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November, 2017

  • Quinsigamond Community College's main campus in Worcester.
November, 2017
November, 2017

The recent national disasters that have displaced so many people has brought the Worcester community together to offer support and services for those in need.

The City of Worcester, Centro, the American Red Cross and other community partners, have been collaborating and finding ways to assist those who have been displaced by the recent hurricanes.

Quinsigamond Community College also stands with its...

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The recent national disasters that have displaced so many people has brought the Worcester community together to offer support and services for those in need.

The City of Worcester, Centro, the American Red Cross and other community partners, have been collaborating and finding ways to assist those who have been displaced by the recent hurricanes.

Quinsigamond Community College also stands with its community partners and is working to find ways to make a difference for those who have been devastated by these natural disasters.

“We have received calls from students from the affected areas and are working to find ways to make it easier for them to attend QCC. I am prepared to take the necessary steps through fee waivers or other measures to ensure affordable access to higher education for these folks until they establish residency,” said President Dr. Luis J. Pedraja.

The City of Worcester has outlined 3 steps for new residents who have been displaced by these disasters to follow, along with a list of programs and services available to them. This will be an ongoing initiative and will evolve as things progress.

“Please try to be mindful of the difficulties these folks may be facing as you encounter them on or off campus,” Dr. Pedraja said. “We as a college need to be able to welcome these students and help to make the transition as painless as possible for them.”

View a Guide to the City of Worcester Services for new residents affected by hurricanes

  • QCC Paramedic students get a refresher course in how to administer Narcan.
  • QCC paramedic students recently renewed took a Narcan refresher course.
November, 2017
November, 2017

The increase of opioid-related deaths has grown to epidemic proportions both locally, regionally and globally. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention cite that six out of 10 drug overdoses are opioid-related. In Worcester, there were 77 opioid-related deaths in 2015 and 56 in 2016.

At Quinsigamond Community College, those statistics are not surprising to the college’s paramedics students, who...

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The increase of opioid-related deaths has grown to epidemic proportions both locally, regionally and globally. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention cite that six out of 10 drug overdoses are opioid-related. In Worcester, there were 77 opioid-related deaths in 2015 and 56 in 2016.

At Quinsigamond Community College, those statistics are not surprising to the college’s paramedics students, who recently took a refresher course on how to administer Narcan (a drug that can reverse the effects of an opioid overdose).

“The students who were there have already been EMT’s for a minimum of one year or longer. Many have already administered Narcan in the field, so this was more of a refresher for the group,” said QCC’s Program Coordinator of the Emergency Medical Services Program, Cheryl Finn.

Administering Narcan is a topic that is covered regularly in both the EMT and paramedics programs at the college, and is a required skill for the national curriculum of both programs.

“Our Paramedic students practice 33 individual skills repetitively during their lab and simulations sessions to meet the higher standards of the National Registry of EMTs Paramedic Psychomotor Competency Portfolio.  Once completed they proceed to clinical and field internships to perfect their skill with live patients. Narcan administration is one of those skills,” Ms. Finn said. “The proper administration of Narcan can save lives. When someone is not breathing, and seconds count, we know that our students are confident in their training and can help give someone a second chance at living a full life. Our students are well trained in the cognitive, psychomotor and affective domains to provide excellent patient care.”

  • From left: QCC student Nick Voyer checks out a FANUC robot with Manufacturing Technology Professor, Damian Kiernan.
  • QCC Manufacturing Technology student, Nick Voyer.
November, 2017
November, 2017

At Quinsigamond Community College, successfully preparing students to enter the workforce is a key component of the college’s manufacturing and engineering programs. From collaborating with companies, staying abreast of the latest trends and technologies, to working with the latest manufacturing equipment, QCC’s manufacturing and engineering programs have advanced the careers of countless students.

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At Quinsigamond Community College, successfully preparing students to enter the workforce is a key component of the college’s manufacturing and engineering programs. From collaborating with companies, staying abreast of the latest trends and technologies, to working with the latest manufacturing equipment, QCC’s manufacturing and engineering programs have advanced the careers of countless students.

One such student is Nick Voyer. Mr. Voyer is a Manufacturing Technology student who has come to QCC as part of a toolmaker apprentice program with Tegra Medical, headquartered in Franklin, MA.

Tegra Medical offers a four-year apprentice program that allows participants to enroll in a local engineering program. The company pays the tuition and participants continue to work at their jobs while attending college.

 Mr. Voyer is a five-year employee at Tegra Medical and was excited to be a part of the first group of employees who took advantage of the apprentice program. He said he saw this as a great way to advance his career both in the short and long-term, adding that had he not joined the apprentice program, he would not have had the motivation to go to college.

“I’m learning things I didn’t know before and I’m looking at things differently,” Mr. Voyer said. “The QCC manufacturing program is more hands-on and helps you figure things out by actually doing them.”

Traveling back and forth from his home in Gardner, to his job in Franklin, to classes at QCC’s main campus in Worcester, means Mr. Voyer logs many, many hours in drive time. While the logistics can sometimes be challenging, he said the practical experience he is getting at QCC is invaluable to him and his future. In May 2018 he will graduate with his associate degree in manufacturing technology.

Tegra Medical’s Director of Manufacturing, Brian Rua, said the company has also benefitted from the education Mr. Voyer is receiving at QCC.

“As an apprentice toolmaker, Nick has to do an extreme amount of math, as he works with metal components from scratch. The math skills he has learned have been very helpful in what he does,” Mr. Rua said. “He also took robotics classes, which directly relates to his work. These classes have also helped give him the ability to talk directly to the engineering and design groups.”

Toolroom Tech Lead Jeff Mercier heartily agrees. Mr. Mercier is Mr. Voyer’s immediate supervisor.

“The Solidworks and AutoCAD classes Nick took gave him the foundational theory of what we do and he applied that knowledge here. This helps both us and the college,” Mr. Mercier said.

“It’s great that even the AutoCAD that we work with at QCC is the same at my job. I work in the R&D side making new things,” Mr Voyer said. “Professors Lee (Duerden) and Damian (Kieran) are very knowledgeable. One of the things they had us do was a lot of presentations, which is something that really helped me in getting comfortable with public speaking. It boosted my confidence.”

In June 2017, Mr. Voyer earned the title of Journeyman Toolmaker and even went one step further by applying his new found confidence in public speaking to his work at Tegra Medical.

“I’m now a safety trainer at Tegra Medical for all the new hires,” he said. “QCC helped fill in the gaps of what I was learning at work with what I am learning at school. “

“It’s great to know that what we are teaching in the classroom is relevant in the real world,” said Professor Kiernan. “It’s also great to have Nick in class. We have real world conversations that everyone learns from.”

The future is bright for Mr. Voyer. He recently bought a house with his wife and is looking to continue his education with the goal of moving into engineering and transferring to Fitchburg State.

“I only have two classes left to take,” he said. “The time management has been tough, but the teachers at QCC have been great and I’ve learned a lot that I can use right away.”

“He’s a rare young man, very aggressive and always bettering himself. He has a high level of motivation and takes a more aggressive schedule than most folks in the apprentice program,” Mr. Rua said.

  • QCC students in the "Women in STEM" group recently toured the Fab Lab with Professors Grimaldo and Sorraco.
November, 2017
November, 2017

Nine female QCC students saw firsthand what amazing opportunities and capabilities QCC’s Fab Lab has to offer through a recent tour of the facility. The tour was arranged by on-campus support group “Women in STEM” (WIS), whose mission is to provide academic, social, and professional mentoring and support to women in STEM programs at QCC.

Located on the first floor in the QuEST building, the...

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Nine female QCC students saw firsthand what amazing opportunities and capabilities QCC’s Fab Lab has to offer through a recent tour of the facility. The tour was arranged by on-campus support group “Women in STEM” (WIS), whose mission is to provide academic, social, and professional mentoring and support to women in STEM programs at QCC.

Located on the first floor in the QuEST building, the Fab Lab contains various types of design and fabrication equipment that students, staff and faculty can learn to use in order to help transform their ideas into reality. Fab Lab Manager Alex Gray and student assistant Elijah Boudreau demonstrated the capabilities of the lab to the students, including the different types of 3-D printers that can make items from various materials; a laser cutter for precision trimming; a vacuum former for making molds; a vinyl printer for creating banners and decals, and an embroidery machine that uses colored thread to personalize items.

Mr. Gray helped the women create a logo for WIS during the tour and the students plan to produce the logo and transfer the design onto shirts using the vinyl printer. Students who participated include Maame Amoah-Dankwah, Narda Bondah, Rose Duchemin, Cathy Evans, Triomphe Kanyeba, Cheryl Ann Letson, Monica McMullan, Savanna Russell, and Emilyrose Sandgren.They were accompanied by Professors Andreana Grimaldo (Mathematics) & Anita Soracco (Environmental / Physical Science), who led the group.

Following the tour, Professor Grimaldo commented, “This incredible lab is located on our campus and it is open to all students.”

Professor Soracco added, “I think the FAB Lab is a unique resource, and typically one that is very male dominated. I think the tour was a wonderful opportunity to expose our female STEM students to this resource, and I encourage them and engage them to get involved. “

Women in STEM is a new organization on campus and membership is open to any QCC woman studying in a STEM field, according to Professor Grimaldo. It is sponsored by QCC’s STEM Starter Academy (SSA) program, which is managed by Darcy Carlson.

 Plans are being finalized for a "Final Exam Good Luck" pizza party and student attendance raffle on Tuesday, December 12 at 12:30 p.m. in room 313 in the QuEST building. An email invitation will be sent to all QCC women who are enrolled in STEM majors.

Any woman wishing to come the group can email either professor or come to an event. For more information reach out to amygrimaldo [at] qcc.mass.edu (Professor Grimaldo) or asoracco [at] qcc.mass.edu (Professor Soracco).

Women in STEM logo
  • Dadbeh Bigonahy, Professor of Engineering & Sciences (right) demonstrates a math concept to a student.
November, 2017
November, 2017

At Quinsigamond Community College, the mathematics department has discovered a way for students to increase their chances for success while completing their degree in a timely manner, through the college’s accelerated math program. Accelerated math classes are longer classes over a shorter period of time. A two year study done by the college showed that students consistently passed the accelerated math classes...

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At Quinsigamond Community College, the mathematics department has discovered a way for students to increase their chances for success while completing their degree in a timely manner, through the college’s accelerated math program. Accelerated math classes are longer classes over a shorter period of time. A two year study done by the college showed that students consistently passed the accelerated math classes at a higher rate than both traditionally scheduled classes and classes taken online. Across all of the courses over that timeframe, all accelerated math courses had a pass rate that was 12 percent better than traditionally scheduled courses (sample size 4,489 students) and 25 percent better than courses taken online (sample size 744 students).

According to Dr. Leslie Bolinger Horton, Dean for the School of Math and Science, the math department looked at the success rate of students taking summer sessions, which are traditionally offered in longer time blocks for a shorter period of time, and found the success rate for these types of classes outpaced traditional and online classes.

“This was data-driven,” Dr. Bolinger Horton said. “We tried the first fall accelerated math classes of Intermediate Algebra (MAT 099) and College Algebra (MAT 100) in 2015 and found that students advanced through the developmental math classes and segued into college math in a shorter period of time, with a high rate of student success.”

The college’s accelerated math classes offer students the ability to take their math classes twice a week in three-hour blocks, as opposed to traditional math classes that meet 50 minutes, three times per week. Students have the same learning requirements as those in traditional face-to-face and online classes, however, with the duration of each class period being longer, students are able to complete their course in just seven and a half weeks as opposed to 15 weeks.

These longer time blocks allow students more time to process content and provide professors with more time to help individual students as needed. The accelerated classes offer a more relaxed atmosphere, due in part to students not being limited to a 50-minute time block. While students are still responsible for mastering the same learning objectives as those in traditional classes, they are able to spend more time on a math concept that may pose a challenge for them before moving on.

While one might normally think accelerated math classes would only be for the student who is drawn to mathematics, it has been shown that a longer period of contact time in class with the professor is what all students seem to need.

“We checked the success rate last spring and in every case students showed a higher success rate than the other more traditional and online methods of learning,” Dr. Bolinger Horton continued. “In all cases the students were more successful. This works with both ends of the spectrum…developmental math classes and advanced math classes.”

Associate Professor of Mathematics, Sheiba Mas-Oud, is one of the professors who has been teaching the accelerated math courses. He noted that his own classes supported these findings.

“The success rates in all the accelerated courses that I taught were at least 40 percent more than my traditional regular semester courses,” Professor Mas-Oud said.

Professors also seem to be drawn to this type of class learning.

“We find the professors love this type of class as well. It allows students a greater amount of time to articulate questions and professors a greater amount of time to explain concepts and clarify student questions,” Dr. Bolinger Horton said.

QCC Liberal Arts major Lizabeth Da Silva said taking an accelerated math course was one of the best academic decisions she’s made.

“My experience taking an accelerated math course was a positive one. I liked the overall curriculum in both accelerated math courses I took, from the interaction with the professor on campus, to the work and assistance MyMathLab™ offered,” Ms. Da Silva said.

“In my opinion, the success rates were higher because students who signed in for the accelerated courses feel more like a team with a sense of urgency to graduation and hence they become more and more motivated by the team,” Professor Mas-Oud said. “I love teaching these courses and I would not hesitate recommending them to any student here at QCC.” 

Dadbeh Bigonahy, Professor of Engineering & Sciences said his engineering students were happy to be able to take the required math classes in a quicker timeframe in order to advance faster in their academic careers.

“I told my students they can get to their dream faster by taking two math courses in one semester,” Professor Bigonahy said, adding that all of his engineering students are required to take a variety of math courses.

This spring, QCC will be offering a variety of accelerated math courses that include intermediate algebra; college algebra; statistics; pre-calculus and trigonometry.

“What students should keep in mind is that even though this is a fast-paced course, the professors at QCC are prepared and equipped in assisting students’ needs while meeting the course's deadlines and syllabus,” Ms. Da Silva added.

To learn more about QCC’s accelerated math courses, visit the Math Department's Web page. 

  • From left: Vice President of the Chess Club, QCC student Michael Imse and Chess Club Advisor Jerry Williams.
  • QCC's Chess Club Advisor and zealous chess player, Jerry Williams.
November, 2017
November, 2017

Stop by Quinsigamond Community College’s cafeteria most mornings and you’ll find a group of students intently playing a game of chess. More often than not you’ll also see their animated and passionate advisor either playing a game with them or quietly offering advice. The students are part of QCC’s Chess Club and QCC Art Professor and avid chess player, Jerry Williams is the...

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Stop by Quinsigamond Community College’s cafeteria most mornings and you’ll find a group of students intently playing a game of chess. More often than not you’ll also see their animated and passionate advisor either playing a game with them or quietly offering advice. The students are part of QCC’s Chess Club and QCC Art Professor and avid chess player, Jerry Williams is the club’s advisor.

QCC has had a chess club for years, averaging between 10-15 players a semester.  Mr. Williams has been a part of the club for as many years, working hard to dispel the stigmas that are sometimes associated with chess, and getting students to understand and appreciate the game.

“The whole idea that you have to be incredibly smart or a nerd to play chess is just ridiculous,” he said. “Chess is for everyone. It’s teachable. Chess teaches you passion, math and problem solving. The U.S. is the only country that doesn’t have chess as a curriculum in school.”

As a devoted chess player himself, Mr. Williams is coached by American chess player, Marc Esserman, who is ranked 40th among active chess players in the U.S. by the U.S. Chess Federation.

Mr. Williams brings the knowledge he gains from Mr. Esserman to the students he advises.

In fact, Mr. Williams has lined up Mr. Esserman to come to QCC for some personal coaching sessions in the near future for anyone who is interested. Additionally, he is working to set up a “simul” chess tournament with Mr. Esserman, where Mr. Esserman will simultaneously play between 20 and 30 people at the same time. Mr. Williams has done these types of “simul” tournaments himself. Most recently at the Octoberfest in Douglas where he simultaneously played multiple people. All proceeds from the tournament went toward the Douglas Library, where his wife is a board member.

In October of this year, QCC sponsored a U.S. Chess Federation official tournament that featured four rounds with prizes given for first, second and third place. The event drew between 30-35 players and included three U.S. masters and one expert, in addition to QCC students, the public, and four fifth and sixth grade elementary school students from Douglas.

The elementary school students were part of a group of Boy Scouts from Douglas. Mr. Williams teaches them about chess once a week and is quick to note that chess is for anyone of any age. In chess, age is not a factor. Young can play old and vice versa. Mr. Williams said his young players have been working hard to learn the game.

“They will get a merit badge for playing chess,” Mr. William said, adding proudly, “Two of my students won two games in the tournament we had at QCC.”

QCC students interested in playing chess or those students who just want to stop by to watch and learn, can visit Room 367A in the Administration Building any Monday, Wednesday or Friday between 3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Mr. Williams has some sage advice for those interested in playing chess.

“Everyone who plays needs to be passionate because when you are not passionate you don’t do the work,” he said. 

  • The Sixth Annual Hat and Mitten Drive is underway.
November, 2017
November, 2017

For the sixth year QCC will be holding its Annual Hat and Mitten Drive to benefit children and adolescents in the Worcester and Southbridge area who are in need.

The Drive is being held from Monday, December 4 - Thursday, December 13. Donations can be dropped off by December 13 at any of the following locations:

  • Harrington Learning Center (HLC), Welcome Center
  • ...
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For the sixth year QCC will be holding its Annual Hat and Mitten Drive to benefit children and adolescents in the Worcester and Southbridge area who are in need.

The Drive is being held from Monday, December 4 - Thursday, December 13. Donations can be dropped off by December 13 at any of the following locations:

  • Harrington Learning Center (HLC), Welcome Center
  • Administration Building, Outside Room 125A
  • QCC Southbridge (Items will be donated to the needy in Southbridge)
  • QCC's Downtown Healthcare and Workforce Development Center

Please consider donating any NEW hat and/or mittens or gloves (any size, color or gender). All donations distributed in the Worcester area will be done by an "army of elves" from the Planting the Seed Foundation, Inc. 

 

Hat and Mitten Drive for Children
  • Last year's Stuff-A-Cruiser was a huge success. Help make this year's even more successful.
November, 2017
November, 2017

QCC’s annual holiday program, Feed-A-Family was developed to help families in need celebrate the holidays. For decades the program has been providing holiday meals to QCC families and bringing good will to all through the simple act of giving. Last year, QCC Campus Police and Counseling Services teamed up with Stuff-A-Cruiser, becoming an important support program to the college’s Feed-A-...

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QCC’s annual holiday program, Feed-A-Family was developed to help families in need celebrate the holidays. For decades the program has been providing holiday meals to QCC families and bringing good will to all through the simple act of giving. Last year, QCC Campus Police and Counseling Services teamed up with Stuff-A-Cruiser, becoming an important support program to the college’s Feed-A-Family Program.This year the college will once again offer both programs to help those in need.

For those looking to nominate someone; fill out the nomination form and provide the name and additional required information of students, faculty or staff who may need assistance during this holiday season. Please keep nominations confidential and submit them in a sealed envelope to QCC mailbox #144. The college community forwards the names and pertinent data to the Feed-A- Family Committee. To date, no one has been turned away.

All cash donations received for the Feed-A-Family program are used to purchase gift cards to a local grocery store. In addition to monetary donations, the QCC Campus Police are asking faculty, staff and students to stop by one of their Stuff-A-Cruiser events where faculty, staff and students can bring a new, unwrapped toy, gift card or movie tickets for a Feed-A-Family child. Please take some time and join the QCC Police and other assisting departments for some hot cocoa and a small token of appreciation. 

Those wishing to make a donation can drop off their donation at:

The Stuff-A-Cruiser Events on:

  • December 5, 2017 10:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. at the Downtown Healthcare and Workforce Development Center, 25 Federal St., Worcester, in the Lobby
  • December 6, 2017 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. at QCC Southbridge, 5 Optical Drive, Southbridge, in the Lobby
  • December 7, 2017 10:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.  at the Main Campus, 670 West Boylston Street, Worcester, at the Flag Poles
  • QCC mailbox #144 donations and nominations accepted until December 7.

Please make all checks out to:  QCC Feed-A-Family.

Recipients will receive a food gift certificate to purchase a holiday meal of their choice, and toys for their children will be provided by the Stuff-A-Cruiser program.

“Thank you for your willingness to make the holidays brighter for our QCC families,” said Tina Wells, Coordinator of Counseling Services. “May all of your holidays be filled with warmth and kindness.”

If you cannot stop by during the scheduled days, please feel free to donate at one of the drop boxes in Room 162A, the Fuller Center, 25 Federal St. or with the QCC Police Department.

Toys & donations will be also be accepted until December 8.

November, 2017
November, 2017

QCC's Fall Student Theater Production, "Struggling to Connect - Exploring Relationships," was preformed in Hebert Auditorium Suprenant Hall on November 30 - December 3. Read below for an opening night review by QCC Professor of English, Margaret Wong.

"QCC Student Theater has come of age. In the production of Struggling to Connect,...

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QCC's Fall Student Theater Production, "Struggling to Connect - Exploring Relationships," was preformed in Hebert Auditorium Suprenant Hall on November 30 - December 3. Read below for an opening night review by QCC Professor of English, Margaret Wong.

"QCC Student Theater has come of age. In the production of Struggling to Connect, there was nothing merely superficially entertaining about what was presented. Rather, the audience experienced the results of thoughtful hard work on the part of a very talented cast, grappling with the full range and depth of what human connecting entails.

The production’s structure was starkly simple. A triad of individuals come on stage, holding hands, physically connected to one another. Then the connection is broken as the center member moves upstage, alone, to tell a story, make a phone call, or deliver a statement. Upon conclusion of the monologue, the lone speaker reconnects to the others, and the triad goes off stage, holding hands again, connected again.

Backgrounded by the disconnected silent witnesses who hang back — to illustrate, emphasize, or shadow — the statements of the monologist emerge exposed and riveting.The raw emotions on display as stories are told of untoward acts, imminent loss, assault, and killing, draw us in, even as they make us aware that we are voyeuristically witnessing something deeply personal and private.

In the final scene, one voice begins to sing Paul Simon’s “The Sound of Silence,” followed by a second, then a third, until the whole cast is on stage singing together, connected in song. The lyrics, which declare the inescapability of aloneness and silence, are countered by the presence of the connected voices, and therefore, the production leaves the audience with the awareness that human connecting is very much possible.

The production celebrated human connection, but it did not shy away from honestly dealing with the emotional damage of lost love or the devastation caused by female battery and institutional racism. If you saw this play, you learned something about yourself and the world, and you came away impressed with the quality of QCC Student Theater."

 

 

QCC's Production of "Struggling to Connect."
  • Students take a break from their classes to visit with a new friend.
  • A QCC student finds a new pal.
  • Paws for Pets service dogs gave a lot of love to students.
November, 2017
November, 2017

For the last three years Quinsigamond Community College has been offering a Winter Wellness Workshop designed to relieve stress from the semester and help students prepare for their final exams. These wellness workshops have been in place for six years and are offered twice a year at the end of each semester.

Activities at these events are designed to help students de-stress. Stress-free activities include...

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For the last three years Quinsigamond Community College has been offering a Winter Wellness Workshop designed to relieve stress from the semester and help students prepare for their final exams. These wellness workshops have been in place for six years and are offered twice a year at the end of each semester.

Activities at these events are designed to help students de-stress. Stress-free activities include anything from massage, reiki, arts and crafts, coloring, Zumba and yoga, to bringing in service animals through the organization, Paws for People. The Paws for People program, affiliated with Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University, is always one of the hits of this biannual event.

On Nov. 29, the organization once again came to the college’s main campus to kick off the two-day event with a few dogs and one cat that offered students a chance to pet the animals and just relax. The animals have been proven stress reducers for the students.

“Students who you haven’t seen on campus will come right in when they see the animals,” said Mike Beane, Director of Student Life and Leadership.

“It’s good for the students to hang out with each other and pet the animals,” said Kristie Proctor, Director of Disability Services, adding that the handlers also engage with the students talking to them about their classes and interacting with them.

Ms. Proctor was the impetus behind bringing the service animals to QCC.

“What inspired me was that I’m a big animal lover. I said we have got to bring these animals to campus and then everyone jumped onboard,” she said.  

In addition to the Worcester campus event, a stress-free wellness event also happened at QCC’s Southbridge location. Tami Strouth, Coordinator of Disability Services in Southborough brought in a cat organization for students to visit with cats and kittens, in addition to offering a mindfulness session, coloring and massage.

Other events scheduled during the two-day event on QCC's main Worcester campus (Nov. 29 & Nov. 30) included mindfulness, coloring, massage and a sounds therapy session led by faculty member Jean Kennedy. In a sounds therapy session the tonalities and vibrations emitted from the bowl are used to help reduce stress and can aid in pain management.

Ms. Proctor said that QCC is extremely supportive of the student experience and offers activities that will get students to interact more and feel part of the community.

Ms. Proctor said that events such as these, “support student success as we move forward toward final exams.”  

  • QCC Veterans Club Members proudly walked in the Worcester Veterans Day parade.
November, 2017
November, 2017

Quinsigamond Community College was selected as a top school in the 2018 Military Advanced Education & Transition Magazine Guide to Colleges & Universities research study. The guide is a comprehensive research tool for service members, education services officers and transition officers.Colleges and universities must fill out an extensive questionnaire that evaluates higher education institutes on military...

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Quinsigamond Community College was selected as a top school in the 2018 Military Advanced Education & Transition Magazine Guide to Colleges & Universities research study. The guide is a comprehensive research tool for service members, education services officers and transition officers.Colleges and universities must fill out an extensive questionnaire that evaluates higher education institutes on military culture, financial aid for veterans, flexibility, on-campus support and online support services.

In other Veteran news, QCC Veterans Club members were part of the annual Worcester Veterans Day parade held each year in Worcester. The parade coincides with Veterans Day, observed every November 11 to honor all American veterans who have served in the military of the U.S.

qcc_wyvern_veterans_club-thumb.png

In celebration of all veterans and to recognize the courage and sacrifices of those who served or are currently serving, Veterans Affairs has also placed a “Military Appreciation Tree” on display in the Veteran Center—Room 258A. 

“Stop by or email your request if you would like a ribbon placed on the tree in honor of a veteran who you have known. Please indicate what color ribbon you would like placed on the tree,” said Paula Ogden, Director of Veterans Affairs.

Bringing Holiday Cheer to Veterans

The Veterans Affairs office will also be sending out holiday care packages cards and letters to service men and women who are currently deployed in Afghanistan and local Veterans hospitals during their annual holiday drive.

“Outside of the registrar’s office is our Veteran Affairs bulletin board where we’ve displayed artwork and messages that were sent to us from a kindergarten class at the AMVET Elementary School in North Attleboro, MA. The school's name stands for 'American veterans' and was named in recognition of veterans,” Ms. Ogden said. "We’ll be sending all of these messages and artwork to the troops in Afghanistan in a couple of weeks."

Those wishing to send an item or card can drop off their items to the Veterans Affairs Office in Room 258A or at the security desk at QCC’s downtown Healthcare and Workforce Development Center. The deadline for dropping off items is December 8. 

Artwork and messages earmarked troops in Afghanistan from a kindergarten class at the AMVET Elementary School in North Attleboro, MA.
  • Taking part in the fun was from left: Director of Student Life and Leadership, Mike Beane; President Dr. Luis Pedraja, Student Senate President, Ed Reitz (after being hit with a pie) and Dean of Students, Terry Vecchio.
  • Preparing to challenge each other are from left: Director of Student Life and Leadership, Mike Beane; QCC student Jack Cuddy and QCC student Daniel Pavone.
  • Students had a great time during Spirit Carnival.
  • Emanuel Gray and Shelitza Ortiz enjoy the festive atmosphere at the Athletic Center.
  •  QCC Student Sabrina Poirier prepares to help Director of Student Life and Leadership, Mike Beane "pie" Student Senate President  Ed Reitz.
  • From left: QCC students Rebecca Owusu and Precious Love are all smiles at QCC's Spirit Carnival.
November, 2017
November, 2017

On November 8, the Athletic Center gymnasium had a carnival-like atmosphere as students, faculty and staff culminated the school’s Spirit Week with a Spirit Carnival.The event was put on by Student Life and featured an obstacle course, games, a nacho bar, air brush beanies and an inflatable wall.

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On November 8, the Athletic Center gymnasium had a carnival-like atmosphere as students, faculty and staff culminated the school’s Spirit Week with a Spirit Carnival.The event was put on by Student Life and featured an obstacle course, games, a nacho bar, air brush beanies and an inflatable wall.

  • Staff Attorney Alexandra Bonazoli, of the Central West Justice Center discussed recent immigration changes with the QCC students, faculty and staff.
November, 2017
November, 2017

Staff Attorney Alexandra Bonazoli of the Central West Justice Center, visited the QCC campus earlier this month to discuss some of the recent changes to immigration and immigration policies. Over 25 students, faculty and staff attended the informal discussion that focused on the current administration’s decision to rescind the DACA program. DACA, which stands for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, was an...

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Staff Attorney Alexandra Bonazoli of the Central West Justice Center, visited the QCC campus earlier this month to discuss some of the recent changes to immigration and immigration policies. Over 25 students, faculty and staff attended the informal discussion that focused on the current administration’s decision to rescind the DACA program. DACA, which stands for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, was an immigration policy that allowed people who entered the U.S. as minors, either illegally or remained in the country illegally, to receive a two-year renewable period of deferred action from deportation and then they could become eligible for a work permit.

Ms. Bonazoli discussed possible options for people who are being impacted by this decision, such as temporary protected status or “TPS.” TPS is a temporary immigration status to the U.S., granted to eligible nationals of designated countries.  However, certain countries that currently have TPS status may also be losing their status, Ms. Bonazoli told those in attendance, adding that it is imperative to stay abreast of current information and be aware of what is going on.

She said there are other options after DACA, which may be available to people on a case-by-case basis.

“We don’t know any sooner than anyone else knows what is going to happen,” Ms. Bonazoli said. “However, if you think one of the programs you are in may be ending, the best thing you can do is seek legal advice.”

Ms. Bonazoli cautioned people to make sure they obtain the correct information about their options.

“You won’t know you have options until you come in and find out,” she said. “Be very careful to not give your money to someone for immigration advice who is not an attorney. There’s lots of scams out there. Be mindful of who you are going to for advice.”

The Central West Justice Center provides free legal services to low-income and elderly families and individuals in central and western Massachusetts.

“The legal services in our office are free and most attorneys speak Spanish. We also have someone in-house who speaks Portuguese and we have access to a language phone service,” Ms. Bonazoli said.

For those who are interested in contacting the Central West Justice Center they can visit www.cwjustice.org and apply for help using the online form or by calling toll-free at 855-252-5342.

  • From left: Carolyn “Cary” Morse, Coordinator of Library Serials & Electronic Resources and QCC students Van Le and Maimona Sow.
November, 2017
November, 2017

Civic literacy is a top priority at QCC. In November, the college continued its civic literacy outreach by showcasing a voting display at the Alden Library. Created by Carolyn “Cary” Morse, Coordinator of Library Serials & Electronic Resources, the display offered students information about their voting rights as well as important dates to know. Students were also able to review a...

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Civic literacy is a top priority at QCC. In November, the college continued its civic literacy outreach by showcasing a voting display at the Alden Library. Created by Carolyn “Cary” Morse, Coordinator of Library Serials & Electronic Resources, the display offered students information about their voting rights as well as important dates to know. Students were also able to review a precinct voting map for Worcester and ask questions.

  • Basketball sensation Ilze Luneau wowed a young Wyvern fan.
  • The 2017 QCC Men's Basketball Team.
  • QCC Soccer All-Region Award Winners: From left- Vanessa Hanger ( All-Region 21 first team), Teena Manter (All –Region 21 second team), and Shelby Maiorana ( All- Region 21 second team).
  • QCC Women's 2017 Soccer Team Banquet.
  • Ilze Luneau performed some amazing stunts during halftime.
November, 2017
November, 2017

At QCC, students, faculty and staff have access to the Athletic Center located on QCC’s Main Campus on West Boylston Street in Worcester. The Athletic Center provides the QCC community with a way to stay healthy through exercise. Studies show that exercising reduces stress, reduces cholesterol, prevents osteoporosis, and helps prevent coronary heart disease in both men and women. In addition, exercising helps to...

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At QCC, students, faculty and staff have access to the Athletic Center located on QCC’s Main Campus on West Boylston Street in Worcester. The Athletic Center provides the QCC community with a way to stay healthy through exercise. Studies show that exercising reduces stress, reduces cholesterol, prevents osteoporosis, and helps prevent coronary heart disease in both men and women. In addition, exercising helps to firm and tone your body, keep your weight maintained and increase your energy level.

“You’ll also meet new people,” added QCC Athletic Director Lisa Gurlick.

A vast array of machines are available at the Athletic Center in addition to men’s and women’s locker rooms that are equipped with showers, restrooms, changing areas, a sauna, and lockers. The gym features a full-sized basketball court, program room, Nintendo Wii Sports, Wii Fit, and a ping pong table, in a comfortable seating area equipped that is with wireless computer access.

Weekly classes in yoga; full body toning and indoor cycling are also available. For a complete list of classes visit: programs and events

Sports Teams Update

The QCC women’s soccer team wrapped up a great season with a team banquet that honored the players for their hard work and dedication throughout the season. All-Region Awards were given to Vanessa Hanger (All-Region 21 first team), Teena Manter (All-Region 21 second team), and Shelby Maiorana ( All-Region 21 second team).

The basketball season is well on its way for both the men’s and women’s basketball teams.

On November 16, during halftime at the men’s home basketball game against Bristol Community College, basketball sensation Ilze Luneau performed. Ms. Luneau is known for her prowess with a basketball and is the first person to dribble five and six basketballs using just hands. She has been featured on the Today Show with Jay Leno and the Ellen Degeneres show. View the complete list of all men’s games.

The Women’s basketball team has also started its season. This year the team has become a club team, taking their schedule down to 14 games. View the complete women's schedule

Remember:  Home games are held in the QCC Athletic Center and entry into Wyvern basketball games is always FREE! Come and show your QCC spirit and support your teams!

  • QCC's Wyvernmobile is ready for action!
  • QCC has gone mobile!
November, 2017
November, 2017

IT’S HERE! Quinsigamond Community College’s van, the “Wyvernmobile” is ready to hit the streets!

The van will provide an increased QCC presence on the streets of Worcester and the surrounding areas, adding a valuable element to the college’s presence in the community. Expect to see the Wyvernmobile at events throughout the QCC region and make sure to give a wave...

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IT’S HERE! Quinsigamond Community College’s van, the “Wyvernmobile” is ready to hit the streets!

The van will provide an increased QCC presence on the streets of Worcester and the surrounding areas, adding a valuable element to the college’s presence in the community. Expect to see the Wyvernmobile at events throughout the QCC region and make sure to give a wave if you happen to spot it!

Do you have an event or location where you’d like to see the Wyvernmobile? Email Josh Martin, Director of Institutional Communications at jmartin [at] qcc.mass.edu and let him know.

  • Electronic transcript ordering is now available to QCC students.
November, 2017
November, 2017

QCC’s Registrar’s Office announced it has partnered with the National Student Clearinghouse to provide electronic transcript ordering. Requestors initiate the process by going to the Registrar’s Office Page on the Q or the QCC Website. Ordering and payment are both done through the National Student Clearinghouse so...

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QCC’s Registrar’s Office announced it has partnered with the National Student Clearinghouse to provide electronic transcript ordering. Requestors initiate the process by going to the Registrar’s Office Page on the Q or the QCC Website. Ordering and payment are both done through the National Student Clearinghouse so students should no longer be directed to the payment center.

 Requestors have several delivery options:

  • regular mail
  • overnight mail
  • electronic delivery  
  • hold for pickup at the Registrar’s Office

     Requestors may select several timing options:

  • process now (we advertise 3 – 5 days for processing but transcripts are generally processed within the next business day)
  • hold for semester grades
  • hold for degree conferral

The requestor has the option to receive text and email notifications from the National Student Clearinghouse during each phase of the processing. 

“We have already received positive feedback from students regarding the ease of use. In the first 10 business days of offering this service, we have received and processed over 200 transcript requests,” said QCC Registrar Barbara Zawalich

November, 2017
November, 2017

Current QCC librarians Denise Cross and Tiger Swan, along with former QCC librarians Dale LaBonte, Matt Bejune and Fyiane Nsilo-Swai, and Coordinator of the Honors Program, Susan McPherson, were the authors in one of the chapters of the recently release book, “Undergraduate Research and the Academic Librarian: Case Studies and Best Practices.”

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Current QCC librarians Denise Cross and Tiger Swan, along with former QCC librarians Dale LaBonte, Matt Bejune and Fyiane Nsilo-Swai, and Coordinator of the Honors Program, Susan McPherson, were the authors in one of the chapters of the recently release book, “Undergraduate Research and the Academic Librarian: Case Studies and Best Practices.”

Published by American Libraries Association Press, the book examines how the structures that undergird undergraduate research, such as the library, can become part of the core infrastructure of the undergraduate experience. QCC’s chapter 23 is titled: The Honors Colloquium at QCC:  A Decade of Excellence. 

Both past and present QCC staff were authors of a chapter in the recently release book, "Undergraduate Research and the Academic Librarian: Case Studies and Best Practices.”
November, 2017
November, 2017

Gina Ciprari – Marketing Manager

gina_2-thumb.png

I live in Sturbridge with my boyfriend and two dogs, Adelaide and Vincenzo Cannoli. Adelaide is a one-eyed husky mix who came from Kentucky as a stray and Vinny is a Papillon mix from Texas. When I have spare time...

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Gina Ciprari – Marketing Manager

gina_2-thumb.png

I live in Sturbridge with my boyfriend and two dogs, Adelaide and Vincenzo Cannoli. Adelaide is a one-eyed husky mix who came from Kentucky as a stray and Vinny is a Papillon mix from Texas. When I have spare time, I play golf with the girls or bocce with my family. When it gets cold out, I like to cook, shop and spend time with my dogs!

Department: Institutional Communications

Office location: Administration Building Room 320

Contact information:gciprari [at] qcc.mass.edu; extension 7505

Tell us about your role at QCC: I work for Josh Martin in the Department of Institutional Communications as the Marketing Manager. I work on Google and social media campaigns, as well as QCC's online presence in general. Digital marketing is what is I love to do. I have only been at QCC for 4 months, but it feels like 2 weeks, time flies here!

How long have you worked at QCC? I started at QCC on August 2.

What is your favorite movie? I don't really have a favorite movie. My favorite type of movie is pretty much any Christmas movie. This time of year, I could watch anything from Lifetime movies to Elf over and over.

What is your favorite T.V. show?: It's hard to pick just one... Ray Donovan, Dexter, the Golden Girls... and of course, QCC's Face the Region!

What is your favorite place? Cape Cod

Quote:  “Bridges freeze first, don’t fill up on bread and nothing good happens after midnight.”  (Advice from my Dad)

We want to learn about you! Please share your story with your colleagues. Please fill out the attached faculty/staff spotlight form and be the next spotlight.

 

  • Make sure to become familiar with QCC's Inclement Weather Policy and Procedures.
November, 2017
November, 2017

As December is once again upon us, the college would like to remind the QCC community of its inclement weather policies and procedures. These will be used in the event that classes and activities are canceled or delayed due to snow, other inclement weather, or an emergency situation.

Cancellation Notification: If it becomes necessary to cancel or delay classes and activities due to the weather...

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As December is once again upon us, the college would like to remind the QCC community of its inclement weather policies and procedures. These will be used in the event that classes and activities are canceled or delayed due to snow, other inclement weather, or an emergency situation.

Cancellation Notification: If it becomes necessary to cancel or delay classes and activities due to the weather and/or an emergency, you may contact the College’s Inclement Weather Line, 508.854.4545, or visit www.QCC.edu/inclement-weather for information.

The priority of Cancellation Notifications is:

  • QCC's Inclement Weather Line (508.854.4545)
  • QCC Mobile App (Search "QCC Mobile" in your app store.)
  • QCC Alerts Text Message (Log in to The Q; sign up at the "My QCC Alert" Link.)
  • QCC Family Email to Faculty and Staff
  • Radio Stations
  • Television Stations

Cancellation of Classes: If classes and activities are canceled, only assigned non-unit professional staff and those classified staff designated as “essential personnel” must report to work. (QCC Employees--See your supervisor with questions.)

Decisions: The decision to cancel or delay classes and activities will be based upon the best information available regarding the operational status of the campus – including heat, electricity, and/or snow removal; the accessibility of the campus – including the availability of public transportation and street conditions in the City of Worcester and surrounding areas. Conditions may vary greatly within the College’s service area. Students must ultimately determine if they are able to attend classes and if it is safe to do so. Students are encouraged to become familiar with the policies of their instructors regarding making up missed work.

Timing of Decisions: Day Classes & Activities (Mon – Sun): Decisions to cancel or delay day classes and activities will be made and conveyed through notifications and radio/television stations at the earliest possible time, but no later than 5:30 a.m. of the day in question. Please Note: Day classes and activities include classes and activities starting before 4:00 p.m.

Evening Classes & Activities (Mon – Fri): Decisions to cancel or delay evening classes and activities will be made as early as possible, but no later than 2:30 p.m. of the day in question. Please Note: Evening classes and activities include classes and activities starting at 4:00 p.m. or later.

Delayed Opening of Classes: In some cases, the beginning of day classes and activities may be delayed to begin at the time indicated in the announcement.

All staff, except “essential personnel” who may already be at work, should report to work at the delayed start time. The decision to cancel or delay classes and activities will be based upon the best information available regarding: the operational status of the campus – including heat, light and snow removal; and the accessibility of the campus – including the availability of public transportation and street conditions in the City of Worcester and surrounding areas. Conditions may vary greatly within the college’s service. Students must ultimately determine if they are able to attend classes and if it is safe to do so. Students are encouraged to become familiar with the policies of their instructors regarding making up missed work.

Satellite Site Operations: Day classes and activities include classes and activities starting before 4:00 p.m. Evening classes and activities include classes and activities starting at 4:00 p.m. or later.

QCC Satellite locations follow the cancellation schedule of the main campus, MAIN - QCC Main Campus, 670 West Boylston Street, Worcester, MA 01606

QCC Satellite locations are:

  • QSB - QCC Southbridge, 5 Optical Drive, Southbridge, MA 01550
  • D - QCC Healthcare and Workforce Development Center, 25 Federal Street, Worcester, MA 01608
  • CWDCE - QCC Center for Workforce Development and Continuing Education, 25 Federal Street, Worcester, MA 01608
  • SRCT - QCC at Worcester Senior Center, 128 Providence St, Worcester, MA 01604
  • QCC Dental Clinic, 670 West Boylston Street, Worcester, MA 01606

The following QCC satellite locations follow the cancellation policies of those institutions:

  • BURN - QCC at Burncoat, 179 Burncoat Street, Worcester, MA 01606
  • ASSA - QCC at Assabet, 215 Fitchburg St, Marlborough, MA 01752
  • QCC at Worcester Technical, 1 Skyline Drive, Worcester, MA 01605

Student Clinical Placements, Co-Op Placements, and Externships: Many of Quinsigamond Community College’s academic programs and/or certificates require students to participate in experiential learning; e.g., clinical, practicum, etc. Since many of these external sites remain open during inclement weather conditions, students should anticipate that they might be expected to report to an external site even if the college closes as a result of inclement weather. At the beginning of each semester, faculty program coordinators will inform students within their programs of the procedures they are expected to follow during inclement weather.

Additional Details:

Text Message Notification: Inclement weather alerts will be sent out as a text message using the QCC Alert system. Students and Faculty can enter their cell phone numbers through The Q. Staff can send email to help [at] qcc.mass.edu .

QCC Mobile App: The QCC Mobile App offers inclement weather alerts and emergency notifications.  QCC Mobile can be downloaded from Google Play, The App Store, or The Windows Store.

Radio and TV Station notification: Inclement weather cancellations are reported on the following radio and TV stations, as applicable. Please note some stations do not allow postings of delayed opening times (e.g. The College will open at 10:30 a.m.). They require delays to be posted in hours (e.g. a 2-hour delay). For these instances, the College’s general business hours of 8 a.m. – 7 p.m. will be utilized. Therefore, a 2-hour delay means the College is opening at 10 a.m. For specific opening times, visit www.QCC.edu/inclement-weather or call the inclement weather line at 508.854.4545.

Radio stations: 

  • WTAG (AM 580)
  • WSRS (FM 96)
  • WBZ (AM 1030)

TV stations:

  • WCVB (Ch. 5)
  • WBZ (Ch. 4)
  • WHDH (Ch. 7)
  • WFXT (Ch 25)
  • NBC Boston (Ch 8.1, Ch 60.2, Ch 60.5)
  • NECN: (channel number varies by cable/satellite provider)

Please do not call the radio and television stations directly OR the college’s main number to find out about inclement weather closings or cancellations. Visit The inclement Weather page or call the QCC Weather Line at 508.854.4545.

  • The Wyvern was getting a birds eye view of Red Rocks Park and Amphitheatre.
  • Scaling the walls of Red Rocks.
  • A perfect day in Boulder Colorado.
November, 2017
November, 2017

The Wyvern recently spent the Thanksgiving holiday checking out the sights at the Red Rocks Park and Amphitheatre in Morrison, Colorado before visiting the "happiest" place in the U.S., Boulder, Colorado. 

If you've seen the Wyvern in the wild, please let us know!  Send your photos and descriptions through the ...

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The Wyvern recently spent the Thanksgiving holiday checking out the sights at the Red Rocks Park and Amphitheatre in Morrison, Colorado before visiting the "happiest" place in the U.S., Boulder, Colorado. 

If you've seen the Wyvern in the wild, please let us know!  Send your photos and descriptions through the newsletter submission form.

The Wyvern was fearless in Red Rocks.
November, 2017
November, 2017

Below is a sampling of some of the articles and press releases published in the local (and sometimes national) media that mention Quinsigamond Community College.

QCC articles for the month of November include: 

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November, 2017
November, 2017

We are very pleased to announce the following full-time staff updates:

On November 27, 2017, Administrative Services welcomed Brian O’Neil as Facilities Manager. Brian brings to the college over 20 years of experience in property/facilities management from the private and public sector. Most recently, he was a Building Maintenance Supervisor I, here at Quinsigamond...

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We are very pleased to announce the following full-time staff updates:

On November 27, 2017, Administrative Services welcomed Brian O’Neil as Facilities Manager. Brian brings to the college over 20 years of experience in property/facilities management from the private and public sector. Most recently, he was a Building Maintenance Supervisor I, here at Quinsigamond Community College. Brian holds several licenses and certifications, including a License in Construction Supervision. Brian received a Certificate in HVAC/R from Bay State School of Appliances.

On November 5, 2017, Enrollment Management, Student Engagement and Community Connections welcomed Young Mi Chun as Records and Registration Systems Manager. Young Mi brings to this position over 15 years of customer service experience and 3 years of experience at QCC. Most recently, she was a Clerk IV in Academic Advising here.Young Mi earned a Bachelor of Literature and Japanese Language and Area Studies from University of Ulsan and a Bachelor of Science in Finance from Arizona State University.   

Please join us in welcoming Brian and Young Mi into their new roles. 

October, 2017

  • QCC's current HVAC certificate program at QCC at Assabet.
October, 2017
October, 2017

Quinsigamond Community College has received $431,900 as part of the state’s Skills Capital Grant program. Skills Capital Grants are awarded to educational institutions that demonstrate partnerships with industry and align curriculum to meet businesses’ needs within the state.

QCC will partner with Worcester Technical High School to serve as a site to expand its HVAC certificate program. The...

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Quinsigamond Community College has received $431,900 as part of the state’s Skills Capital Grant program. Skills Capital Grants are awarded to educational institutions that demonstrate partnerships with industry and align curriculum to meet businesses’ needs within the state.

QCC will partner with Worcester Technical High School to serve as a site to expand its HVAC certificate program. The expansion is designed to double the enrollment capacity of the HVAC certificate program and enable a second start date for students during the spring semester. Currently the HVAC program is being offered at QCC at Assabet.

“We are honored to receive this funding, which demonstrates our curriculum’s alignment with businesses’ demands,” said QCC President Dr. Luis G. Pedraja. “We are committed to the future both locally and globally, ensuring that our students are afforded the best possible opportunity for success. The partnerships we are making will have lasting effects on our future workforce.”

“Worcester Technical High School is thrilled to be partnering with QCC to provide high quality competencies in the ever-growing and much needed field of Heating Ventilation Air Conditioning and Refrigeration. The current Administration and Legislative body recognize the need to provide highly skilled individuals to meet these workforce demands through the provision of the Massachusetts Skills Capital Grant Awards,” said Kyle J. Brenner, principal of Worcester Technical High School.

Governor Charlie Baker announced that a total of $9.8 million in grants were awarded to 32 high schools, community colleges and educational institutions. QCC is one of six community colleges to be named a recipient of the competitive grants and received the second highest grant among its peers for its partnership program with Worcester Technical High School.

“These Skills Capital Grants will help boost our economy and equip students with new skills, knowledge and experience with state-of-the-art equipment across the Commonwealth,” said Governor Charlie Baker. “We look forward to continuing our work with these 32 institutions and previous awardees to enhance their programs and develop a skilled workforce ready to meet the needs of the Commonwealth.”

To date more than $36 million in Skills Capital Grants have been awarded in the last two years.

  • From left: Assistant Vice President of Extended Campus Operations & Community Engagement, Victor Somma Jr.; CSET instructor Luis Carmine; QCC student Shawn Coltran; President Dr. Luis Pedraja; QCC student Edris Ebouel; Professor of Computer Systems Engineering Technology, Betty Lauer; CSET Lab Manager, Paul Sluckis; Science Lab Manager, Tracy Levin, and Dean of Business, Engineering and Technology, Kathy Rentsch.
  • From left: QCC President Dr. Luis J. Pedraja and Southbridge High School President Dr. Andrae Townsel.
  • From left: Professor Betty Lauer and Science Lab Manager Tracy Levin
  • QCC student Edris Ebouel explains some of the features of the new CSET land and hideaway desks.
October, 2017
October, 2017

Quinsigamond Community College has had a presence in the Southbridge community for the last 38 years, beginning with a variety of individual course offerings in partnership with Southbridge High School. In 2009, QCC opened a satellite location in Southbridge. On October 25, QCC solidified its investment in South County by officially inaugurating its Computer Systems Engineering Technology (CSET) and enhanced science...

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Quinsigamond Community College has had a presence in the Southbridge community for the last 38 years, beginning with a variety of individual course offerings in partnership with Southbridge High School. In 2009, QCC opened a satellite location in Southbridge. On October 25, QCC solidified its investment in South County by officially inaugurating its Computer Systems Engineering Technology (CSET) and enhanced science labs in a ribbon cutting ceremony and open house. The labs were made possible through a $488,735 Workforce Skills Capital Grant that was awarded to QCC in 2016. The Workforce Skills Capital Grant Program is an initiative of the Governor’s Workforce Skills Cabinet, which seeks to align education, workforce and economic development strategies across the state.

“I believe very strongly that education is a pathway to success. It’s the best way of success for the students and those who are working hard to achieve their dreams and to make something of themselves. It’s up to us to provide the resources they need and the opportunities they need to achieve those dreams,” said QCC’s new President, Dr. Luis G. Pedraja.

Part of that need is to offer services that mirror those required in today’s ever-changing, technology-driven world. Technology is now needed in all industries, from manufacturing, education and healthcare, to large corporations and small businesses. New skillsets have become necessary by students and those already in the workforce, in order to succeed in the business world. The addition of the new CSET lab at QCC Southbridge, will enable the college to meet this demand by bringing additional technical training options to the South County region.

The new CSET lab features 12 state-of-the-art workstations with hideaway, split desks that can bring up the computers when they are needed, or hide them away under the desks when not in use, simply at the touch of a button. The CSET lab is also equipped with servers and cabling, allowing students hands-on learning that replicates a business environment.

“We all require some level of information technology expertise. I believe we need to teach for the jobs of tomorrow. We need to open up these skillsets here in South County,” Dr. Pedraja said. “The opportunities that the CSET lab and the science lab enhancement will bring allows more people in this area to access classes they normally couldn’t access unless they traveled to Worcester.”

Additionally, community partnerships with area industries will continue to be a part of QCC Southbridge, with the new labs offering additional resources to community businesses.

“The Computer Systems Engineering Technology and Enhanced Science Labs strengthen our partnership with Quinsigamond Community College. They give us an opportunity to allow our young people to interact with college professors and utilize the most advanced technological equipment. QCC has been an amazing asset to the academic advancement of our students. We look forward to continued collaboration of preparing young people to compete in our global society,” said Dr. Andrae Townsel, principal of Southbridge High School.

Kathy Rentsch, Dean of Business, Engineering and Technology said workforce development opportunities will now be readily available in Southbridge for companies to have their employees learn new skillsets, in addition to unemployed or under-employed adults, who might want to obtain some quick skills to get back into the workforce.

“I believe in being present in the communities we serve. A community college is about serving the community. It’s not just bringing people to our location, it’s about going to where the needs are and where the people are. The students, the employers and the community need education,” Dr. Pedraja said.

  • Current Student Registration begins November 6.
October, 2017
October, 2017

While it may seem hard to believe, Spring Registration is right around the corner.  Beginning on Monday, November 6 – Monday, November 20, current QCC students can take advantage of the college’s early registration program and register for the classes they need before receiving their final grades.  

By taking advantage of this early registration, current students receive...

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While it may seem hard to believe, Spring Registration is right around the corner.  Beginning on Monday, November 6 – Monday, November 20, current QCC students can take advantage of the college’s early registration program and register for the classes they need before receiving their final grades.  

By taking advantage of this early registration, current students receive “VIP” treatment and are the first students allowed to choose their classes, professors and schedule, ensuring they get the classes they need.

“Too often students have the misconception that they can’t register for classes until after they have received their grades. Unfortunately by putting off registration, they can sometimes get locked out of their first choice of classes,” said QCC Director of Admissions Mishawn Davis-Eyene.

Additionally, studies have shown that late registration correlates with lower grades, lower completion rates and lower re-enrollment the following semester. *

Current students can register for classes by simply visiting advising on QCC’s Main Worcester Campus (Room 62A). It’s that easy!

Advising hours are:

  • Monday - Thursday: 8:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m.
  • Friday: 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

*Ford, G.G., Stahl, K.J., Walker, M.E., & Ford, A.M. (June 2008). Better late than never? The relation of registration data to class performance. College Student Journal, 42(2), 402–407

  • Dr. Luis Pedraja, Senator Harriette Chandler and Worcester Commissioner of Health & Human Services, Dr. Matilde Castiel, joined PTK student leaders to discuss their honors action project.
  • From left: Tony Sanders, Senator Harriette Chandler, PTK President Maia Shalev and PTK Vice President of Leadership, Nicole Bodinizzo.
October, 2017
October, 2017

Earlier this month QCC’s Phi Theta Kappa officers met with Senator Harriette Chandler, Worcester Commissioner of Health & Human Services, Dr. Matilde Castiel, and QCC’s President Dr. Luis G. Pedraja, to discuss the chapter’s Honors Action Project and how they hoped to help make a difference for the homeless in Worcester.

The PTK Honors in Action Project is part of the...

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Earlier this month QCC’s Phi Theta Kappa officers met with Senator Harriette Chandler, Worcester Commissioner of Health & Human Services, Dr. Matilde Castiel, and QCC’s President Dr. Luis G. Pedraja, to discuss the chapter’s Honors Action Project and how they hoped to help make a difference for the homeless in Worcester.

The PTK Honors in Action Project is part of the group’s initiative to become a five star chapter in the international honor society. To become a five star, a charter must demonstrate a global element of engagement outside of its community. A primary component of becoming a five star chapter is through a yearlong Honors Action Project chosen from one of eight themes from the current Honors Action Program Guide. This year’s PTK officers chose the theme: “RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES: What roles do rights and responsibilities play in shaping ways in which the world works?”

In discussing ideas for the project, PTK officers decided to address the issue of whether or not government is responsible for potable water for sanitation and consumption.The group decided they would like to champion the cause of potable water and developed an Honors Action Project proposal that detailed creating a mobile shower bus, which would service the homeless of Worcester.

The PTK officers presented their idea to Senator Chandler and Dr. Castiel and while both felt this was an admirable project, they concluded it would be too difficult to implement. However, the PTK officers were not to be deterred and a collaborative discussion ensued. Dr. Castiel told the students that housing was truly the immediate need of the homeless. Dr. Castiel cited a recent report by the Central Massachusetts Housing Alliance, Inc. that showed a total of 1,111 people who were homeless in the City of Worcester.

PTK officers in attendance agreed that this would be a better avenue to pursue and discussed ways in which they could bring in modular housing for the homeless. The officers left the meeting exciting to share what they learned with other PTK members and revamp their project.

  • From left: Dr. Luis G. Pedraja; Dean Kathy Rentsch; COO Steve Marini and QCC alumni Stephanie Teixteria.
  • Dean Kathy Rentsch and QCC Board President Maurice "Moe" Boisvert.
  • Dr. Pedraja discusses new funding strategies with area legislators.
  • Legislators met with Karen Rucks, QCC's Executive Director of Advancement.
October, 2017
October, 2017

On Friday, Oct. 27, QCC’s Board of Trustees Chair Susan Mailman and QCC Foundation Board President Maurice "Moe" Boisvert, along with President Luis G. Pedraja, hosted the college’s Legislative Breakfast. The breakfast was held to inform and incite local legislators to assist QCC in obtaining fiscal support from the state to invest in education...

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On Friday, Oct. 27, QCC’s Board of Trustees Chair Susan Mailman and QCC Foundation Board President Maurice "Moe" Boisvert, along with President Luis G. Pedraja, hosted the college’s Legislative Breakfast. The breakfast was held to inform and incite local legislators to assist QCC in obtaining fiscal support from the state to invest in education on the community college level, specifically to help support its scholarship program.  According to Mr. Boisvert, the college has embarked on a plan to raise money to make sure every student who comes to QCC and needs a scholarship, is able to obtain one. The Board has made a commitment to work with all donors, especially alumni, to increase the number of Foundation scholarships each year by 20 percent.

“We are a long ways from this,” Mr. Boisvert said. “This fall we had 125 applicants and we gave out 25 from the Foundation. Our goal is to give out $350,000 privately and a total of almost a million dollars for the year, in addition to those funds. We want all students who need a scholarship to get one. Our hope is that this funding initiative will make this goal a reality."

He shared the ways in which funding will be raised and added that they would like to be able to use  include contributions from all Board members and Trustees, which is anticipated to bring in between $10,000-$15,000.  A robust alumni appeal is underway and was initially anticipated to bring in at least $20,000. A recent $80,000 gift from the Worcester City Hospital Nursing Association pushed that number much higher.

“They (the nurses) are closing their association and their generosity is helping us get to our goal sooner,” Mr. Boisvert said, adding that the college has such a strong nursing program there is a waiting list for nursing students.

Other ways of raising funds include donations from QCC employees and the soliciting of family foundations. Dr. Pedraja shared the news that Jim Harrington, of the Harrington Foundation has agreed to disperse all its foundation resources to just three institutions going forward in perpetuity: the Boys and Girls Club; Clark University and Quinsigamond Community College.

“This will double the amount we receive,” Dr. Pedraja added.

Other fundraising endeavors include: raising $100,000 through grants and $30,000-$50,000 in named scholarships.

While all these will get QCC closer to its goal, a state match that would incentivize the private sector (for every two dollars the private sector invested the state put in one dollar) would make QCC’s fundraising goal reality.

Mr. Boisvert appealed to the legislators in attendance to support the two current House and Senate bills that could make this match a reality.

“Help us send more people to Quinsigamond Community College to build their dream, their American dream can came true,” he said.

  • From left" QCC student Alexis Marsh meets with employers from Securitas.
  • QCC students were able to get on the job interview with FedEx.
  • QCC alumi Tommy Moore along with Carreu Kamanda met with Recruiter Jim March of Microtech staffing Group.
  • QCC student Chad Jackson discussed employment opportunities with Kara Blom of At & T.
  • QCC's Job Fair  offered many employment opportunities for students.
October, 2017
October, 2017

QCC students may have met their potential new employers at the college’s Career Services semi-annual Fall Job Fair, held on November 1, in the Harrington Learning Center. QCC students met and mingled with over 25 employers that were in attendance, learning about some of the job opportunities available to them. At many of the booths, students were able to share resumes, fill out job applications, and speak...

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QCC students may have met their potential new employers at the college’s Career Services semi-annual Fall Job Fair, held on November 1, in the Harrington Learning Center. QCC students met and mingled with over 25 employers that were in attendance, learning about some of the job opportunities available to them. At many of the booths, students were able to share resumes, fill out job applications, and speak with prospective employers.

“We have people applying on the spot and being interviewed,” said Sydney Ocran, Talent Acquisition Coordinator for FedEX Ground. “We have 500 seasonal openings.”

Many of the other companies in attendance had immediate openings they were trying to fill.

“We are open to interview anyone to fill our positions as soon as possible,” said, Kara Blom, of AT&T.

“This is a nice place to do this,” said QCC student Alexis March, who was at her first job fair.

Companies in attendance included:

  • Alternatives
  • American Fabrication
  • AT&T
  • Autism Learning Partners
  • Barton Associates
  • Charming Charlies
  • City of Worcester
  • CoWorx Staffing Services
  • Cunningham & Associates
  • Eaton
  • Federal Bureau of Prisons
  • FedEx
  • H&M Hennes & Mauritz
  • Home Depot
  • IPG Photonics
  • Microtech Staffing Group
  • Monroe Staffing
  • QCC Campus Police
  • Remedy Staffing
  • Renewal by Anderson
  • Securitas
  • The Arc
  • UMASS Memorial
  • UPS
  • Valet Park of America
  • Venture Community Services
  • Wakefly

Career Services offers a wide variety of resources to assist students in identifying career opportunities, finding up to date information on the latest job market trends, acquiring work experience in their career field of choice, and developing job search skills for a successful transition from school to work.

Career Placement Representatives are available for assistance and additional web resources including the Wyvern JobNet, co-op, and internship database can be found on The Q.

  • The state-of-the-art kitchen where the meal replacement meals are prepared.
  • QCC students are a big part of the meal preparation during the school year.
October, 2017
October, 2017

Statistics show that food insecurity is growing among older adults. The National Council on Aging noted that in 2014, 10.2 million older Americans faced the threat of hunger, which represents 15.8 percent of adults aged 60 and over in the U.S. At Quinsigamond Community College that information has not gone unnoticed by the college’s Hospitality and Recreation Management (HRM) faculty, staff and students.

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Statistics show that food insecurity is growing among older adults. The National Council on Aging noted that in 2014, 10.2 million older Americans faced the threat of hunger, which represents 15.8 percent of adults aged 60 and over in the U.S. At Quinsigamond Community College that information has not gone unnoticed by the college’s Hospitality and Recreation Management (HRM) faculty, staff and students.

Once a week since March 2017, QCC students, faculty and staff located at QCC in the Worcester Senior Center have been offering healthy, hearty and balanced meals that people can purchase and take home.  The meals are prepared weekly in the state-of-the-art kitchen and are designed to meet the needs of seniors, who often live alone or are homebound.

According to Coordinator of the Hospitality & Recreation Management Program, Pat Hutchinson, this type of learning gives QCC students valuable hands-on training, while teaching them about general healthy eating and the food needs of the public.

“We started to do these meals in order to offer nutritional, reasonably priced meals that may otherwise be out of a person’s reach. These meals have been very well-received,” said HRM Dietary Management Lab Site Supervisor, Rebecca King. “During the school year the students help plan the menu and prep and package the meals during their kitchen lab.”

All meals are targeted to be 500 calories or less total, packaged in eco-friendly durable packaging that is microwave safe, and designed to be served at home over the weekend. A label on the packaging indicates the meal, the ingredients and instructions for re-heating, as well as a use by date (meals are good for 5 days). Meals are based on a cycle menu that includes a rotation of proteins and incorporates seasonal offerings and products. The meals are offered every Friday throughout the year and are available to the public at a cost of $5 per meal. Reservations are due by Wednesday at noon for that Friday’s meal.

The weekly menu choice is posted in the Worcester Senior Center; is available at Bobby M’s Diner (located in the Worcester Senior Center) and is included in the senior newsletter.

“If someone would like a meal, they can simply call our reservation line 508.799.8068, or sign up in person in the diner,” Ms. King said. “We have many people that sign up for the month or several weeks a month.”

Meals are available for pick up at the Bobby M’s Diner, located at 128 Providence Street, Worcester (Inside the Worcester Senior Center) on Friday's until 3:00 p.m., some are available for pick up on Thursdays after 2:00 p.m., if requested and available. Check out the November menu .

For more information, contact Rebecca King at rking [at] qcc.umass.edu.