and Panel Discussion co-hosted with the QCC Environmental Science Program from 11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.

This groundbreaking new documentary connects all of the planet's environmental emergencies, including climate change, with unsustainable population growth. A very pertinent part of this discussion is women’s rights, empowerment and environmental justice.

Wednesday, April 28: Moving Beyond Monolingual Policy and Practice: Culturally and Linguistically Responsive Pedagogy to Support English Learners in Community College, beginning at 11:00 a.m. Teresa Varriale Gonzalez and Deborah Gonzalez to lead the program.


 

  • L to R: Dean for Compliance & Education Liz Woods, President Luis G. Pedraja, and Manager for Student Resources Bonnie Coleman
March, 2021

Student Resources Manager Bonnie Coleman and Dean for Compliance & Education, Liz Woods were recognized for 15 years of dedicated service to Phi Theta Kappa (PTK) students at Quinsigamond Community College. Ms. Coleman has been the PTK Alpha Theta Zeta Chapter Advisor and Ms. Woods serves on the PTK Advisory Board. 

"Countless students have been...

More...

Student Resources Manager Bonnie Coleman and Dean for Compliance & Education, Liz Woods were recognized for 15 years of dedicated service to Phi Theta Kappa (PTK) students at Quinsigamond Community College. Ms. Coleman has been the PTK Alpha Theta Zeta Chapter Advisor and Ms. Woods serves on the PTK Advisory Board. 

"Countless students have been nurtured and supported over the years by Bonnie and Liz. These two extraordinary individuals have made, and continue to make, a positive and lasting impact on our student body," said President Luis G. Pedraja, Ph.D. 

This year, QCC's PTK Chapter has experienced the largest student membership growth since it was chartered in 1980. 

"PTK students not only excel academically, they also take part in community service projects to become engaged citizens in their community," Dr. Pedraja said. "It's inspiring to know that students have not let the pandemic get in the way of their future goals. I thank Bonnie and Liz for helping so many students realize their dreams."

PTK is an internationally recognized honor society for two-year colleges and has approximately 1,300 chapters in the U.S. and around the globe. To be eligible for QCC’s PTK Honor Society, students must have at least 12 credits of college level courses (level 100 courses or higher) and a cumulative GPA of 3.5 or greater. To lean more visit, www.QCC.edu/PTK. 

March, 2021

March, 2021

More...

March, 2021

 

  • QCC Athletics helps you exercise your mind and body.
March, 2021

E-sports Team

Congratulations to the Wyverns E-sports team! The Wyverns pulled out another win on March 30 against Mass Bay Community College, and the team now has an impressive 3-1 record.

If you are a full-time student (12 credits of more) this Spring semester, or you know of a student who is full-time and may be interested in being part of QCC’s E-sports team, Coach ...

More...

E-sports Team

Congratulations to the Wyverns E-sports team! The Wyverns pulled out another win on March 30 against Mass Bay Community College, and the team now has an impressive 3-1 record.

If you are a full-time student (12 credits of more) this Spring semester, or you know of a student who is full-time and may be interested in being part of QCC’s E-sports team, Coach Nate Mello wants to hear from you! To learn more, email Coach Mello at nmello [at] qcc.mass.edu

 

Free Fitness Classes for all QCC Students, Staff and Faculty.

 

New Boot Camp

Body Blaster Boot Camp will give you the workout you're looking for to help get ready for the summer months. The free, virtual class is held every Tuesday from 5:30 p.m. - 6:15 p.m.

Zoom Yoga

Free, ongoing Virtual Zoom Yoga classes are held Monday – Friday, 12:00 p.m. -12:40 p.m. This is a perfect midday break and pick-me -up!

Yoga & Meditation Class

This free class is the perfect combination of stretching and relaxation at the end of a long day! Monday and Wednesdays from 6:00pm – 6:40 p.m. All that’s needed are comfortable clothes and a yoga mat if you have one, and an open mind.

Zoom Zumba

QCC’s Zoom Zumba is held twice a week on Tuesdays from 1:15 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. and Thursdays 6:00 p.m. - 6:45p.m.Dance your way to a healthier you!

Email Athletic Director Lisa Gurnick for a Zoom invite to any of the free fitness classes at lisag [at] qcc.mass.edu.

Cooking Matters at Home Session

QCC students only - Staying healthy also means eating healthy. On April 7, QCC students can register for a virtual Cooking Matters at Home Session from 4:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m. Students will learn how to make Pantry Pizza with their own homemade dough. This is a two-session event with the second session (Pineapple Carrot Muffins) to be held on May 5 from 4:00 p.m. - 4:30 p.m. Students who attend each session will receive a $10 E-Gift card to Wal-Mart, for a total of $20. To register email lisag [at] qcc.mass.edu.

 

  • Creative Writers Club
March, 2021

The Creative Writers Club Wyvern is the newest member of QCC's Wyvern family. The Creative Writers Club joins other extra-curricular clubs and organizations at QCC.

Clubs are designed to add value to life on and off campus. Student can find find endless opportunities to:

  • meet others, make connections, gain social contacts, establish friendships
  • participate in...
More...

The Creative Writers Club Wyvern is the newest member of QCC's Wyvern family. The Creative Writers Club joins other extra-curricular clubs and organizations at QCC.

Clubs are designed to add value to life on and off campus. Student can find find endless opportunities to:

  • meet others, make connections, gain social contacts, establish friendships
  • participate in exciting experiences while learning about yourself and the world around you
  • develop and hone vital leadership skills
  • transfer classroom theory into practice
  • build your resume and portfolio
  • discover your values, potential and campus spirit

Become a part of the QCC community and visit Student Life today and make sure to check out the other  Wyvern family members! 

March, 2021

On March 7, 2021, Strategic Enrollment Development & Student Engagement welcomed Bonnie Coleman as Manager for Student Resources. Bonnie brings to this position over 30 years of experience. Most recently, she was Administrative Secretary I/Enrollment and Student Services (PTK Office) here at QCC.

On March 14, 2021 Administrative Services welcomed David Shapiro as...

More...

On March 7, 2021, Strategic Enrollment Development & Student Engagement welcomed Bonnie Coleman as Manager for Student Resources. Bonnie brings to this position over 30 years of experience. Most recently, she was Administrative Secretary I/Enrollment and Student Services (PTK Office) here at QCC.

On March 14, 2021 Administrative Services welcomed David Shapiro as Assistant Director of Human Resources, HR Operations. David brings to this position over 10 years of experience. Most recently, he was a Human Resources Generalist here at Quinsigamond Community College. David earned bachelor's and master’s degrees from Clark University.

On March 14, 2021 Administrative Services welcomed Jose Rivera as Institution Security Officer IV (Lieutenant). Jose brings to this position over 20 years of experience. Most recently, he was Institution Security Officer II here at Quinsigamond Community College. Jose is a recent graduate from the QCC Reserve / Intermittent Police Academy and the Public Safety Academy in New Hampshire. 

Please join us in welcoming Bonnie, David and Jose into their new roles at QCC.

February, 2021

  • From left: Dean of Compliance Liz Woods and QCC Foundation President Dr. Linda Maykel help load food into a student's vehicle.
February, 2021

Thirty-seven percent of public university students in Massachusetts experience food insecurity, according to a recent report by the Hope Center for College, Community and Justice, and the MA Department of Higher Education. This stark reality, combined with the opportunity at the federal and state level to tackle food access as a basic need on campus, led to the filing of comprehensive and visionary legislation titled...

More...

Thirty-seven percent of public university students in Massachusetts experience food insecurity, according to a recent report by the Hope Center for College, Community and Justice, and the MA Department of Higher Education. This stark reality, combined with the opportunity at the federal and state level to tackle food access as a basic need on campus, led to the filing of comprehensive and visionary legislation titled, “An Act establishing the Massachusetts Hunger-Free Campus Initiative.”

The bill sponsors include Senator Harriette Chandler (D-Worcester), Representative Mindy Domb (D-Amherst) and Representative Andy Vargas (D-Haverhill). This critical legislation aims to provide capacity, guidance, and funding to allow 2- and 4-year public colleges and not-for profit institutions of higher education that serve a significant proportion of low-income students, to take several steps in alleviating hunger and food insecurity on campus. The effort is supported by the statewide Hunger-Free Campus Coalition, which formed in the Fall of 2019 to address food insecurity among high-need populations enrolled in MA public colleges and universities.

"Access to food is a fundamental survival need and all students deserve a hunger free campus. Unfortunately, food insecurity and hunger are daily struggles for some Massachusetts college students, many of whom are already saddled by loan debt and the stress of schoolwork,” said Senator Harriette Chandler. “This bill seeks to empower students and colleges to address food insecurity together and to chart a path towards hunger free campuses statewide.”

"Burdened by student debt, college students often work more than one job while attending school to help meet their expenses, and still have to make painful decisions between paying for dinner or buying textbooks. This legislation partners with campus communities to build their capacity to address student hunger with meaningful and effective interventions. I’m proud to join my colleagues to offer a mechanism to support campuses to engage in this crucial work,” said Representative Mindy Domb.

“Food insecurity is a solvable problem. The pandemic has further exacerbated hunger, especially for college students already struggling to get by. In a state where our cost of living is so high and navigating support can be complicated, solving food insecurity will require a systems approach that builds capacity, efficiency and meets people where they’re at,” said Representative Andy Vargas. “At the end of the day, college students can’t learn or take advantage of professional opportunities while on an empty stomach. We can fix this.”

The bill includes steps such as establishing a hunger-free campus taskforce comprised of both students and administration staff, notifying students of their potential eligibility for federal and state nutrition benefits, developing a student meal credit sharing program, creating an emergency fund to support students in crisis, providing capacity-building funds for campuses to implement these best practices, and more.

In 2018, noting an important need, Quinsigamond Community College established a Food Pantry and Resource Center to address the food insecurity its students were facing. 

“We have witnessed first-hand the hunger our students are experiencing. Many are first-generation college students, working for a better life for themselves and their families. They face an uphill battle that often includes food insecurity issues. The pandemic has compounded the hunger many in our community face. Today well over 400 Quinsigamond Community College students are regularly utilizing the college’s food pantry to feed themselves and their families. Food insecurity is a systemic issue in our community that can no longer be ignored. It is our duty as educators and citizens of the Commonwealth to remove food insecurity from our higher education system,” said QCC President Luis G. Pedraja, Ph.D.

This legislation and the movement behind this hunger-free campus effort comes during a national hunger crisis. Massachusetts is seeing the largest increase in food insecurity at 59% when compared to any other state in the nation as a result of COVID-19. Many students are currently off campus; however, there is an opportunity to ensure that when they return, their schools are equipped to address one of their most basic needs – food.

“We must remove the stigma that is often associated with college students who experience food insecurity. I have the opportunity to volunteer at the food pantry. It opened my eyes to the needs of our students and the community as a whole. My hope is that this legislative bill will shine a light on the issue of food insecurity and make a positive and lasting impact on our students. No one should be denied the chance of a better life because they are hungry,” said QCC Foundation President Linda Maykel, D.D.S.

“Worcester County Food Bank supports food pantries at three institutions of higher learning because we believe that no college student should have to choose between buying food and paying college expenses.  It’s normal for college students to worry about grades, papers, and exams; they shouldn’t have to also worry about where their next meal is coming from.  We support this important legislation because the services it provides are an investment in their education and lifelong achievement,” said Worcester County Food Bank CEO, Jean McMurray.

The Massachusetts public higher education system serves over 250,000 students annually. Due to historic and contemporary divestment and discrimination, Black, Latinx, and LGBTQ+ students disproportionately experience food insecurity – at rates of 52%, 47%, and 46% respectively. Student parents also experience higher rates of food insecurity at 53%. This initiative prioritizes equity and ensures that all students, particularly these groups who are traditionally underserved, have access to food.

“It’s difficult to learn when you have been at work and school all day but not have had means to eat. Hunger, like homework and paying tuition, is a reality for college students. This legislation acknowledges that food insecure high school students do not stop being food insecure upon entering college. It provides guidelines and resources to tackle this issue. As hunger advocates in central Massachusetts where lack of transportation makes things more difficult, we’re excited to support this legislation that will help students focus on school and successfully complete their education,” said Gina Plata-Nino, Central West Justice Center.

Actions at the federal level, such as the Consolidated Appropriations Act passed in December that expanded SNAP eligibility for college students, have created recent momentum around the issue of college student hunger. The MA Department of Higher Education and Department of Transitional Assistance proactively sent letters to 94,000 low-income college students recently to inform them of this expanded eligibility. While these measures are effective short-term solutions, colleges need long-term anti-hunger strategies to combat food insecurity, and implementing those strategies is the intent of this bill.

About the Massachusetts Hunger-Free Campus Coalition

The Massachusetts Hunger-Free Campus Coalition was formed in the fall of 2019 to address food insecurity among high-need populations enrolled in MA public colleges and universities.

Collectively, the coalition is working to leverage and expand existing resources and services including maximizing student enrollment in federal nutrition programs such as SNAP, supporting meal swipe options with campus food vendors, ensuring that campuses work with MA food banks to expand food pantries, and other initiatives designed to address food insecurity among the student population.

Current members include: The Greater Boston Food Bank, The Food Bank of Western Massachusetts, Mass Law Reform Institute (MLRI), Worcester County Food Bank, Central West Justice Center, One Family, Project Bread, Boston Office of Food Access, Quinsigamond Community College, Bunker Hill Community College, The Open Door of Gloucester, uAspire, Worcester State University, Holyoke Community College, Springfield College, Bristol Community College, University of Massachusetts – Amherst, Salem State University, Roxbury Community College, UMass Extension Nutrition Education Program, North Shore Community College, and The Amherst Survival Center.

Our goal is to ensure equity and incorporate student voices as we work to make Massachusetts college campuses hunger free.

  • QCC nursing students from left: René Latino, Paramita Pal Roy and Angela Yarborough.
February, 2021

QCC nursing students are now an official part of history – a history that is expected to change the trajectory of the COVID-19 pandemic. The students recently took part in the COVID-19 vaccination process for healthcare workers at UMass Memorial Medical Center’s COVID-19 vaccine clinic. This is not the first foray into nursing for most of these students, yet all say they have gained valuable lifelong...

More...

QCC nursing students are now an official part of history – a history that is expected to change the trajectory of the COVID-19 pandemic. The students recently took part in the COVID-19 vaccination process for healthcare workers at UMass Memorial Medical Center’s COVID-19 vaccine clinic. This is not the first foray into nursing for most of these students, yet all say they have gained valuable lifelong skills they will take with them in their nursing careers.

QCC nursing student Luisa Contreras is one such student who has taken part in the vaccination process.

“I was incredibly excited when we were informed that we'd be involved in the administration of COVID-19 vaccines. I never imagined that as a nursing student we would be able to help out in such a tremendous way,” Ms. Contreras said. “This is such an important step to begin to regain some normalcy and I feel so lucky to have been involved. I am so grateful to both the staff at QCC and UMass for setting this up and providing us with tremendous opportunity. “

Ms. Contreras came to QCC after earning her Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) from Assabet Valley Regional Technical High School in 2017. She is on track to receive her Associate Degree in Nursing, December 2021, and plans to continue her education.

“The professors at QCC are absolutely wonderful and super supportive. This past year, we've seen just how important nurses are and we definitely need more of us out there. From my experience, QCC has set up a fantastic learning environment for their nursing students to succeed,” Ms. Contrera said.  “I think that with everything that’s happened this past year, we’ve seen just how much the health care world is constantly changing and evolving. So who knows, maybe my future lies in something that has yet to be fully developed.”

Nursing student Angela Yarborough said being a part of the COVID-19 vaccination process was a “wonderful” experience. A seasoned nurse who was a graduate of the first LPN class of QCC in 2000, Ms. Yarborough came back to QCC to further her nursing education after her daughter went off to college. At UMass she helped vaccinate nurses, doctors, and other hospital staff with their second vaccination.

“We would say ‘congratulations’ after giving someone their second vaccination. They would hold up their vaccination card with pride. One woman mentioned how she hopes that getting the vaccine is going to allow her to be able to finally see her parents once they are vaccinated without fear of getting them ill,  she said, adding, “It was exciting to be a part of this initiative. It was a very rewarding experience. I am thankful to Professor Ellen Vangel-Brousseau for coordinating our participation with the UMass vaccine clinic.”

Ms. Yarborough anticipates earning her degree in December 2021 and plans to take a couple of courses at a time to reach her next goal  - attending the RN to BS program that QCC offers with Worcester State University. She currently works in home health care and is excited to see what opportunities the future holds after she earns her degree.

“When I decided to begin my journey to return to school to become a registered nurse, I was able to take a couple classes a semester to complete my prerequisites. This allowed me to still work, while I furthered my education,” she said. “I have met so many peers at different stages of their nursing journey who have inspired me. QCC offers both day and night nursing programs that make it possible to continue your education with a schedule that still allows you to work and take care of family needs.”

For nursing student Paramita Pal Roy, doing her clinical at UMass Memorial’s vaccine clinic was a bit of a happy coincidence, as she had been a volunteer in the hospital’s cardiac ICU family waiting room before attending QCC.

Before coming to the U.S., Ms. Pal Roy was an ICU nurse who had to give up her career due to family commitments. Once she came to the U.S., she began to rethink her nursing career and started researching nursing programs. She discovered that not only did QCC have an impressive nursing program; it was also affordable. She began in the College’s LPN program and graduated last year. Currently she is in the bridging program to graduate as an RN.

“Since last year, COVID-19 has changed our lives in many ways. As nursing students, we needed that hands-on experience. I am thankful to my college and UMass for providing me with the opportunity to be a part of this vaccination process. It feels great to be part of the COVID-19 vaccination team,” she said. “The whole process was organized meticulously, maintaining all safety protocols was always the priority. I was very excited and fortunate at the same time to be a part of this program. I look forward to being in the vaccination clinic in the near future.”

She said the recent experience in the vaccine clinic will add value to her nursing career, and is looking forward to finishing the RN program later this year and take the National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX) for her RN license.

“QCC has a great nursing program,” she said. “I am fortunate that QCC has the best nurse education faculty. Due to this well-structured program, QCC has an impressive NCLEX pass rate. I will always recommend QCC’s nursing program.”

As an alumna of QCC’s PN program, Jedda Richardson decided to return to QCC for its Nurse Education Program to enhance her skills and qualifications for more job opportunities. She said participating in the vaccine clinic was a great experience.

“I felt like I was involved in a positive change to overcome this pandemic and felt like I was making a difference within our community,” she said, adding “The professors (at QCC) are great and very compassionate about teaching the next generation of nursing students. They really prepare students for real life experience within the nursing field.” 

Ms. Richardson anticipates graduating in 2022 and plans to work in critical care within the nursing field.

For nursing student René Latino, nursing called to her after she earned a four-year degree in communications.

“I have a lot of nurses in my family and I think it's really amazing how much they care about other people. I would say the biggest thing that pulled me into nursing is my desire to take care of those who can't take care of themselves or for those who just need help,” she said.

Ms. Latino was able to enroll in the accelerated nursing program at QCC because she already had a bachelor’s degree.

“QCC was the best choice because of the program, the great reviews, and the location,” she said.

QCC’s nursing program also gave her the opportunity to take part in the COVID-19 vaccine clinic, an experience she described as “amazing.”

“It was great to be able to be a part of something in the community. I really felt like we were making a difference in this step to stop this virus, which has created such a change and sadness in our world. I'm very thankful that UMass gave us the opportunity to be a part of the initiative and I really hope that I get to do it again in the future.” 

Ms. Latino is expected to graduate from QCC in December 2021 and is hoping to work in some type of a hospital setting, where she can feel she is making a difference in the lives of patients.

“For anyone considering enrolling in QCC's nursing program, I think it's a great choice. The professors are awesome and they're so compassionate about what they do. I started this program in September of last year and I can't believe how much I've already learned. I've heard from so many people that QCC has a great nursing program and I'm really seeing that for myself,” she said.

Visit QCC Nursing to learn more.

Guest speaker Tim Wise
February, 2021

QCC’s Black Student Union and the Diversity Caucus recently hosted guest speaker Tim Wise in a live Zoom webinar on February 23.

Mr. Wise is among the most prominent anti-racist writers and educators in the United States. He has spent the past 25 years speaking to audiences on over 1,500 campuses, at hundreds of conferences, and to community groups across the country. He has provided anti-racism training...

More...

QCC’s Black Student Union and the Diversity Caucus recently hosted guest speaker Tim Wise in a live Zoom webinar on February 23.

Mr. Wise is among the most prominent anti-racist writers and educators in the United States. He has spent the past 25 years speaking to audiences on over 1,500 campuses, at hundreds of conferences, and to community groups across the country. He has provided anti-racism training to educators and administrators nationwide and internationally. During the hour-long webinar, he shared information on ending systemic racism and increasing awareness at QCC, as well as in our community.

According to Human Services Professor Brenda Safford, co-chair of the President's Advisory Council on Equity, co-chair of the Diversity Caucus and advisor of QCC’s Black Student Union, there were 250 members of the college community in attendance, of which 160 were students.

“In July 2020, President Pedraja charged the College to begin the work on the Equity Initiative. It requires everyone, to have a clear and thoughtful understanding of diversity, inclusion, and equity. The Black Student Union and the Diversity Caucus' major objective of inviting Mr. Wise was for him to share his knowledge and increase understanding and awareness of systemic racism to help further the college’s progress regarding the Equity Initiative,” Professor Safford said.

"We were so excited to have so many faculty, staff, students and community members in attendance to hear Mr. Wise speak. Feedback has been very positive and one faculty member shared some of her students' reactions to the presentation included eye-opening, informative, necessary, captivating and interesting," said Selina Boria, co-chair of the President's Advisory Council on Equity and the Diversity Caucus.

  • QCC alumna Katie Berry will be the March 11 Psi Beta & Psych Club guest speaker.
February, 2021

On March 11, from 12:30 p.m. -1:30 p.m. Psi Beta & Psych Club Guest Speaker Series will have a familiar face as its virtual guest speaker, QCC alumna Katie Berry. Her presentation, "Food and Alcohol Disturbance Among U.S. College Students: A Scoping Review," addresses disordered eating and problematic alcohol use that are primary health concerns on U.S. college...

More...

On March 11, from 12:30 p.m. -1:30 p.m. Psi Beta & Psych Club Guest Speaker Series will have a familiar face as its virtual guest speaker, QCC alumna Katie Berry. Her presentation, "Food and Alcohol Disturbance Among U.S. College Students: A Scoping Review," addresses disordered eating and problematic alcohol use that are primary health concerns on U.S. college campuses.

Ms. Berry received her Associate Degree in Psychology from QCC in 2018 and her Bachelor’s degree in Psychology and Exercise and Sports Studies from Smith College in December of 2020. She will be starting a Clinical Psychology Ph.D. program in the fall and is currently wrapping up the interview process.

She chose to focus her research on food and alcohol disturbance because it was a topic that she was interested in learning more about the relationship between disordered eating and alcohol use.

“It's also a relatively new phenomenon, so there are a lot of opportunities for future research, which is something that I find exciting,” she said.

Ms. Berry was an active student body member during her time at QCC. She was president of the Psi Beta and Psychology Club, as well as the Executive Director of Phi Theta Kappa's High School Mentoring Program.

“I fully immersed myself in several volunteer and community outreach opportunities both on and off-campus such as hosting a prom for the elderly, volunteering at a free medical clinic every Tuesday, and mentoring at-risk high school students. I also had the opportunity to become very involved in research and present my findings at the New England Psychological Association Conference,” she said, also noting that QCC prepared her for Smith College.

“QCC allowed me to learn more about who I am, what I'm passionate about, and develop an appreciation for my journey. Academically speaking, QCC also helped teach me how to think critically and analytically about my work, which made my transition to Smith College relatively easy.”

 While she has moved on from QCC, she has never forgotten her Wyvern roots and said she decided to do the upcoming virtual speaker presentation as a way to give back for all that the psychology club has done for her.

“I remember when I was still a student at QCC, I would always tell Psychology Professor Valarie Clemente that one day I'm going to come back to QCC and present my own research, so it's cool to see that this is finally happening,” she said. “I hope students will take away that community college can be a wonderful stepping stone, no matter what your dreams are! There is often a stigma surrounding community colleges, but I hope people will see that community college isn't something to be ashamed of, but, instead, it's something to be proud of because it's a launching pad for great success and a promising future!”

When asked what she would tell someone who was considering attending QCC, Ms. Berry was quick to reply.

“Do it! I sincerely loved my time at QCC and it fully prepared me for Smith College. I strongly believe that college is what you make of it, no matter where you go, so if you come to QCC and take advantage of all it has to offer I promise that you will have a bright future ahead of you!”

For Zoom information on this upcoming event, e-mail to Dr. Clemente at vclemente [at] qcc.mass.edu

  • From left: Laurinda, Thomas, Elena, Joseph and James Ralph.
February, 2021

Quinsigamond Community College is a familiar place to the Ralph family, of Webster. All five siblings have taken classes (or are currently taking classes) at QCC. Laurinda is the oldest, followed closely by brothers Thomas, Joseph and James. Youngest sibling Elena is following in her older siblings footsteps. She is the last to attend the college...

More...

Quinsigamond Community College is a familiar place to the Ralph family, of Webster. All five siblings have taken classes (or are currently taking classes) at QCC. Laurinda is the oldest, followed closely by brothers Thomas, Joseph and James. Youngest sibling Elena is following in her older siblings footsteps. She is the last to attend the college and is currently taking online courses.

“We all started taking classes before we could drive. QCC allowed us to be close enough to home to take public transportation or to receive rides. The small campus was more comfortable for us to manage, as we started attending as high school students. And the online options allowed us to take classes from home, as well,” Laurinda said.

The siblings said they chose QCC because of the “amazing faculty and staff,” as well as the support they received when they had an issue. The family used a variety of support services that included the student center and library, as well as utilizing faculty office hours.

“Office hours were pivotal to helping me understand the content being taught and allowed me to forge friendly relationships with several of the professors,” Thomas said.

“I loved writing for the Open Door newspaper and I had a lot of great professors. My art professor (Art 131, Spring 2012) and I wrote a grant to get easels for the school, which was a really amazing experience for me,” Laurinda said.

One faculty member who is very familiar with the Ralph family is Mathematics Professor, Steve Zona, who has had four of the five family members (Laurinda was the only one who did not take a course with Professor Zona).

“All are hard-working, motivated students, all of whom got A's in both my college algebra and pre-calculus classes (Elena completed the college algebra class and is presently in the pre-calculus class).  Often in online classes, I need to send out some nudges here and there, because students do not see me every week, and, thus, they can put the online class on the back burner. However, this did not happen with the Ralph family. If anything, they were ahead of where they needed to be during any week of the semester,” Professor Zona said.

According to mom, Christina Ralph, Professor Zona made quite an impression on her and her children as well.

“I have recommended him to other high school students taking QCC courses and know that several have gone on to take his courses,” Ms. Ralph said, making sure to add the valuable assistance the family received from Senior Enrollment Counselor Rebecca Brownstein.

“Rebecca Brownstein has been amazing, year after year. She is knowledgeable, helpful and approachable.  She has helped the last four kids get their testing and get registered for classes,” Ms. Ralph continued.

“It was my pleasure to provide advising and enrollment services to members of the Ralph family at the QCC Southbridge location over the years, and I enjoyed having the opportunity to help them realize their academic and lifelong goals. I am so pleased to have made such a positive impact on their lives,” Ms. Brownstein said.

While only one of the Ralph siblings is currently attending QCC, the impact it has had on all of them is significant.

“I went on to attend Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) and graduated with degrees in Electrical & Computer Engineering and International and Global Studies. The credits I earned while at QCC were instrumental in allowing me to pursue dual majors at WPI,” said Thomas, an Ensign in the U.S. Navy.

Younger James is also currently attending WPI, and Joseph graduated UMass Amherst on May 2020.

Yet for older sister Laurinda, the lure of QCC is still strong.

“I now have my Master’s degree but hope to attend QCC within the next few semesters to increase my American Sign Language (ASL) skills,” Laurinda said. “And I think that is the best thing about QCC. It was a great fit for me when I was in high school and is still a great fit for me after graduate school, because it offers such a wide variety of awesome classes. I really loved QCC. I had really amazing professors and learned a lot.”

The siblings have a bit of advice for anyone considering attending QCC.

“QCC has amazing faculty, a beautiful campus, and great classes at an affordable price,” Laurinda said.

“The faculty at QCC are friendly and want to help you succeed.  Take the time after class to speak with them and be friendly. The relationships you make will pay dividends in the future,” Thomas said.

Younger brother James said that he recommends attending QCC.

“I attended and some of my friends have also gone there, and I have only heard good things about the college. I also suggest asking lots of questions of your teachers. They are extremely friendly and also very helpful. If you decide to go to QCC, I don't think you will regret your decision,” he said.  

Elena gives high praise to the professors, adding,”...it is very accommodating if you take online classes.”

Ms. Ralph said attending QCC was a great way to save money on college expenses.

“If a student isn’t sure about college, they can try a few classes before deciding whether to attend a four-year program.  In our case, all the kids have credits that have transferred to their four-year college. It allowed Laurinda to take extra classes to explore her interests at UMass Dartmouth, allowed Thomas to get a double major at WPI, and allowed Joseph to graduate UMass Amherst in three years ("which is a huge cost savings,” she said. “I am also of the belief that taking QCC classes has helped the kids get into college, since their success at QCC is a good indication that they will be successful in their chosen 4-year college program.”

By the look of things, it appears Ms. Ralph is right.

 

  • QCC Dental Assisting students are trained to take dental radiographs.
  • Dental Assisting student Jessica Flood, of Worcester, is currenly doing an externship at Dr. John Gusha's office.
February, 2021

Since 1977, the American Dental Assistants Association (ADAA) has recognized the invaluable contributions dental assistants make to quality dental care through Dental Assistant Recognition Week™ held the first full week in March every year.

This year’s theme,” "Dental Assistants - Our Heart Goes Into Every Smile," acknowledges the growing importance of these valued workers and on...

More...

Since 1977, the American Dental Assistants Association (ADAA) has recognized the invaluable contributions dental assistants make to quality dental care through Dental Assistant Recognition Week™ held the first full week in March every year.

This year’s theme,” "Dental Assistants - Our Heart Goes Into Every Smile," acknowledges the growing importance of these valued workers and on March 7-13, 2021, dental assistants across the country will be honored for their commitment to professional development and quality dental care.

QCC’s Dental Assisting Certificate program is an important part of the dental education landscape in Massachusetts, and is the only program accredited by the Commission on Dental Accreditation in Worcester.

“Our students can take their Certified Dental Assistant (CDA) exam in the last few weeks of the program so they are credentialed, if they pass, with Dental Assisting National Board, CDA when they graduate,” said Jennifer McKeon, professor of Dental Assisting/Hygiene.

The one-year Dental Assisting Certificate program prepares graduates to perform a wide range of patient care duties in the dental office. Dental assistants support dentists by obtaining necessary health history information, maintaining patient comfort during examinations, providing necessary instruments and materials to the dentist during surgical procedures, taking radiographs, and casting impressions. The dental assistant manages a variety of office-related duties including scheduling and confirming appointments, updating patient records, generating bills, following third-party payments, and ordering supplies and materials. According to the state’s Executive Office of Labor and Workforce Development, the number of Massachusetts dental assistant jobs is projected to grow by 12.5% over a 10-year period ending in 2022.

QCC’s curriculum provides students with the ability to make judgments regarding intra-oral, chair-side, and laboratory procedures. Courses in business office procedures and basic computer usage are also included. In addition, students will be required to complete a series of clinical rotations arranged by QCC in a variety of general and specialty dental practices.

Students have the opportunity to see different avenues of dentistry while in the program, by being placed in different general dental offices, such as an oral surgeon’s office and an orthodontist office. Students are also exposed to a variety of different avenues of dentistry, through collaboration with the College’s Dental Hygiene program.

Dental Assisting students take radiology courses that offer them hands-on education in digital radiography. Students learn film and developing techniques, learning on a dental X-ray teaching training replica (known as a Dexter head) prior to live patients. The curriculum enables students to take part in the state-of-the-art dental materials lab with Cerac scanning and milling of crowns, affording them the unique opportunity to learn about a dental materials lab.

According to Professor McKeon, students who enter the workforce after completing the program have 100 percent placement.

“Most students have a job offer before they even graduate,” she added.

Additionally, students who complete the dental assisting program will be prepared to continue their studies at the associate's degree level in such disciplines as allied dental services or dental hygiene.

"We have a bridge program that allows two students every year from the dental assisting program to bridge into the dental hygiene program and bypass the waitlist.  Student must have all the admission requirements for the dental hygiene program to qualify to bypass the waitlist,” Professor McKeon said.

To learn more, visit QCC’s Dental Assisting Certificate Program.

  • From left: Connecticut Sun WNBA mascot, Blaze looks forward to meeting the QCC Wyvern.
February, 2021

The Wyvern has a new admirer in the form of the Connecticut Sun WNBA mascot, Blaze. The mascot became enamored with QCC’s mythical, winged dragon when he saw the Wyvern’s photo, and immediately felt a kindred spirit to the college’s well-known mascot. The unique design of the Wyvern costume drew praise and questions from it's admirer.

Blaze is the well-loved mascot of the Connecticut Sun...

More...

The Wyvern has a new admirer in the form of the Connecticut Sun WNBA mascot, Blaze. The mascot became enamored with QCC’s mythical, winged dragon when he saw the Wyvern’s photo, and immediately felt a kindred spirit to the college’s well-known mascot. The unique design of the Wyvern costume drew praise and questions from it's admirer.

Blaze is the well-loved mascot of the Connecticut Sun WNBA. Known for his joy-filled dances at WNBA games, as well as his affinity for sunflower seeds (often handing them out to referees during the games), Blaze has become a fixture to the Connecticut Sun fans, as the Wyvern has to QCC.

Blaze may just find a great friend in the Wyvern. The two mascots have much in common, with a love for basketball and their community topping the list. While currently the pandemic is keeping these two future friends apart, rest-assured when COVID-19 restrictions lift, the Connecticut Sun WNBA mascot hopes to blaze a trail to QCC for a visit. QCC and the Wyvern cannot wait!

  • Quinsigamond Community College has earned the 2021-2022 Military Friendly School designation.
February, 2021

Quinsigamond Community College has earned the 2021-2022 Military Friendly® School designation. Institutions earning the Military Friendly® School designation were evaluated using both public data sources and responses from a proprietary survey. Over 1,200 schools participated in the 2021-2022 survey with 747 earning the designation.

“This award is an honor for QCC and...

More...

Quinsigamond Community College has earned the 2021-2022 Military Friendly® School designation. Institutions earning the Military Friendly® School designation were evaluated using both public data sources and responses from a proprietary survey. Over 1,200 schools participated in the 2021-2022 survey with 747 earning the designation.

“This award is an honor for QCC and all the veterans who attend here. We pride ourselves on our commitment to our vets. We are extremely proud of every service person who walks through our doors,” said QCC’s Veteran Affairs Director, Paula Ogden.

Methodology, criteria, and weightings were determined by Viqtory with input from the Military Friendly® Advisory Council of independent leaders in the higher education and military recruitment community. Final ratings were determined by combining the institution’s survey response set and government/agency public data sources, within a logic based scoring assessment.

“Schools that achieve designation show true commitment and dedication in their efforts. Our standards assist schools by providing a benchmark that promotes positive educational outcomes, resources, and support services that better the educational landscape and provide opportunity for the military community,” said National Director of Military Partnerships, Military Friendly®, Kayla Lopez.

The 2021-2022 Military Friendly® Schools list will be published in the May issue of G.I. Jobs magazine. For more information on QCC’s Veteran Affairs, visit https://www.qcc.edu/veteran-affairs.

About Military Friendly® Schools

The Military Friendly® Schools list is created each year based on extensive research using public data sources for more than 8,800 schools nationwide, input from student veterans, and responses to the proprietary, data-driven Military Friendly® Schools survey from participating institutions. The survey questions, methodology, criteria and weighting were developed with the assistance of an independent research firm and an advisory council of educators and employers. The survey is administered for free and is open to all postsecondary schools that wish to participate.Criteria for consideration can be found at www.militaryfriendly.com.

About Viqtory

Founded in 2001, VIQTORY is a service-disabled, veteran-owned small business (SDVOSB) that connects the military community to civilian employment, educational and entrepreneurial opportunities through its G.I. Jobs® and Military Friendly® brands. VIQTORY and its brands are not a part of or endorsed by the U.S. Dept of Defense or any federal government entity.

 

  • Rebecca Ashmore is part of QCC's Attend College Early (ACE) Program.
  • From left: Rebecca Ashmore assembles a printed circuit board. Ms. Ashmore works with a laser cutter at Technocopia.
February, 2021

There is a poise that Rebecca Ashmore demonstrates which belies her age. In the summer of 2020, the high school senior began taking courses through QCC’s Attend College Early (ACE) Program, allowing her to complete her high school degree in Blackstone Valley Regional Vocation Technical High School (BVT), simultaneously pursuing her Associate Degree in Engineering, while also being a part of the...

More...

There is a poise that Rebecca Ashmore demonstrates which belies her age. In the summer of 2020, the high school senior began taking courses through QCC’s Attend College Early (ACE) Program, allowing her to complete her high school degree in Blackstone Valley Regional Vocation Technical High School (BVT), simultaneously pursuing her Associate Degree in Engineering, while also being a part of the Commonwealth Honors Program. She is active in her community, volunteering at Technocopia, a non-profit makerspace in Worcester, the Community Harvest Project, and is a teaching assistant at Kumon Math and Reading Center in South Grafton.

Recently she spoke with the Wyvern Guardian on her passion for STEM and what it means to be a female in a field known to be male dominated.

How did you become interested in engineering and STEM as a whole?

I’ve been involved with STEM for as long as I can remember - where even at 6 years old I was doing science experiments at home. I just enjoyed trying new things and learning whatever I could. I particularly remember this one experiment I did with a friend around that time where we extracted, analyzed, and froze strawberry DNA - and to this day there is still a small container in the freezer as a reminder.

Doing experiments continued on for several years and covered branches such as Chemistry, Physics, Astronomy, Geology, and Biology and evolved into elaborate home projects such as a Roshambo robotic hand that could react to how you play against it, by monitoring your hand with a camera. As I went into high school, I widened my scope even more to other projects like a temperature data logger to make sure my pet sugar gliders (small, omnivorous, arboreal, and nocturnal gliding possums) had a stable environment during the winter.

Did you have a specific experience(s) that sparked your interest in engineering?

I would say that it was more of a chain of experiences - as I sort of fell in love with the Electronic and Engineering Technology shop at a nearby high school when I toured it in elementary school. I later joined the shop, and it became the leading cause of my focus to move from pure science to engineering. After that, my interest only grew with each experience.

Females in STEM are still in the minority. Do you see this changing in the future based on your personal experiences?

I don’t think that it will be a quick change, sadly. I do have confidence that as the younger generations see females in STEM normalized, it will improve. I’ve personally seen excellent programs to encourage women to be in the field that truly helped me become more involved in STEM, and I feel that we’ll get closer to women no longer being in the minority through these programs.

My high school (BVT) has a great program that requires freshmen to explore different trades that they may not otherwise have considered. I have personally had the privilege of being involved in a Women’s Research and Mentorship (WRAMP) program, which introduced me to researching with a female mentor who still reviews my research work today, Girls Who Code Club, and met with very high profile female military leaders. Programs like these offered in my area definitely had a big impact on me, and I strongly believe that they can help many others as well.

Do you have a mentor who has been instrumental in your life? Can you tell me how he/she has supported you and the value of having a mentor?

Mentors are definitely impactful. They have given me opportunities that were keystones in my STEM education. I have had multiple mentors, but I do still keep in touch and I hope that one day I’ll be able to pay it forward. Currently, my mentor at QCC is helping me prepare for a presentation at the Commonwealth Undergraduate Research Conference - and before this, they had helped me find a place to volunteer as an intern by referring me to Technocopia, a local makerspace.

Can you tell me why you chose to come to QCC and what prompted you to take part in the ACE program?

Going to QCC has been a decisive part of adjusting my education to match my interests and goals. I chose to go to BVT in high school for the small team project-based learning with hands-on engineering content, and an online high school program for additional subjects that they didn’t offer. The ACE program at QCC was the next level of that - as I plan on attending a 4-year college. The program provided me with the first year of an engineering degree designed for transfer to a 4-year degree, as opposed to a set of high school AP-credit classes. Essentially, the program provides me with a cost-effective engineering-focused college transition year, whether I stay at QCC or go to a 4-year college. I do; however, still work with my high school on specific subjects, independent research, and clubs.

You have accomplished so many thing already. How do you balance it all?

A bulk of it is just planning accordingly, since fortunately everything isn’t happening at the same time. Although there has been the odd time with four soccer games on one day, and another time with two science competitions at the same time. Most of the time I make sure to balance out my commitments as much as I can. There’s also the more long-term activities that require me to go between one focus to the next, but the constant shifts between juggling things like community service and schoolwork are ones that keep me present and in the moment year-round.

You mentioned that QCC is helping you reach your goals. Can you tell me what those goals are?

One of my goals that QCC is helping me reach is a 4-year engineering degree at a well-fitting college. Articulation agreements with public and private colleges give me confidence that the engineering curriculum is in alignment, and I can be credited for my work. QCC is also helping me with my independent research with an independent mechanical design project as part of the Commonwealth Honors Program and helping me present my recent work at the state undergraduate research conference.

Where do you see yourself in 10 years?

I would like to complete a Master’s degree, and have made enough development in my work to take the next step of achievement through a patent, award, or thesis. Whatever I am able to achieve, I want to be able to look back with satisfaction.

What would you tell someone who was considering attending QCC?

I would try to understand what you want from attending QCC and plan for it as much as you can. Planning early allowed me to put together a set of courses that would fulfill my high school requirements, meet prerequisites, be part of an engineering degree program and fully transfer beyond QCC. I also found out about other opportunities like the Commonwealth Honors Program, the Commonwealth Research Conference, Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society, and the Fab Lab with my current mentor. I would definitely recommend contacting the advisors - as they really helped clear the fog for me and helped me set my path. Everyone has been friendly and helpful, which has really made me feel welcome even when remote learning. QCC has been a great experience for me and I would definitely recommend.

  • QCC's 7-week courses are part of the reason why QCC is College. Made Smarter.
February, 2021

Imagine earning a degree or certificate in the half the time than it would normally take. Sound interesting? Quinsigamond Community College offers 7-week courses that enable students to attain their academic goals faster, while still receiving the highest quality education.

Earning a degree or certificate in half the time is possible thanks to 7-week courses that are available during Spring I and Spring II,...

More...

Imagine earning a degree or certificate in the half the time than it would normally take. Sound interesting? Quinsigamond Community College offers 7-week courses that enable students to attain their academic goals faster, while still receiving the highest quality education.

Earning a degree or certificate in half the time is possible thanks to 7-week courses that are available during Spring I and Spring II, Summer I and Summer II, and Fall I and Fall II Semesters. These courses are a great way for students to earn the same number of credits as traditional 15-week courses in half the time.

Students who may have missed the traditional start of the Spring or Fall Semesters can register for one or more 7-week courses and get back on track quickly.

There is still time for students to register for over 20 courses offered during Spring II Semester, which begins March 22 and runs through May 11.

QCC is the smarter, safer, option for higher education. To learn more visit 7-Week Courses.