Search form

You are here

Newsletter Archive

Newsletter Banner

February, 2020

  • QCC HVAC students Jason Laraia (L) and Brian Mele (R) with Governor Charlie Baker.
  • QCC students show Governor Baker the HVAC lab at WTHS.
  • Lt. Governor Polito listens to QCC students explain the project he is working on in the HVAC lab.
  • Governor Baker and Lt. Governor Polito with students from QCC's HVAC program and WTHS's plumbing and welding programs.
  • President Pedraja with Governor Baker and Lt. Governor Polito
  • A Governor's roundtable discussion on vocational learning held at WTHS.
February, 2020

Quinsigamond Community College President Dr. Luis Pedraja was part of a roundtable discussion with Governor Charlie Baker, Lt. Governor Karyn Polito, and other state and local legislators to discuss the Governor’s new Career Technical Initiative. Held at Worcester Technical High School (WTHS), the event addressed the need for more adult programs at vocational high schools on February 12. In...

More...

Quinsigamond Community College President Dr. Luis Pedraja was part of a roundtable discussion with Governor Charlie Baker, Lt. Governor Karyn Polito, and other state and local legislators to discuss the Governor’s new Career Technical Initiative. Held at Worcester Technical High School (WTHS), the event addressed the need for more adult programs at vocational high schools on February 12. In addition to Gov. Baker, Lt. Gov. Polito and President Pedraja, other state and local officials who took part in the roundtable discussion included:

  • Massachusetts Secretary of Labor and Workforce Development, Rosalin Acosta
  • Massachusetts Secretary of Housing and Economic Development, Mike Kennealy
  • Senator Michael Moore
  • Worcester Mayor Joseph Petty
  • Worcester Superintendent of Schools, Maureen Binienda
  • Executive Director of the MassHire Central Region Workforce Board, Jeffrey Turgeon
  • WTHS Principal Kyle Brenner
  • Director of WTHS Night Life, Liz Tiley

The distinguished group toured the HVAC and plumbing programs that are held at WTHS and spoke with six students during the roundtable discussion who are in the HVAC, plumbing and welding programs.

QCC HVAC students Brian Mele, of Rutland, and Jason Laraia, of Sutton, described what it was like to be an adult learner taking part in the HVAC program in order to change careers. Mr. Laraia, currently a land surveyor, said he initially got into the program at the encouragement of his mother, who is also a QCC student. Both said they are enjoying the program and expect to use this to change and advance their careers.

QCC’s HVAC program, a partnership with WTHS and funded by a $431,900 Skills Capital Grant, was one such program that was highlighted during the roundtable discussion. The College’s HVAC program is also held at Assabet Valley Regional Technical High School through a similar partnership.

“We are very excited about this partnership with WTHS,” President Pedraja told Governor Baker, noting the partnership QCC has with other schools such as Burncoat High School, which hosts the College’s automotive technology program.

“We are now trying to see how to articulate our programs into early college,” Dr. Pedraja added.

The Career Technical Initiative is designed to train 20,000 skilled trades workers over the next four years and the governor has included $15 million in his fiscal 2021 budget for this initiative.

“There’s a lot of people who want to be able to expand their career options,” President Pedraja said.

“The bottom line is that every single business you can think of is going to be playing in the STEM space,” Governor Baker said. “This is gratifying work we’ve done, but we have a long way to go.” 

  • From left: PTK Vice President Krystle “Mixhe” Bedrick and PTK alumna Kim Lawrence
February, 2020

Mixhe Bedrick Named Newman Civic Fellow

Every once in a while you meet a person who is motivated to better not only themselves, but work for the betterment of others. Phi Theta Kappa (PTK) Vice President Krystle “Mixhe” Bedrick is one such person. The QCC sophomore is set to graduate in May and has already been making a name for herself in the Worcester community, as...

More...

Mixhe Bedrick Named Newman Civic Fellow

Every once in a while you meet a person who is motivated to better not only themselves, but work for the betterment of others. Phi Theta Kappa (PTK) Vice President Krystle “Mixhe” Bedrick is one such person. The QCC sophomore is set to graduate in May and has already been making a name for herself in the Worcester community, as well as the QCC community.  She was recently named a Newman Civic Fellow. This is a one-year fellowship experience for community-minded students, which supports the student’s personal, professional and civic development. This is the first time a QCC student was recommended for this fellowship. Each student is required to have his/her own mentor, a stipulation of the Newman Civic Fellowship. PTK alumna Kim Lawrence was asked and agreed to be Ms. Bedrick's mentor.

“It’s an honor giving back to anyone and it’s a privilege to give back to PTK,” Ms. Lawrence said.

"We are incredibly proud of Mixhe and the amazing accomplishments she has achieved. She has faced adversities in her life, but has never let those stand in the way of a brighter future," QCC President Dr. Luis Pedraja said. "She is a shining example for others." 

Ms. Bedrick was also recently chosen as a semifinalist for the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation and is one of 456 finalists, chosen from over 1,500 applicant from across the nation. Winners for the award will be announced in April.

Ms. Bedrick attributes much of what she has accomplished at QCC to being an active member of the PTK, QCC's honor society.

“Phi Theta Kappa has been the platform that has lifted me up. As a person with many intersecting marginalized identities, it has been difficult to find success. My membership, outside of marrying my spouse and having children, has been the most challenging but fulfilling part of my life,” Ms. Bedrick said.” I have always enjoyed being a student and learning, but Phi Theta Kappa gave me the opportunity to be part of something greater, a global consciousness that is focused on improving the lives of all people. My life is changed for the better, and I will be forever grateful.”

Ms. Bedrick said it was the invitation to join PTK that was the catalyst for change within her life.

“It's difficult to say everything I feel for Phi Theta Kappa. I was extended an invitation to join the Honor Society and was thrilled, and then, melancholy. I knew that I did not have the money to pay for the membership fee, but still felt compelled to follow through. When I walked into the PTK office I told the advisors that I did not have the money to join, but still very much wanted to be a part of the organization. I said something to the effect of, "If this is for me, then it will be.”

Being part of PTK was "meant to be" for Ms. Bedrick, who was offered a scholarship to cover the cost of membership and encouraged to run for an officer position.

“I felt elated. I felt seen. PTK was already taking the time to tell me that I am deserving, and that made me feel welcomed. I found a place to grow as a leader as I was elected as Vice President of Leadership after coming in second in the race for the presidency,” she said.

The officer position offered Ms. Bedrick opportunities to expand her horizon and broadened her experience academia.

“The research that I have participated in has spurred my advocacy and activism. It is because of what we discovered during research that pushed me into my civic engagement. I have been active in advocating for transportation equity in my community, as a way to combat poverty and systemic oppression. Phi Theta Kappa opened the door for me to be able to become a voice for my community. It has given me the foundation and backing to be taken seriously as a student advocate,” she said.

Today Ms. Bedrick sits on the Worcester Regional Transit Authority (WRTA) Board as a representative for the QCC population, working to help reduce fare rates for all college students, as well as working to get public transportation closer to those who are incarcerated in the Worcester County Jail and House of Correction.

“Currently the closest WRTA stop is 1.7 miles away,” she said, noting that studies have shown that visitation helps to reduce recidivism.

The next group of PTK officers will soon be elected and Ms. Bedrick wants to encourage others to take a chance and run for office.

“My membership, plainly stated, has changed the trajectory of my life forever. The opportunities that I have been able to take advantage of, the accolades, achievements and scholarships I have received, and the networking connections that I have made have all come from being active in my Chapter,” she said. “I am the first person in my family to attend college. I will be the first to graduate, and I'm slated to transfer to an Ivy League institution, something I never thought possible before joining PTK.”

For more information, visit Phi Theta Kappa.

  • From left: Kristen Foster and Matt Foster receive an award in memory of Whit Foster from Professor Charulata Trivedi.
  • QCC grads and current employees of Storm Petrel, Story DuVall and Daniel Margolis, interview a QCC student.
February, 2020

It’s been close to 10 years since Quinsigamond Community College’s Computer Information System (CIS) Department began its cooperative/internship program. In that time, 72 QCC students have taken part in internship and co-op opportunities that have led many to careers in the technology space.

One local company, which has played a major role in QCC’s program is Avatar Computing, Inc. For close...

More...

It’s been close to 10 years since Quinsigamond Community College’s Computer Information System (CIS) Department began its cooperative/internship program. In that time, 72 QCC students have taken part in internship and co-op opportunities that have led many to careers in the technology space.

One local company, which has played a major role in QCC’s program is Avatar Computing, Inc. For close to 10 years, the company, which does a great deal of R&D work for the U.S. government, has been hiring QCC students to work on achievable projects that have enabled them to learn valuable, real world skill sets.

“We saw this as an opportunity to test the waters,” said Avatar’s CIO, Matt Foster. “The government was also willing to give the students feedback.”

This became a perfect partnership for both QCC and Avatar, and one that both felt was mutually beneficial. To date, a half dozen QCC graduates have been hired, with two or three still working for the company.

“Avatar helped us to keep going with the program and gave us an opportunity to continue the program,” said Charulata Trivedi, professor of Computer Information Systems.

One person who was intimately involved with the internship program with QCC was Avatar COO Whitney “Whit” Foster. Sadly, last October, Mr. Foster passed away from an illness. In honor of his contribution to the program, QCC honored him posthumously at the Annual Tech Apprentice Breakfast, held on February 26 at the Harrington Learning Center, located on QCC's main campus.

QCC’s Vice President of Academic Affairs, James Keane, presented a plaque to Mr. Foster’s brother Matt and wife, Kristen at the breakfast in honor of his amazing contributions.

“We want to recognize the special partnership we’ve had with the Avatar family and one of its founding members, Whitney Foster,” said Mr. Keane. “The impact he’s had on our students has been invaluable.”

 “He was very proud of the program,” Matt Foster said.

Another company that has played an instrumental role in the program is Storm Petrel LLC, a Vermont-based company that has been bringing on QCC students as interns. Often these interns are hired when they graduate. In fact, in 2016 the company did a Skype interview with a perspective QCC student intern and ended up ultimately hiring the student upon her graduation. Subsequently that student has come back to QCC and hired another QCC student, with the cycle repeating.

Two QCC 2019 grads, Story DuVall and Daniel Margolis were part of this hiring cycle. They both started out as interns before being hired part-time, then full-time by Storm Petrel. Both graduates were recruited by another former QCC intern, Raul Gomez, a 2018 QCC graduate of the CIS program, who ended up getting hired by Storm Petrel LLC as a programmer. He was back last year as an employer for the company and recruited Ms. DuVall and Mr. Margolis.

“I started as an intern unpaid, went to part-time and then full-time,” Ms. DuVall said. “I was hired as a programming trainee and now I’m migrating away from that a bit.”

“I took the same path to Storm Petrel,” said Mr. Margolis, who is working as a corporate administrator for the company. “I came to QCC after having my masters. My job had ended so I came to QCC to change career tracts.”

After an informational presentation by Ms. Trivedi, students were able to do a type of “speed interviewing” spending seven minutes with each employer before moving onto the next one.

“This is a real great opportunity,” said Michael Jennette, internship coordinator for the Worcester County District Attorney’s Office. “We certainly like working with Quinsig.”

Companies taking part in this year’s program include:

  • Worcester County District Attorney’s Office
  • Avatar
  • QCC
  • Art Reach
  • Storm Petrel
  • Center for Applied Behavioral Instruction
  • Table Talk
  • Dr. Pedraja addresses legislators at ACC's Annual Legislative Breakfast.
  • QCC Student Government Association President Jorgo Gushi
  • PTK Vice President Krystle “Mixhe” Bedrick
  • Legislators, students, faculty and staff at the 2020 Legislative Breakfast
  • QCC student speakers from left: Mustafa Bowden, Tabithia Leber, Jorgo Gushi and Krystle “Mixhe” Bedrick
February, 2020

Melodic sounds by Quinsigamond Community College student Yozue Davila and Music Program Coordinator Jose Castillo set the tone for the College’s annual Legislative Breakfast held on Friday, February 7 at the Harrington Learning Center. Over a dozen legislators or their representatives from across the region, in addition to QCC faculty and staff, spent part of their morning...

More...

Melodic sounds by Quinsigamond Community College student Yozue Davila and Music Program Coordinator Jose Castillo set the tone for the College’s annual Legislative Breakfast held on Friday, February 7 at the Harrington Learning Center. Over a dozen legislators or their representatives from across the region, in addition to QCC faculty and staff, spent part of their morning learning about what makes QCC so unique, from the people who can speak to this best – the students.

Phi Theta Kappa (PTK) Honor Society Vice President, Krystle “Mixhe” Bedrick,  gave an emotional and heartfelt accounting of her life as a first generation college student, whose experience at QCC she said, has been “wonderful and life changing.” She told those in attendance about an upbringing of intergenerational poverty. Today, poised to graduate in May with an Early Childhood Education degree, Ms. Bedrick is hoping to attend Smith College this fall.  Already the scholarships and awards are stacking up for her. She is the college's first Newman Civic Fellow, a semifinalist for the Jack Kent Cooke Scholarship, and a recipient of the MLK Scholarship, Fuller Foundation Scholarship and the Roland Lajoie Scholarship.

“I never believed in my entire life I could attend college,” she said. “I stand before you having worked incredibly hard to be worth the accolades bestowed on me today.”

“QCC lifts you up and I’m proud to be a student here.  When I graduate from QCC I will be the first in my family to graduate college,” Ms. Bedrick continued, proudly adding, “I have Ivy League institutions emailing me!”

QCC President Dr. Luis Pedraja told the legislators, “What we do here we do for our students. We are always striving to assist students in fulfilling their dreams.”

QCC’s Student Government Association President Jorgo Gushi, a bilingual engineering student from Albania, and a member of PTK, told the legislators of the metamorphosis he experienced when he began at QCC.

“QCC was the place where I grew as a student leader and individual,” he said.

Mr. Gushi is hoping to transfer to Worcester Polytechnic Institute or an Ivy League school in the fall to continue his education and told the legislators it is the pathway that QCC has paved for him that has transformed his life. “QCC is about far more than attending classes,” he said, noting that for him it was also about building confidence and acquiring leadership skills. “My voice was fostered by the QCC family. Many of the skills that are making me a good leader were developed and taught at QCC.”

Another student speaker, PTK President Tabitha Leber described her journey to QCC as a 21-year-old single mom who had experienced a debilitating, on-the-job injury and as a result could no longer work. Having to still take care of herself and child, she began working in her daughter’s kindergarten classroom and realized how fulfilling that was. A chance conversation with her daughter’s kindergarten teacher made her realize she wanted to become a teacher. She began taking classes at QCC part-time, while continuing to work for Worcester Public Schools. Today she is a full-time student, telling those in the audience of the amazing initiatives the College’s honor society works on such as the QCC Food Pantry and Resource Center and the PTK Live and Learn Greenhouse.

“We are so grateful for Dr. Pedraja who supports us through these initiatives, which helps students return to college and the community at large,” she said.

QCC Foundation Board President Dr. Linda Maykel addressed the inequity in the current state funding formula, which affords community colleges only 25 percent of higher education funding. She addressed the ways in which QCC is working to help students attend college by working to increase scholarships, expanding daycare, and even looking at an emergency fund for students who experience events that might preclude them from coming back to college.

QCC’s Student Trustee Mustafa Bowden, an immigrant from Libya, expounded on the issues students face, addressing one of the common obstacles – purchasing textbooks.

“Here we have the most dedicated, committed students who step over every barrier there is, yet the biggest barrier we face is paying for a $500 textbook,” he said.

Mr. Bowden went on to discuss the Open Educational Resources (OER) that offers students the ability to access online textbooks for free.

“This alternative will be an accessible way for our students to have better grades in college. I represent 7,000-plus students and close to 50 percent of them are facing hunger and close to 12 percent are facing homelessness insecurity. If we can take that $500 book cost away then no one will have to choose between a meal or the cost of a book,” he said. “We ask for your help, endorsement and support of the OER initiative so more students can pursue higher education.”

While President Pedraja explained the many projects and programs that are going on at QCC, he reminded the legislators of the quality workforce QCC has delivered to the Commonwealth, through the students of QCC.

“I’ve talked to employers who like having our students.They know our students are dedicated. It says a lot about what we are all about. We need to continue to invest in higher education to ensure the Commonwealth succeeds,” he said.

“Education is a way to release those bonds so that our dreams can be a reality. This can’t happen without legislative support,” Ms. Bedrick said, pointedly telling legislators, “Without this institution I would not be the person I am today.”

WBZ visits QCC Food Pantry and Resource Center
February, 2020

It was “lights, camera, action” for Quisigamond Community College’s QCC Food Pantry and Resource Center. The food pantry and resource center, along with Phi Theta Kappa’s Live and Learn Greenhouse were recently featured by our local CBS News Affiliate WBZ/Channel 4, in a “4 Your Community” segment.

PTK student Farah Mohamad, along with QCC President...

More...

It was “lights, camera, action” for Quisigamond Community College’s QCC Food Pantry and Resource Center. The food pantry and resource center, along with Phi Theta Kappa’s Live and Learn Greenhouse were recently featured by our local CBS News Affiliate WBZ/Channel 4, in a “4 Your Community” segment.

PTK student Farah Mohamad, along with QCC President Dr. Luis Pedraja and community member Ingrid Murphy were interviewed by WBZ Anchor Kate Merrill for the television spot that highlighted the plight of students in need. 

Visit the QCC Food Pantry and Resource Center to learn more about the services and support services available. 

  • QCC's newest Fulbright Scholar Dr. Ingrid Skadberg
February, 2020

Quinsigamond Community College’s Dean of Institutional Research and Planning, Dr. Ingrid Skadberg, has received a Fulbright Scholar Award. She is the fourth person from QCC to be honored as a Fulbright Scholar, and is one of only six from the U.S. who will be visiting Russia for two weeks in April. The Fulbright Program is the U.S. government’s flagship international educational exchange...

More...

Quinsigamond Community College’s Dean of Institutional Research and Planning, Dr. Ingrid Skadberg, has received a Fulbright Scholar Award. She is the fourth person from QCC to be honored as a Fulbright Scholar, and is one of only six from the U.S. who will be visiting Russia for two weeks in April. The Fulbright Program is the U.S. government’s flagship international educational exchange program and is designed to build lasting connections between the people of the United States and the people of other countries. It operates in over 160 countries worldwide. Recipients of Fulbright awards are selected on the basis of academic and professional achievement, as well as record of service and demonstrated leadership in their respective fields.

Dr. Skadberg holds a Ph.D. in sociology from the City University of New York (CUNY), specializing in immigration studies and education, and has been a QCC staff member since 2006. In addition to her duties as dean of Institutional Research and Planning at QCC, she is the co-chair of the College’s strategic plan.

During her two-weeks in Russia she will spend time in Moscow, Tula and Volgorad, in a variety of academic, business and cultural settings learning about Russia’s educational processes, as well how their educational system is working to meet industry demands. She will also do a presentation about QCC and its programs.

“Exposure to various viewpoints will enable me to approach my work from a different perspective and be more effective in shaping institutional policy,” Dr. Skadberg said. “There is a lot that we could learn from Russia’s approach to education. One challenge that many countries encounter is how to better align workforce development with industry needs. Many of Russia’s challenges in workforce development are similar and I’m interested in learning how and what they are doing.”

Dr. Skadberg is one of over 800 U.S. citizens who will teach, conduct research, and/or provide expertise abroad for the 2019-2020 academic year through the Fulbright U.S. Scholar Program. QCC's other Fulbright Scholars include: English Professor Trent Masiki; Assistant Vice President for Workforce Readiness and Innovation, Dr. Kathleen "Kathy" Rentsch; and Business Administration Professor Flo Lucci.

  • Respiratory Care students
February, 2020

Recently three Quinsigamond Community College respiratory care students, Megan Marie Hufault, Tracey Mannix and Federico Ortiz were inducted into the Lambda Beta Society, a prestigious national honor society sponsored and maintained by the National Board for Respiratory Care (NBRC). The students were chosen on the basis of high academic achievement, service, and...

More...

Recently three Quinsigamond Community College respiratory care students, Megan Marie Hufault, Tracey Mannix and Federico Ortiz were inducted into the Lambda Beta Society, a prestigious national honor society sponsored and maintained by the National Board for Respiratory Care (NBRC). The students were chosen on the basis of high academic achievement, service, and strength of character. This is the first time QCC has had a chapter in the Lambda Beta Society.

Ms. Hufault came to QCC straight from high school and is currently in her last semester in the Respiratory Care program. Throughout her time at QCC she has earned many industry-recognized certificates such as Basic Life Support, Advanced Cardiac Life Support, and Pediatric Advanced Life Support. In April, she will become certified as an American Academy of Pediatrics Neonatal Resuscitation provider. She is currently in the process of completing her senior project, which is a requirement for each respiratory care student in their sophomore year. Her senior project is working as a lab assistant for the respiratory care freshmen class.  

“This is a very challenging program and I have worked hard to maintain a 3.96 GPA,” she said, adding that she was able to apply for her student license after her first year in QCC’s program and is currently employed by UMass Memorial Hospital as a student respiratory therapist. “I am proud of these accomplishments. The Respiratory Care program at QCC has provided me with the opportunity to be a caring, competent and accomplished health care professional.”

Ms. Mannix is a respiratory care student who came to the profession late in life after a 24 year career working in the telecommunications industry. She is also set to graduate this spring and embark on a new career.

“I chose respiratory care because of my personal experience with the profession. My grandmother was diagnosed with congestive heart failure. I went to Florida to make sure that she was receiving the proper care. Respiratory therapists came in every day to work with her,” she said. “I saw what amazing people they were and how important their job was. The respiratory therapists were instrumental in making sure that my grandmother was comfortable. At one point, one of the respiratory therapists asked me if I ever considered a career in respiratory care. I thought about it for a while and then decided it was not only what I wanted to do but…it was what I was meant to do.”

Today, like Ms. Hufault, she has earned a multitude of industry-recognized certificates and said this has been the "most rewarding undertaking I have ever accomplished.”  

Ms. Mannix is currently working in the Pulmonary Function Laboratory at UMass Hospital University campus for her senior project.

“I am very proud of the accomplishments that I have made at QCC. The Respiratory Care Program has allowed me to realize my goals. I look forward to beginning my career when I graduate in May,” she said.

The final respiratory care student inducted into the Lambda Beta Society is Mr. Ortiz, who is the first in his family to pursue a degree in the medical field.

“It has taken a considerable amount of hard work and dedication, but I can proudly say that I have maintained a 3.87 GPA. My educational achievements have allowed me to become a member of Phi Theta Kappa, Psi Beta, and Lambda Beta Honor Societies,” he said. “Last fall, I was awarded one of two scholarships presented to Quinsigamond Community College students by the Massachusetts Society of Respiratory Care. After this, I was offered a student respiratory therapist position at UMass Memorial Hospital.”

Mr. Ortiz said that for his required senior project, he has been able to mentor freshmen students entering the respiratory care program.

“This was a great opportunity as I was able to teach the skills I had mastered, mentor members of the freshmen class and share my tools for success. I feel as though my academic achievements, hands-on experience and classroom success at Quinsigamond Community College has not only built a great reputation for myself, but has also set a strong foundation for a bright future in the field of respiratory care," he said.

Visit QCC’s Respiratory Care program to learn more.

  • Milexie Evri and Shannen Jimenez
February, 2020

Two peas in a pod…that’s what most people think of when they meet South High School students Milexie Evri and Shannen Jimenez. The seniors, who have been friends and virtually inseparable since high school, have recently been taking part in Quinsigamond Community College’s Early College Program. They are currently on-track to complete their fifth class this semester...

More...

Two peas in a pod…that’s what most people think of when they meet South High School students Milexie Evri and Shannen Jimenez. The seniors, who have been friends and virtually inseparable since high school, have recently been taking part in Quinsigamond Community College’s Early College Program. They are currently on-track to complete their fifth class this semester, which will earn them a total of 15 college credits before they even graduate high school.

QCC’s Early College program gives high school students the ability to take college courses for college credit at no cost. The program gives students a chance to experience college ahead of time, with the goal of having students enroll in college after they graduate from high school. The program allows students to earn college credits while simultaneously attending high school as is the case for Ms. Evri and Ms. Jimenez.

According to Ms. Jimenez, both students are currently taking AP classes at their high school; however, when they found out about the opportunity to take college courses for credit at no cost, they each jumped at the chance.

The students say they find the college courses challenging, but both said they are enjoying the independence.

“You have to be independent and you either do the work or you don’t. You are treated as adults,” Ms. Evri said. “Being able to experience college, the classes, and the college environment for credit, and for free, has been great.”

“As my parents said, ‘if you do it, do it right,’” Ms. Jimenez continued.

Both young women have already taken a variety of courses together that included art, psychology, business law and introduction to microcomputer applications. This semester they are each taking a different mathematics course. They come to QCC each day on a Worcester school bus and travel home at the end of the day by way of the city bus.

Their schedule is incredibly busy and they each put in hours nightly doing homework, yet the two don't seemed phased by the work load.

“We’ve got it down and we know how to manage our time,” Ms. Jimenez said.

The early college experience has been one that both young women say has been a positive one, noting the support they have been receiving from their QCC instructors.

“The teachers are very nice and a lot of them are really encouraging. They understand we have other things in our lives and high school too,” Ms. Jimenez continued. “They make you feel comfortable and listen to you.”

According to Ms. Jimenez, her older sister has also started QCC and her mom is now interested in coming to QCC for nursing.

While Ms. Evri and Ms. Jimenez have applied to several colleges along with QCC, they both believe they will end up attending QCC.

“The faculty are here for you if you need anything,” Ms. Jimenez added. “This has been a good experience.”

To learn more, visit QCC’s Early College Program.

  • QCC Student Government Association President, Jorgo Gushi becomes President Pedraja for a day.
  • President Switch Day
  • Dr. Luis Pedraja and Jorgo Gushi during President Switch Day.
  • QCC Student Government Association meeting that President Pedraja presided over.
February, 2020

QCC’s President, Dr. Luis Pedraja, and President of the QCC Student Government Association, Jorgo Gushi got the chance to find out what it was like to spend a day in each other “shoes,” during President Switch Day, held in late February.

Mr. Gushi spent the day going from meeting to meeting seeing exactly how Dr. Pedraja spends his...

More...

QCC’s President, Dr. Luis Pedraja, and President of the QCC Student Government Association, Jorgo Gushi got the chance to find out what it was like to spend a day in each other “shoes,” during President Switch Day, held in late February.

Mr. Gushi spent the day going from meeting to meeting seeing exactly how Dr. Pedraja spends his days. The engineering major, who is a sophomore this year, was kept on his toes all day as he navigated the president’s schedule.

"President’s Switch Day has been one of the most fascinating and exciting experiences I have ever had as a student and leader," he said. "The first day, when I shadowed President Pedraja, was intense. It all started with a cup of coffee at the president’s office (believe me, much more than a cup is needed to be ready for such a day!). A series of meetings followed, starting with the Executive Team, continuing with the Leadership Team and ending up with the Board of Trustees meeting. Through every meeting I attended and every discussion that I participated in, I realized the uniqueness of the responsibilities somebody has as college president; the hard decisions, the lengthy meetings, but also the fun and excitement of serving 7000-plus students."

"The most thrilling part of the day, was when I had the opportunity to make an executive decision on behalf of the President’s Office. I was able to make available one of the staff/faculty parking spots to a different student every month," Mr. Gushi continued. "A student success survey will be released on the first Monday of each month via student email and students can complete the monthly survey to have their name entered into the drawing to win this parking spot."

During his time in Presidents Switch Day, Dr. Pedraja went back in time, becoming a college student once again. He took one of Mr. Jorgo’s courses with Engineering Professor Dadbeh Bigonahy; spent time socializing in the Fuller Student Center, and co-chaired a Student Government Association meeting with Mr. Gushi.

“This was truly enlightening for both of us,” said Dr. Pedraja. “Not only was it fun, but we also walked away learning something valuable about each other’s day-to-day life on campus. It was a terrific experience and one that I hope to do again in the future.”

  • From left: QCC student Destiny Fausta, Ryan Rios, Bridgett Hylton, Esq., Professor Brenda Safford and President Luis Pedraja
February, 2020

February is Black History Month and at QCC on February 25, the college’s Black Student Union and the League of Women Voters in Worcester hosted a program by Bridgett Hylton, Esq. that highlighted the history of the black vote. Ms. Hylton is the assistant director of the Counseling and Assessment Clinic of Worcester, a clinic that provides mental health services to the residents of Central...

More...

February is Black History Month and at QCC on February 25, the college’s Black Student Union and the League of Women Voters in Worcester hosted a program by Bridgett Hylton, Esq. that highlighted the history of the black vote. Ms. Hylton is the assistant director of the Counseling and Assessment Clinic of Worcester, a clinic that provides mental health services to the residents of Central Massachusetts. She attended Dartmouth College and received her law degree from Harvard Law.

QCC students Ryan Rios, president of the Black Student Union, and Destiny Fausta, vice president of the Black Student Union, introduced Ms. Hylton, who represents the League of Women Voters in the Worcester Area and gave a bit of background on the 1965 Voting Rights Act.

The program began with a video, “Bridging History: Selma and the Voting Rights Act of 1965,” describing what has historically been known as “Bloody Sunday.” Out of these injustices came the 1965 Voting Rights Act, which created a significant change in the status of African Americans throughout the South. The Voting Rights Act prohibited the states from using literacy tests and other methods of excluding African Americans from voting. Prior to this, there was only an estimated 23 percent of voting-age African Americans who were registered nationally, but by 1969 that number had jumped to 61 percent.

“Ms. Hylton shared a timeline of events to help students understand how important voting is in our country and how their vote can help with our identity, decision-making and judgment. History provides models of good and responsible behavior, as well as teaching us how to learn from the mistakes of others,” said Associate Professor of Human Services Brenda Safford, who is also the advisor for the Black Student Union.

  • From left: QCC Alumni President Cheryl Marrino and Assistant Director of Operations, Shirely Dempsey.
  • Kristy Proctor's Salted Chocolate Caramel Cookies took home first prize at the College's main campus.
  • QCC Rad Tech student, Jennifer Mangrum, took home second prize at the college's main campus contest.
  • QCC Financial Aid Counselor, Kirstie Leonard, won third place in the Bake-Off contest at QCC's West Boylston campus.
February, 2020

It was a tough way to judge a contest but students, faculty and staff were up to the challenge during the recent Alumni Association Bake-Off. No one crumbled under the pressure, unless it was the pressure of choosing their favorite sweet treat, with students, faculty and staff turning out for the tasty voting. After a hard fought battle that brought in close to $800 for QCC Alumni Scholarship Fund,...

More...

It was a tough way to judge a contest but students, faculty and staff were up to the challenge during the recent Alumni Association Bake-Off. No one crumbled under the pressure, unless it was the pressure of choosing their favorite sweet treat, with students, faculty and staff turning out for the tasty voting. After a hard fought battle that brought in close to $800 for QCC Alumni Scholarship Fund, thanks in part to a simultaneous bake sale and raffle drawing, the following people were crowned the 2020 QCC Bake-Off winners from the college’s main campus:

  • 1st Place: Salted Chocolate Caramel Cookies, created by Director of Disability Services, Kristie Proctor
  • 2nd Place: Reese’s Peanut Butter Cookies, created by QCC Rad Tech student, Jennifer Mangrum
  • 3rd Place: Cheesecake Brownies, created by QCC Financial Aid Counselor, Kirstie Leonard

QCC Healthcare and Workforce Development Center Bake-Off Contest Winners included:

  • 1st Place:  Strawberry Rhubarb Cheesecake Squares created by QCC Alumna, Cheryl Letson
  • 2nd Place:  Carrot Cake created by Professor of Nurse Education, Patricia Creelman
  • 3rd Place: Gluten-Free Cheesecake created by Bronwyn Teixeira, Math & Science Department

Winners received an exclusive QCC cutting board, custom-made for the event in QCC Fab lab.

 

  • Veterans at Museum
February, 2020

Quinsigamond Community College's Veteran Affairs department recently learned that it has earned the 2020-2021 Military Friendly® School designation. Institutions earning the Military Friendly® School designation were evaluated using both public data sources and responses from a proprietary survey. More than 1,000 schools participated in the 2020-2021 survey with 695 earning...

More...

Quinsigamond Community College's Veteran Affairs department recently learned that it has earned the 2020-2021 Military Friendly® School designation. Institutions earning the Military Friendly® School designation were evaluated using both public data sources and responses from a proprietary survey. More than 1,000 schools participated in the 2020-2021 survey with 695 earning the designation.

"This is an honor to be designated as a military friendly institution. We try our best and do whatever it takes to help our student vets be successful," said Paula Ogden, director of Veteran Affairs.

Methodology, criteria, and weightings were determined by Viqtory with input from the Military Friendly® Advisory Council of independent leaders in the higher education and military recruitment community. Final ratings were determined by combining each institution’s survey scores with the assessment of the institution’s ability to meet thresholds for student retention, graduation, job placement, loan repayment, persistence (degree advancement or transfer) and loan default rates for all students and, specifically, for student veterans.

QCC's Veteran Affairs and Veterans Club offer veterans a robust array of services that range from academics, fellowship and comradery to social events and social service activities.To learn more visit Veteran Affairs

 

  • Veronica Morson (L) and Alyssa Durham
February, 2020

At Quinsigamond Community College we see many smiling faces on campus. These are the smiles of over 7,000 students,working in a smarter way to better their futures through higher education that is affordable, accessible and supportive.

We want to let the world know of the amazing accomplishments of our students, which is why we have begun the newly created, QCC‌ ‌SMILE...

More...

At Quinsigamond Community College we see many smiling faces on campus. These are the smiles of over 7,000 students,working in a smarter way to better their futures through higher education that is affordable, accessible and supportive.

We want to let the world know of the amazing accomplishments of our students, which is why we have begun the newly created, QCC‌ ‌SMILE‌ ‌program‌. The program uses social media to highlight QCC students, and allows them to tell their story and be an inspiration for others who are considering their college options. The purpose is to put the spotlight on QCC students, friendships, relationships, activities, learning, sports, clubs, study groups and all of the other little moments that make QCC the smartest higher education experience in the region. It’s all of these things that build a sense of community and inspire others to be a part of it. This program is a way to inspire those who are thinking about going to college and to have them consider QCC. Additionally, the program is a way to inspire students already at QCC to be more actively engaged.

For students interested in taking part in the QCC SMILE program, below are some ideas on how to be a part of the program:

  • Ask friends to participate with you
  • Attend campus events and take group photos and selfies
  • Send us interesting things you may have learned here
  • Send us a photo of something on campus that made you smile or laugh or think
  • Photos of your favorite place on campus – tell us why
  • Photo of you and your favorite professor (Why does he/she inspire you?)
  • Tell us who inspires you and why

Participating ‌students‌ ‌will‌ also ‌get‌ ‌a‌ ‌professional‌ ‌portrait‌ ‌to‌ ‌use‌ ‌for‌ ‌LinkedIn,‌ ‌their ‌resume‌, ‌or‌ ‌whatever‌ ‌else‌ ‌they ‌choose‌ ‌to‌ ‌use‌ ‌it‌ ‌for‌…who knows, a few students might even become famous!  Students who take part in the QCC SMILE program may be featured in a QCC ad campaign that can range from print advertising, a Hulu spot, a TV or radio commercial, to social media, website and signage.

Already the response from students has been great! Meet Veronica Morson and Alyssa Durham, both Liberal Arts Music majors who are part of the SMILE program. Both students in this dynamic duo came to QCC to save money and get a quality education. Today they are making beautiful music together and fulfilling their dreams. Make sure to look for them in an upcoming QCC promotional spot.

Anyone who is interested in being a part of the QCC SMILE program can reach out to Marketing Manager Gina Cone, at gcone [at] qcc.mass.edu.

We hope to see your smiling faces soon so you too and tell the world how QCC is college made smarter. 

QCC Cheerleaders
February, 2020

QCC Cheerleaders Bring Out Team Spirit

QCC’s Cheerleaders took to the courts at halftime during the Wyvern Men’s Basketball games, bringing a sense of community and camaraderie to the team and its spectators. The cheering squad performed dynamic dance routines, as well as mounts that showed the team’s skill and dexterity. Go Team Wyvern! 

Wyverns Rallied to End their Season on...

More...

QCC Cheerleaders Bring Out Team Spirit

QCC’s Cheerleaders took to the courts at halftime during the Wyvern Men’s Basketball games, bringing a sense of community and camaraderie to the team and its spectators. The cheering squad performed dynamic dance routines, as well as mounts that showed the team’s skill and dexterity. Go Team Wyvern! 

Wyverns Rallied to End their Season on a High Note

The QCC Men’s Basketball team started off the year a bit slowly, but everything jelled in the second half of their season for the Wyverns, falling just shy of making the playoffs.

“They played hard, fast and with heart. Completing their season with a record of 10-11,” said Director of Athletics & Fitness Center, Lisa Gurnick.

The last game of the season featured Wyvern sophomore student athletes during the annual “sophomore game,” where the students presented a parent or guardian with flowers.

Standouts from the season included Victor Florentino, who averaged 12.3 points and 9.5 rebounds per game, and Brendan Dion, who ranked first in the NJCAA, Region XXI 3-point field goal percentage.

 

February, 2020

We are very pleased to announce the following full-time staff updates:

On January 27, 2020 Administrative Services welcomed Jason Graves as the Network Administrator. Jason brings to this position over 10 years of experience. Most recently, he was the Interim Network Administrator at QCC. Jason earned an Associate’s Degree in Computer Systems Engineering Technology from Quinsigamond...

More...

We are very pleased to announce the following full-time staff updates:

On January 27, 2020 Administrative Services welcomed Jason Graves as the Network Administrator. Jason brings to this position over 10 years of experience. Most recently, he was the Interim Network Administrator at QCC. Jason earned an Associate’s Degree in Computer Systems Engineering Technology from Quinsigamond Community College and a Bachelor’s Degree in Information Technology with a minor in Business from University of Massachusetts, Lowell.

On February 2, 2020 Academic Affairs welcomed Renae Owens as the Clerk IV-Educational Partnerships and Early College. Renae brings to this position over 10 years of experience. Most recently, she was the International Account Manager with Kidde Fire Suppression. Renae earned an Associate’s Degree in Business from Quinsigamond Community College and a Bachelor’s Degree in Business Administration from Worcester State University.

On February 23, 2020 Administrative Services welcomed Karen West as the Accountant I- Workforce & Grants. Karen brings to this position over 20 years of experience. Most recently, she was the Accountant I at QCC.

Please join us in welcoming Jason, Renae and Karen into their new roles at QCC.

January, 2020

  • Sharon Henderson delivers a forceful message of inclusion at the MLK Community Breakfast.
  • Lt. Governor Karyn Polito commends President Pedraja for his leadership at the MLK Community Breakfast.
  • Congressman Jim McGovern offers his greetings at the 35th Annual Martin Luther King, Jr. Community Breakfast.
  • Motivational music was prevelant at the MLK Community Breakfast held at QCC.
  • QCC's Athletic Center was packed full for the 35th Annual MLK Community Breakfast.
  • QCC President Dr. Luis Pedraja gives a powerful speech at the MLK Community Breakfast.
  • The audience enjoys the soulful music from the Knights of Zion Men's Choir.
  • New children’s books for grades K-3 related to Dr. King, or ones that had a social justice theme were collected.
January, 2020

On a frigid January 20th morning, Quinsigamond Community College’s Athletic Center was filled to capacity with feelings of warmth and hope, as the College once again hosted the 35th Annual Martin Luther King, Jr. Community Breakfast. Co-chaired this year by Phil Niddrie and Nellie P. Toney, the Worcester County MLK Community Breakfast Committee puts together this breakfast each year to honor the birth of civil...

More...

On a frigid January 20th morning, Quinsigamond Community College’s Athletic Center was filled to capacity with feelings of warmth and hope, as the College once again hosted the 35th Annual Martin Luther King, Jr. Community Breakfast. Co-chaired this year by Phil Niddrie and Nellie P. Toney, the Worcester County MLK Community Breakfast Committee puts together this breakfast each year to honor the birth of civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

This year’s community breakfast theme, “More Than a Day Off,” highlighted the powerful and soulful music of the New England Gospel Choir, under the direction of Director Eric Edmonds, as well as the Knights of Zion Men’s Choir and special solo performances by Sharon Henderson, marketing director for the YMCA of Central Massachusetts; saxophonist Noah Allen, accompanied by guitarist David Allen of the Journey Community Church; and Bennet Ebinezer from the Pakachoag Music School.  City Commissioner of Health and Human services, Dr. Matilde Castiel, opened the event with her own personal story of immigration from Cuba in the early '60s as a young child. She said the annual breakfast is held to honor the ideals of Dr. King and noted the vast representation of religious, business and community disciplines throughout Central Massachusetts that come together each year at this event.

Federal, state and local officials in attendance included: Congressman Jim McGovern, Lt. Governor Karyn Polito, City Manager Edward Augustus Jr., Senator Harriette Chandler, Representative James O’Day, Sheriff Lew Evangelidis, City Councilor Matthew Wally, City Councilor Candy F. Mero-Carlson, City Councilor George Russell, Worcester School Committee Member John Monfredo, Councilor-at-Large Donna Colorio, Councilor-at-Large Khrystian King and Worcester District Attorney Joseph Early Jr.

QCC President Dr. Luis Pedraja gave an impassioned speech in his greetings that addressed the issues going on in our nation and asked how we, as a country, will address what has been happening in our country to the generations of the future.

“I, for one, hope we can say we took a stand, that we did not stay silent, that we made a difference and helped bend the moral arc of the universe a little more toward justice,” President Pedraja said. “Our classrooms are filled with a rainbow of humanity striving for a better future. As educators we must honor the trust that students have placed in us and provide them with the tools to build a better future. I believe that through education we can lift the veil of lies, ignorance and fear that has descended upon us and upon our country.”

In his greetings, Congressman McGovern thanked the QCC community, adding, “I also want to thank him (President Pedraja) for his leadership on so many important issues in the City. We are proud of him. “

Lt. Governor Polito also acknowledged President Pedraja in her remarks.

“President Pedraja thank you for your leadership and what you do at this institution, which is an integral part of the success story that Worcester is experiencing,” she said.

In discussing the motivation for the annual event, Congressman McGovern talked about Dr. King’s vision for meeting hatred, oppression and injustice with love.

“I believe in the goodness of the people in this room and I believe in the goodness of the American people, and I believe by working together we will move this country closer to the dreams, hopes and aspirations of the man we are honoring here today,” he said.

This year the MLK Community Breakfast Committee partnered with the United Way of Central Massachusetts, WamsWorks (Worcester Area Mission Society) and the United Congregational Church, to collect new children’s books for grades K-3 related to Dr. King, or books that had a social justice theme.  All books collected will be distributed to select Worcester schools. Those in attendance were invited to assist in assembling early literacy kits for young Worcester students at the conclusion of the breakfast.

Additionally, as is tradition at the breakfast, the winners of the MLK scholarships, essay and art contests were announced. They included:

$1,000 Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Scholarships recipients:

Krystle Bedrick of Quinsigamond Community College, Amyah Chagnon-Verdieu of UMass Lowell, Olivia Curnen of the College of the Holy Cross, Chrinovain Kankonde of Clark University, Starr Kyenkyenhene of UMass Boston, Justine Palencia of Bentley University, Ricardo Ponce of Boston College, and Elsi Tutu of UMass Amherst.

Recipient of the $2,000 Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Scholarship:

 Gynesis Vance of the College of the Holy Cross.

The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. essay winners are: Samara V. Masiki, a seventh grader at St. Peter Central Catholic High School; Sophia Wildes, a seventh grader at Our Lady of the Valley Regional School, Uxbridge; Siobhan Twohig, an eighth grader at Our Lady of the Valley; and Ryan Mechery, a ninth grader at Holy Name High School.

Winners of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. art contest were students from All Saints Academy, Webster, under the direction of art teacher Beth Crowley.

Fourth grade students winners: Meghan Baca, Max Boulmetis, Joe Chahine, Aiden Collins, Alex Correa, Kendyl Fales, Kamryn Fasshauer, James Ferguson, George-Ann Gajewski, Joey Gajewski, Emma Grochowski, Tim Gardner, Patrick Hylka, Dylan Kelly, Kaitlyn McQuiston, Callum Park, Alissa Perron, Tristan Pico, Camden Rockwood, Ariella Roure, Caitlyn Timlege, and Danielle Vigeant.

Fifth grade students: Haleigh Creighton, Sam Guay, Bobby Hasting, Sophie Kann, Emily Kelly, Jackson Meehan, Mayli Pedersen, Bronwyn Petkus, Alli Santora, and Liam Simao.

  • From left: Ingrid Murphy and PTK students Luceily Ortiz, Farah Mohamad and Alexander Paulino.
January, 2020

It was by pure chance that Douglas resident Ingrid Murphy read a story in the local paper about Quinsigamond Community College’s Food Pantry and Resource Center. A mother to two grown daughters, she was stunned to learn of the food insecurity that college students face, particularly right in her own back yard.

“I had never thought about college students going through hunger,” she said.

... More...

It was by pure chance that Douglas resident Ingrid Murphy read a story in the local paper about Quinsigamond Community College’s Food Pantry and Resource Center. A mother to two grown daughters, she was stunned to learn of the food insecurity that college students face, particularly right in her own back yard.

“I had never thought about college students going through hunger,” she said.

Deciding that she wanted to learn more, Ms. Murphy contacted QCC and spoke with Bonnie Coleman. Ms. Coleman is the college’s Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society advisor and has been instrumental in helping to run the food pantry. Ms. Murphy learned from Ms. Coleman that a college survey (2018 Wisconsin Hope Lab Survey) showed close to 50 percent of students at the College were food insecure.

“This is just so sad that these students are going through this on top of all the other things they have to deal with,” Ms. Murphy said.

It didn’t take long for her to decide that she wanted to help make a difference. As a member of the Blackstone Valley United Methodist Church in Whitinsville, and active member of the church’s women’s group, she knew it was the perfect time to bring this to the church’s attention, as the women were putting together a retreat and looking for a mission project. She presented her idea of gathering donations for the college’s food pantry and the women of the church were immediately onboard.

“They thought this would be great to use as our mission project,” she said.

Quickly the project snowballed as the entire church learned of the students’ needs. For eight Sundays the entire church collected donations for the school’s food pantry.

“We got a lot of donations. It was just wonderful and it spurred a lot of conversations,” she said, adding that she has no connection to QCC. “After we made our donation to QCC, another article was in the paper about college students and food pantries and people from the church sent it to me.”

Recently Ms. Murphy celebrated a milestone birthday and her husband, Brian Murphy, decided to do something extra special for her. Unbeknownst to her, he planned a surprise party in her honor and asked the invited guests to bring donations for the college’s food pantry. Needless to say, Ms. Murphy was flabbergasted when they held the party.

“Oh my gosh, I had no idea! They had all this food in the back and they brought it to me and asked that I donate it to the food pantry. I just lost it,” she said.

Donations ranged from food to toiletries, and even included $102 in cash.

“The whole car was filled. It was just amazing,” Ms. Coleman said.

Between the two donations, Ms. Coleman estimates there was close to $1,000 worth of food and toiletries donated. Ms. Murphy said she plans to keep making donations and bringing awareness to the needs’ of college students. The church is also planning to do another donation drive for the college’s food pantry in the spring.

“Young people need a break and we need to help them more. They’re our future,” she said, adding, “It takes a village doesn’t it?”

To learn more, visit the QCC Food Pantry and Resource Center .

 

  • QCC Nursing graduates from the day program (from left) Suzanne Phipps and Kim Nguyen.
  • Alena Kuzniatsova is all smiles at the Nurse Education day program pinning ceremony.
  • From left: Kendra Furtek, nursing graduate from the day program,Patrick Muthee, and Nurse Education Professor Patricia Creelman.
  • Nurse Education evening program graduate Kenai Adams gets pinned by Associate Professor of Nurse Education Suzanne Kiniry.
  • Nursing graduates from the evening program receive their lamps during a December pinning ceremony.
  • December nursing graduates
  • December Nurse Education graduates from the evening programs.
  • Graduates in the December 2019 Nurse Education day program.
  • Two Letters say it all for these nursing grads.
January, 2020

In mid-December, Quinsigamond Community College's day and evening nursing classes each held their annual graduation pinning ceremonies at Hebert Auditorium. A total of 32 day students and 63 evening students received their nursing pins in powerful, annual ceremonies steeped in tradition. According to Professor of Nurse Education,​ Patricia Creelman, all nursing graduates in both the day and...

More...

In mid-December, Quinsigamond Community College's day and evening nursing classes each held their annual graduation pinning ceremonies at Hebert Auditorium. A total of 32 day students and 63 evening students received their nursing pins in powerful, annual ceremonies steeped in tradition. According to Professor of Nurse Education,​ Patricia Creelman, all nursing graduates in both the day and evening programs will be sitting for their licensure exam during February or March.

“This past year was a great one for our nursing programs. We graduated over 90 nursing students in December, our largest graduating class ever,” said Dean of the School of Healthcare​Pat Schmohl. “I am so proud of our staff and faculty for working so hard over these last couple of years to prepare so many nurses to help our community.”

Additionally, 96% of QCC nursing graduates who graduated in 2019 prior to December, passed the NCLEX exam on the first try.

Since the early 1800s pinning ceremonies have become a time-honored tradition at colleges and universities nationwide. Each nursing school has an identifiable pin designating the school where nursing graduates received their education.

“The nursing programs are quite rigorous and these students diligently worked to meet the requirements of each of the programs,” Professor Creelman said. “These graduating classes represent a diverse group of students who bring a variety of life experiences to our programs and, as such, enrich the educational experiences of all.”

December graduates in the Nurse Education day program included:

  • Phiona Amankwah
  • Kelly Ashe-Dailida
  • Jessica Auclair
  • Lilla Bulman
  • Sarah Creelman
  • Stephanie Donaghy
  • Heather Dozois
  • Amanda Eddy
  • David Farmer
  • Alex Gachuhi
  • Natalie Giangaspro
  • Ashley Granger
  • Laura Haddad
  • Danielle Kokoski
  • Alena Kuzniatsova
  • Danielle Larson
  • Tatsuki Motoyoshi
  • Edmund Mugaragu
  • Patrick Muthee
  • Kim Nguyen
  • Akua Nti
  • Kaitlen Olszta
  • Solomon Oneka
  • Susanne Phipps
  • Eric Quitadamo
  • Alyssa Ramos
  • Michelle Sarfo-Adu
  • Ashley Sizer
  • Mina Tajiani
  • Erica Widen
  • Tara Zuschlag

December graduates in the Nurse Education evening program included:

  • Kenai Adams
  • Vivian Boahen
  • Peter Brennan
  • Afua Darkwah
  • Laura De Sosa
  • Laura De Sosa
  • Andrea De Sosa
  • Tia Gaines
  • Lily Grote
  • Nina Hernandes
  • Alyssa Herrick
  • Juliana Hickey
  • Jessica Hutchins
  • Jennette Kent
  • Galen Kerr
  • Lauren Kiritsy
  • Kirsten Laak
  • Margareth Larrieux
  • Kathleen Mendez
  • Thanh Nguyen
  • Thomas Oliva
  • Nicole Sweet
  • Alysia Tashjian
  • Alexis Tashjian
  • Simon Waweru
  • Samuel Ampadu
  • Linda Asare
  • Schari Bennett
  • Nicole Bisazza
  • Krista Buchanan
  • David Canale
  • Philip Damoah
  • Kerry-Ann Desautels
  • Linda Duah
  • Amanda Elfman
  • Sarah Fagan
  • Emily Figueroa
  • Julie Fraher
  • Jennifer Garlick
  • Kormassa Gboviyea
  • Jonathan Gonzalez
  • Kelly Green
  • Ruth Gurney
  • Lily Gyasi-Denteh
  • Judy Kimaku
  • Kayla Kimball
  • Tammy LaFleche
  • Sauda Matovu
  • Agnes Muia
  • George Nganga
  • Adwoa Obenewaa
  • Elizabeth Romanik
  • Michael Ruhamya
  • Lucia Sears
  • Lindsay Silva
  • Simone Spencer
  • Melissa Tolan
  • Melissa Tolan
  • Kristin Williams

December graduates in Nurse Education - Advance Placement LPN Option evening program included:

  • Samuel Ampadu
  • Linda Asare
  • Schari Bennett
  • Nicole Bisazza
  • Krista Buchanan
  • David Canale
  • Philip Damoah
  • Kerry-Ann Desautels
  • Linda Duah
  • Amanda Elfman
  • Sarah Fagan
  • Emily Figueroa
  • Julie Fraher
  • Jennifer Garlick
  • Kormassa Gboviyea
  • Jonathan Gonzalez
  • Kelly Green
  • Ruth Gurney
  • Lily Gyasi-Denteh
  • Judy Kimaku
  • Kayla Kimball
  • Tammy LaFleche
  • Sauda Matovu
  • Agnes Muia
  • George Nganga
  • Adwoa Obenewaa
  • Elizabeth Romanik
  • Michael Ruhamya
  • Lucia Sears
  • Lindsay Silva
  • Simone Spencer
  • Melissa Tolan
  • Melissa Tolan
  • Kristin Williams

December graduates in Nurse Education - Advance Placement Paramedic Option evening program included:

  • Stephanie Kent
  • Michael Levesque
  • Nicholas North
  • Robert O'Hearn
  • PTK student Luceily Ortiz is a student volunteer at the College's Food Pantry and Resource Center.
January, 2020

As new and current students converge on Quinsigamond Community College’s campus, Phi Theta Kappa (PTK) student volunteers will be manning the QCC Food Pantry and Resource Center to help any students experiencing food insecurity. A recent food donation made to the food pantry and resource center by Albert and Magdalena Maykel, owners of Living Earth Natural Market & Café, has enabled the pantry to...

More...

As new and current students converge on Quinsigamond Community College’s campus, Phi Theta Kappa (PTK) student volunteers will be manning the QCC Food Pantry and Resource Center to help any students experiencing food insecurity. A recent food donation made to the food pantry and resource center by Albert and Magdalena Maykel, owners of Living Earth Natural Market & Café, has enabled the pantry to be well-stocked for the start of the new semester. The food was even delivered to the food pantry by Mr. Maykel himself.

This semester there is a new addition to the food pantry -  a “Recipe of the Month,” which gives students the opportunity to pick up the majority of the ingredients in the featured recipe. This month’s recipe is “Mediterranean Cracked Wheat Salad.” While there is a limit of 15 items per month, anyone who chooses the “Recipe of the Month” will only be charged for two food items. 

Students wishing to use QCC’s Food Pantry and Resource Center must be current QCC students with a valid ID. Students who are new to the food pantry and resource center will be asked to fill out a confidential application on their first visit. During the intake process, students will be assigned a unique pantry ID number that they should bring with them each time they come to the food pantry and resource center.

The Food Pantry and Resource Center is located in on QCC’s main campus (670 West Boylston St., Worcester) in the Administration Building, room B63A.

 Currently the hours of operation are:

  • Monday: 11:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Tuesday: 10:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.
  • Wednesday: 10:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.
  • Thursday: 10:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.
  • Friday: 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.
  • Closed on weekends.

Hours of operation will be subject change depending on volunteers, exam schedules, holidays and other factors. Due to limited volunteer availability, volunteers are only able to assist during posted hours.

One upcoming event will take place on Wednesday, February 26 from 3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. in room 367A (Administration building on QCC’s main campus). Cooking Matters Massachusetts will offer nutritional education to the first 20 students who sign up.  Developed to teach parents and caregivers with limited food budgets how to make healthy food choices, Cooking Matters Massachusetts, has visited the college’s food pantry and resource center on a few occasions. Students who wish to attend the session will receive a gift card from Market32. Space is limited. Interested students must RSVP to foodpantry [at] qcc.mass.edu  

  • Students in Assistant Professor Lee Duerden's (far right) classes who received either MACWIC Level 1 or Level 2 Certifications.
  • MACWIC Level 1 receipients
January, 2020

In late December a group of advanced manufacturing students received certificates for passing either the Level 1 or Level 2 of the Manufacturing Advancement Center Workforce Innovation Collaborative (MACWIC) credentialing/certification program. This MACWIC credentialing is a stackable system that continues to build on students’ manufacturing skill sets as they advance through the various levels. The...

More...

In late December a group of advanced manufacturing students received certificates for passing either the Level 1 or Level 2 of the Manufacturing Advancement Center Workforce Innovation Collaborative (MACWIC) credentialing/certification program. This MACWIC credentialing is a stackable system that continues to build on students’ manufacturing skill sets as they advance through the various levels. The credentialing plays a big part in QCC’s advanced manufacturing program and gives students a great foundation for when they enter the workforce. The College has been using this credentialing system for over four years.

Students who have completed MACWIC Level 1, have demonstrated the fundamental skills to work in a production environment. The certification shows that students are competent with basic mathematical skills, can use precision measurement equipment, and can interpret technical information from a blueprint. Additionally, they are aware of general safety protocols in place for most manufacturing companies.

“Students who have completed MACWIC Level 2, provide employers with the confidence that these individuals can set up and run CNC machines and can understand and write the CNC code at a beginner’s level,” said Assistant Professor of Manufacturing Technology, Lee Duerden. “These individuals are also knowledgeable with LEAN concepts and understand how important continuous improvement and quality is to the profitability and success of a company. They also have a more advanced knowledge of blueprint reading and can handle more complex problem solving techniques.”

To learn more, visit QCC’s manufacturing programs.

  • Donated hats made by PTK alumni Jacqui Viar
January, 2020

Jacqui Viar is a 2017 Quinsigamond Community College graduate and Phi Theta Kappa (PTK) alumna who graduated with highest honors with an Associate Degree in Business Administration Career, a certificate in Accounting/Finance and a Clerical Office Certificate. She was inducted into PTK in the spring of 2016 and was the PTK recording secretary from 2016-2017.

In the December 2019 issue of...

More...

Jacqui Viar is a 2017 Quinsigamond Community College graduate and Phi Theta Kappa (PTK) alumna who graduated with highest honors with an Associate Degree in Business Administration Career, a certificate in Accounting/Finance and a Clerical Office Certificate. She was inducted into PTK in the spring of 2016 and was the PTK recording secretary from 2016-2017.

In the December 2019 issue of the Wyvern Guardian, Ms. Viar was mentioned in an article for giving back to her alma mater by knitting and crocheting hats for QCC students. Recently the Wyvern got a chance to learn more about this amazing alumna.

  • After you graduated from QCC did you continue on in school or enter the workforce?

I will graduate with my BS in Accounting from UMass Dartmouth this May. I have done volunteer work for both Abby's House in Worcester and as a money management volunteer for Elder Services of Worcester for some time. Last summer I actually stepped out of my comfort zone and sought out an internship in accounting.  (*Recently Ms. Viar received a job offer to be an accountant. “I'm still in a bit of disbelief, but absolutely thrilled at the same time!”)

  • You transferred to QCC from Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI). Why did you choose to come to QCC?

Actually, I went to WPI out of high school and have three courses remaining to get my Bachelor’s Degree in Civil Engineering. It was something I had been considering completing but thought better of it - I'm much happier with accounting.  Honestly, I chose QCC because I had been out of school for so long, and had been through a very dark and difficult time, I wasn't sure at all how well I would fare returning to school. Fortunately, it appears to have been just what I needed. QCC gave me the much needed courage and confidence to strive for more.

  • You were an active member of PTK and are now an active alumna. Why is PTK important to you?

I was fortunate to know several fabulous students making invaluable contributions to the organization while I was active and it really motivated me and made an impact. I also admire how hard Bonnie (PTK Advisor Bonnie Coleman) works each year to make the organization successful and I guess in a selfish way, I wanted to continue to be a part of her goodness.

  • You crochet (and knit) hats each year for QCC students. How long have you been doing this and why do you continue to do this?

I've been donating handmade items since I was a student, but last year one of the officers did a "hats for the homeless" campaign, which was something I could really contribute to. As long as the hats are useful to others, I'm honored to be making them.

  • Lastly, what is it about QCC and PTK that is special for you?

I was impressed from day one by PTK's goal to actually help real people. It's a sincere mission and I think that's special all in itself! (I also just absolutely ADORE Bonnie and the remarkable work she does.)

To learn more visit PTK Honor Society.

  • Last year's QCC’s Alumni Association Bake-Off was a sweet treat for all.
  • From left: Karen Rucks, Cheryl Marrino and Shirley Dempsey
  • Students enjoy some delicious goodies at last year's Bake-Off.
  • Voting is very serious business at QCC’s Alumni Association Bake-Off.
January, 2020

It’s not exactly the “Great British Bake Off,” but QCC’s Alumni Association Bake-Off on Wednesday, February 12, has all the makings of an exciting, tasty and good-natured competition. Students, faculty and staff are invited to enter their homemade baked goods for the chance to earn bragging rights as QCC’s Best Baker! The best part  of the Bake-Off...

More...

It’s not exactly the “Great British Bake Off,” but QCC’s Alumni Association Bake-Off on Wednesday, February 12, has all the makings of an exciting, tasty and good-natured competition. Students, faculty and staff are invited to enter their homemade baked goods for the chance to earn bragging rights as QCC’s Best Baker! The best part  of the Bake-Off is that when you are folding, stirring and beating yourself into a baking frenzy, you will be doing it for a great cause. All funds raised will go to the QCC Alumni Scholarship Fund, for students in need. Couple this with prizes for the top three bakers at each location and you have yourselves a recipe for success! Love to bake, but not interested in competing? Donate to the QCC’s Alumni Association Bake Sale that will be going on during the Bake-Off competition.

This mouth-watering event will take place simultaneously at QCC’s main campus (107A, Administration Building) and also at the Healthcare and Workforce Development Center, 25 Federal Street, Worcester,  in the lobby. All baked goods being judged should be cut up into bite-sized pieces and dropped off between 8:00 a.m. and 9:30 a.m. at either the main campus, or the downtown location. Recipes must be included, with a list of all ingredients.

Will you crumble under the pressure, or will you take the cake? The only way to find out by registering online by February 5 and get baking (bake sale bakers are also asked to register)!

Judging will take place in both locations between 11:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. All entries are FREE and the QCC community will be the judges! Anyone in the QCC community can stop by and be a judge.

To be a tasty tester and vote for your favorite, simply stop by either location until 2:00 p.m., sample the treats and cast your vote for your favorites. The cost to be a judge and taste test these delectable treats is $1 for students and $2 for faculty and staff. Not interested in being a judge, but looking for a little sweet treat? Stop by and check out the bake sale and take home something delectable for yourself or the family.

For questions, email June Vo, Community Connections at jvo [at] qcc.mass.edu.

  • Director of Counseling and Wellness, Tina Wells stands with donations from the Stuff-A-Cruiser event.
January, 2020

As the Spring semester gets underway and students are back in classes, Director of Counseling and Wellness, Tina Wells, a licensed social worker with years of student experience, is prepared to help those students who may feel overwhelmed or in need of support. The office of Counseling and Wellness is dedicated to promoting the emotional well-being of QCC students, with the intent to facilitate the...

More...

As the Spring semester gets underway and students are back in classes, Director of Counseling and Wellness, Tina Wells, a licensed social worker with years of student experience, is prepared to help those students who may feel overwhelmed or in need of support. The office of Counseling and Wellness is dedicated to promoting the emotional well-being of QCC students, with the intent to facilitate the student's ability to achieve their life goals and manage everyday challenges.

“My position is essentially counseling and wellness. I focus on support and solutions for student wellness - personally and academically,” Ms. Wells said.

Services that are provided include:

  • Direct personal counseling
  • Community referrals to local vendors and resources, to help assist with therapy resources
  • Health and wellness consultation, coaching and information
  • Resource information for legal, financial, childcare, elder care, utility support, housing and transportation

According to Ms. Wells, students generally come to her office when they are in distress and in crisis. The goal is to manage the crisis or immediate distress first, then access what the primary needs of the student might be and go from there.

“We discuss their strengths and their abilities and help them move to a better mindset,” she said. “We then create a plan of action with the student.” Counseling and Wellness support is meant to be short-term and solution-focused.

A large inner city college that has a very diverse student population brings its own set of unique challenges. Ms. Wells said that a variety of different issues are routinely brought to her, which she then has to triage and deal with accordingly. “How students deal with things often has a cultural component to it as well,” she said. 

The priority is always mental health treatment, which is dealt with first and foremost. During emergency situations, Ms. Wells accesses local emergency rooms when needed. 

Ms. Wells has been at QCC for four years, playing an integral role in connecting students with the services they need both on and off campus. She wants faculty and staff to know she is a resource that is available to them for any questions or concerns they may have.

“I work hard to meet with any and all students who contact me, as well as those who are referred by faculty and staff,” she said.

To refer a student, faculty and staff can reach out directly to Ms. Wells at 508.854.4479 or email her at twells [at] qcc.mass.edu to schedule an appointment. For non-urgent issues, they can also fill out the “Care Form” located on the College’s intranet (Frequently used Forms section under “Student Incident Report”.)

As the spring semester begins, Ms. Wells has several simple recommendations to students on how they can cope with the stress of being in college.

  • Take breaks from studying           
  • Try to get enough sleep
  • Make healthy food choices
  • Talk to yourself as you would your best friend. Don’t be so hard on yourself.

The optimum way to contact the Office of Counseling and Wellness is by phone or email (see above) for an appointment. 

Office hours are Monday – Friday from 8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. To learn more visit Counseling and Wellness.  

  • QCC will be holding information sessions February 11 and 13 for businesses to learn about upcoming free soft skills workshops.
January, 2020

Businesses have the chance to attend information sessions on February 11 and February 13 to learn about the upcoming free Soft Skills Workshop Series that Quinsigamond Community College will be teaching this spring. “Soft skills” is a term that seems to be flooding the business market, as more and more employers are finding their employees do not have the basic skill sets needed to be competitive in today...

More...

Businesses have the chance to attend information sessions on February 11 and February 13 to learn about the upcoming free Soft Skills Workshop Series that Quinsigamond Community College will be teaching this spring. “Soft skills” is a term that seems to be flooding the business market, as more and more employers are finding their employees do not have the basic skill sets needed to be competitive in today’s global marketplace.

“At QCC, we stay cognizant of industry needs,” said Dean of the Center for Workforce Development and Continuing Education, Kathleen Manning.

Free soft skills workshops will be available at various QCC locations in March, April and May. Companies that are eligible for these upcoming free training workshops must be located in Massachusetts, pay into the MA Unemployment Fund (which allocates money into the Workforce Training Fund) and hold a Certificate of Good Standing with the MA Department of Revenue.

To learn about QCC’s soft skills workshops series and how your company can take part, or to learn more about the various Workforce Training Grants available to companies, attend one of the following free information sessions:

  • Tuesday, February 11, 10:00 a.m. at the Center for Workforce Development and Continuing Education, 25 Federal Street, Worcester
  • Thursday, February 13, 10:00 a.m., Central MA South Chamber, 46 Hall Street, Sturbridge

Funding for QCC’s soft skills training workshops is through a $143,000 Direct Access Grant from the Workforce Training Fund. QCC’s spring soft skills workshops will include:       

  • Essential Business Skills
  • Time Management
  • Conflict Resolution
  • Presenting with Impact
  • Communicating with Clarity and Impact
  • Creative Problem Solving and Decision Making 

For more information or to register for an information session, contact Business Development Specialist Christine McNally 508.751.7900 or Business Development Specialist Eileen Morgan at 508.751.7929.

Las Vegas
January, 2020

Does the recent fairly mild January weather get you dreaming of a day on the links? If golfing is your passion and you want to help a student in need, the QCC Foundation might just have an answer for you. The Ultimate Golf Raffle, 30 Rounds in 30 Days™. The raffle is being held from April 1, 2020 - April 30, 2020 to raise funds for the Endowed Scholarship Fund and the QCC Food Pantry and Resource Center...

More...

Does the recent fairly mild January weather get you dreaming of a day on the links? If golfing is your passion and you want to help a student in need, the QCC Foundation might just have an answer for you. The Ultimate Golf Raffle, 30 Rounds in 30 Days™. The raffle is being held from April 1, 2020 - April 30, 2020 to raise funds for the Endowed Scholarship Fund and the QCC Food Pantry and Resource Center. This raffle offers you a chance to golf at some of today’s most elite golf clubs and raise money for the Quinsigamond Community College Foundation’s Endowed Scholarship Fund and the QCC Food Pantry.

Grand prize is a Las Vegas golf extravaganza, with a round of golf at the famed Cascata Club, in Nevada, considered by some to be the “8th Wonder in the Golfing World,” and one of the most spectacular places to golf. The grand prize package includes airfare for two to Las Vegas, Nevada, overnight accommodations at the Marriott Grand Chateau (4 nights), as well as golf for two at Cascata.

Other top prizes in the 30-day raffle include:

  •  A trip to Naples, Florida that includes airfare and overnight accommodations for three people and golf at The Vineyards Country Club’s two link style and traditional style courses, where challenging play is available for every golfer at every skill level and handicap.
  •  A getaway to Chatham on Cape Cod that includes overnight accommodations and golfing at Eastward Ho!, considered the finest course on Cape Cod and named one of the best courses in North America by Golf Digest. An early morning Bluefin tuna deep sea fishing trip completes this package.

Additional prizes include golf at 27 golf courses and clubs across New England to appeal to both the seasoned or beginner golfer.

Tickets are $50 each and a limit of 1,000 tickets will be sold. You have a one in 1,000 chance of being a winner!

Winning tickets are based on the last three digits of the Massachusetts mid-day daily lottery number. The raffle will begin on April 1, 2020 and end on April 30, 2020. Numbers will be posted daily by 4:00 p.m. at 30 Rounds in 30 Days

To purchase a raffle ticket, contact the QCC Foundation at qccfoundation [at] qcc.mass.edu; contact a QCC Foundation Director, or contact Assistant Director of Operations, Shirley Dempsey at 508.854.4520. The deadline to purchase tickets is March 31, 2020 at 4:00 p.m. No tickets can be sold after this deadline. To learn more, visit 30 Rounds in 30 Days

  • QCC Service Award Winners
January, 2020

Spring semester began at Quinsigamond Community College with an All College Day the day before students began classes, in which QCC President Dr. Luis Pedraja reiterated the College’s mission of not resting until the College achieves 100% student success. He told faculty and staff of the challenges he faced as a young immigrant child from Cuba who struggled to learn English and who was teased by...

More...

Spring semester began at Quinsigamond Community College with an All College Day the day before students began classes, in which QCC President Dr. Luis Pedraja reiterated the College’s mission of not resting until the College achieves 100% student success. He told faculty and staff of the challenges he faced as a young immigrant child from Cuba who struggled to learn English and who was teased by the other students because he couldn’t speak the language.  He acknowledged the many people who supported him and how it was for him to pay that help forward.

“The reality is that all of us are about student success. It was the people who took an interest in me in college that made a difference,” he said, adding that today the College is getting ready to receive students who are “trusting their futures to us.”

An annual event during All College Day is the College’s recognition of longevity of its faculty and staff. A total of 24 faculty and staff members were recognized for over 370 years of service to the College. They include:

10 years of service:

  • Jennifer Arner Welsh
  • Valerie Clemente-Crain
  • Daniele DeAdder 
  • Thomas Hebert
  • Raymond Lawless
  • Eric Mania
  • Susan Meola
  • Paula Ogden
  • Robert Russell Jr.
  • Lisa Schlegel 
  • Liza Smith
  • Linda Stake
  • Karen West
  • Penny West

20 years of service:

  • Patricia Creelman
  • Pamela Fleming
  • Ireneusz Gawedzki
  • James Heffernan
  • Carol Rinaldi
  • Victor Somma
  • Barbara Zabka

30 years of service:

  • Lynda Deschenes
  • Jane Joyce
  • Veterans Club Holds K-Cup Drive for Overseas Troops
January, 2020

The Veterans Club is currently holding a K-Cup Coffee Drive for U.S. troops serving overseas. Those wishing to donate K-Cups for the troops may drop off their donation to the Veteran Affairs Office, room 258A (Administration Building at QCC’s main campus). 

Recently Veteran Affairs, in conjunction with the Veterans Club, hosted a Valentines for...

More...

The Veterans Club is currently holding a K-Cup Coffee Drive for U.S. troops serving overseas. Those wishing to donate K-Cups for the troops may drop off their donation to the Veteran Affairs Office, room 258A (Administration Building at QCC’s main campus). 

Recently Veteran Affairs, in conjunction with the Veterans Club, hosted a Valentines for Veterans Drive to show appreciation for veterans and active duty service members. Donations of cards, notes and drawings were sent to veterans overseas, as well as those in local VA hospitals. QCC's Veterans Club President Tony Barnardo, spoke to his daughter's second grade class at Park Ave Elementary School in Webster, about his time in the U.S. Navy and what he does with the Veteran's Club. After listening to Mr. Barnardo, the students took part in the Valentine Drive, making cards that were sent ot the veterans.

“We send our cards at Christmas time to our veterans, but why not remember them again and say ‘thank you,’ Director of Veteran Affairs Paula Ogden said.

To learn more about the services and opportunities offered to veterans at QCC, visit Veteran Affairs
 

  • Psi Beta Honor Society
January, 2020

The mind is a beautiful thing to waste and no one knows that better than the folks in QCC’s chapter of Psi Beta - the National Psychology Honor Society. If you have an interest in psychology, taken at least one Psychology course, have a minimum overall GPA of 3.25 or higher and completed at least 12 credits, you may qualify.  Psi Beta’s mission is to encourage professional development and...

More...

The mind is a beautiful thing to waste and no one knows that better than the folks in QCC’s chapter of Psi Beta - the National Psychology Honor Society. If you have an interest in psychology, taken at least one Psychology course, have a minimum overall GPA of 3.25 or higher and completed at least 12 credits, you may qualify.  Psi Beta’s mission is to encourage professional development and psychological literacy of all students at two-year colleges through promotion and recognition of excellence in scholarship, leadership, research and community service.

To be considered for induction students should send the following information to Psychology Professor Dr. Valerie Clemente at vclemente [at] qcc.mass.edu by March 6.  

  • Your name, address and phone number
  • QCC ID number and Qmail address
  • Program/major and anticipated date of graduation

Students’ qualifications will be reviewed and you will receive a response within a week. Students are encouraged to check their email frequently once they apply as time sensitive information may be sent to you if you are accepted for induction.

There is a one-time induction fee of $50 payable to the national organization. The induction ceremony will be held on Monday, April 9 at 2:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. in the Harrington Learning Center room 109A . Friends and family are welcome to attend.

Interested in psychology but not sure you meet the Psi Beta requirements? QCC’s Psychology Club offers students a way to learn and engage in psychology beyond the classroom with numerous psychology-based activities throughout the year.  

Psi Beta and the Psychology Club will meet in room 239 of the Harrington Learning Center during the spring semester. Meetings are every other Wednesday, from noon to 1:00 p.m. beginning on January 29 and ending on April 22. For questions, contact vclemente [at] qcc.mass.edu (Professor Clemente).

  • QCC students in the Black Student Union were part of the College's Club Rush event.
January, 2020

Tuesday, February 4:  “Introduction to Meditation” from 10:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m., is part of a four-week “Mindfulness Series,” in February, designed to help students learn to be less anxious and overwhelmed. Each session helps attendees learn how to better self-regulate. Each Tuesday, from 10:00 -11:00 a.m. there will be a new session. February 11- Body Relaxation;...

More...

Tuesday, February 4:  “Introduction to Meditation” from 10:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m., is part of a four-week “Mindfulness Series,” in February, designed to help students learn to be less anxious and overwhelmed. Each session helps attendees learn how to better self-regulate. Each Tuesday, from 10:00 -11:00 a.m. there will be a new session. February 11- Body Relaxation; February 18 – Cognitive Behavior Techniques and February 25 – Loving Kindness. To learn more about the series contact Tina Wells, director of Counseling and Wellness at twells [at] qcc.mass.edu

Thursday, February 6: Learn about the Walt Disney World College Program from 2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. in room 272A (Administration Building on QCC’s main campus). This is a paid internship open to students in all majors. To learn more or to register for the event, call Nichole Wheeler, coordinator of Career Services & Credit for Prior Learning at 508.854.7476 or stop by Career Services in room 272A.

Tuesday, February 18: Career Services is hosting a three-part workshop series focusing on the essentials of business ownership.  “Steps to Start a Business,” is the second part in this series and will take place at 11:00 a.m. in the Harrington Learning Center, room 109B.  This is open to all students and all majors. The event is sponsored and facilitated by Michelle Miller from the Center for Women & Enterprise.  For questions contact Career Services at 508-854-4439.

Tuesday, February 18: Free dinners for QCC students and their families at the Greendale People’s Church from 6:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. at 25 Francis Street, Worcester. RSVP to burbanczyk [at] campusone80.com

February Spotlight: Winter/Spring Transfer Services FAQ and Workshop Series: These workshops are designed to give students quick information and answers to transfer questions and issues. These workshops will be held in February and March in the Harrington Learning Center, Egan Conference room 239. Below are the February dates and times. Please note: bolded dates will include a workshop during the first hour which covers transfer basics. For questions, call 508.854.4404 or email transfer [at] qcc.mass.edu

Tuesday, 2/4, 2-4 p.m.

Thursday, 2/6, 10:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

Monday, 2/10, 9:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

Wednesday, 2/12, 2:00 p.m. -4:00 p.m.

Friday, 2/14, 1:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.

Tuesday, 2/18, 10:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

Thursday, 2/20, 9:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

Monday, 2/24, 10 a.m.-12 p.m.

*Wednesday, 2/26, 9-11 a.m.

Friday, 2/28, 1-3 p.m.