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July, 2017

  • QCC President Dr. Luis G. Pedraja
July, 2017
July, 2017

On July 10, 2017 we were pleased to welcome Dr. Luis G. Pedraja as Quinsigamond Community College’s new president. Dr. Pedraja is the sixth president of QCC taking the reins from former President Dr. Gail E. Carberry. Dr. Pedraja was the former interim vice chancellor of academic affairs for the Peralta Community College District in California. The district included four...

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On July 10, 2017 we were pleased to welcome Dr. Luis G. Pedraja as Quinsigamond Community College’s new president. Dr. Pedraja is the sixth president of QCC taking the reins from former President Dr. Gail E. Carberry. Dr. Pedraja was the former interim vice chancellor of academic affairs for the Peralta Community College District in California. The district included four colleges with a student population of 35,000.

Dr. Pedraja, who emigrated from Cuba and grew up in a low-income Miami neighborhood was the first in his family to attend college; later earning his Ph.D. from the University of Virginia. His background gives him a unique understanding and perspective in the struggles that may face students in their pursuit of a higher education and a better life. To that end, Dr. Pedraja is a true example for all of QCC’s current and future students, faculty and staff. Currently that includes over 1,000 full- and part-time employees and over 13,000 students who are annually serviced through the college.

In his inaugural President’s Message, Dr. Pedraja noted some of the things that make QCC special.

“At QCC, you will not only receive a world-class education, but you will also receive the support that you need to succeed. Our small class size, as well as advising, tutoring, and other support mechanisms are in place to ensure that you receive the personalized attention and assistance you need to complete your education as efficiently as possible,” he said, adding, “We live in a global economy, and QCC has positioned our academic programs and facilities to offer instruction that not only addresses today’s demands, but sets you on the path to gain the skills and knowledge for tomorrow’s economic needs.”

Please join us in welcoming Dr. Pedraja to QCC!

July, 2017
July, 2017

Beginning on Monday July 31 – Friday, August 11 new and returning students can register for classes all under one roof, with no appointment necessary. The One-Stop Registration event offers students a way to gather more information about financial aid, admissions and placement tests, all in one place at the same time.

Potential students can print out forms ahead of time to fill out and...

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Beginning on Monday July 31 – Friday, August 11 new and returning students can register for classes all under one roof, with no appointment necessary. The One-Stop Registration event offers students a way to gather more information about financial aid, admissions and placement tests, all in one place at the same time.

Potential students can print out forms ahead of time to fill out and bring to one-stop registration. Information is available on the One-Stop Registration website at www.qcc.edu/one-stop. The site details what forms and information are required.

The one-stop registration event gives students a chance to get everything done at once and simplifies the application process by not requiring appointments with different departments. Registering early also gives students a better chance to get the classes they want, since classes often fill up as the first day of classes gets closer.

“There is no better or easier way to get started in the enrollment process than beginning with the One-Stop Registration,” said Mishawn Davis-Eyene, Director of Admissions. "The first step involves applying to QCC, completing placement testing and registering. The second part is applying for financial aid. Both steps can be accomplished under one roof on the same day, without needing an appointment, during the One-Stop Registration event."

The One-Stop Registration event is being held at the Harrington Learning Center on our 670 West Boylston Street Campus in Worcester. Hours are Monday-Thursday from 8:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. and Friday 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon. Classes begin September 6.

July, 2017
July, 2017

It’s close to bloom time for the Live & Learn Greenhouse, a Phi Theta Kappa project that will offer students the opportunity to have a hands-on experience growing plants and vegetables and learning about food sustainability.  

For the last few months a group of close to 30 people including QCC faculty, led by project manager and PTK member and current student Dathiel Blake, have...

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It’s close to bloom time for the Live & Learn Greenhouse, a Phi Theta Kappa project that will offer students the opportunity to have a hands-on experience growing plants and vegetables and learning about food sustainability.  

For the last few months a group of close to 30 people including QCC faculty, led by project manager and PTK member and current student Dathiel Blake, have been working feverishly to get the greenhouse open and fully functional. A diverse group of breakout teams encompassing botany, automation, hydroponics and grant writing have come together to help the Live & Learn Greenhouse become a reality.

There’s really something for everyone,” said PTK member and current student Kyle Mondino, a self-professed person with a “black thumb,” who is the team lead for grant writing. “We are always looking for more people to help out and become part of this.”

The idea of the greenhouse came about through the need to address food insecurities on campus, according to PTK Advisor Bonnie Coleman. Food insecurities have become a real issue on campuses across the nation, particularly on community college campuses. A 2017 report published by the Wisconsin HOPE Lab surveyed 33,000 students at 70 community colleges in 24 states and found that two out three students were food insecure.

The Live & Learn Greenhouse Project is designed to provide not only a resource for healthy, nutrient-rich food for the Quinsigamond Community College community, but also an educational resource for QCC students, faculty, staff and children of the QCC Children’s School.

The greenhouse, which began in the spring, measures 7’ 4 ½”W x 14’ 7 ½”L and is located behind QCC’s Administration building at a former bus stop shelter. To date the plumbing for the water is completed and the lights, heating, exhaust fans and vents are installed. The project is waiting for the electrical to be completed, which is expected to be finished shortly.

“One of the really cool aspects of this project is that everything is automated. We will be able to control and check the doors, vents, temperature and even the PH levels,” Mr. Blake said. “We’ll also have a web camera. ”There is even talk of a robot sometime in the future.

The automation team is designing a system that will be housed on a server that enables anyone to view the greenhouse at anytime, as well as operate items such as the irrigation system remotely. This is still in the design stages, however, the goal is to have this live as soon as possible.

While the final push is underway to open the greenhouse, plants are currently germinating at the home of Ms. Coleman or in the PTK office. These include: sweet basil, spinach, chives, parsley, cucumbers, sage, lavender butterhead lettuce, kale eggplant, tomatoes, eucalyptus and a variety of sunflowers. They should be transplanted to the greenhouse shortly.

Once the Live & Learn Greenhouse is completely up and running there are still projects that will be available for anyone wishing to get involved, as the greenhouse will be in use 365 days of the year.

“We will be working on this every day. Anyone who is interested in gardening or food sustainability, we want your help,” said PTK Assistant Kayla Patterson.

The Live and Learn Greenhouse was partially funded by a $16,500 grant through the QCC Foundation. PTK’s Annual Fall Charity Cookout last September raised over $2,000 for the greenhouse and other events are scheduled throughout the year to help fund the project.

Donations of plants, seeds pots, soil, shelving and lighting, in addition to cash donations are always welcome. Anyone interested in making a donation or becoming involved can contact PTK or Ms. Colman in Room 349A.

Those looking to follow the progress of the Live & Learn Greenhouse can visit PTK’s  Facebook, Twitter, Instagram or Snapchat.

July, 2017
July, 2017

​Quinsigamond Community College has announced a new privately-funded scholarship, the LEADA@Liberty Scholarship, offered by Liberty Mutual Insurance Company, Boston, Mass. Students of African descent who are part of the Commonwealth Commitment program are eligible to apply. Four community college students of African descent will be chosen from the pool of applicants to...

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​Quinsigamond Community College has announced a new privately-funded scholarship, the LEADA@Liberty Scholarship, offered by Liberty Mutual Insurance Company, Boston, Mass. Students of African descent who are part of the Commonwealth Commitment program are eligible to apply. Four community college students of African descent will be chosen from the pool of applicants to receive the $2,500 annual scholarship for the entire four years of their college career.

The Commonwealth Commitment program is the first of its kind in the country and was developed by the Massachusetts Department of Higher Education to assist Massachusetts students to achieve their goals of a higher education. This innovative program is a partnership between Massachusetts colleges, universities and students, and provides financial incentives to students who begin their advanced education at one of the 15 Massachusetts community colleges. Students admitted into the Commonwealth Commitment program receive a freeze on tuition and fees for all four years upon entry into the program until they graduate or leave the program. Students will receive a 10 percent rebate off tuition and mandatory fees at the end of every successfully completed semester. In addition, students receive a MassTransfer tuition credit once they are enrolled in a bachelor’s program for a total overall savings of approximately $5,090 over four years. Students must attain an associate degree within 2.5 years and then transfer to a Massachusetts State University or one of the University of Massachusetts Campuses.

Liberty Mutual Life Insurance Company is the first private sector partner of the Commonwealth Commitment program. The scholarship was designed to help offset the cost of college for Massachusetts students who enroll in a community college, with the goal of transferring to a Massachusetts State University or one of the University of Massachusetts Campuses to attain their bachelor’s degree. The scholarship will be administered by the United Negro College Fund.

“Providing access to higher education for all has been a mission of QCC since it was founded in 1963,” said Mishawn Davis-Eyene, director of admissions at QCC. “This new scholarship opportunity provides another way in which our communities, both public and now private, are working together to reduce the financial burden that can sometimes prevent students from pursuing a higher education.”

Those chosen as LEADA@Liberty scholarship winners will also be mentored by Liberty Mutual employees and offered internships in the firm’s Boston office. 

For more information or to apply visit the Liberty Mutual Scholarship page.

“Our goal is to reach this untapped pool of talent and we see this scholarship as a win-win for community college students, Liberty Mutual Life Insurance and the Commonwealth of Massachusetts,” said Kevin Gayle, Finance Committee Chair of Liberty Mutual’s Employees of African Descent and Allies (LEADA@Liberty) employee resource group. 

For more information, contact Josh Martin, Director of Institutional Communications at 508.854.7513 or jmartin [at] qcc.mass.edu

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Quinsigamond Community College provides the community with high quality, affordable higher education in Worcester County. As a regional leader in education and workforce development, QCC serves the diverse educational needs of Central Massachusetts by providing affordable, accessible, and high quality programming leading to transfer, career, and lifelong learning.

 

July, 2017
July, 2017

Earlier this month President Dr. Luis G. Pedraja was interviewed by Charter TV 3 regarding Senator Michael Moore’s recent Senate bill proposal that would make Massachusetts Community Colleges free for in-state students.

Dr. Pedraja touted the benefits of this type of program and discussed how the bill could help many in the QCC community. In his interview, Dr. Pedraja said this would be...

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Earlier this month President Dr. Luis G. Pedraja was interviewed by Charter TV 3 regarding Senator Michael Moore’s recent Senate bill proposal that would make Massachusetts Community Colleges free for in-state students.

Dr. Pedraja touted the benefits of this type of program and discussed how the bill could help many in the QCC community. In his interview, Dr. Pedraja said this would be an excellent opportunity for working adults, noting the cost of community college may not seem like much for some people, however, for a lot of people it could mean the difference in their ability to pay rent or put food on the table for their children.

He added, “Nowadays about 64 percent of the new jobs and jobs that are going to be opening up are going to require at least some college.”

Dr. Lillian Ortiz, Vice President for Enrollment Management, Student Engagement & Community Connections concurred with Dr. Pedraja.

“Senator Moore’s bill is important to ensure all resident of Massachusetts have access to higher education,” she said. “This will not only allow individuals to improve their ability to support themselves and their families, but it will also strengthen communities on many levels. Businesses will have a strong pool of talented employees to draw upon, allowing them to grow and prosper.”

July, 2017
July, 2017

Student Life and Phi Theta Kappa members are looking for your help. PTK and Student Life have been assembling a team for the Relay for Life of Central South County to help raise money for the American Cancer Society and take action against cancer. They are looking for additional team members and/or donations, as well as people to help hand out flyers and build awareness. Last year’s PTK team raised $600 and the...

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Student Life and Phi Theta Kappa members are looking for your help. PTK and Student Life have been assembling a team for the Relay for Life of Central South County to help raise money for the American Cancer Society and take action against cancer. They are looking for additional team members and/or donations, as well as people to help hand out flyers and build awareness. Last year’s PTK team raised $600 and the goal this year is to raise $5,000.

The annual event is held at Lemansky Field, 1 Reith Street, Auburn, Mass. This year’s Relay begins at 6:00 p.m. on September 8, 2017 and ends September 9, 2017 at 10:30 a.m.  Team members will take turns walking around a track or designated path and each team is asked to have a member on the track at all times to signify that cancer never sleeps.

“We’d love for you to join our team and walk with us.   You can make it fun and wear costumes and do a theme, said PTK member and student Kyle Mondino.

The first 50 people to join this year’s team will receive a free T-shirt.

On PTK’s team page their message reads, “Cancer has touched many of us in some way, so we decided to fight back by raising funds and walking in our local American Cancer Society Relay for Life event. Please join our team or make a donation. Saving lives from cancer starts one team, one participant, one dollar at a time.”

To join the team visit, Relay.ACSEvents.org and click “Join a Relay,” then search the dropdown menu for “Quinsigamond Community College,” and click “Join Our Team.”  That’s it!

If you have any questions or would like to pick up flyers, please stop by the Phi Theta Kappa Office, Room 349A or the Student Life Office. 

July, 2017
July, 2017

Quinsigamond Community College is situated on a 52-acre campus in the Greendale neighborhood of Worcester. Since 1963, we have been making a difference in the lives of thousands of students from all walks of life offering affordable higher education. Today QCC offers over 120 associate degree and certificate career option (19 that are available completely online) in the fields of Business, Technology, Liberal Arts,...

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Quinsigamond Community College is situated on a 52-acre campus in the Greendale neighborhood of Worcester. Since 1963, we have been making a difference in the lives of thousands of students from all walks of life offering affordable higher education. Today QCC offers over 120 associate degree and certificate career option (19 that are available completely online) in the fields of Business, Technology, Liberal Arts, Health Care, Human Services and more. QCC's Training and Education Center (TEC) offers over 400 traditional and online courses, workshops, seminars, and customized training programs.

Take a tour of our picturesque campus to see firsthand what makes QCC one of the best kept secrets in Worcester County!

Currently tours are available Monday-Thursday at 3:00 p.m.  Online registration is required.

Walk-in's will need to reschedule with an Admissions Counselor.

Register Today!

For group tours please email aabercrombie [at] qcc.mass.edu (Ai Co Abercrombie). Two weeks advance notice is requested for all group tours.

Group tours are asked to include the following information:

  • Name of Organization/Responsible Party
  • Please Provide Preferred Dates/Times (at least 2)
  • Number in your Tour Group
  • Number of Chaperones (If Applicable)
  • In addition, please arrive at least 10 minutes prior to the tour start time (15 minutes for groups larger than 20) to complete registration forms.

Please Note: It is up to the discretion of the Tour Manager and Student Ambassador regarding favorable weather conditions for a tour. Should weather not be conducive to a safe and informative tour for all, the tour party will need to reschedule.

We hope to see you soon!  

July, 2017
July, 2017

At Quinsigamond Community College our faculty and staff are here to help provide new students with a smooth transition from their previous environment to QCC, by offering a New Student Orientation and Student Services Fair in late August. This is an engaging and fun way new students can learn about their college community and the services available to them.

QCC has designed the New Student Orientation to offer...

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At Quinsigamond Community College our faculty and staff are here to help provide new students with a smooth transition from their previous environment to QCC, by offering a New Student Orientation and Student Services Fair in late August. This is an engaging and fun way new students can learn about their college community and the services available to them.

QCC has designed the New Student Orientation to offer students new to QCC a way in which they can connect with staff, faculty and peers prior to the start of college.  Students will learn about and connect with the different services offered at QCC, with the goal of enhancing their academic success and overall experience at the college.

There will be breakout sessions available during this timeframe that will give students’ added strategies for success. Samples of breakout sessions include:

  • Balancing College and Child Care
  • How to Build Your Resume for Your Dream Job while in College
  • Learning Styles and Creating a Study Plan for your Specific Learning Style.

In addition to the New Student Orientation, there will also be a Student Services Fair that takes place at the end of each New Student Orientation held at the Worcester campus location. The Student Services Fair allows students to connect with all the resources they will need to help them succeed at QCC.

New Student Orientation and Student Services Fair schedules are listed below.

Worcester Campus – Hebert Auditorium:

  • August 23 from 4 p.m. – 7 p.m.

Breakout sessions will be from 5:50 p.m. -6:25 p.m.

Student Services Fair will be from 6:25-7:00 p.m. in the Auditorium Lobby

  • August 24 from 11 a.m. – 2 p.m.

Breakout sessions will be from 12:50 p.m. -1:25 p.m.

Student Services Fair will be from 1:25 p.m. -2:00 p.m. in the Auditorium Lobby

  • August 29 from 9 a.m. – noon

Breakout sessions will be from 10:50 a.m. -11:25 a.m.

Student Services Fair will be from 11:25 a.m. – noon in the Auditorium Lobby

  • August 30 from 11 a.m. – 2 p.m.

Breakout sessions will be from 12:50 p.m. -1:25 p.m.

Student Services Fair will be from 1:25 p.m. -2:00 p.m. in the Auditorium Lobby

Southbridge Campus:

  • August 28 from 5 p.m. – 7 p.m.

Breakout sessions will be from 6:20 p.m. -6:50 p.m.

Those wishing to attend are encouraged to register at Student Life.

July, 2017
July, 2017

Did you know that the Institutional Communications Department at QCC provides a number of services ranging from print and digital media to public relations? The department offers invaluable resources from web and print collateral, to public relations outreach that evangelizes the college and its mission through news coverage in print, television and radio.

Want to learn more?

Requests...

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Did you know that the Institutional Communications Department at QCC provides a number of services ranging from print and digital media to public relations? The department offers invaluable resources from web and print collateral, to public relations outreach that evangelizes the college and its mission through news coverage in print, television and radio.

Want to learn more?

Requests for marketing projects such as: catalogs, booklets, brochures, flyers/posters, ads, forms, postcards/invites and tent tables/small collateral can be made by filling out the project request form on the Institutional Communications section of the QCC website, listed under the “News and Events” section, or by contacting Director of Institutional Communications, Josh Martin.  

A style guide detailing colors, fonts, logos and QCC standards is also available in this section. All marketing collateral must conform to these guidelines.  Please make sure to check deadlines for projects and remember that no project can begin until all materials have been received.

The department is also always looking for great news that will help to bring a positive light to QCC.  Have a story idea, event or project that you feel needs to be told? Please reach out to Mr. Martin at 508.854.7513 or email him at jmartin [at] qcc.mass.edu .

To learn more about what the Institutional Communications Department has to offer and to see existing marketing materials and press coverage please visit:

 

July, 2017
July, 2017

QCC in the News is a new addition to the Wyvern Guardian. Each month we will show you a sampling of some of the articles and press releases discussing Quinsigamond Community College that have made it into the local (and sometimes national) media.

QCC articles for the month of July include:

  • Telegram & Gazette:...
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QCC in the News is a new addition to the Wyvern Guardian. Each month we will show you a sampling of some of the articles and press releases discussing Quinsigamond Community College that have made it into the local (and sometimes national) media.

QCC articles for the month of July include:

July, 2017
July, 2017

We are very pleased to announce the following staff updates:

We wish to extend a very warm welcome to Dr. Luis Pedraja, who began his tenure as our new President of Quinsigamond Community College on July 10, 2017.

Additionally, we are very pleased to announce the following full-time staff updates:

On July 5, 2017, Administrative Services...

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We are very pleased to announce the following staff updates:

We wish to extend a very warm welcome to Dr. Luis Pedraja, who began his tenure as our new President of Quinsigamond Community College on July 10, 2017.

Additionally, we are very pleased to announce the following full-time staff updates:

On July 5, 2017, Administrative Services welcomed Patricia “Trish” Kehoe as Systems Analyst/Programmer. Ms. Kehoe brings to this position over 15 years of database management and reporting experience in the public and private education sector. Most recently, she was a Database Administrator at Ana Maria College. Ms. Kehoe earned an Associate of Science in Office Technology/Medical Administration from North Shore Community College, a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration and a Master’s in Business Administration from Anna Maria College.

On July 10, 2017, Academic Affairs welcomed Pamela Dempsey-O’Connell as Coordinator of Instructional Technology and Assessment – SABES PDC. Ms. Dempsey-O’Connell brings to this position over 24 years of experience teaching students of diverse ages. Most recently Pamela was an ABE Site Manager for Mount Wachusett Community College. Ms. Dempsey-O’Connell earned an Associate in Science from University of New Hampshire and a Bachelor of Science in Biological Science Education from Plymouth State College.

On July 10, 2017, Enrollment Management, Student Engagement and Community Connections, welcomed Karen Hutner as Publications and Press Manager. Mrs. Hutner brings to this position over 15 years of media and marketing experience in the private sector. Most recently, she was a Public Relations and Media Services Manager for an agency that focuses on the manufacturing industry.   

On July 17, 2017, Enrollment Management, Student Engagement and Community Connections, welcomed Amy Lawson as Senior Financial Aid Counselor. Ms. Lawson brings to this position over 15 years of Financial Aid experience. Most recently, she was a Senior Financial Aid Counselor at Massachusetts Bay Community College. She is also an active member of the Massachusetts Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators. Ms. Lawson earned a Bachelor of Arts from Clark University and a Master of Science in Higher Education Administration from Bay Path University.    

On July 17, 2017, Enrollment Management, Student Engagement and Community Connections, welcomed Michelle Greenwood as Financial Aid Counselor. Ms. Greenwood brings to this position over 4 years of experience as a Clerk III in Financial Aid at Quinsigamond Community College. Additionally she has over 10 years of customer relations experience in the private sector. Michelle earned an Associate in Science from Quinsigamond Community College and a Bachelor’s degree from University of Massachusetts Amherst.

On July 24, 2017, Enrollment Management, Student Engagement and Community Connections, welcomed June Vo as Clerk III – Community Connections. Ms. Vo brings to this position over 5 years of administrative experience from the private sector. She earned an Associate in Science in Business Administration from Quinsigamond Community College. 

Please join us in welcoming QCC’s new president and staff into their new roles. 

June, 2017

June, 2017
June, 2017

QCC hosted the HiSET graduation in June, celebrating with the graduates who completed the test and earned their high school equivalency.

Laura Tino, Director of Testing at Quinsigamond Community College, said about 60 people completed the test this year and about 35 attended the graduation ceremony. About 100 family, friends and staff attended the event on June 5 in the Hebert Auditorium....

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QCC hosted the HiSET graduation in June, celebrating with the graduates who completed the test and earned their high school equivalency.

Laura Tino, Director of Testing at Quinsigamond Community College, said about 60 people completed the test this year and about 35 attended the graduation ceremony. About 100 family, friends and staff attended the event on June 5 in the Hebert Auditorium. 

QCC President Gail Carberry spoke to graduates for the final time before her retirement this June. Students Hope Hazard and Danielle Lopez spoke at the ceremony about their experiences.

“The speeches were touching,” Ms. Tino said. “They spoke about how they got to where they are, the challenges they faced. It was an emotional evening.”

This was QCC’s third HiSET graduation ceremony, as the HiSET was introduced in Massachusetts in 2014, following years of GED graduation ceremonies.

The HiSET is a high school equivalency test that is more affordable and accessible than the traditional GED. It can be taken in different languages and formats, and can be more accommodating for people with disabilities or health-related needs.

Ms. Tino said graduates come from the QCC prep program, from other programs in the region or they are just local people who take the test.

June, 2017
June, 2017

The Gateway to College program celebrated its fifth graduation on May 24, with its largest class yet of 30 graduates.

“Many of our students have failed in a high school setting, and here they are able to gain confidence and begin to believe in themselves,” said Jenna Glazer, Resource Specialist at Gateway to College. “If they can find their footing, they can really accomplish...

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The Gateway to College program celebrated its fifth graduation on May 24, with its largest class yet of 30 graduates.

“Many of our students have failed in a high school setting, and here they are able to gain confidence and begin to believe in themselves,” said Jenna Glazer, Resource Specialist at Gateway to College. “If they can find their footing, they can really accomplish amazing things. I always tell them, ‘Your future is yours to make or break.’ These students will have a positive impact in the world.”

Students graduate from the program every semester, but they all walk together in the spring for their diplomas.

Teresa Watts, one of the featured speakers at graduation, spoke of what she had overcome to earn her degree.

“Everyone comes to Gateway for different reasons. Look around this room and everyone here has a different past and different struggles, but what we all have in common is we wanted more out of our situation,” she said. “For me, I'm here because I was diagnosed with a chronic illness that causes me to be in pain every day for the rest of my life. My illness stopped me from attending school, being with friends and doing anything that I enjoyed. I thought my life was over. I knew that I couldn't just sit around and let this pain ruin my future, so my mom helped me and here I am now. I have graduated from both high school and college, and I’m only 18.”

Ms. Watts, of Sutton, graduated from Gateway and from QCC with an associate’s degree in general studies. She is matriculating to Assumption College to study neuroscience.

“The program is becoming more well-known at QCC and in the region,” Ms. Glazer said. There are students from 19 different high schools in the program, she said they work with guidance counselors at the high schools to educate them about what the Gateway to College program offers.

The Gateway to College program is a national program for students who have dropped out of high school or who may not graduate. Through the program, students can obtain their high school diploma and earn college credits at the same time. Many graduates go on to finish associate degrees and transfer to four-year colleges.

The QCC program was awarded the Program Excellence Award by the Gateway to College National Network, recognizing outstanding data and outcomes for the 2015-16 school year. The program exceeded established benchmarks for four categories: first-term grades, one-year persistence, two-year persistence, and graduation rate. The program had the network high for two-year persistence and graduation rate, both of which were 75 percent.

About 19 students from the program this year are matriculating into the major of their choice at QCC.

These students will move on to four-year colleges: Teresa Watts, Assumption College; Nathan Manna, Holy Cross; Josh Sadri and Casey Tompkins, Hampshire College.

Graduate Alyssa Wilmot enlisted with the Marines. Patrick Morin and Kyle Rochon also enlisted with the military.

Eight Gateway to College alumni from previous years graduated this year from Quinsigamond Community College. They are: Katherine Barber, Noelle Haslam, Dylan Marengo, Susan Mayes, Steven Scichilone, Doug Swartz, Darien Ward-Andrade, and Teresa Watts. Four of these students will be matriculating to four-year colleges, and one is continuing at QCC for an additional associate’s degree.

June, 2017
June, 2017

Quinsigamond Community College became the first campus in Massachusetts to build an articulation bridge in mechanical technology that links to the aeronautics specialization at Cape Cod Community College. The colleges signed an articulation agreement on June 23, providing opportunity for Worcester area residents to earn credentials as airplane mechanics.

Dr. Gail Carberry, QCC...

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Quinsigamond Community College became the first campus in Massachusetts to build an articulation bridge in mechanical technology that links to the aeronautics specialization at Cape Cod Community College. The colleges signed an articulation agreement on June 23, providing opportunity for Worcester area residents to earn credentials as airplane mechanics.

Dr. Gail Carberry, QCC president, said, “I am glad the Cape Cod and Quinsigamond curriculum partnership was signed today. In an era of tight fiscal resources, maximizing partnerships across the state for the benefit of Worcester area students and businesses is the right thing to do. President Cox of Cape Cod Community College is one of my heroes for making this happen.”

“This is truly a historic moment, establishing this agreement enabling QCC students to complete their general education requirements locally and then enter Cape Cod Community College's FAA-Certified Aviation Maintenance Technology Program,” stated Dr. John Cox, President of Cape Cod Community College. “With 14 months of education at our Plymouth Airport Center, QCC students will complete the requirements for Airframe and Powerplant Certifications and the Associate of Applied Science Degree in Aviation Maintenance, and take the exams for FAA-certifications leading to available career opportunities. As we speak, we are working on housing options for those interested in local accommodations.”

“I am very grateful for President Carberry's commitment in this educational pathway for students and her vision in establishing this agreement between our colleges,” he said.

Commencing in 2012, Presidents Cox and Carberry met to explore the potential to create a joint program to meet the shortage of airplane mechanics in the Commonwealth. The curriculum requirements, lab sophistication and expense to launch a program of this sort required the presidents to think creatively and holistically about how and where to begin its development.

Dr. Carberry travelled to the airport in Hyannis to begin the conversations with President Cox and then state Sen. Dan Wolf, the CEO of Cape Air. At the time, Senator Wolf had made comments at a workforce summit in Sturbridge about a critical national shortage of airplane mechanics.

A Department of Labor grant, coordinated by QCC in 2012, that delivered on statewide curriculum advancements in workforce education in all 15 Massachusetts community colleges, paved the way for CCCC to take a lead among the campuses in curriculum design to meet this uncommon workforce shortage. CCCC started exploring the FAA requirements of a curriculum model, while QCC committed to a future articulation with CCCC to facilitate the training of airplane mechanics to support the burgeoning air traffic patterns at the Worcester Airport under MassPort.

The discussions advanced still further over the next several years, as CCCC designed a state-of-the-art airplane mechanics training facility to meet FAA requirements and created a capitalization plan to build it. QCC waited with a greater sense of urgency as Jet Blue advanced its flights in and out of Worcester.

The fully completed phase one laboratory hangars operated by Cape Cod Community College opened in Fall 2016 in Plymouth. CCCC sought and received state earmarks and federal grants to advance the facility's development, along with private donations. It is the only such public higher education facility in the state.

CCCC is working with the private sector to create residential spaces for students from Quinsigamond to be housed.  Worcester area students will complete one year of programming at QCC before transferring credits and relocating to the CCCC program.

Incoming QCC president Dr. Luis Pedraja, who will take the helm at QCC on July 10, has been in communication with Dr. Cox, expressing his support for this important collaboration.

Individuals interested in the program should contact the QCC admissions office at admissions [at] qcc.mass.edu.

A story about the agreement ran in the Worcester Business Journal.

June, 2017
June, 2017

The QCC Foundation hosted a gala on June 15 at Mechanics Hall in Worcester, to celebrate QCC President Gail Carberry’s accomplishments and her retirement.

The gala had a Wizard of Oz theme, including a visit from the Cowardly Lion, the Tinman and Scarecrow, as well as Glinda the Good Witch. Dr. Carberry had often spoken of Dorothy’s ruby slippers, and how she brought a...

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The QCC Foundation hosted a gala on June 15 at Mechanics Hall in Worcester, to celebrate QCC President Gail Carberry’s accomplishments and her retirement.

The gala had a Wizard of Oz theme, including a visit from the Cowardly Lion, the Tinman and Scarecrow, as well as Glinda the Good Witch. Dr. Carberry had often spoken of Dorothy’s ruby slippers, and how she brought a miniature set to her interviews for the position of president at QCC, and kept them in her office after she was sworn in.

“Sometimes, kind folks will speak to me about my impending retirement, they will say ‘You have big shoes left to fill.’ I chuckle at the thought of my successor wearing the tiny red Mary Jane’s, but fitting into those metaphorical shoes is essential for leading a community college in Worcester. Worcester is a community that is fiercely proud of its history, protects its legacies but equally pulls together to effect positive change for the future.

“Miracles happen every day at Quinsigamond Community College. I have shaken the hands of over 10,000 graduates, many of whom believe that a miracle pulled them through … but I know it was the courage of each students and the skill of the faculty and staff who helped make their success happen,” Dr. Carberry said.

The event also recognized donors to the Regional Investment in Service and Education (RISE) Campaign.

Campaign Chairperson Susan Mailman said the contributions helped leverage additional monies through the Commonwealth’s grant opportunities.

“Overall, in addition to the $3.2 mill campaign raised through donors, the RISE campaign leverage approximately $7.8 million, bringing in a total of $11 million,” Ms. Mailman said. “We want to thank all those involved for their generosity and commitment to provide students at QCC with a first-class education that includes state-of-the-art buildings and equipment.”

This included the QuEST Center on the Worcester campus, which has a FAB Lab, updated equipment for manufacturing labs and more. Also in downtown Worcester, the Healthcare and Workforce Development Center was equipped with new labs and classrooms.

Hank Stolz was the master of ceremonies at the event. The Jerry Cecco Big Band and the QCC Faculty Jazz Ensemble performed, under the direction of Tom Hebert, renowned jazz saxophonist. The ensemble includes Jim Heffernan on keyboard, John Solaperto, vocals and percussion, Jose Castillo on bass and Rick Ricardi on drums.

Portions of the event were catered by the QCC Food Service, and students in the program helped with serving.

Quinsigamond Community College also hosted a retirement party for Dr. Carberry on campus on June 21, for faculty and staff to say their goodbyes, and to dedicate the new Gail E. Carberry Gallery in the HLC. 

For more photos and videos, visit the Congratulations gallery or check out full album

June, 2017
June, 2017

Gateway graduate Dylan Marengo, 22, opened a tropical fish store in Worcester in June, making his longtime dream a reality.

A collector of fish, as well as a fisherman, he had wanted to open his own store. The store is a culmination of his hard work and dedication, tangible proof of how he has taken steps to change his life and choose a different path than one that was once before him.

... More...

Gateway graduate Dylan Marengo, 22, opened a tropical fish store in Worcester in June, making his longtime dream a reality.

A collector of fish, as well as a fisherman, he had wanted to open his own store. The store is a culmination of his hard work and dedication, tangible proof of how he has taken steps to change his life and choose a different path than one that was once before him.

Mr. Marengo started in the Gateway program when he was 17 years old, after he had been kicked out of South High and an alternative high school program.

“Previously in high school, I was getting in trouble. I was surrounded by unmotivated people who were causing trouble,” he said. “At Gateway, I was surrounded by people who were trying to excel and better themselves. It rubbed off on me, I started enjoying school and working harder.”

“By the grace of God, they took me, and it turned my entire life around,” Mr. Marengo said.

He completed the Gateway program, earning his high school diploma. In May, he graduated from Quinsigamond Community College with an associate’s degree in Criminal Justice.

Mr. Marengo’s goal is to become an environmental police officer or game warden. He enjoys kayak fishing, and even travelled to Tennessee to compete in a kayak fishing competition.

Jenna Glazer, Resource Specialist at the Gateway to College program, said QCC opened a lot of doors for him.

“He’s come a long way since I met him in 2013,” said Ms. Glazer. “He has taken ahold of his future and now he will be able to move forward in a successful life.”

Mr. Marengo has been keeping fish since he was young. “It was my dream to have a tropical fish store, I just never thought I could do it,” he said.

He had been breeding and selling fish on the side, and through his own interest realized there wasn’t a fish store in the area. When he saw a retail spot available that fit his needs for space and affordability, he decided to go for it. 

“I have been setting it up for the last three months, while I’ve been going to school every day,” he said. “Just two weeks after I graduated, on June 1, I had a soft opening of the shop. I plan to have another opening later this summer.”

His store, Lucky’s Aquarium, is at 70 James St., Suite 111A in Worcester. The store is named after his freshwater stingray Lucky, who he rescued from a pet store. The stingray was at the bottom of a tank, and had been forgotten about. “He was extremely malnourished,” he said. “I fed him and took care of him and now he is a healthy, big boy. Once his tank is ready, I’ll bring him to the store, as a store mascot.”

At QCC, having a flexible schedule was an important to Mr. Marengo, because he was working as a pizza delivery driver while attending school. Mr. Marengo grew up in Worcester, on Sylvan Street. He has two older brothers. 

  • Pictured from left to right: Ethan O’Connell, Dathiel Blake, Kyle Mondino, and Kayla Paterson
June, 2017
June, 2017

PTK is excited to announce the Live & Learn Greenhouse will be up and running in July. The group has been working hard to get the project started and the finishing touches were recently made on the greenhouse.

Construction started in the spring on the four-season greenhouse on campus.

PTK Faculty Advisor Bonnie Coleman said students will grow vegetables and plants, to not only...

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PTK is excited to announce the Live & Learn Greenhouse will be up and running in July. The group has been working hard to get the project started and the finishing touches were recently made on the greenhouse.

Construction started in the spring on the four-season greenhouse on campus.

PTK Faculty Advisor Bonnie Coleman said students will grow vegetables and plants, to not only learn more about gardening, but also to ultimately to provide food.

The mission of the Live & Learn Greenhouse Project is to renew connections between people and the natural environment, create a resource of healthy, nutrient-rich food for the Quinsigamond Community College community, and provide an educational resource for students, faculty, staff, and children.

Different students and academic programs will be able to use the greenhouse and learn more about various growing methods, such as hydroponics, to raise awareness about the natural environment.

The idea came about because of food insecurity on campus, said Ms. Coleman. According to Higher Education Today, many college students struggle with food insecurity. This can be especially true at community colleges, where many students are non-traditional age. Feeding America, a national nonprofit network of food banks that provides food assistance to 46.5 million individuals and 15.5 million households, estimates that nearly half (49.3 percent) of its clients in college must choose between educational expenses (i.e., tuition, books and supplies, rent) and food annually, and that 21 percent did so for a full 12 months.

A $16,500 grant will partially fund the greenhouse, where students will grow vegetables and plants. Ms. Coleman said they plan to start with herbs, cucumbers and tomatoes and then add new items each season. There also will be a “Plant A Seed’ project with the Early Childhood Education program, where children can come in to plant a seed and watch it grow.

PTK is accepting donations of pots, potting soil, seeds, shelving, lighting or cash donations. The students will be working with a botanist, who is a part-time faculty member, to learn more about the process.

Former PTK President Kimberly May said earlier this spring they hope to also involve applied arts students and have them create a book about gardening and the project, which could then be donated to local schools and the city’s bookmobiles. The honor society also is involved in promoting children’s literacy through raising funds for one of the city’s bookmobile’s, Lilly.

Ms. Coleman said they hope to grow and sell poinsettias in the winter season to raise money for the greenhouse project.

June, 2017
June, 2017

QCC President Gail Carberry received the Salute to Achievement Award on May 13 at the second annual Worcester Black Tie Gala held by the Odd Fellows Home.

The award was given to Dr. Carberry for her strong leadership and her untiring dedication to higher education, to the business community and to nonprofit organizations, said Nancy Cyr, executive assistant.

The event included dinner,...

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QCC President Gail Carberry received the Salute to Achievement Award on May 13 at the second annual Worcester Black Tie Gala held by the Odd Fellows Home.

The award was given to Dr. Carberry for her strong leadership and her untiring dedication to higher education, to the business community and to nonprofit organizations, said Nancy Cyr, executive assistant.

The event included dinner, a wine tasting and silent auction. The Odd Fellows Home is a long-term care and rehabilitation facility that offers skilled nursing care. The home has provided care since 1892.

The gala was held at the Beechwood Hotel, and about 180 people attended. The Odd Fellows Home recognizes an individual each year for his, her or their significant leadership and dedication within the Worcester Community.    

June, 2017
June, 2017

Quinsigamond Community College held a graduation for its TRAIN program, a pilot program held at five different community colleges across the state.

Honored speakers included QCC President Gail Carberry, State Sen. Karen E. Spilka, Secretary of Elder Affairs Alice Bonner, and David Cedrone, Associate Commissioner for Economic and Workforce Development for the Massachusetts Department of Higher...

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Quinsigamond Community College held a graduation for its TRAIN program, a pilot program held at five different community colleges across the state.

Honored speakers included QCC President Gail Carberry, State Sen. Karen E. Spilka, Secretary of Elder Affairs Alice Bonner, and David Cedrone, Associate Commissioner for Economic and Workforce Development for the Massachusetts Department of Higher Education. Kathie Manning, Dean of Workforce Development and Continuing Education at QCC, made the closing remarks.

At QCC, 28 participants completed the course, a Nurse Assistant/Home Health Aide class. The course helped prepare participants for the Red Cross test to become a Certified Nursing Assistant.

TRAIN (Training Resources and Internship Networks) is a pilot program overseen by the Massachusetts Department of Higher Education (MDHE), in collaboration with the Executive Office of Labor and Workforce Development. A Current Population Survey reported that in the state in 2014, the percentage of unemployed individuals, who were long-term unemployed, was 34.6 percent. Over time, people who are experiencing long-term unemployment have an erosion of their skills, motivation and self-esteem, leading to them often no longer seeking employment.

In response, the legislature passed the TRAIN grant program and funds were given to community colleges to implement training programs and provide employer-sponsored internships for the long-term unemployed.

Student-centered support services were provided through a Worcester Downtown Connect network, including transportation, child care, nutrition, financial literacy, comprehensive case management, individualized service plans, skills training and employment-related services.

 “It was a very successful program,” said Program Coordinator Jo Sundin. “To qualify for the program, participants had to be under-employed or unemployed for at least a year. This program is trying to fill a gap and provide training and education.”

“QCC has opened a door full of opportunities that make me feel confident to pursue my goals and have a brighter future,” said participant Teresa Criollo. “Through this program, I’ve also made lifelong friends.”

Participant Hellen Nyangori, who gave one of the student testimonials at the ceremony, said the program showed her age doesn’t matter when it comes to learning. “Coming originally from Kenya, I thought I knew a lot about being a nurse, but I have come to know there is always more to learn,” she said. “Thank you for this program.”

Three classes, or cohorts, have been held at QCC. Out of those, 13 students have already gotten jobs, three have enrolled in QCC to take further classes. The most recent class of 10 has not had a chance to take the CNA test yet.

“It’s all about timing,” Ms. Sundin said. “They have to be ready to make a shift, and they want to make a difference for their lives and their families. We keep checking in with them and motivating them, but they have to be ready for change.”

The graduation ceremony was held for all three cohorts. Classes for the six-week program were started in January, March and May.

June, 2017
June, 2017

Quinsigamond Community College announced two initiatives in Blackstone Valley in June, which will improve the accessibility and affordability of training and educational programs for residents of the region.

A ribbon cutting was held for the QCC Blackstone Valley Internet Learning Café at Alternatives Unlimited in Whitinsville.

“This will expand access for the people of Blackstone Valley...

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Quinsigamond Community College announced two initiatives in Blackstone Valley in June, which will improve the accessibility and affordability of training and educational programs for residents of the region.

A ribbon cutting was held for the QCC Blackstone Valley Internet Learning Café at Alternatives Unlimited in Whitinsville.

“This will expand access for the people of Blackstone Valley to the broad range of programming QCC offers,” said QCC President Gail Carberry. “Students can engage with one another, as well as learn online in a common space. Students will be supported by advisors, financial aid officers and other support staff.”

Dr. Carberry said the college worked with public and private sector partnerships for this project.

More than 700 students at QCC hail from the Blackstone Valley, with about 200 of them taking online courses, she said. QCC offers more than 70 degree programs online, in subjects ranging from tech, business, human services, education, liberal arts, criminal justice, health and more.

Dennis Rice, Executive Director of Alternatives, said the organization has opened different career centers throughout the region that give something back to the community, through initiatives such as art galleries, gardens and more.

“With this partnership with QCC, we have created a space and raised funds for a learning café,” he said. “We are very excited to be partnered with QCC.”

The café in the renovated Whitin Mill will offer a place for students, clients and employees of Alternatives and the public to use free wifi, grab a cup of coffee and a pastry and take online courses through QCC.

Alternatives is a leading provider of services for adults with developmental or psychiatric disabilities in Central Massachusetts.

State Sen. Michael Moore, D-Millbury, said the legislature and community partners have been working to get something going in Blackstone Valley for almost 20 years.

“I look forward to this being the first of many celebrations of growing this program, with the vision of a satellite campus in Blackstone Valley,” Mr. Moore said. “Higher education is an economic driver, if we bring students, it will also bring their business to other establishments in the area.”

An alum of QCC, Mr. Moore said QCC offers a great education. “They can help set you in the right direction,” he said. “Graduates today have so many choices, and many positions need a higher level of skill.”

He thanked the legislative delegation for their hard work bringing this project to fruition. He said former State Sen. Richard Moore was involved in getting the fiscal appropriation of $300,000 for the expansion into Blackstone Valley.

June, 2017
June, 2017

On June 19, Quinsigamond Community College entered into an agreement with the Blackstone Valley Chamber of Commerce to promote an advanced manufacturing training program.

After lunch at the college’s new Blackstone Valley Internet Learning Cafe, an event was held at the Blackstone Valley Chamber of Commerce to sign a Memorandum of Understanding for a partnership. It initially starts with two...

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On June 19, Quinsigamond Community College entered into an agreement with the Blackstone Valley Chamber of Commerce to promote an advanced manufacturing training program.

After lunch at the college’s new Blackstone Valley Internet Learning Cafe, an event was held at the Blackstone Valley Chamber of Commerce to sign a Memorandum of Understanding for a partnership. It initially starts with two classrooms at Linwood Mill, 670 Linwood Ave., for an advanced manufacturing training program.

Jeannie Hebert, President and CEO of the Blackstone Valley Chamber of Commerce and a member of the QCC Foundation Board of Directors, said the MOU is the first step toward a manufacturing center in Blackstone Valley. She said certificate courses and customized curriculum will address a skills gap in manufacturing.

“This is a long time coming, and is one of the number one initiatives that we have been working to accomplish,” Ms. Hebert said. “To get this signed and get equipment to fill the classrooms is just going to be a wonder for us.”

“This can lead to so much more in the Valley, a whole multitude of different courses can be offered,” said State Rep. David Muradian, R-Grafton. “It’s amazing to see it finally come to fruition, it’s been a lot of work from everyone involved.”

Scott Rossiter, Chairman of employee-owned Lampin Corporation, a manufacturer of precision parts and assemblies, said this partnership between businesses, the Chamber and QCC goes back many years. He is a member of the QCC Foundation Board and the Blackstone Valley Chamber, and said he is excited about the plans moving forward.

“Seven employees are currently undergoing customized training at QCC,” he said. “Having access in Blackstone Valley for other kinds of training for our employees would be an unbelievable opportunity.”

QCC President Gail Carberry said the needs of the Valley are diverse and opportunities to get people started on their career pathways are important. The college has been working with technical high schools in the area, Ben Franklin Institute of Technology, Worcester State and Fitchburg State, as well as employers, to provide educational and training opportunities for students and employees.

Signing the Memorandum of Understanding with the Chamber signifies a commitment to offer certificate courses for manufacturing, but also a promise to the future to create viable curricula for the region.

“Our goal is to get a campus out here, but it has to be done in stages,” said Dr. Carberry. “This is an acorn that we hope will grow into a mighty oak. We will continue to look at what is appropriate for workforce training and skills for students and employees coming in.”

June, 2017
June, 2017

Quinsigamond Community College’s (QCC) KidSeal Program is celebrating 19 years of service to underserved, elementary school-aged children from Worcester County.

The KidSeal Program was established in 1999 by Professor Emeritus Joyce Cooney, RDH, B.S., M.Ed. The program is part of the larger Central Massachusetts Oral Health Initiative, which serves more than 40 Worcester elementary...

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Quinsigamond Community College’s (QCC) KidSeal Program is celebrating 19 years of service to underserved, elementary school-aged children from Worcester County.

The KidSeal Program was established in 1999 by Professor Emeritus Joyce Cooney, RDH, B.S., M.Ed. The program is part of the larger Central Massachusetts Oral Health Initiative, which serves more than 40 Worcester elementary schools.

For many of these children, their experience at QCC Dental Hygiene Clinic is the only time they ever receive dental services. 

“The beauty of the KidSeal Program, working collaboratively with the dental hygiene and dental assisting students, is that it is a win-win for all involved,” said Jane E. Gauthier, M.Ed., of the Dental Hygiene Department at Quinsigamond Community College. “Dental services are provided to the most vulnerable population, namely the children in Worcester County who otherwise would not have access to care. This directly aligns with the mission of the Massachusetts Office of Oral Health, to decrease the burden of oral disease. Additionally, QCC students are enriching their education while supporting their community and making a difference in the lives of those less fortunate than themselves.” 

The KidSeal Program provides free dental care, including dental screenings, prophylaxis, radiographs, oral health education and fluoride varnish, to elementary school-aged children at 10 schools in the greater Worcester area.

In 2016, more than 650 elementary school students received caries risk screenings, fluoride varnish applications and oral health education. Over 300 children received 1,033 sealants from all KidSeal clinics combined. In spring 2017, an additional 618 students were screened for caries risk. The data is being collected to demonstrate the serious need for dental services in Worcester County when vying for financial resources to address this need and to advocate for the creation of the mid-level dental practitioner. 

The city of Worcester is one of the nearly 5,000 areas that has been designated by the Department of Health and Human Services as a Dental Health Professional Shortage Area. To help address the area’s service shortage, the KidSeal Program is three-pronged:

Segment I: Dental Hygiene Clinic
In May and January, when the college is not in session, the KidSeal Program uses the QCC Dental Hygiene Clinic to provide services to underserved children from 10 of the inner-city elementary schools in Worcester. The children are screened to determine their oral health needs, which are reported back to school nurses and, subsequently, the children’s parents. Emergency and restorative dental care is provided by volunteer dentists from the community. 

Segment II: Service Learning Component
The KidSeal Program also has a fluoride varnish program that is part of the QCC dental hygiene curriculum. As part of service learning, QCC dental hygiene students visit 10 different schools in Worcester County and provide oral health screenings, oral health education and fluoride varnish applications to hundreds of children.

Segment III: Clinical Requirements
During the academic school year, KidSeal Program sealant clinics are held for two days in November and two days in April in the QCC Dental Hygiene Clinic.The children are treated by the sophomore dental hygiene students, as part of their clinical requirements. The dental assisting students also attend these clinic sessions to help keep the flow of care moving at a steady pace, as well as to gain valuable experience.  

The June 2017 issue of the American Dental Educational Association, Bulletin of Dental Education, featured an article on the KidSeal program. The article can be viewed at http://www.adea.org/BDEBlog.aspx?id=37036&blogid=27619&_zs=MXGhc1&_zl=0rbw3

 

June, 2017
June, 2017

Even though it’s summer, the Phi Theta Kappa office is keeping busy with planning activities for the fall, choosing its Honors In Action topic and forming teams for upcoming community fundraising walks.

General meetings this summer will be held July 12, from 10:00-11:00 a.m., July 27, from 10:15-11:15 a.m., August 16 from 5:30-6:30 p.m. and August 28, from 2:30-3:30 p.m.

The Honors in...

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Even though it’s summer, the Phi Theta Kappa office is keeping busy with planning activities for the fall, choosing its Honors In Action topic and forming teams for upcoming community fundraising walks.

General meetings this summer will be held July 12, from 10:00-11:00 a.m., July 27, from 10:15-11:15 a.m., August 16 from 5:30-6:30 p.m. and August 28, from 2:30-3:30 p.m.

The Honors in Action Kickoff meeting will be held July 8, in Room 107A, from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. At the meeting members of PTK will choose a topic for the community-based research project. A light lunch will be served. Members are encouraged to attend to help make a difference in their community.

PTK members will be volunteering at the Community Harvest Garden on August 5 and August 19 from 9:00 a.m. to noon.

The PTK Annual Cookout is scheduled for October 4, with a rain date of October 11. It will be held outside the Fuller Student Center.

Sign up for walks in September

QCC and PTK are involved in the Relay for Life and the Step Out Walk to Stop Diabetes in September. Sign up to join teams now and start raising pledges.

The Relay for Life of Central South County will be Friday, September 8, starting at 5:00 p.m. at Lemansky Park, Auburn Mass. QCC, Alpha Zeta Theta and the Office of Student Life encourage people to join their team. You can sign up online at relay.acsevents.org, click join a relay and select team name, then search for Quinsigamond Community College.

Members also will be participating in the Central MA Step Out Walk to Stop Diabetes on September 24, at Assumption College.

For more information about any of these events, stop by the PTK office, Room 349A.

June, 2017
June, 2017

At the third annual Faculty Innovations and Best Practices Showcase on Wednesday, May 31, forty-five faculty and staff members learned from their colleagues about new ways to engage students.

This day-long teaching and learning event began with opening remarks from Interim Vice President of Academic Affairs Nancy Schoenfeld, who thanked the presenters for sharing their innovative pedagogical...

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At the third annual Faculty Innovations and Best Practices Showcase on Wednesday, May 31, forty-five faculty and staff members learned from their colleagues about new ways to engage students.

This day-long teaching and learning event began with opening remarks from Interim Vice President of Academic Affairs Nancy Schoenfeld, who thanked the presenters for sharing their innovative pedagogical practices with the college community. Dr. Schoenfeld’s welcome address was followed by these presentations: “Service Learning: Lessons Learned ing” by Jim Brennan, “Using Blackboard for the Classroom” by Carrie H. Johnson, “Go Open for Manufacturing CAD” by Damian Kieran, “Collaborating with Colleagues in Other Disciplines” by Karen O’Neill and Amy Beaudry, “Blackboard Collaborate Ultra—Not Your Mother’s Virtual Classroom” by Robert Knox, and “Let’s Share ‘Apps’!” by Andreana M. Grimaldo.

The final presentation was a hands-on demonstration of the new music room by Josè Castillo. During this “Music at QCC?” presentation, attendees had a chance to set up the Yamaha 88 weighted keyboards and try on headphones, which are part of a sophisticated conferencing system allowing students to play the keyboards without hearing one another. Mr. Castillo showed how the instructor can talk to students while they are playing, listen in and give feedback, or offer further explanations to the entire class.

Over lunch, attendees had more opportunities to ask the presenters follow-up questions and converse with their peers.   

June, 2017
June, 2017

We are very pleased to announce the following staff updates:

On June 4, 2017, Administrative Services welcomed Elizabeth Blaue as System Analyst/Programmer. Ms. Blaue has been at Quinsigamond Community College since 2006 as a Staff Assistant/ERP Client Software Support. Prior to her work at QCC, she was a Help Desk Support Analyst at UMASS Memorial Hospital. Ms. Blaue...

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We are very pleased to announce the following staff updates:

On June 4, 2017, Administrative Services welcomed Elizabeth Blaue as System Analyst/Programmer. Ms. Blaue has been at Quinsigamond Community College since 2006 as a Staff Assistant/ERP Client Software Support. Prior to her work at QCC, she was a Help Desk Support Analyst at UMASS Memorial Hospital. Ms. Blaue earned a Bachelor’s of Computer Science from Worcester State University. 

On June 5, 2017, Administrative Services welcomed Juliana Esposito as Purchasing Manager. Ms. Esposito has been with Quinsigamond Community College since 2008 as an Accountant II in Payroll. She is the current chair of the Operations Council and she is a member of the Support, Help and Encouragement (S.H.E.) program at QCC. Ms. Esposito earned a Bachelor’s of Science in Business Administration from Nichols College.

On June 5, 2017, Academic Affairs welcomed Erica Stevenson as Teacher, Children’s School. Ms. Stevenson has been with Quinsigamond Community College as a part time Teacher in the Children’s school for over 6 years. She has also worked as a Preschool Teacher in the private sector for over 16 years. She is certified by Massachusetts Department of Early Education and Care for Preschool and Infant/Toddler Lead Teacher and she is CPR and First Aid certified. Ms. Stevenson earned an Associate Degree in Early Childhood Education from Quinsigamond Community College. 

On June 12, 2017, Academic Affairs welcomed Melissa A. Desmarais as Administrative Secretary I, School of Humanities & Education. Ms. Desmarais brings to this position over 14 years of administrative assistant and clerical experience in the public and private education sector, serving most recently as an Administrative Secretary I at Bristol Community College. Ms. Desmarais earned an Associate of Science in Paralegal Studies at Fisher College.

On June 14, 2017, Academic Affairs welcomed Maureen Giacobbe back to QCC in a new role as Coordinator of Instructional Technology and Assessment. Ms. Giacobbe brings to this position over 12 years of Instructional Design experience in the public and private sector. While at QCC she worked 5 years as a Career Placement Representative and taught computer applications as an adjunct faculty member. Ms. Giacobbe earned a B achelors in Information Systems from University of Massachusetts Lowell and a Master of Education in Instructional Technology from Lesley University.   

Please join us in welcoming QCC's new staff into their new roles. 

May, 2017

May, 2017
May, 2017

Marching into the DCU Center to the sound of bagpipes, nearly 1,400 Quinsigamond Community College students came to celebrate their commencement on May 18, 2017.

Students heard from a number of speakers about being leaders and reaching for their dreams.

State Rep. Kate Campanale said the students would leave as a new generation of leaders. “I challenge you to live a life of...

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Marching into the DCU Center to the sound of bagpipes, nearly 1,400 Quinsigamond Community College students came to celebrate their commencement on May 18, 2017.

Students heard from a number of speakers about being leaders and reaching for their dreams.

State Rep. Kate Campanale said the students would leave as a new generation of leaders. “I challenge you to live a life of purpose, meaning and fulfillment,” she said.

She also said the personality and passion of QCC President Dr. Gail Carberry, who created relationships throughout Worcester County, will be missed.

Dr. Carberry, who is retiring this summer, was the featured speaker at this year’s ceremony.

Dr. Carberry said she overcame many hardships to get to this pinnacle in her career. As a community college student 42 years ago, she fell in love with community colleges.

“It was community college faculty who believe in me, who helped me begin to believe in myself,” Dr. Carberry said. She said she had struggled with a learning disability, and wasn’t a strong reader, which caused her to doubt her own intelligence.

During their marriage, she and her husband faced financial struggles and job changes, but she turned to further her education, which ignited a passion that turned into a career.

“Community college classes are pathways of opportunity, they can lead you to a better life,” she said. “I encourage you to take on the role of alumni, join the guardian protectors of Central Massachusetts as Wyverns.”

She held up a small pair of ruby red slippers, which she carried with her to her interviews for the position of QCC president, and has kept in her office since.

“There is no place like home, Worcester is where I grew up and it has been a pleasure to lead the college for 11 years,” she said. “My charge to you is to guard and protect this community.”

“Wyvern’s wings are meant soar, to fly to great heights, fly over the rainbow that follows the storms of life,” she encouraged graduates.

Her speech was followed by an award of President Emeritus from Board of Trustees Chairman Susan Mailman.

Faculty Speaker Associate Professor of Criminal Justice Kristy Glover said 16 years ago she graduated from community college as well.

“For you, this is the beginning of a voyage with endless possibilities, that will lead you anywhere your heart desires, as long as you are willing to work hard, persevere and not let adversity derail you,” she said.

“You have earned your degree, if you can do this you can do absolutely anything you put your mind to,” she said.

Student Speaker Ethan O’Connell, 2016-17 Student Trustee, Vice President of the Student Senate and a member of many clubs and organizations, said for all the students this accomplishment was the culmination of many hours of hard work.

“In preparing for this speech, I realized there is no typical QCC student, we all come from different backgrounds, different places, different eras and different cultures, but we have one thing in common,” he said. “All of us are here today because we took a risk. Whatever your path, I’m willing to bet you took at least one significant risk on your journey.”

“It is important to take risks and go out of your comfort zone when it can lead to personal growth,” Mr. O’Connell said. “My message for you is to be kind, be honest, work hard and continue to take risks.”

Visit the Celebrate 2017 page for more photos and video of the event.

QCC's 2017 Commencement was also featured in a story in the Worcester Telegram & Gazette.

  • MNT 216 - Manufacturing Processes II 3d Printer
  • MNT 216 - Manufacturing Processes II Students
  • MNT 215 Students
  • Energy Utility Technology Fair
  • Energy Utility Technology Fair
  • Energy Utility Technology Fair
  • Mechatronics Option Students
  • Mechatronics Option Student
May, 2017
May, 2017

Now that students have been able to use the QuEST Center for almost 18 months, they are reaping the benefits of having increased lab space, a dedicated maker space and the latest high tech equipment.

This semester several STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) classes had final projects and exams that involved hands-on creation of technology, such as 3D printers, Stirling heat engines, or...

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Now that students have been able to use the QuEST Center for almost 18 months, they are reaping the benefits of having increased lab space, a dedicated maker space and the latest high tech equipment.

This semester several STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) classes had final projects and exams that involved hands-on creation of technology, such as 3D printers, Stirling heat engines, or exploration of different energy sources, such as solar energy, electromagnetism and steam engines.  

“Many of these types projects were done previously, but we are at a completely different level of depth, quality and complete integration with the curriculum now,” said Kathy Rentsch, Dean of Business, Engineering and Technology. 

Students are able to use these skills to continue their education, if they are seeking a bachelor’s degree in engineering or related fields, or apply them directly to the workplace.

Here are some of the projects students having been working on:

Creating 3D Printers

img_7187.jpgStudents in MNT 216, Manufacturing Processes II, built two 3D printers from kits, model Mendel 90. They ran into multiple challenges, as the instructions for the kits were not up-to-date and did not match the parts provided. Students had to problem solve and re-engineer the process. While doing so, they also improved upon the original design.

The Fab Lab now has nine 3D printers that use different materials. Students select the material that will meet the needs of the design they are building in terms of flexibility, strength and transparency. The Fab Lab is open to anyone on campus. Summer hours are Monday and Wednesday from noon to 3 p.m., Tuesday and Thursday from 3-6 p.m. and Friday from 9 a.m. to noon. Students can come in and see how the machines available work and learn how to use the technology for their own projects.

Students involved include Eric Akillian, Jason Butler, Stephen Burris, Emily Miller, Steve Kelly, and Johanny Polanco.

Students Make Stirling Engines

img_7215.jpgStudents in senior level MNT 215 were assigned the task of building five Stirling engines, which are heat engines. The project included research, downloading appropriate information, using parametric modeling software to re-engineer one of many designs. Students then worked together to identify which parts needed machining and which could be manufactured using additive manufacturing equipment, such as 3D printing.

One the machined parts were identified, students were required to design fixtures, create the CNC programs, and run the machines to produce five copies of each component. The next step was to assemble the parts, identify any errors and make corrections.

“The students realized immediately upon assembly that friction was their enemy and that simple frictional resistance could render a system inoperable,” said Lee Duerden, Assistant Professor and Program Coordinator of Manufacturing Technology at QCC. “It was a terrific learning curve for them and a genuine challenge.”

Students involved in this project included Thomas Le, Emily Miller, Stephen Kelly, Nicholas Voyer, Eric Akillian, and Jason Butler. In the group picture, Dean Kathy Rentsch and Leslie Horton, Dean of the School of Math and Science, also are pictured.


eut-fair020.jpgEnergy Utility Technology Fair

The Energy Utility Technology option program is designed to prepare students for advancement in the energy industry. Students can use this associate’s degree to advance in the workplace or transfer to a four-year program to complete a bachelor’s degree.

The QCC community was invited to the Energy Utility Fair on May 3. Projects included advantages and disadvantages of solar energy, electromagnetism, how steam engines work, and a demonstration of a lemon battery. Professors and staff walk around the fair, students present their interactive projects and are scored. The scores and projects are part of their final grade.

 

Manufacturing and Mechatronics

mechatronics-final-projects030.jpg

The final project in ELT 130 Embedded Microcontrollers was to design build and program a microcontroller-based system. Examples are:

  • Mobile robot controlled by a PS2 controller, with the ability to detect and avoid obstacles or to avoid driving off the edge of a table
  • Mobile robot capable of following a line on the floor
  • A multicolored RGB LED lamp that can generate any color by mixing together various amounts of red, green and blue light.
  • A laser harp that sends out multiple laser beams in a fan pattern, and plays notes based on which beam is interrupted.

Through these projects, students learn electronic assembly and troubleshooting; drawing electronic schematics; and microcontroller programming. These skills prepare them for careers such as electronics technician, automation technician, mechatronics technician and robotics technician.

Students involved include Joe Kimball, Brendan Jett, Perla Abboud, Steve Villalobos, Sarah Dinsmore, Robert Allred, Christain Hulett, Elijah Boudreau, Shawn Reese, Long Sybouheuang, and Cody Hamilton. Not pictured is Tyler Church.

May, 2017
May, 2017

The first floor of the Harrington Learning Center at the main QCC Campus now hosts the Dr. Gail E. Carberry Gallery, a collection of photos celebrating Quinsigamond Community College and many of the different opportunities offered at the college.

It is dedicated to Dr. Gail Carberry, QCC's sixth President who is retiring this summer after 11 years at the college. Her leadership has...

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The first floor of the Harrington Learning Center at the main QCC Campus now hosts the Dr. Gail E. Carberry Gallery, a collection of photos celebrating Quinsigamond Community College and many of the different opportunities offered at the college.

It is dedicated to Dr. Gail Carberry, QCC's sixth President who is retiring this summer after 11 years at the college. Her leadership has led to the College's growth in doubling the list of graduates, increasing enrollment by over 40%, adding the QuEST Center to the main campus, and shortening the distance to higher education by adding additional QCC  locations in Southbridge, Marlborough, and downtown Worcester. Additionally, Dr. Carberry expanded academic offerings with programs in science and technology, healthcare, liberal arts and more. 

May, 2017
May, 2017

The Quinsigamond Community College Foundation hosted its third annual Scholarship Lunch on Tuesday, May 16, at noon at the Harrington Learning Center at QCC.

In the past 11 years, funds have grown from 19 scholarship funds to 54 funds, which allowed the foundation to make 158 awards this year to 98 students, totaling more than $174,000 in scholarship funds for distribution this fiscal year.

About 30...

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The Quinsigamond Community College Foundation hosted its third annual Scholarship Lunch on Tuesday, May 16, at noon at the Harrington Learning Center at QCC.

In the past 11 years, funds have grown from 19 scholarship funds to 54 funds, which allowed the foundation to make 158 awards this year to 98 students, totaling more than $174,000 in scholarship funds for distribution this fiscal year.

About 30 students attended the luncheon to be honored for awards received during the current academic year. A total of 70 people, including donors, family of those receiving scholarships, QCC Foundation members and QCC Trustees attended the luncheon.

Donors attending included Barbara Guthrie and Gary MacConnell from the Worcester Rotary Club; Teresa Gentile, Dorothy Stanton, and Pat Gibbons from the Worcester City Hospital School of Nursing Alumni Association; QCC Foundation Lifetime Director Jim Harrington from The Francis A. and Jacquelyn H. Harrington Foundation; QCC President Dr. Gail Carberry; and QCC Foundation Director Al Maykel, Jr.

The foundation raises money for some scholarships through events, such as the golf tournament and spelling bee. Other scholarships are memorial funds or endowed scholarships, or supported by different QCC departments or organizations.

May, 2017
May, 2017

The Worcester Business Development Corporation has named 25 Federal Street, home of QCC's Healthcare and Workforce Developmet Center the Carberry Center, in honor of QCC President Dr. Gail Carberry, who is retiring this summer.

The announcement was made at the 52nd annual meeting of the WBDC by Craig L. Blais, president and CEO of the organization, on May 16....

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The Worcester Business Development Corporation has named 25 Federal Street, home of QCC's Healthcare and Workforce Developmet Center the Carberry Center, in honor of QCC President Dr. Gail Carberry, who is retiring this summer.

The announcement was made at the 52nd annual meeting of the WBDC by Craig L. Blais, president and CEO of the organization, on May 16.

The building, was opened in April 2015 as part of a partnership between Quinsigamond Community College and the WBDC. The former Telegram & Gazette building was renovated at a cost of $40 million, and now includes new labs and equipment for nursing and healthcare courses. It also includes the Center for Workforce Development and Continuing Education, which offers adult education and workforce training.

Dr. Carberry has been recognized for her work collaborating with other Worcester colleges, local businesses and economic development organizations to offer coursework and degrees that easily transfer to further education opportunities or immediate workforce development. During her tenure as QCC president for the past 11 years, she has expanded the college, not only geographically to reach other populations in areas such as Southbridge, and Marlborough, but has also expanded course offerings and technology to meet workforce needs.

At the annual meeting, keynote speaker Travis McCready, president and chief executive officer of the Massachusetts Life Sciences Center, spoke about Worcester being poised to take advantage of new trends in biotechnology, including a push towards biomanufacturing.

More information about the annual meeting can be found in the Worcester Telegram & Gazette story.