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April, 2017

April, 2017
April, 2017

The Women of Distinction event was held April 19 in the Harrington Learning Center to recognize students who have overcome great odds or made a difference in their community.

Brenda Safford, Program Coordinator of Human Services and assistant professor at QCC, spoke to the students about her experiences. Ms. Safford attended QCC, graduating in 1998 with her Associate degree before...

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The Women of Distinction event was held April 19 in the Harrington Learning Center to recognize students who have overcome great odds or made a difference in their community.

Brenda Safford, Program Coordinator of Human Services and assistant professor at QCC, spoke to the students about her experiences. Ms. Safford attended QCC, graduating in 1998 with her Associate degree before attending Assumption College, where she received her bachelor of science and master’s degree in science of Human Services and Rehabilitation Counseling. She previously was director of the Career Resource Center at the YWCA of Central Massachusetts. She was named one of QCC’s 50 Guardians.

Women students who distinguished themselves by overcoming great odds and/or who made a difference in their community were nominated for the award by faculty members.

There were 28 recipients of the award this year.

President Carberry ended the ceremony with kind words of how proud the nominees should be, and wished them the best in their future endeavors.

The event included time for honorees and faculty who they were nominated by to socialize and light refreshments were served.

April, 2017
April, 2017

Earlier this month the Quinsigamond Community College chapter of Phi Theta Kappa welcomed new members at its annual induction ceremony.

This is the largest induction in the history of the chapter, with 188 new members being welcomed. The QCC chapter of the honor society has 488 active members.

Faculty advisor Bonnie Coleman said the chapter has worked hard the past few years to become...

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Earlier this month the Quinsigamond Community College chapter of Phi Theta Kappa welcomed new members at its annual induction ceremony.

This is the largest induction in the history of the chapter, with 188 new members being welcomed. The QCC chapter of the honor society has 488 active members.

Faculty advisor Bonnie Coleman said the chapter has worked hard the past few years to become more active, not only with different community projects but new members. At the recent international convention, the chapter was named one of the Top 50 Chapters.

The purpose of Phi Theta Kappa is to recognize and encourage scholarship among two-year college students. To achieve this purpose, Phi Theta Kappa provides opportunity for the development of leadership and service, for an intellectual climate for exchange of ideas and ideals, for lively fellowship for scholars, and for stimulation of interest in continuing academic excellence.

Membership is by invitation only, to be invited the student must have a cumulative grade point average of 3.5 with 16 college credits earned at Quinsigamond Community College. Invitations are sent out in the Fall and Spring semesters.

The chapter has been working on the Live & Learn Greenhouse Project on the QCC campus. Ms. Coleman said construction will be underway this spring, and they hope to have the greenhouse up and running in May, depending on the weather.

A $16,500 grant will partially fund the greenhouse, where students will grow vegetables and plants. Ms. Coleman said they plan to start with herbs, cucumbers and tomatoes and then add new items each season. There also will be a “Plant A Seed’ project with the Early Childhood Education program, where children can come in to plant a seed and watch it grow.

April, 2017
April, 2017

The annual Honors Program Showcase gives students a chance to display their poster and presentation on their honors research from this semester’s Honors Colloquium, “Rewriting Ourselves: An Exploration of Emerging Paradigms.” 

The showcase was held April 27, in the Harrington Learning Center, and was open to faculty and students. Eleven students researched topics ranging from the future...

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The annual Honors Program Showcase gives students a chance to display their poster and presentation on their honors research from this semester’s Honors Colloquium, “Rewriting Ourselves: An Exploration of Emerging Paradigms.” 

The showcase was held April 27, in the Harrington Learning Center, and was open to faculty and students. Eleven students researched topics ranging from the future of employment to the use of artificial intelligence. The students also presented their projects at the University of Massachusetts Amherst at the annual Undergraduate Research Conference on April 28.

English Professor Susan McPherson, and Jean Kennedy, Human Services professor, co-taught the Honors Capstone Course, which honors students are required to take to graduate. It is a seminar-style course, each student works on a research project for the semester with the goal to create a scholarly writing project and presentation. This is one of the requirements of the Commonwealth Honors Scholars program, and helps students prepare for the four-year college experience.

The following students were involved in this year’s Honors Program:

  • Richmond Amoako (BT): The Future of Employment
  • Leah Berthiaume (GSHC): The Evolution of Consciousness: Qualia vs Attention Schema Theory
  • Kristi Door (LA): The Rise of Neopaganism in the West
  • Rachel Ferdinand (LA): Millennials: A New American Ideology
  • Amanda LeBeau (GS): The Illusion of Death
  • Nathan Manna (Gateway): The Theatricality of Reality
  • Peter Orlovsky (GS): Drug-Resistant Bacteria
  • Alondra Pichardo (LA-PSY): Artificial Intelligence: Are We Ready for It?
  • Cristian Robles (BT): The Rise of Populism and Rejection of Globalism
  • Maximus Seale (BT): The Rise of Artificial Intelligence and Self Driving Cars
  • Mary Tremblay (LA): Mindfulness: The Future Cure for Psychological Disorders

The Honors Program at QCC is accredited by the Massachusetts Department of Higher Education as a Commonwealth Honors Program. It is part of an integrated, collaborative system-wide network of honors programs in Massachusetts public higher education. Students participating in the Honors Program:

  • Complete selected courses on an Honors level.
  • Participate in an Honors Colloquium.
  • Participate in cultural and social events.
  • Receive personal guidance and peer support.
  • Increase their transfer and scholarship opportunities.

For more information about the Honors Program and Showcase, visit the Commonwealth Honors program page.

April, 2017
April, 2017

The Quinsigamond Community College chapter of Alpha Zeta Theta Chapter was recognized recently at the Phi Theta Kappa International Convention, held in Nashville, Tenn., on April 6-9.

Ms. Coleman said each year the chapter works for eight months researching an Honors Topic, while taking full-time classes. Many members also have jobs and families. Through hard work and community involvement, the...

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The Quinsigamond Community College chapter of Alpha Zeta Theta Chapter was recognized recently at the Phi Theta Kappa International Convention, held in Nashville, Tenn., on April 6-9.

Ms. Coleman said each year the chapter works for eight months researching an Honors Topic, while taking full-time classes. Many members also have jobs and families. Through hard work and community involvement, the chapter members strive to become a Five Star Chapter.

This year at the Phi Theta Kappa International Convention the chapter received many awards. A total of 1,976 entries were received in the 2017 Hallmark Awards completion. The 2017 International Awards the QCC chapter received are:

  • Distinguished Honors in Action Project Awards: The Honors in Action Project Award recognizes the top chapters whose Honors in Action Project entries demonstrated excellence in academic research into the Honors Study topic, leadership roles and leadership development activities, service learning and collaboration.
  • Distinguished Top 50 Chapters: Out of 1,342 chapters, QCC’s chapter was named one of the Top 50.
  • Administrator Awards: Awards are presented to college presidents, campus CEOs at two-year or senior institutions, and state community college directors who have been supportive of Phi Theta Kappa, and are retiring from their careers. The award is in honor of the late Dr. Michael Bennett, longtime president of St. Petersburg College in Florida. QCC President Dr. Gail Carberry received a Michael Bennet Lifetime Achievement Award. Dr. Carberry is retiring at the end of this school year after being president at QCC for 11 years.

Ms. Coleman said outgoing officers Kimberly May, Ethan O’Connell, Leah Boutelle, Tony Sanders, Mary Sylvester, Laurence Fankep, Tashena Matthew, Toby Ajayi, John Snyder and Holden Lindblom all worked hard to support the chapter.

April, 2017
April, 2017

As QCC students geared up for final exams, a peak stress time, Disability Services arranged for PAWS for People to visit campus before exams began. PAWS for People is affiliated with Tufts University’s Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine and is a Community Partner of Pet Partners, Inc. The volunteer animal-handler teams are registered to visit a variety of settings such as...

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As QCC students geared up for final exams, a peak stress time, Disability Services arranged for PAWS for People to visit campus before exams began. PAWS for People is affiliated with Tufts University’s Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine and is a Community Partner of Pet Partners, Inc. The volunteer animal-handler teams are registered to visit a variety of settings such as campuses, libraries, elder-care facilities, and hospitals. This April, PAWS for a Study Break, brought registered therapy dogs, cats, and a miniature horse to campus.

This spring, due to inclement weather, the program was held inside the Fuller Student Center. Students were delighted to sit on the floor next to the dogs, petting their fur and rubbing their heads. Autumn the cat was fine with being held by different students while Gypsy, the miniature horse, was the biggest surprise for many students who exclaimed over her petite size. Many students posed for “selfies” with their new friends.

The following week, the weather was nicer, and Angel Hair Alpacas came to visit outside the Fuller Student Center. Students were very excited to pet their coats and ask questions of owners Jay Cohen and Maureen Agley who brought two adult alpacas, Acorn and Sargon, from their farm in North Grafton. Students were encouraged to touch their dense fur and feed the alpacas from their hands. Several brave students tried this and were surprised to find how soft the alpaca lips felt against their skin. The Cohen’s son Jamie attends QCC, and came by for a quick visit between classes. 

Thank you to Deb Gibbs, Program Coordinator at Tufts University, for coordinating animal-handler teams for this visit. Additionally, thank you to Angel Hair Alpacas for a well-received visit to campus and educating us on the nuances of alpacas.  Moreover, thank you Michael Beane, Director of Student Life and Leadership and his staff for hosting all the animals at the Fuller Student Center!  Disability Services staff who contribute to this program each semester are Kristie Proctor, Director, and Terri Rodriguez, Associate Director, of Disability Services

April, 2017
April, 2017

QCC hosted Denim Day to bring awareness to Sexual Awareness Month and the issue of sexual assault on college campuses.

Students were invited to wear jeans with a purpose on April 26, when QCC Campus Police sponsored Sexual Assault Awareness Day.

Many students came out, as well as QCC President Gail Carberry, wearing a denim jacket, to sign a pledge and discuss the importance of...

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QCC hosted Denim Day to bring awareness to Sexual Awareness Month and the issue of sexual assault on college campuses.

Students were invited to wear jeans with a purpose on April 26, when QCC Campus Police sponsored Sexual Assault Awareness Day.

Many students came out, as well as QCC President Gail Carberry, wearing a denim jacket, to sign a pledge and discuss the importance of awareness about misconceptions and misinformation about rape and sexual assault.

April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month. The two events are intended to draw attention to the fact that rape and sexual assault remains a serious issue in our society and harmful attitudes about rape and sexual assault allow these crimes to persist and allow victim/survivors to be re-victimized; and “Sexual Assault Awareness Month” and “Denim Day” were also instituted to call attention to the problem that many in society remain disturbingly uninformed with respect to issues of assault and forcible rape.

The event was held to help communicate the message that there is “no excuse and never an invitation to rape.”

QCC Campus Police also recently held a self-defense class, RAD, (Rape, Assault Defense) Class, with QCC Police Officer Catherine Dixon. The four-session class was open to students, faculty, staff and family members. The free classes were conducted in the fall and spring. 

April, 2017
April, 2017

The “Who We Are and What We Do: Opportunities for Inclusion” Panel was part of QCC’s Diversity Week, a week for QCC to celebrate its diversity and raise awareness.

The panel discussion included several Worcester community leaders, such as Sharon McQueen, a LGBTQ Liaison Officer from the Worcester Police Department and Lt. Catherine Dixon, the Community Outreach Officer from...

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The “Who We Are and What We Do: Opportunities for Inclusion” Panel was part of QCC’s Diversity Week, a week for QCC to celebrate its diversity and raise awareness.

The panel discussion included several Worcester community leaders, such as Sharon McQueen, a LGBTQ Liaison Officer from the Worcester Police Department and Lt. Catherine Dixon, the Community Outreach Officer from the QCC Campus Police, who spoke about their professional and personal journeys to their current positions. QCC Board of Trustees member Miguel A. Lopez, a lieutenant in the Worcester Police Department and QCC alumni, also participated in the panel.

Following the panel, held on April 5, there was further discussion panel, “What Makes You Unique,” where students could discuss the culture at QCC, their personal hobbies, what their religion means to them and share their own journeys in life.

Kelly Lamond, Program Assistant for Student Life at QCC, said the room was packed in the Fuller Student Center and the engaging conversation from the inclusion panel continued into the next panel discussion. She said students discussed everything from what it means to be a Muslim woman at QCC to anime and gaming culture, to social stigma surrounding tattoos. 

April, 2017
April, 2017

The Psi Beta Honor Society hosted its annual Psych Fest in April. The event features spoken word, music performances and more.

The event benefits YOU Inc.’s substance abuse treatment program for adolescents.

The Psi Beta Honor Society and Psychology Club host the event, which was on April 7 in Hebert Auditorium.

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The Psi Beta Honor Society hosted its annual Psych Fest in April. The event features spoken word, music performances and more.

The event benefits YOU Inc.’s substance abuse treatment program for adolescents.

The Psi Beta Honor Society and Psychology Club host the event, which was on April 7 in Hebert Auditorium.

April, 2017
April, 2017

In an effort to support immigrants and refugees in the college community, QCC hosted an event and discussions to combat racism.

On Friday, April 28, QCC worked with the YWCA to host an event taking a Stand Against Racism. The topic of the event was “Immigration and Race in Our Communities,” and the day included two panel discussions, a lunch and the showing of a film. The discussions were to...

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In an effort to support immigrants and refugees in the college community, QCC hosted an event and discussions to combat racism.

On Friday, April 28, QCC worked with the YWCA to host an event taking a Stand Against Racism. The topic of the event was “Immigration and Race in Our Communities,” and the day included two panel discussions, a lunch and the showing of a film. The discussions were to explore the realities facing immigrants, refugees and transnational migrants in Central Massachusetts.

The first panel discussion, “Our Stories,” included QCC students, faculty and staff speaking about their experiences as newcomers to the United States. The second panel discussion, “Realities, Supports, Resources,” included local area service providers and immigrant advocates who shared information and practical resources.

In between the panels, lunch was provided and there was a showing of the film, Ni Aqui, Ni Alla (Neither Here, Nor There), by Gabriela Bortolamedi, about the challenges faced by an undocumented college student and her family.

Students, faculty and staff can show their support by wearing a Stand Against Racism wristband, signifying their commitment to promoting peace, justice, freedom and dignity for all people. The wristbands will be distributed in locations around campus, or you may obtain one by calling ext. 4368 or stopping by the President’s Ofiice, room 132A

For the fifth year in a row, there will be a Stand Against Racism banner available for signing. Students were able to sign the banner at the events on April 28, and it was also available for signing in the Healthcare and Workforce Development Center earlier that week.

For further information, contact the Diversity Caucus Chairman Trent Masiki at tmasiki [at] qcc.mass.edu or SAR Project Leader Anne Shull at ashull [at] qcc.mass.edu

April, 2017
April, 2017

The Cultural Festival was held on April 5 as part of QCC’s Diversity Week, which was sponsored by the QCC Student Life Office. It included a Cultural Food Fest with different cultural food examples.

Community-based cultural events bring people together in many ways to express their ideas, traditions and values. The event had tunes by DJ Sprino, who played music from around the world; Indian dancers,...

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The Cultural Festival was held on April 5 as part of QCC’s Diversity Week, which was sponsored by the QCC Student Life Office. It included a Cultural Food Fest with different cultural food examples.

Community-based cultural events bring people together in many ways to express their ideas, traditions and values. The event had tunes by DJ Sprino, who played music from around the world; Indian dancers, origami instruction, and a henna artist. Kelly Lamond, Program Assistant for Student Life at QCC, said about 200-250 students stopped by to try various foods and enjoy the events. 

Diversity Week, from April 3-5, also included movie screenings of Selma, about the civil rights movement and the march from Selma to Montgomery; Tickling Giants, about an Egyptian satirical show that has been compared to The Daily Show; and The Out List, a documentary film that features a diverse cross-section of accomplished leaders from entertainment, business, sports and public service sharing stories about their childhood, understanding gender and sexuality and building careers while out and reflecting on the challenges facing the LGBT community. 

The events were sponsored by the Office of Student Life and the Diversity Caucus, in partnership with other student clubs and organizations.

April, 2017
April, 2017

Children’s School students get to show off their creativity and hard work at the QCC Children’s School Art Show.

The art show opening was held April 25, during the Week of the Young Child. This is the eighth year the Children’s School has held the popular event.

“It was a wonderful event, children, parents and grandparents and more attended to see the children’s art work,...

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Children’s School students get to show off their creativity and hard work at the QCC Children’s School Art Show.

The art show opening was held April 25, during the Week of the Young Child. This is the eighth year the Children’s School has held the popular event.

“It was a wonderful event, children, parents and grandparents and more attended to see the children’s art work,” said Janet McKeon, Associate Director of the Children’s School at QCC. “It is a great way to showcase the children’s creativity. The children get so excited to show their work.”

The artwork is on display in the hallways and classrooms, for QCC students and faculty to visit. “People walk by and say how much they love the art,” Ms. McKeon said.

There also was a slide show video shown of the students creating and working on their art shown at the opening. Light refreshments were served. Art work includes table and easel paintings, 3-D art with foam, wood and metals. Various other art with water colors, 3-D chalk, tempera paint, and bio colors used with different instruments on a variety of surfaces such as foil, filters, canvas and paper were hung in the hallways and room 107A.

In Classroom I, children helped create a kindness tree. It was a collaborative piece, children were involved in decorating the tree, and then classroom teachers would write down when the children used kind words and kind gestures and post it on the tree. The exercise was part of the curriculum and helping children learn to be kinder to others.

There are 51 children enrolled in the Children’s School. The Children’s School provides full-day programs open to students enrolled in the college with children ages two years and nine months to five years old, as well as to member of the college and community. The school also serves as a training site for students in the Early Childhood Education Program.

This event is made possible by the dedication of the teachers, faculty and ECE students. Other college departments such as Food Services, Facilities and the Print Shop support this event. The Art Exhibit would not be successful without our young artists and their family and extended family members.

For more information about the Quinsigamond Children’s School, visit the Children's School website, contact Director Nancy Knight at nknight [at] qcc.mass.edu or call 508.854.4220. 

April, 2017
April, 2017

Quinsigamond Community College, in association with Fitchburg State University, presented “12 Angry Jurors,” a powerful play about the American legal system.

Margaret Wong, Professor of English at QCC, said the production was superb. “The actors completely inhabited their respective roles. With most productions, to enjoy a play, audience members generally have to make a...

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Quinsigamond Community College, in association with Fitchburg State University, presented “12 Angry Jurors,” a powerful play about the American legal system.

Margaret Wong, Professor of English at QCC, said the production was superb. “The actors completely inhabited their respective roles. With most productions, to enjoy a play, audience members generally have to make a concerted effort to maintain a suspension of disbelief. With this performance, however, audience members had to constantly remind themselves that they were watching a play. There were many moments that I wanted to spring from my seat to argue against the bigotry of Juror No. 10 or lend a supportive word to Juror No. 8.”

She said the play’s contents were timely and relevant. The play, written by Reginald Rose, was made into a movie in 1957 “12 Angry Men” and was viewed as a powerful indictment of the trial by jury system.

Victor Somma, Assistant Vice President of Extended Campuses Operations and Community Engagement at QCC, said the QCC Theatre Club performed a stunning rendering of the play.

“You are in the room with the jurors, almost making you want to be part of their decision process. Guilty or not guilty? You will be surprised!”

Performances were held on April 27, 28 and 29 at 7:30 p.m. in the Harrington Learning Center.

The play was directed by Nick Wakely, adjunct professor of theatre production at QCC.

Special thanks to Quinsigamond Community College President Gail Carberry, Dean of Humanities Clarence Ates and Karole Hager, Director of Auxiliary Services, QCC Public Safety. From Fitchburg State University, the production wants to thank University President Richard Lapidus, Communications Media Chairperson Mary Baker, Head of Theatre Kelly Morgan, Denise Alexander and Peter Anderregg, Manager of the Fitchburg Law Library.

The production also wants to thank the Reginald Rose Foundation. 

April, 2017
April, 2017

Six students won $50 gift certificates to the QCC Bookstore as part of a Priority Registration raffle. The winners are:

  • Rebecca Fisher
  • Pria Nesta
  • Pamela Corriveau
  • Ashley Blackman
  • Edward Mugaragu
  • Joseph Diaz Rentas
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Six students won $50 gift certificates to the QCC Bookstore as part of a Priority Registration raffle. The winners are:

  • Rebecca Fisher
  • Pria Nesta
  • Pamela Corriveau
  • Ashley Blackman
  • Edward Mugaragu
  • Joseph Diaz Rentas
April, 2017
April, 2017

QCC has several new testimonials and commercials coming out to showcase different opportunities at the college. The Marketing Office has been working on new materials, such as summer and fall semester postcards, a new 2017 enrollment guide and area of study brochures.

Those interested in finding out more about the QCC community can also check out the ...

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QCC has several new testimonials and commercials coming out to showcase different opportunities at the college. The Marketing Office has been working on new materials, such as summer and fall semester postcards, a new 2017 enrollment guide and area of study brochures.

Those interested in finding out more about the QCC community can also check out the Wyvern TV page.

You also can watch episodes of Face the Region, a weekly show about QCC events, organizations and offerings on QCC's Face the Region page.

All new brochures have been created about Student Life, Disability Services, financial aid, testing, tutoring and more. These can be seen online on the marketing collateral section.

The new commercials and testimonials have information about transfer opportunities; how QCC supports careers with flexible schedules, online courses and different locations; and how QCC supports students through career counseling and financial aid. They will be broadcast throughout the region on television and the web.

With more than 100 degree and certificate programs, full- and part-time course options, online courses, transfer paths to four-year colleges and financing options, QCC has something to offer everyone.

April, 2017
April, 2017

We are very pleased to announce the following full-time staff update:

On April 24, 2017, Administrative Services welcomed Dillon George in to a new role as Campus Police Officer I. Mr. George brings to this position a passion for law enforcement. He has a license to carry in Massachusetts, is CPR and AED certified and he is a graduate of the Worcester Police Department Academy’s basic...

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We are very pleased to announce the following full-time staff update:

On April 24, 2017, Administrative Services welcomed Dillon George in to a new role as Campus Police Officer I. Mr. George brings to this position a passion for law enforcement. He has a license to carry in Massachusetts, is CPR and AED certified and he is a graduate of the Worcester Police Department Academy’s basic training course for police officers. Mr. George earned a Bachelor’s of Science in Criminal Justice with a focus in Forensic Criminology from Anna Maria College.

Please join us in welcoming Mr. George into his new roles at QCC. 

March, 2017

March, 2017
March, 2017

Quinsigamond Community College Board of Trustees has named Dr. Luis Pedraja as its pick to succeed President Dr. Gail Carberry when she retires at the end of the school year.

Dr. Pedraja’s nomination now must be approved by the state Board of Higher Education, which is scheduled to vote on his appointment in May.

Dr. Pedraja visited the West Boylston Street...

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Quinsigamond Community College Board of Trustees has named Dr. Luis Pedraja as its pick to succeed President Dr. Gail Carberry when she retires at the end of the school year.

Dr. Pedraja’s nomination now must be approved by the state Board of Higher Education, which is scheduled to vote on his appointment in May.

Dr. Pedraja visited the West Boylston Street campus as part of the interview process in March.

“I am deeply honored to have been chosen as Quinsigamond’s next president,” he said. “(My wife) Leigh and I truly enjoyed the warm welcome we received during our visit and are excited to join such a wonderful college and community.”

As a child, Dr. Pedraja emigrated from Cuba and grew up in a low-income Miami neighborhood. He became the first in his family to attend college; and he later earned a Ph.D. from the University of Virginia.

Currently, Dr. Pedraja serves as Interim Vice Chancellor of Academic Affairs for California’s 35,000-student Peralta Community College District, where he leads faculty, staff, and administrators to develop innovative programs and ensure student success. The district includes four colleges.

From 2011-2016, Dr. Pedraja was Provost and Vice President of Academic Affairs at Antioch University Los Angeles, a non-profit institution serving adult students with bachelor degree completion and professional graduate programs. His career has also included teaching stints at the University of Puget Sound and Southern Methodist University.

“During my visit, I could tell that Quinsigamond’s faculty and staff share my commitment to helping students succeed. I am confident that through our efforts we can continue to serve our community with distinction; and that we can achieve national recognition as a leader in ensuring student success for all our students, specifically first-generation and low-income students.”

Learn more about the presidential search and Dr. Pedraja’s qualifications on the Presidential Search page.
 

March, 2017
March, 2017

Julie de Oliveira, who is studying liberal arts at Quinsigamond Community College, recently had a poem published in Acentos Review.

Born and raised in Worcester, Ms. de Oliveira, 20, writes short stories and poetry that bring light to silenced voices of Brazilian immigrants and the fairly recent phenomena of the Brazilian diaspora in America and finding their identity within the U.S. Latino...

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Julie de Oliveira, who is studying liberal arts at Quinsigamond Community College, recently had a poem published in Acentos Review.

Born and raised in Worcester, Ms. de Oliveira, 20, writes short stories and poetry that bring light to silenced voices of Brazilian immigrants and the fairly recent phenomena of the Brazilian diaspora in America and finding their identity within the U.S. Latino community.

“I don’t see many Brazilian writers in the Latin climate, and I think it is important to create a space for that, to write about the Brazilian diaspora.”

Her parents immigrated to the United States when her mother was pregnant with her in 1995. “My parents didn’t get a green card until 2008, and that was the first time they were able to go back to Brazil to visit since leaving. I have been to Brazil a handful of time, and I have a very big family there that I keep in close contact with,” she said.

“My writing is largely influenced by members of the Brazilian community, I consider them my family more so than my actual family members in Brazil. Their stories are all different, but they still share a similar connection, of being displaced in a way. Many of them are unable to go back home to their families because of their immigration status, they are alone without access to resources like welfare or health insurance because of lack of documentation. They are the strongest people I know.”

She will be graduating in May with an associate’s degree in liberal arts. She plans to pursue a bachelor’s degree in English with a concentration in Latin American/Latino studies.

When she was taking a poetry class with Professor Trent Masiki, he encouraged her to submit her poems to various literary publications. One of her poems “Saudade” was published in the Acentos Review, a quarterly literary and arts journal that promotes and publishes LatinX work.

From her powerful poem “Saudade”:

We yearn to find the word for saudade in
English, because the definition
Of nostalgia can't come close.
We don't miss our home, but rather,
Brazil is missing from us.

“I was so excited, that was the first time I was published,” she said. “I obsess over my poems, there is a lot of editing involved.”

She said she became interested in journaling after her younger brother passed away in 2012. She then used her journaling for prose and structured poems, and uses entries to inspire her poetry.

“He was only 18 months old when he passed away a week after my 16th birthday,” Ms. De Oliveira said. “He was the only sibling I had. I’m very grateful for the time, albeit short, that I had with him.”

Ms. De Oliveira graduated from Burncoat High School in 2014. “I decided to attend QCC to give me more time to think about what I wanted to do next,” she said. “I wanted to explore my options.”

She works full-time as a receptionist at a psychiatric clinic. “At QCC, I could be more flexible with my schedule,” she said. She has taken night courses and online courses as well as day classes.

She said she has really enjoyed her classes at QCC, especially a Humanities class with Michael Gormley, assistant professor of English, where she could be creative with her work. She took two creative writing classes with John Stazinski, associate professor of English, who she said gave her space to work with her stories and improve her writing.

March, 2017
March, 2017

Members of the Alpha Zeta Theta Chapter recently attended the New England Regional PTK Conference in Concord, New Hampshire. Quinsigamond Community College PTK President Kimberly May, Vice President of Leadership Ethan O’Connell and lead faculty advisor Bonnie Coleman attended the event. The chapter received many outstanding awards, which included:

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Members of the Alpha Zeta Theta Chapter recently attended the New England Regional PTK Conference in Concord, New Hampshire. Quinsigamond Community College PTK President Kimberly May, Vice President of Leadership Ethan O’Connell and lead faculty advisor Bonnie Coleman attended the event. The chapter received many outstanding awards, which included:

  • Honors in Action Most Distinguished Chapter
  • Most Distinguished Chapter in New England Region (56 chapters)
  • College Project Award – Most Distinguished
  • Honors in Action Distinguished Theme Award – Theme 7 Innovation and Replication

“This was a team effort and without the support of our QCC Family this would not have happened,” said Ms. Coleman.

The College Project recognized was the Live & Learn Greenhouse Project on the QCC campus. Ms. Coleman said construction will be underway this spring, and they hope to have the greenhouse up and running in May, depending on the weather.

A $16,500 grant will partially fund the greenhouse, where students will grow vegetables and plants. Ms. Coleman said they plan to start with herbs, cucumbers and tomatoes and then add new items each season. There also will be a “Plant A Seed’ project with the Early Childhood Education program, where children can come in to plant a seed and watch it grow.

PTK is accepting donations of pots, potting soil, seeds, shelving, lighting or cash donations. The students will be working with a botanist, who is a part-time faculty member, to learn more about the process.

The mission of the Live & Learn Greenhouse Project is to renew connections between people and the natural environment, create a resource of healthy, nutrient-rich food for the Quinsigamond Community College community, and provide an educational resource for students, faculty, staff, and children.

Different students and programs will be able to use the greenhouse and learn more about various growing methods, such as hydroponics, to raise awareness about the natural environment. Plans are to start construction soon and then in spring 2017 bring on faculty that want to be involved.

The idea came about because of food insecurity on campus. According to Higher Education Today, many college students struggle with food insecurity. This can be especially true at community colleges, where many students are non-traditional age. Feeding America, a national nonprofit network of food banks that provides food assistance to 46.5 million individuals and 15.5 million households, estimates that nearly half (49.3 percent) of its clients in college must choose between educational expenses (i.e., tuition, books and supplies, rent) and food annually, and that 21 percent did so for a full 12 months.

Ms. Coleman said they plan for it to be a four-season greenhouse. They also plan to grow poinsettias in the future, to be sold to raise money for the project.

PTK also is in the second year of an ongoing campaign to support children’s literacy through the Worcester mobile library, bookmobile “Lilly.” With the support of the QCC Foundation, the chapter pledged to raise $100,000 to fund the continued operation of the Worcester Public Library bookmobile, which visits schools and community events.

The chapter recently donated $20,000 as part of the campaign. QCC partnered with Worcester State and the United Way of Massachusetts last spring for the makeover effort.

The purpose of Phi Theta Kappa is to recognize and encourage scholarship among two-year college students. To achieve this purpose, Phi Theta Kappa provides opportunity for the development of leadership and service, for an intellectual climate for exchange of ideas and ideals, for lively fellowship for scholars, and for stimulation of interest in continuing academic excellence.

Membership is by invitation only, to be invited the student must have a cumulative grade point average of 3.5 with 16 college credits earned at Quinsigamond Community College. Invitations are sent out in the fall and spring semesters.

QCC’s chapter has 488 active members. On April 5, PTK will host the induction of new members, welcome 188 new members, the largest induction in the history of the chapter.

Ms. Coleman will be attending the national PTK conference in Nashville, Tenn., along with outgoing PTK President Kimberly May, Vice President of Leadership Ethan O’Connell, and chapter officers Stephanie Collins and Tony Sanders. The conference will be April 6-9.

March, 2017
March, 2017

When Kimberly May began her journey at Quinsigamond Community College, she was employed full-time at Reliant Medical Group, but for her to move forward in her career, she realized she would need to pursue a higher education. Becoming a student at QCC not only led to more career opportunities, but also led to leadership roles.

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When Kimberly May began her journey at Quinsigamond Community College, she was employed full-time at Reliant Medical Group, but for her to move forward in her career, she realized she would need to pursue a higher education. Becoming a student at QCC not only led to more career opportunities, but also led to leadership roles.

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Having held supervisory roles in both her current and past jobs, she felt capable of performing in an upper level management position. However, she was faced with the fact that she lacked a degree. Having been turned down twice in her pursuit to obtain a higher position was what ultimately catapulted her to initiate the first step towards her higher educational journey.

 “I was fearful when I first came to QCC as a non-traditional student,” said the 45-year-old mother of two. “I suffered from reading comprehension issues during my primary and secondary years, which impacted my academic performance and often resulted in having to memorize concepts in order to perform well on exams. I was an average student who struggled.”

Upon coming to QCC, she took advantage of the services offered, such as the math lab. “I was motivated once I got here, but as soon as I began obtaining good grades, that motivated me further. As a result of my tireless efforts, I got invited to the Commonwealth Honors program and began taking honors level courses.”

Ms. May has been named a “29 Who Shine” scholar by the state of Massachusetts.

Since 2011, the state Department of Higher Education has named an annual list of outstanding graduates from the Commonwealth’s public higher education system. The winners will be celebrated at a ceremony at the Statehouse in Boston in May. Award winners are selected on the basis of their academic success as well as their records of leadership and community service.

“It has been a truly humbling experience,” she said. “I was surprised to learn I was named the recipient of this award, and I was proud of how well I performed as a non-traditional student. It goes to show that hard work really does pay off.”

During her tenure, she was involved in the TRiO Student Support Services program, a federally funded program that provides support and services to students, enabling them to achieve their academic and career goals. She was an officer of the Alpha Zeta Theta Chapter of Phi Theta Kappa, an international honor society, as well as a member of Psi Beta Honor Society for Psychology.

She originally started part-time, but became a full-time student when she entered the nursing program. While in the program, she was the Liaison for the Workforce and Development Center, a new position that was created to support PTK at the downtown campus.

But in 2015, her world was turned upside down when her 23-year-long marriage unraveled and she suffered a traumatic experience that would have an impact her schooling. “I was devastated after getting eliminated from the nursing program as a result of all the adversities that I faced. However, the support and encouragement that I received from Bonnie Coleman (faculty advisor for PTK), the members of the chapter, faculty members and from my family and friends acted as a vehicle, and motivated me to continue my studies. QCC, and PTK in particular, has been like a second family for me,” she said. “I am so grateful for all the opportunities that have been afforded to me. As a child, I was a shy individual, but the training I have received through PTK has really helped me grow personally and professionally.”

Ms. May will graduate this spring with two degrees, an associate’s degree in general studies, and an associate’s degree in general studies healthcare. She plans to transfer her credits to Northeastern University to pursue a bachelor’s degree in healthcare management.

Ms. May received scholarships through the QCC Foundation, the Paul Connell Memorial Scholarship and the Alumni Scholarship. She was also named a Women of Distinction for 2015.

“Kimberly May deserves this award because of her dedication to our chapter and our school,” Ms. Coleman said. “Kim has high academic achievement and has been a leader throughout this year in our chapter. She embraces every situation, good or bad, as a way of learning. I am extremely grateful for Kim, she has been an inspiration to all our members and her officer team.”

Being involved in PTK has led to some unique experiences, such as being on the Hank Stolz radio show, Face the Region, and filming a QCC video commercial.

“I chose to become president of PTK and devote a year of selfless service to the members of the chapter and the school, because I wanted to say thank you for all the support and encouragement that I received, not only when at my lowest ebb, but all throughout my journey,” she said.

She has been involved in the fundraising efforts to support “Lilly,” Worcester Public Library’s newest bookmobile, which visits area schools and family events. “It is a very important project,” she said. “Due to budget constraints, a lot of schools in the Worcester area no longer have libraries, so a lot of children don’t have access to library books. In Worcester, statistics show that roughly 59% of students entering the fourth grade are not reading with proficiency.”

In 2014, PTK voted to help sustain Lilly with a pledge of $100,000 over three years. The pledge is supported by the QCC Foundation.

She also has been involved with the Live & Learn Greenhouse initiative, a gardening project that aims to renew the connections between people and the natural environment, provide healthy, nutrient-rich food for the Quinsigamond Community College community, and will serve as an educational tool for students, faculty, staff and children.

“The most rewarding part of serving in a leadership capacity is the ability to cultivate new leaders and inspire others,” she said. “We’ve seen tremendous growth in our chapter this academic year, as a result of the officer team’s efforts to increase awareness here on campus.”

She will be attending the international PTK leadership conference in Nashville, Tenn., in April, where she has been bestowed the honor of representing the state of Massachusetts as flag bearer during the Parade of Flags Ceremony.

Ms. May will be the first in her family to graduate with a professional degree. She has two children, Colleen, 20, and Brianna, 23, both of whom reside in Massachusetts.

March, 2017
March, 2017

A QCC student was named one of the finalists in the College Poetry Competition.

The Worcester County Poetry Association hosted a College Poetry Competition Finalists Reading on Sunday, April 2, at the Worcester Public Library.

Julie de Oliveira was one of eight finalists named to read. The judges for the event were Jenith Charpentier and Michael Fisher.

She submitted three...

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A QCC student was named one of the finalists in the College Poetry Competition.

The Worcester County Poetry Association hosted a College Poetry Competition Finalists Reading on Sunday, April 2, at the Worcester Public Library.

Julie de Oliveira was one of eight finalists named to read. The judges for the event were Jenith Charpentier and Michael Fisher.

She submitted three unpublished poems for the competition. “I wasn’t expecting to be a finalist,” she said. “It has motivated me to look at other literary magazines to submit my work.”

At the reading, she won the Manuscript Prize. One of the three poems she submitted will be published in the Fall 2017 issue of The Worcester Review.

Ms. de Oliveira, 20, recently had a story published in the Acentos Review, a quarterly literary and arts journal that promotes and publishes LatinX work.

She will graduate from QCC in May with an Associate Degree in liberal arts. She plans to pursue a Bachelor’s Degree in English with a concentration in Latin American/Latino studies.

See related story here.

March, 2017
March, 2017

QCC alum Jasmine Rose Solaperto Sullivan will be featured on “Say Yes to the Dress.”

The TLC show highlights Kleinfeld Bridal, the Manhattan-based bridal salon. “Part bridal story, part fashion makeover and part family therapy session, each ‘Say Yes to the Dress’ looks at the personalities and craftsmanship that come into play,” according to...

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QCC alum Jasmine Rose Solaperto Sullivan will be featured on “Say Yes to the Dress.”

The TLC show highlights Kleinfeld Bridal, the Manhattan-based bridal salon. “Part bridal story, part fashion makeover and part family therapy session, each ‘Say Yes to the Dress’ looks at the personalities and craftsmanship that come into play,” according to the TLC website.

Jasmine was married to Brian Sullivan of Westport, CT last November in a destination wedding in Las Vegas. She graduated from Quinsigamond Community College in May 2013 and was an active member of the Phi Theta Kappa honor society during her time at the college.

Her father, John Solaperto, Senior Technical Specialist in QCC's Office of  Institutional Communications, said the show shot footage in New York City, at Kleinfeld Bridal, and in Las Vegas. The wedding was held at the Valley of Fire, which he said is about a 20-minute helicopter ride outside of Vegas.

“On our helicopter trip out, we flew over the Grand Canyon and saw the Hoover Dam,” said Mr. Solaperto. “It was amazing.”

He said it was just a coincidence that his daughter ended up being featured on the show. A friend of Brian's said they should shop for a dress at Kleinfeld’s and while they were there, producers for the show asked if she wanted to be on the TLC hit.

The episode is scheduled to air on April 22 at 8 p.m. on TLC.

March, 2017
March, 2017

QCC Adjunct Professor Brian Cummings was named one of the four recipients of the 2017 Thomas S. Green Public Service Award from the Worcester Regional Resource Bureau.

He teaches advanced manufacturing at Worcester Technical High School and is an adjunct professor of advanced manufacturing at Quinsigamond Community College.

Mr. Cummings received the award for a community project with...

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QCC Adjunct Professor Brian Cummings was named one of the four recipients of the 2017 Thomas S. Green Public Service Award from the Worcester Regional Resource Bureau.

He teaches advanced manufacturing at Worcester Technical High School and is an adjunct professor of advanced manufacturing at Quinsigamond Community College.

Mr. Cummings received the award for a community project with students, including redesigning and creating a new Key to the City as well as special event coins. He also assisted Metal Fabrication students in CNC programming of parts used in the construction of winter streetlight decorations in Worcester.

The awards will be presented in a ceremony on April 26, at 5:00 p.m. at Assumption College. A reception in honor of the recipients will follow.

The Green Award recognizes exceptional competence and efficient handling of all assigned responsibilities; enthusiastic performance of tasks above and beyond the call of duty; cooperative, helpful and friendly attitude toward the public and fellow employees; and community involvement outside of job responsibilities.

The Research Bureau’s 12-member award committee, composed of representatives from diverse community organizations, selected the recipients from nominees submitted by the public. This is the 29th annual Green Awards.

In 1987, when Tom Green, a distinguished civic leader, former Vice President of Norton Company, and a founder of The Research Bureau passed away, the Worcester Regional Resource Bureau honored his memory by establishing the Thomas S. Green Public Service Awards for outstanding public servants. Since 1988, The Research Bureau has recognized over 100 “unsung heroes” in municipal government for their commitment to making Worcester and nearby communities better places to live and work.

March, 2017
March, 2017

Donny Williams, Christina Lane, and Jennifer Bemis, representing the student members, of the Quinsigamond Community College Business, Entrepreneurship Club (QCCBEC) along with Business faculty members, Jane Joyce and Maryann Kania, presented a donation to David Hagan, director of Why Me and Sherry’s House organization on March 9, 2017....

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Donny Williams, Christina Lane, and Jennifer Bemis, representing the student members, of the Quinsigamond Community College Business, Entrepreneurship Club (QCCBEC) along with Business faculty members, Jane Joyce and Maryann Kania, presented a donation to David Hagan, director of Why Me and Sherry’s House organization on March 9, 2017. The QCCBEC student members were able to make this donation by fund raising during the college’s Fall Festival and movie event, Food Fight, Inside the Battle for Market Basket.

March, 2017
March, 2017

The American Association of Physics Teachers, New England Section, held its spring regional meeting at Quinsigamond Community College March 17-18.

On Friday evening, keynote speaker Dr. Jay Pasachoff, Field Memorial Professor and Director of the Hopkins Observatory at Williams College, spoke about the August 21, 2017, total solar eclipse. He spoke about the science and use of equipment in observing the...

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The American Association of Physics Teachers, New England Section, held its spring regional meeting at Quinsigamond Community College March 17-18.

On Friday evening, keynote speaker Dr. Jay Pasachoff, Field Memorial Professor and Director of the Hopkins Observatory at Williams College, spoke about the August 21, 2017, total solar eclipse. He spoke about the science and use of equipment in observing the eclipse and circumstances around the track of the eclipse.

After his presentation, attendees could observe the skies with the Aldrich Astronomical Society.

On Saturday, there were demonstrations of telescopes and various talks and discussions, including about how to involve high school students in authentic research and how to use physics to explain different space exploration projects. Teachers and students were invited to present talks and demonstrations about ways to use experiments or different methods for introducing physic concepts in the classroom.

In the afternoon, there were presentations about Arduino, a maker project to create circuit boards; a video analysis project, where objects in a video frame can be measured and then the data can be graphed and analyzed and compared to theoretical models; and a Teaching with Telescopes class, taught by QCC Professor Andria Schwortz, about how to integrate telescopes into science curriculum, working with reflecting and refracting telescopes and brainstorming lesson plans. The Aldrich Astronomical Society assisted with the class.

March, 2017
March, 2017

“Remember the Alamo!” 

By Karen Kaletski Dufault 

On October 14-18, I attended the 2016 American Association for Respiratory Care Congress in San Antonio, Texas. This conference was all and more than I could have hoped for. What an amazing, educational experience! 

While attending the Congress, I also found some time to explore the...

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“Remember the Alamo!” 

By Karen Kaletski Dufault 

On October 14-18, I attended the 2016 American Association for Respiratory Care Congress in San Antonio, Texas. This conference was all and more than I could have hoped for. What an amazing, educational experience! 

While attending the Congress, I also found some time to explore the City of San Antonio and I thoroughly enjoyed its rich, historical heritage! I toured The Alamo, where Davy Crockett, William Travis, Jim Bowie and many other brave men came to an untimely end in a historic battle with Mexico’s General Santa Anna during Texas’ fight for independence. I strolled down the winding path of the River Walk that led me through the city and beyond, delighting my senses with beautiful trees, flowers, and fascinating architecture. I was also captivated by San Antonio’s Mission Trails, which are a series of missions established by Franciscan friars in the 1700’s to bring Christianity to the Native Americans of the region. Today, these buildings comprise the San Antonio Missions National Historical Park, making the Alamo City one of only a few urban areas with a national park within its city limits. Seeing these beautiful historical sites was a wonderful way to commemorate the centennial celebration of the U.S. National Park Service. This area of the country provided an unexpected, exciting dimension to my travels!

In 2015, the Respiratory Care program completed a comprehensive, re-accreditation process by the Committee on Accreditation for Respiratory Care (CoARC). The program was ultimately granted the maximum ten year external accreditation. In an exit interview, the visiting team commended the Coordinators and the College for educational excellence and student-centered learning. The site visitors were particularly impressed that the program was able to maintain currency even with a 20% reduction in budget and congratulated the administration for their “support of continued professional growth of faculty and staff.” The site visitors stated that this element was essential for the education of faculty (and ultimately students), and the continued success of the program.

 According to Standard 2.04 of CoARC’s expected priorities, “The Program Director (Coordinator) must be responsible for all aspects of the program, including the management, administration, continuous review and analysis, planning, development, and general effectiveness of the program.” As Program Coordinator, I am charged with this massive responsibility and I address these expected Standards in my Annual Reports to CoARC. To meet this mandate, it is imperative that the Program Coordinator attends professional conferences in order to maintain currency in an ever-evolving medical environment. Careers in healthcare and medicine require the instructor to be mindful of changes in treatment and technology and we must continuously revise our curriculum to reflect these changes. Since I no longer have the time to practice in the field, the only way I can accomplish this goal is by reading journal articles (which I do), and attending professional conferences. Students in the Respiratory Care program are the ultimate benefactors of these efforts.

I am currently writing the Respiratory Care APR. This October educational excursion aligns perfectly with Objective 1.6a of the Strategic Plan which addresses currency of the college’s curriculum. “Continuously review and improve the relevancy, responsiveness, and quality of the College’s curriculum and instruction by strengthening the College’s Academic Program Review (APR) and Student Learning Outcomes Assessment processes and procedures.” Since The AARC Congress is the industry’s premier professional development opportunity for Respiratory Care professionals, this Congress met all expectations! The lectures and symposiums for this event were developed with the patient in mind, from zeroing in on the latest treatments and technologies aimed at recovery, to highlighting the new and important role respiratory therapy plays in maintaining health and wellness. The impact of disease management and the significance of telemedicine was also examined. In addition, the conference covered legislative and regulatory changes that may impact the profession’s future. According to the AARC, this is the “largest and most comprehensive Respiratory Care meeting anywhere in the world!” In the medical field, “evidence-based medicine” is the expected standard of care. The conference addressed this “best practice” in most of its lectures.

The anticipated outcomes that occurred when I attended this conference were truly centered on that fact that I have learned new trends and treatments in the field of medicine, particularly Respiratory Care. This knowledge will allow me to maintain currency in a constantly changing medical profession. I will incorporate these findings into​ ​instructional​ ​strategies so that my student-centered lectures remain relevant. A very important result/outcome of this knowledge is that my students will be better prepared, and possess the necessary tools… to take, and pass…the industry’s national credentialing exams to ultimately become Registered Respiratory Therapists!

While ideally, the Program Coordinator should attend this conference on a yearly basis, reality dictates that it this is not always possible due to time limitations and prohibitive cost. In fact, this is the first time in seventeen years, that this​ Program Coordinator has attended this conference! To date, Respiratory Care program currency has been maintained by attending conferences closer to home such as the

Massachusetts Society for Respiratory Care and the Worcester Pulmonary Symposium. This year, due to even deeper financial cuts, and not being able to use the program’s budget to pay for registration fees, even these in-state conferences will unfortunately, need to be paid for using my personal funds.

 I would like to thank the Staff Development Committee for providing a portion of the funding so that I could participate in this magnificent educational opportunity. The College must continue to sustain this initiative! We teach in an ever-evolving world that is subject to a vast spectrum of change. These monetary resources may be the only way our colleagues can afford to attend conferences which will allow us to remain at the “top of our game.” Faculty and Staff could not accomplish our student-centered goals without this valuable support.

March, 2017
March, 2017

Join the Psi Beta Honor Society for its annual Psych Fest this month. The event features spoken word, music performances and more.

Tickets are $5 and the event benefits YOU Inc.’s substance abuse treatment program for adolescents.

Refreshments will be available. The event will be Friday, April 7, from 2:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m. in the Hebert Auditorium at the Suprenant Building at Quinsigamond...

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Join the Psi Beta Honor Society for its annual Psych Fest this month. The event features spoken word, music performances and more.

Tickets are $5 and the event benefits YOU Inc.’s substance abuse treatment program for adolescents.

Refreshments will be available. The event will be Friday, April 7, from 2:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m. in the Hebert Auditorium at the Suprenant Building at Quinsigamond Community College.

The Psi Beta Honor Society and Psychology Club host the event. 

March, 2017
March, 2017

A Comedy Fundraiser, featuring New England comedians, is being held in May to benefit the Pinning Ceremony for the QCC Nursing Class of Fall 2017.

The fundraiser will be Friday, May 19, in the Hebert Auditorium, at the West Boylston St. QCC Campus. Doors open at 7:00 p.m., the show starts at 8:00 p.m. There will be raffles and a 50/50 drawing.

Tickets are $25. For tickets, please contact Class...

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A Comedy Fundraiser, featuring New England comedians, is being held in May to benefit the Pinning Ceremony for the QCC Nursing Class of Fall 2017.

The fundraiser will be Friday, May 19, in the Hebert Auditorium, at the West Boylston St. QCC Campus. Doors open at 7:00 p.m., the show starts at 8:00 p.m. There will be raffles and a 50/50 drawing.

Tickets are $25. For tickets, please contact Class President Dena Laudon at 774.303.1899. Sponsored by QCC and Funny4Fund$.com

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March, 2017
March, 2017

Due to weather, the Women Of Distinction event was postponed to April 19.

The event will be Wednesday, April 19, at 2:00 p.m. in 109 A & B in the Harrington Learning Center. The event is a celebration and special opportunity for the women honored to be acknowledged and gather together.

The program will include group pictures, followed by a brief formal presentation. Honorees will be welcomed,...

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Due to weather, the Women Of Distinction event was postponed to April 19.

The event will be Wednesday, April 19, at 2:00 p.m. in 109 A & B in the Harrington Learning Center. The event is a celebration and special opportunity for the women honored to be acknowledged and gather together.

The program will include group pictures, followed by a brief formal presentation. Honorees will be welcomed, recognized by President Gail Carberry and given a gift and certificate. Nominees and the faculty who they were nominated by are invited for light refreshments and relaxed conversations.

Women students who distinguished themselves by overcoming great odds and/or who made a difference in their community were nominated for the award. Nominations were due March 10.

For questions, please contact Josh Cole at ext. 4317 or Debbie Ryder at ext. 4232.

March, 2017
March, 2017

Gateway to College at Quinsigamond Community College is one of only eight programs nationwide to receive a Program Excellent Award for the Academic Year 2015/16.  QCC Gateway to College attained all four performance benchmarks in each category: first term grades, one year persistence, two year persistence and graduation rate. It is the network leader in two year persistence and three year graduation rates as...

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Gateway to College at Quinsigamond Community College is one of only eight programs nationwide to receive a Program Excellent Award for the Academic Year 2015/16.  QCC Gateway to College attained all four performance benchmarks in each category: first term grades, one year persistence, two year persistence and graduation rate. It is the network leader in two year persistence and three year graduation rates as well.

This program was first established at QCC in March 2012, with their first group of students graduating in December of 2012. Since then, they have graduated over 60 students with another 20 graduating this Spring.

They continue to serve approximately 50-60 students from the Worcester County area each year and the program continues to thrive as it helps impact the most vulnerable students to achieve their educational goals.

Gateway was developed from a proven early college model that reconnects struggling students with their education. The program serves students between the ages of 16 and 20 and enables them to complete their high school diploma requirements while attending Quinsigamond Community College. Credits are transferred to a partnering high school's transcript each semester, and students supplement their coursework with career exploration, transfer opportunities and support from a small cohort of peers and advisors. If you are interested in learning more about the program, please contact them directly at 508.854.7587 or email gtcinfo [at] qcc.mass.edu

March, 2017
March, 2017

The President has approved the following appointments and administrative reassignments which are presently in effect or will be effective as noted.

Selina Boria, Executive Assistant to the President, will be focusing her responsibilities in three key areas; Policy, College Governance, and Diversity Initiatives.  Her title will now reflect the focus of her role, Executive Assistant to the...

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The President has approved the following appointments and administrative reassignments which are presently in effect or will be effective as noted.

Selina Boria, Executive Assistant to the President, will be focusing her responsibilities in three key areas; Policy, College Governance, and Diversity Initiatives.  Her title will now reflect the focus of her role, Executive Assistant to the President for Policy, Governance, and Diversity.

Lucinda Costa, formerly Assistant to the Vice President for Community Engagement, will permanently assume the full responsibilities of Assistant to the President. 

Donna Harvey, Administrative Secretary I in the Vice President for Strategic Enrollment and Student Engagement’s office, will become Acting Assistant to the VP, continuing to report to Vice President, Lillian Ortiz.  The vacancy was made available by a recent retirement.  A new classified position will be posted and filled in the Vice President’s office in the next several weeks.

Nancy Chosta, Clerk V, has been assigned to the Facilities Department, reporting to Jim Racki, Director of Facilities.

Elizabeth Woods, Dean of Students, is taking on the responsibilities of Dean for Compliance.  In this new role she will continue to report to the VP for Strategic Enrollment.  Her position as Dean of Students will be posted and filled in the next several weeks.  Liz will remain in the Dean of Students role until a successor is appointed.