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May, 2017

  • Scholarship Lunch attendees
  • Scholarship Lunch attendees
  • Scholarship Lunch attendees
  • Scholarship Lunch attendees
May, 2017
May, 2017

The Quinsigamond Community College Foundation hosted its third annual Scholarship Lunch on Tuesday, May 16, at noon at the Harrington Learning Center at QCC.

In the past 11 years, funds have grown from 19 scholarship funds to 54 funds, which allowed the foundation to make 158 awards this year to 98 students, totaling more than $174,000 in scholarship funds for distribution this fiscal year.

About 30...

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The Quinsigamond Community College Foundation hosted its third annual Scholarship Lunch on Tuesday, May 16, at noon at the Harrington Learning Center at QCC.

In the past 11 years, funds have grown from 19 scholarship funds to 54 funds, which allowed the foundation to make 158 awards this year to 98 students, totaling more than $174,000 in scholarship funds for distribution this fiscal year.

About 30 students attended the luncheon to be honored for awards received during the current academic year. A total of 70 people, including donors, family of those receiving scholarships, QCC Foundation members and QCC Trustees attended the luncheon.

Donors attending included Barbara Guthrie and Gary MacConnell from the Worcester Rotary Club; Teresa Gentile, Dorothy Stanton, and Pat Gibbons from the Worcester City Hospital School of Nursing Alumni Association; QCC Foundation Lifetime Director Jim Harrington from The Francis A. and Jacquelyn H. Harrington Foundation; QCC President Dr. Gail Carberry; and QCC Foundation Director Al Maykel, Jr.

The foundation raises money for some scholarships through events, such as the golf tournament and spelling bee. Other scholarships are memorial funds or endowed scholarships, or supported by different QCC departments or organizations.

  • Carberry Center
May, 2017
May, 2017

The Worcester Business Development Corporation has named 25 Federal Street, home of QCC's Healthcare and Workforce Developmet Center the Carberry Center, in honor of QCC President Dr. Gail Carberry, who is retiring this summer.

The announcement was made at the 52nd annual meeting of the WBDC by Craig L. Blais, president and CEO of the organization, on May 16....

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The Worcester Business Development Corporation has named 25 Federal Street, home of QCC's Healthcare and Workforce Developmet Center the Carberry Center, in honor of QCC President Dr. Gail Carberry, who is retiring this summer.

The announcement was made at the 52nd annual meeting of the WBDC by Craig L. Blais, president and CEO of the organization, on May 16.

The building, was opened in April 2015 as part of a partnership between Quinsigamond Community College and the WBDC. The former Telegram & Gazette building was renovated at a cost of $40 million, and now includes new labs and equipment for nursing and healthcare courses. It also includes the Center for Workforce Development and Continuing Education, which offers adult education and workforce training.

Dr. Carberry has been recognized for her work collaborating with other Worcester colleges, local businesses and economic development organizations to offer coursework and degrees that easily transfer to further education opportunities or immediate workforce development. During her tenure as QCC president for the past 11 years, she has expanded the college, not only geographically to reach other populations in areas such as Southbridge, and Marlborough, but has also expanded course offerings and technology to meet workforce needs.

At the annual meeting, keynote speaker Travis McCready, president and chief executive officer of the Massachusetts Life Sciences Center, spoke about Worcester being poised to take advantage of new trends in biotechnology, including a push towards biomanufacturing.

More information about the annual meeting can be found in the Worcester Telegram & Gazette story.

  • students in gateway program
  • puppets created by gateway students
May, 2017
May, 2017

QCC Gateway to College hosted a Fab Lab Showcase May 4 at the QuEST Center, which gave Gateway students a chance to share the projects they created this semester.

Visitors could learn about what the Fab Lab offers and tour the facility. Students spoke about their experience using the lab and what they learned during the semester. Eighteen students were involved in the Gateway Fab Lab program, which fulfilled a...

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QCC Gateway to College hosted a Fab Lab Showcase May 4 at the QuEST Center, which gave Gateway students a chance to share the projects they created this semester.

Visitors could learn about what the Fab Lab offers and tour the facility. Students spoke about their experience using the lab and what they learned during the semester. Eighteen students were involved in the Gateway Fab Lab program, which fulfilled a science credit for their high school requirements.

About 30 people attended the event, which was held from 2:30-4:00 p.m., including from area schools, community partners, QCC staff and faculty and families and friends of Gateway students. The lab experience and equipment at the QuEST Center impressed those who attended the event.

“Gateway to College was happy to work collaboratively with Alex Gray, a Fab Lab staff member, in helping our students explore the possibilities in the QuEST Fab Lab. This opportunity helped the students meet their science requirement for high school and learn something new at the same time,” said QCC Gateway Clerk Glenda Rodriguez. “Although they had no previous knowledge in coding, their instructor taught them what it was all about. Students knew that making animatronic puppet heads would be hard, but worth it in the end. They were all happy with their results and what they got out of it. We hope to offer this again to our students in upcoming semesters.”  

The Fab Lab is a maker space that can be used by students, entrepreneurs and the community to create prototypes and test design ideas. The Fab Lab network includes more than 500 Fab Labs in 30 countries around the world. The college joined the Fab Lab Network to provide students and other Fab Lab users with not only the high-tech tools, but also access to people, knowledge and idea sharing.

The QCC Fab Lab has been built into the educational specifications of the QuEST Center project and includes a laser cutter, a vinyl cutter, 3D printers, a 3D scanner, a precision milling machine, molding and casting equipment, and soldering equipment. This equipment is used to enhance the current curriculum in the Manufacturing Technology and other engineering technology programs.

The Gateway to College is a national program that supports students who have dropped out of high school or who may not graduate. Through the program, students ages 16 to 21 can obtain their high school diploma and earn college credits at the same time. Many graduates go on to finish associate degrees and transfer to four-year colleges.

The program, now available at 41 colleges in 21 states, is rigorous. Students take a fulltime college course load, with classes that match their high school requirements, MCAS needs, and career interests. 

To learn more about QCC’s Gateway to College program, visit the Gateway to College website.

See Gateway to College's Twitter to follow the progress and highlights of the program.

  • Luis Pedraja
May, 2017
May, 2017

Dr. Luis Pedraja’s appointment as the next president of Quinsigamond Community College was unanimously approved by the Massachusetts Board of Higher Education on May 9.

Dr. Pedraja succeeds QCC President Dr. Gail Carberry, who is retiring after 11 years as the community college’s president. He officially starts on July 10.

Dr. Pedraja was nominated for the...

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Dr. Luis Pedraja’s appointment as the next president of Quinsigamond Community College was unanimously approved by the Massachusetts Board of Higher Education on May 9.

Dr. Pedraja succeeds QCC President Dr. Gail Carberry, who is retiring after 11 years as the community college’s president. He officially starts on July 10.

Dr. Pedraja was nominated for the position in March by the QCC Board of Trustees after an intensive presidential search.

As a child, Dr. Pedraja emigrated from Cuba and grew up in a low-income Miami neighborhood. He became the first in his family to attend college; and he later earned a Ph.D. from the University of Virginia.

Currently, Dr. Pedraja serves as Interim Vice Chancellor of Academic Affairs for California’s 35,000-student Peralta Community College District, where he leads faculty, staff, and administrators to develop innovative programs and ensure student success. The district includes four colleges.

To learn about his previous appointment, read the previous story.

To learn more about the presidential search and Dr. Pedraja’s qualifications, visit the presidential search page

In the News

 

  • Students at Honors and Awards Ceremony
  • Students at Honors and Awards Ceremony
  • Students at Honors and Awards Ceremony
May, 2017
May, 2017

Students who have a record of high achievement and high level of involvement on campus and in the community are recognized by Quinsigamond Community College at the annual Honors and Awards Ceremony. This year’s event was held May 10 at Mechanics Hall in Worcester and was attended by students, their families, faculty and staff.

This year, 93 Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society students received...

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Students who have a record of high achievement and high level of involvement on campus and in the community are recognized by Quinsigamond Community College at the annual Honors and Awards Ceremony. This year’s event was held May 10 at Mechanics Hall in Worcester and was attended by students, their families, faculty and staff.

This year, 93 Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society students received their gold stole in commemoration of both their academic and community service commitments. Each student receiving their gold stole completed a minimum of two community service events while maintaining a 3.5 cumulative GPA.

  • Brian Adams
  • Zahraa Alaloosi
  • Fatin Alkhaledi
  • William Allen
  • Richmond Amoako
  • Tara Andrews
  • Rosina Asaah
  • Mehar Ashaq
  • Mary Assan
  • Albano Bandilli
  • Claudia Barrett
  • Jessica Becque
  • Laurie Behrmann
  • Jennifer Bemis
  • William Bennett
  • Linette Benson
  • Melissa Benson
  • Kristin Blair
  • Leah Boutelle
  • Katana Boutiette
  • Ashley Brown
  • Ryan Bruder
  • Hilton Carboo
  • Angela Collins
  • Paul Collins
  • Cherise Connolly
  • Chelsea Cove
  • Rory Cronin
  • Jennifer Crossen
  • Daniela Cunha Raphael
  • Shannon Curran
  • Rosanna DaCosta
  • Nhan Dao
  • Aaron Dean
  • Shirley Dempsey
  • Silvia DeSantis
  • Tanner Desrosiers
  • Ekua Djan
  • Robert Ela
  • Tracy Ellis
  • Laurence Fankep
  • Samuel Farrar
  • Sabina Fecteau-Ellis
  • Waleska Fernandez
  • Jennifer Ferrone
  • Ivonne Flores
  • Luis Fontanez
  • Hannah Furno
  • Nuur Gacal
  • Rochelle Gallant
  • James Gangemi
  • Winnie Gitau
  • Michele Goulding
  • Cristian Gramajo Rodriguez
  • Karina Gregoire
  • Tefta Gremaj
  • Ernesto Guerrero-Rojas
  • Omar Guzman Correa
  • Menal Hammodi
  • Hadeel Hamza
  • Alicia Henry
  • Loretta Herman
  • Paula Hernandez Acosta
  • Melissa Holland
  • Olivia Hoyt
  • Hanan Ibraheim
  • Trendafile Ibrahimi
  • Alfred Iraola
  • Saja Ismael
  • Alexander Jeneski
  • Henry Jones
  • Lonny Joseph
  • Kostandinos​ Kalkounis
  • Boakai Kamara
  • Margaret Karanja
  • Robin Karoway-Waterhouse
  • Kelly Kokernak
  • Nicole Laingor
  • Damian Lamie
  • Nhat Le
  • Amanda LeBeau
  • Brittany LeBlanc
  • Paul Ledoux
  • Terry Letourneau
  • Marcelo Lopez
  • Karen Lopez
  • Regalado
  • Barbara Lopez-Swenson
  • Keri Lowe
  • Jennifer Lyford
  • Patrice Magloire
  • Travis Malo
  • Monique Manna
  • Kerry Markvenas
  • Karana Marlowe
  • Derek Marszalek
  • Sara Martellotta
  • Noelia Martinez
  • Kimberly May
  • Joy May
  • Adele Mayer
  • Kelsey McCue
  • Samantha McQueen
  • Brenda Melia
  • Emily Miller
  • Krystal Monge
  • John Monterroso
  • Jake Montgomery
  • Cameron Morin
  • Erin Motil
  • Megan Murphy
  • Alex Nagorski
  • Leah Njoroge
  • Serena Noinala
  • Ethan O’Connell
  • Duke Ogeto
  • Margarita Oquendo
  • Stephanie Orlando
  • Peter Orlovsky
  • Luis Pena Mateo
  • Nicole Pham
  • Jae Phoenix
  • Alondra Pichardo Rosario
  • Kalista Pierre
  • Linda Pietropaolo
  • Deu Pokhrel
  • Jacqueline Prosser
  • Rawa Radwan
  • Joshua Renfro
  • Emmanuel Reyes-Pichardo
  • Tracy Rinker
  • Susan Rivera-Robles
  • Taisha Rodriguez
  • David Rodziewicz
  • Roxana Romero
  • Cherie Ronayne
  • Luis Rosa
  • Timothy Ruston
  • Helen Salce
  • Tony Sanders
  • Johnathan Saniuk
  • Sierra Sasser
  • Megan Schultze
  • Benjamin Secino
  • Dayna Sharon
  • Christine Sherman
  • Dominique Simoncini
  • Amanda Smith
  • John Snyder
  • Cole Stanley
  • Christine Stone
  • Clark Sun
  • Long Sybounheuang
  • Gary Tambolleo
  • Sharon Tango
  • Mary Tanona
  • Donna Terestre
  • Cindy Terestre
  • Cristin Torrey
  • Brian Truenow
  • Kala Vandersluis
  • Keyla Vargas
  • Eric Wells
  • Alan Wheeler
  • John Wheeler
  • Catherine Wielock
  • Heather Williams
  • Cristyn Young
  • Jordon Zablocki

For the Commonwealth Honors Scholars Program, 17 students received their tassel signifying completion of four voluntary honors level courses at the college.

  • Richard Amoako
  • Leah Berthiaume
  • Cambre Colon
  • Kristi Dorr
  • Rachel Ferdinand
  • Hannah Furno
  • Alexander Jeneski
  • Boakai Kamara
  • Cory Keith
  • Damian Lamie
  • Kimberly May
  • Ethan O’Connell
  • Peter Orlovsky
  • Alondra Pichardo
  • Cristian Robles
  • Mary Tremblay
  • Robin Karoway-Waterhouse

For Psi Beta Honor Society, 19 students received their medals upon completion of their academic fulfillments within the honor society. Psi Beta is the psychology honor society for community colleges.

  • Kevin Adams
  • Kwame Antwi
  • Jennifer Bemis
  • Ekua Djan
  • Laurence Fankep
  • Brittany LeBlanc
  • Karana Marlowe
  • Maria Martinez
  • Kimberly May
  • Kelsey McCue
  • Majorie Medina
  • Ethan O’Connell
  • Carmen Ortiz
  • Margarita
  • Oquendo
  • Kyla Perez
  • Alondra Pichardo
  • Megan Stevenson
  • Steven Tisdell
  • Mary Tremblay

For Who’s Who Among Students in American Junior Colleges, eight students were named and recognized with a special gift. Each student was nominated by a staff member based on scholastic ability, leadership and service to the college.

  • Leah Boutelle
  • Paul Collins
  • Laurence Fankep
  • Kimberly May
  • Ben Nylen
  • Ethan O’Connell
  • Tony Sanders
  • John Snyder

Graduating Veterans received cords on behalf of their dedication to our country.

  • Mari Alkhamisi
  • William Allen
  • Luiz Azevedo
  • James Baarda
  • Charles Bastien
  • Thomas Beggs
  • William Bennett
  • David Berthiume
  • Patrick Cusson
  • Ludmilla Donahue
  • Robert Ela
  • David Farrell
  • Andrew Flint
  • Thomas French
  • Jay Gittao
  • Justin Halley
  • Scott Handley
  • Andrew Jubinville
  • Christopher Keenan
  • Vincent Lepore
  • Carlos Lima
  • Edris Attica Logue
  • Travis Malo
  • Sean Maynard
  • Xavier Miranda
  • Andrew Morris
  • Kara Olsen
  • Devon Orcutt
  • Emmanuel Peyes-Pichado
  • Danielle Plue
  • Paul Riley
  • Adam Rodeen
  • Tony Sanders
  • Michael Sielis
  • Amber Sullivan
  • Kendra Swett
  • Long Sybounheuang
  • Edward Tenelus
  • Tommy Thomas
  • Brian Truenow
  • Eric Wells
  • Kyla Yates

Engineering Student Distinction Awards were presented to 15 high achieving students in their respective engineering academic major.

  • Fatin Alkhaledi
  • Arman Atoofi
  • Luke Donaldson
  • Rekpene Enyi-Idoh
  • Colin Gagne
  • Timothy Hatton
  • Attilio Hoxha
  • William Karrow
  • Terry Le Tourneau
  • Brian Moore
  • Joshua Renfro
  • David Rodziewicz
  • Johnathan Saniuk
  • Cole Stanley
  • Joel Wentworth

Special Recognition Awards were given to four students.

  • David Auger
  • Matthew Gauthier
  • Jennifer Lyford
  • Kerri Richardson

Distinguished Service Awards were presented to seven students

  • Lori Darling
  • Jorge Calvera
  • Alexis Gomez
  • Andrew Girard
  • Nicole Gadbois
  • Kara Lewis
  • Karana Marlowe

Other awards of note included:

Memorial Awards

  • Rose Caprioli Memorial Award: Colleen Shugrue
  • Nancy Ohan Memorial Award: Cristyn Marie Young
  • Jean Smelewicz Award for Computer Information Systems: Cori Scott
  • Francis X. Gardner Pyschology Achievement Award: Gabrielle Plainte
  • Robert J. McDonald Award: Tanner Derosiers

Outstanding Student Awards

  • Outstanding Female Student Athlete: Sami Barbosa
  • Outstanding Male Student Athlete: Jimmy Flynn
  • Wyvern Award: Ethan O’Connell
  • James H. Harrington Outstanding Student Citizen: Leah Boutelle
  • Outstanding Student Leader Award: Kimberly May
  • QCC Wyverns Baseball players
May, 2017
May, 2017

Congratulations to the Quinsigamond Wyverns for reaching the finals in the National Junior College Athletic Association, Region 21 Championship Series!

The team received a plaque for making the finals. The tournament, held May 13-15, was covered by the Telegram and Gazette. Read the story about the tournament on the...

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Congratulations to the Quinsigamond Wyverns for reaching the finals in the National Junior College Athletic Association, Region 21 Championship Series!

The team received a plaque for making the finals. The tournament, held May 13-15, was covered by the Telegram and Gazette. Read the story about the tournament on the Telegram Website.

  • QCC Students at Research Conference
May, 2017
May, 2017

Students who participated in the Honors Program Showcase took their presentations to the Massachusetts Undergraduate Research Conference.

Susan McPherson, a QCC English professor who co-teaches the Honors Capstone Course, said the conference, held at UMass Amherst on April 28, is an excellent networking opportunity for students. There were more than 1,200 student presenters at this year’...

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Students who participated in the Honors Program Showcase took their presentations to the Massachusetts Undergraduate Research Conference.

Susan McPherson, a QCC English professor who co-teaches the Honors Capstone Course, said the conference, held at UMass Amherst on April 28, is an excellent networking opportunity for students. There were more than 1,200 student presenters at this year’s conference, representing 21 campuses in the public higher education system. The conference is co-sponsored by the Commonwealth Honors College at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, the Massachusetts Department of Higher Education, and the Massachusetts State University Council of Presidents.

“In addition to the networking possibilities, students are given a platform to showcase their semester-long research and view they types of research their peers are doing at other community colleges and at the four-year university level,” Ms. McPherson said. “The presentation types include a panel, with oral presentation; poster presentations; and e-poster presentations; we had a combination of all three types delivered by QCC honors students.”

Ms. McPherson and Jean Kennedy, a Human Services professor, co-taught the Honors Capstone Course, which honors students are required to take to graduate. It is a seminar-style course, each student works on a research project for the semester with the goal to create a scholarly writing project and presentation. This is one of the requirements of the Commonwealth Honors Scholars program, and helps students prepare for the four-year college experience.

The following students presented at the conference: Richmond Amoako, Leah Berthiaume, Stephanie Collins, Kristi Dorr, Rachel Ferdinand, Amanda LeBeau, Nathan Manna, Ethan O’Connell, Peter Orlovsky, Alondra Pichardo, Cristian Robles, Maximus Seale and Mary Tremblay. Research topics ranged from artificial intelligence, drug resistant bacteria to the future of self-driving cars.

For more information about the projects they researched, see previous newsletter story.

Some STEM students also attended the event. The STEM Starter Academy funded a bus to take students, faculty, and staff to the conference. The keynote address was given by Gerald B. Downes, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Biology at UMass Amherst, who spoke about his research in neurological disease and disorders.

The Honors Program at QCC is accredited by the Massachusetts Department of Higher Education as a Commonwealth Honors Program. It is part of an integrated, collaborative system-wide network of honors programs in Massachusetts public higher education. Students participating in the Honors Program:

  • Complete selected courses on an Honors level.
  • Participate in an Honors Colloquium.
  • Participate in cultural and social events.
  • Receive personal guidance and peer support.
  • Increase their transfer and scholarship opportunities.

For more information about the Honors Program and Showcase, visit the Commonwealth Honors Program website.

May, 2017
May, 2017

QCC hosted its annual Celebration of Excellence and Retirement Recognition Reception on May 18 to recognize and celebrate staff and faulty who have retired this year. A total of 13 faculty and staff were recognized at this year’s event.

The reception was held at the Harrington Learning Center before commencement on May 18 to celebrate another successful year and honor recently retired and retiring...

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QCC hosted its annual Celebration of Excellence and Retirement Recognition Reception on May 18 to recognize and celebrate staff and faulty who have retired this year. A total of 13 faculty and staff were recognized at this year’s event.

The reception was held at the Harrington Learning Center before commencement on May 18 to celebrate another successful year and honor recently retired and retiring colleagues.

Those recognized this year included:

  • Ellen Andrews
  • John Brand
  • Eleanor Dailida
  • Louise Hamelin
  • Jane June
  • Karen Kachadoorian
  • Dale LaBonte
  • Michelle McCrillis
  • Kathryn Ronzanski
  • Peter Tamulis
  • Maurice Tonissi
  • Maureen Woolhouse

QCC President Gail Carberry also was recognized for her hard work and dedication to the college. She is retiring from QCC after 11 years as president of the college.

  • gala invite
May, 2017
May, 2017

The QCC Foundation is hosting “A Journey to Remember” in June. The annual gala is being held to recognize the illustrious career and retirement of Dr. Gail Carberry and to thank supporters for the success of the RISE Campaign.

The RISE Campaign raised $5 million to equip and furnish two new state-of-the-art buildings, expand program delivery throughout the region and build...

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The QCC Foundation is hosting “A Journey to Remember” in June. The annual gala is being held to recognize the illustrious career and retirement of Dr. Gail Carberry and to thank supporters for the success of the RISE Campaign.

The RISE Campaign raised $5 million to equip and furnish two new state-of-the-art buildings, expand program delivery throughout the region and build endowment for scholarships and teaching positions.

The event will be June 15, at 5:30 p.m., at Mechanics Hall in Worcester. For more information, to register or to donate, please visit www.QCC.edu/journey

Proceeds will benefit the Amy H. Carberry Endowed Scholarship Fund.

Dr. Carberry has generously offered to match every dollar of donations between now and June 15, up to $100,000. This means donations will have twice the impact in helping QCC provide high-quality, affordable higher education to members of the community.

For more information on sponsorships or to register as a sponsor, download, complete and return the sponsorship registration form, available at the above link.

The QCC Foundation would like to express its gratitude to sponsors of the event:

Silver Sponsors: St. Vincent Hospital

Bronze Sponsors: Fallon Health, Higher Education Assistance Group, National Grid

Community Sponsors: Dr. Daniel M. Asquino, President Emertius, MWCC; Assabet; Clark University; Coghlin Electric Contractors, Inc.; Fitchburg State University, Worcester Business Development Corporation; Worcester Polytechnic Institute

Partnering Sponsors: Anna Maria College; Fidelity Bank; PRA Architects; Reliant Medical Group

May, 2017
May, 2017

We are very pleased to announce the following staff updates:

On May 1, 2017, Academic Affairs welcomed Adrienne Linnell as Program Administrator, STEM Initiatives. Ms. Linnell brings to this position over 35 years of management experience in the private and public sector. Most recently, she has been working with the Massachusetts Animal Coalition as a Program...

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We are very pleased to announce the following staff updates:

On May 1, 2017, Academic Affairs welcomed Adrienne Linnell as Program Administrator, STEM Initiatives. Ms. Linnell brings to this position over 35 years of management experience in the private and public sector. Most recently, she has been working with the Massachusetts Animal Coalition as a Program Administrator and as Board Treasurer and the Merrimack River Feline Rescue Society as the Board President. Ms. Linnell earned a Bachelor’s of Science in Business Administration from Cornell University, and a Master of Business Administration from The University of Michigan at Ann Arbor. 

On May 8, 2017, Administrative Services welcomed Ryan Clark in to a new role as Communications Dispatcher I. Mr. Clark brings to this position over 10 years of customer service and police and security dispatching. He currently works as a Service Representative at a private company and was a Police Dispatcher at Worcester Polytechnic Institute. He is a graduate of the Municipal Police Training Committee’s Reserve/Intermittent Police Academy. Mr. Clark earned a Bachelor’s of Science in Criminal Justice from Worcester State University.

On May 8, 2017, Administrative Services welcomed Priscilla Witherspoon as Clerk III-Southbridge. Ms. Witherspoon brings to the College over 8 years of administrative and customer service experience in the private sector. Most recently, she worked as a Clerk at a medical device company. Ms. Witherspoon is CPR and First Aid certified.    

On May 30, 2017, Academic Affairs welcomed Pat Schmohl as Interim Dean of the School of Healthcare. Mr. Schmohl has been with Quinsigamond Community College since 2005 in a variety of roles. Prior to this new appointment, he served as Dean of Distance Learning and Professional Development, acting Assistant Vice President of Academic Affairs, Coordinator of the Fire Science Program and as a tenured Professor. Additionally, he was a Registered Nurse at Saint Vincent Hospital in the emergency department for 5 years. Mr. Schmohl earned an Associate Degree in Nursing from Quinsigamond Community College, a Master’s of Business Administration from Anna Maria College and a Master’s of Science in Nursing – Community Health from Worcester State University.  

Please join us in welcoming QCC's new staff into their new roles. 

April, 2017

  • Women of Distinction group
  • student receives Women of Distinction award
  • student receives Women of Distinction award
  • student receives Women of Distinction award
  • Women of Distinction attendees
April, 2017
April, 2017

The Women of Distinction event was held April 19 in the Harrington Learning Center to recognize students who have overcome great odds or made a difference in their community.

Brenda Safford, Program Coordinator of Human Services and assistant professor at QCC, spoke to the students about her experiences. Ms. Safford attended QCC, graduating in 1998 with her Associate degree before...

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The Women of Distinction event was held April 19 in the Harrington Learning Center to recognize students who have overcome great odds or made a difference in their community.

Brenda Safford, Program Coordinator of Human Services and assistant professor at QCC, spoke to the students about her experiences. Ms. Safford attended QCC, graduating in 1998 with her Associate degree before attending Assumption College, where she received her bachelor of science and master’s degree in science of Human Services and Rehabilitation Counseling. She previously was director of the Career Resource Center at the YWCA of Central Massachusetts. She was named one of QCC’s 50 Guardians.

Women students who distinguished themselves by overcoming great odds and/or who made a difference in their community were nominated for the award by faculty members.

There were 28 recipients of the award this year.

President Carberry ended the ceremony with kind words of how proud the nominees should be, and wished them the best in their future endeavors.

The event included time for honorees and faculty who they were nominated by to socialize and light refreshments were served.

  • PTK students
  • PTK student
  • PTK students
  • PTK students
April, 2017
April, 2017

Earlier this month the Quinsigamond Community College chapter of Phi Theta Kappa welcomed new members at its annual induction ceremony.

This is the largest induction in the history of the chapter, with 188 new members being welcomed. The QCC chapter of the honor society has 488 active members.

Faculty advisor Bonnie Coleman said the chapter has worked hard the past few years to become...

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Earlier this month the Quinsigamond Community College chapter of Phi Theta Kappa welcomed new members at its annual induction ceremony.

This is the largest induction in the history of the chapter, with 188 new members being welcomed. The QCC chapter of the honor society has 488 active members.

Faculty advisor Bonnie Coleman said the chapter has worked hard the past few years to become more active, not only with different community projects but new members. At the recent international convention, the chapter was named one of the Top 50 Chapters.

The purpose of Phi Theta Kappa is to recognize and encourage scholarship among two-year college students. To achieve this purpose, Phi Theta Kappa provides opportunity for the development of leadership and service, for an intellectual climate for exchange of ideas and ideals, for lively fellowship for scholars, and for stimulation of interest in continuing academic excellence.

Membership is by invitation only, to be invited the student must have a cumulative grade point average of 3.5 with 16 college credits earned at Quinsigamond Community College. Invitations are sent out in the Fall and Spring semesters.

The chapter has been working on the Live & Learn Greenhouse Project on the QCC campus. Ms. Coleman said construction will be underway this spring, and they hope to have the greenhouse up and running in May, depending on the weather.

A $16,500 grant will partially fund the greenhouse, where students will grow vegetables and plants. Ms. Coleman said they plan to start with herbs, cucumbers and tomatoes and then add new items each season. There also will be a “Plant A Seed’ project with the Early Childhood Education program, where children can come in to plant a seed and watch it grow.

  • Students present at Honors Program Showcase
  • Students present at Honors Program Showcase
  • Student presents at Honors Program Showcase
  • Student presents at Honors Program Showcase
  • Students present at Honors Program Showcase
April, 2017
April, 2017

The annual Honors Program Showcase gives students a chance to display their poster and presentation on their honors research from this semester’s Honors Colloquium, “Rewriting Ourselves: An Exploration of Emerging Paradigms.” 

The showcase was held April 27, in the Harrington Learning Center, and was open to faculty and students. Eleven students researched topics ranging from the future...

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The annual Honors Program Showcase gives students a chance to display their poster and presentation on their honors research from this semester’s Honors Colloquium, “Rewriting Ourselves: An Exploration of Emerging Paradigms.” 

The showcase was held April 27, in the Harrington Learning Center, and was open to faculty and students. Eleven students researched topics ranging from the future of employment to the use of artificial intelligence. The students also presented their projects at the University of Massachusetts Amherst at the annual Undergraduate Research Conference on April 28.

English Professor Susan McPherson, and Jean Kennedy, Human Services professor, co-taught the Honors Capstone Course, which honors students are required to take to graduate. It is a seminar-style course, each student works on a research project for the semester with the goal to create a scholarly writing project and presentation. This is one of the requirements of the Commonwealth Honors Scholars program, and helps students prepare for the four-year college experience.

The following students were involved in this year’s Honors Program:

  • Richmond Amoako (BT): The Future of Employment
  • Leah Berthiaume (GSHC): The Evolution of Consciousness: Qualia vs Attention Schema Theory
  • Kristi Door (LA): The Rise of Neopaganism in the West
  • Rachel Ferdinand (LA): Millennials: A New American Ideology
  • Amanda LeBeau (GS): The Illusion of Death
  • Nathan Manna (Gateway): The Theatricality of Reality
  • Peter Orlovsky (GS): Drug-Resistant Bacteria
  • Alondra Pichardo (LA-PSY): Artificial Intelligence: Are We Ready for It?
  • Cristian Robles (BT): The Rise of Populism and Rejection of Globalism
  • Maximus Seale (BT): The Rise of Artificial Intelligence and Self Driving Cars
  • Mary Tremblay (LA): Mindfulness: The Future Cure for Psychological Disorders

The Honors Program at QCC is accredited by the Massachusetts Department of Higher Education as a Commonwealth Honors Program. It is part of an integrated, collaborative system-wide network of honors programs in Massachusetts public higher education. Students participating in the Honors Program:

  • Complete selected courses on an Honors level.
  • Participate in an Honors Colloquium.
  • Participate in cultural and social events.
  • Receive personal guidance and peer support.
  • Increase their transfer and scholarship opportunities.

For more information about the Honors Program and Showcase, visit the Commonwealth Honors program page.

  • PTK students at cookout
  • PTK students
  • PTK student speaks
  • PTK students
April, 2017
April, 2017

The Quinsigamond Community College chapter of Alpha Zeta Theta Chapter was recognized recently at the Phi Theta Kappa International Convention, held in Nashville, Tenn., on April 6-9.

Ms. Coleman said each year the chapter works for eight months researching an Honors Topic, while taking full-time classes. Many members also have jobs and families. Through hard work and community involvement, the...

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The Quinsigamond Community College chapter of Alpha Zeta Theta Chapter was recognized recently at the Phi Theta Kappa International Convention, held in Nashville, Tenn., on April 6-9.

Ms. Coleman said each year the chapter works for eight months researching an Honors Topic, while taking full-time classes. Many members also have jobs and families. Through hard work and community involvement, the chapter members strive to become a Five Star Chapter.

This year at the Phi Theta Kappa International Convention the chapter received many awards. A total of 1,976 entries were received in the 2017 Hallmark Awards completion. The 2017 International Awards the QCC chapter received are:

  • Distinguished Honors in Action Project Awards: The Honors in Action Project Award recognizes the top chapters whose Honors in Action Project entries demonstrated excellence in academic research into the Honors Study topic, leadership roles and leadership development activities, service learning and collaboration.
  • Distinguished Top 50 Chapters: Out of 1,342 chapters, QCC’s chapter was named one of the Top 50.
  • Administrator Awards: Awards are presented to college presidents, campus CEOs at two-year or senior institutions, and state community college directors who have been supportive of Phi Theta Kappa, and are retiring from their careers. The award is in honor of the late Dr. Michael Bennett, longtime president of St. Petersburg College in Florida. QCC President Dr. Gail Carberry received a Michael Bennet Lifetime Achievement Award. Dr. Carberry is retiring at the end of this school year after being president at QCC for 11 years.

Ms. Coleman said outgoing officers Kimberly May, Ethan O’Connell, Leah Boutelle, Tony Sanders, Mary Sylvester, Laurence Fankep, Tashena Matthew, Toby Ajayi, John Snyder and Holden Lindblom all worked hard to support the chapter.

  • student pets pony at PAWS for People event
  • dog at PAWS for People event
  • students pet animals at PAWS for People event
  • students pet animals at PAWS for People event
  • students pet animals at PAWS for People event
April, 2017
April, 2017

As QCC students geared up for final exams, a peak stress time, Disability Services arranged for PAWS for People to visit campus before exams began. PAWS for People is affiliated with Tufts University’s Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine and is a Community Partner of Pet Partners, Inc. The volunteer animal-handler teams are registered to visit a variety of settings such as...

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As QCC students geared up for final exams, a peak stress time, Disability Services arranged for PAWS for People to visit campus before exams began. PAWS for People is affiliated with Tufts University’s Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine and is a Community Partner of Pet Partners, Inc. The volunteer animal-handler teams are registered to visit a variety of settings such as campuses, libraries, elder-care facilities, and hospitals. This April, PAWS for a Study Break, brought registered therapy dogs, cats, and a miniature horse to campus.

This spring, due to inclement weather, the program was held inside the Fuller Student Center. Students were delighted to sit on the floor next to the dogs, petting their fur and rubbing their heads. Autumn the cat was fine with being held by different students while Gypsy, the miniature horse, was the biggest surprise for many students who exclaimed over her petite size. Many students posed for “selfies” with their new friends.

The following week, the weather was nicer, and Angel Hair Alpacas came to visit outside the Fuller Student Center. Students were very excited to pet their coats and ask questions of owners Jay Cohen and Maureen Agley who brought two adult alpacas, Acorn and Sargon, from their farm in North Grafton. Students were encouraged to touch their dense fur and feed the alpacas from their hands. Several brave students tried this and were surprised to find how soft the alpaca lips felt against their skin. The Cohen’s son Jamie attends QCC, and came by for a quick visit between classes. 

Thank you to Deb Gibbs, Program Coordinator at Tufts University, for coordinating animal-handler teams for this visit. Additionally, thank you to Angel Hair Alpacas for a well-received visit to campus and educating us on the nuances of alpacas.  Moreover, thank you Michael Beane, Director of Student Life and Leadership and his staff for hosting all the animals at the Fuller Student Center!  Disability Services staff who contribute to this program each semester are Kristie Proctor, Director, and Terri Rodriguez, Associate Director, of Disability Services

  • Denim Day signed shirts
  • Denim Day attendees
  • Denim Day signed jeans
April, 2017
April, 2017

QCC hosted Denim Day to bring awareness to Sexual Awareness Month and the issue of sexual assault on college campuses.

Students were invited to wear jeans with a purpose on April 26, when QCC Campus Police sponsored Sexual Assault Awareness Day.

Many students came out, as well as QCC President Gail Carberry, wearing a denim jacket, to sign a pledge and discuss the importance of...

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QCC hosted Denim Day to bring awareness to Sexual Awareness Month and the issue of sexual assault on college campuses.

Students were invited to wear jeans with a purpose on April 26, when QCC Campus Police sponsored Sexual Assault Awareness Day.

Many students came out, as well as QCC President Gail Carberry, wearing a denim jacket, to sign a pledge and discuss the importance of awareness about misconceptions and misinformation about rape and sexual assault.

April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month. The two events are intended to draw attention to the fact that rape and sexual assault remains a serious issue in our society and harmful attitudes about rape and sexual assault allow these crimes to persist and allow victim/survivors to be re-victimized; and “Sexual Assault Awareness Month” and “Denim Day” were also instituted to call attention to the problem that many in society remain disturbingly uninformed with respect to issues of assault and forcible rape.

The event was held to help communicate the message that there is “no excuse and never an invitation to rape.”

QCC Campus Police also recently held a self-defense class, RAD, (Rape, Assault Defense) Class, with QCC Police Officer Catherine Dixon. The four-session class was open to students, faculty, staff and family members. The free classes were conducted in the fall and spring. 

  • QCC campus police officers
  • QCC campus police officers speak at panel
April, 2017
April, 2017

The “Who We Are and What We Do: Opportunities for Inclusion” Panel was part of QCC’s Diversity Week, a week for QCC to celebrate its diversity and raise awareness.

The panel discussion included several Worcester community leaders, such as Sharon McQueen, a LGBTQ Liaison Officer from the Worcester Police Department and Lt. Catherine Dixon, the Community Outreach Officer from...

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The “Who We Are and What We Do: Opportunities for Inclusion” Panel was part of QCC’s Diversity Week, a week for QCC to celebrate its diversity and raise awareness.

The panel discussion included several Worcester community leaders, such as Sharon McQueen, a LGBTQ Liaison Officer from the Worcester Police Department and Lt. Catherine Dixon, the Community Outreach Officer from the QCC Campus Police, who spoke about their professional and personal journeys to their current positions. QCC Board of Trustees member Miguel A. Lopez, a lieutenant in the Worcester Police Department and QCC alumni, also participated in the panel.

Following the panel, held on April 5, there was further discussion panel, “What Makes You Unique,” where students could discuss the culture at QCC, their personal hobbies, what their religion means to them and share their own journeys in life.

Kelly Lamond, Program Assistant for Student Life at QCC, said the room was packed in the Fuller Student Center and the engaging conversation from the inclusion panel continued into the next panel discussion. She said students discussed everything from what it means to be a Muslim woman at QCC to anime and gaming culture, to social stigma surrounding tattoos. 

  • Psych Fest Speaker
  • Psych Fest Speaker
  • Psych Fest performers
  • Psych Fest performers
April, 2017
April, 2017

The Psi Beta Honor Society hosted its annual Psych Fest in April. The event features spoken word, music performances and more.

The event benefits YOU Inc.’s substance abuse treatment program for adolescents.

The Psi Beta Honor Society and Psychology Club host the event, which was on April 7 in Hebert Auditorium.

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The Psi Beta Honor Society hosted its annual Psych Fest in April. The event features spoken word, music performances and more.

The event benefits YOU Inc.’s substance abuse treatment program for adolescents.

The Psi Beta Honor Society and Psychology Club host the event, which was on April 7 in Hebert Auditorium.

  • Stand Against Racism attendees
  • Stand Against Racism panel
  • Stand Against Racism speakers
  • Stand Against Racism banner
April, 2017
April, 2017

In an effort to support immigrants and refugees in the college community, QCC hosted an event and discussions to combat racism.

On Friday, April 28, QCC worked with the YWCA to host an event taking a Stand Against Racism. The topic of the event was “Immigration and Race in Our Communities,” and the day included two panel discussions, a lunch and the showing of a film. The discussions were to...

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In an effort to support immigrants and refugees in the college community, QCC hosted an event and discussions to combat racism.

On Friday, April 28, QCC worked with the YWCA to host an event taking a Stand Against Racism. The topic of the event was “Immigration and Race in Our Communities,” and the day included two panel discussions, a lunch and the showing of a film. The discussions were to explore the realities facing immigrants, refugees and transnational migrants in Central Massachusetts.

The first panel discussion, “Our Stories,” included QCC students, faculty and staff speaking about their experiences as newcomers to the United States. The second panel discussion, “Realities, Supports, Resources,” included local area service providers and immigrant advocates who shared information and practical resources.

In between the panels, lunch was provided and there was a showing of the film, Ni Aqui, Ni Alla (Neither Here, Nor There), by Gabriela Bortolamedi, about the challenges faced by an undocumented college student and her family.

Students, faculty and staff can show their support by wearing a Stand Against Racism wristband, signifying their commitment to promoting peace, justice, freedom and dignity for all people. The wristbands will be distributed in locations around campus, or you may obtain one by calling ext. 4368 or stopping by the President’s Ofiice, room 132A

For the fifth year in a row, there will be a Stand Against Racism banner available for signing. Students were able to sign the banner at the events on April 28, and it was also available for signing in the Healthcare and Workforce Development Center earlier that week.

For further information, contact the Diversity Caucus Chairman Trent Masiki at tmasiki [at] qcc.mass.edu or SAR Project Leader Anne Shull at ashull [at] qcc.mass.edu

  • students in authentic cultural garb
  • student at Cultural Fest
  • students in authentic cultural garb
  • students at Cultural Fest
April, 2017
April, 2017

The Cultural Festival was held on April 5 as part of QCC’s Diversity Week, which was sponsored by the QCC Student Life Office. It included a Cultural Food Fest with different cultural food examples.

Community-based cultural events bring people together in many ways to express their ideas, traditions and values. The event had tunes by DJ Sprino, who played music from around the world; Indian dancers,...

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The Cultural Festival was held on April 5 as part of QCC’s Diversity Week, which was sponsored by the QCC Student Life Office. It included a Cultural Food Fest with different cultural food examples.

Community-based cultural events bring people together in many ways to express their ideas, traditions and values. The event had tunes by DJ Sprino, who played music from around the world; Indian dancers, origami instruction, and a henna artist. Kelly Lamond, Program Assistant for Student Life at QCC, said about 200-250 students stopped by to try various foods and enjoy the events. 

Diversity Week, from April 3-5, also included movie screenings of Selma, about the civil rights movement and the march from Selma to Montgomery; Tickling Giants, about an Egyptian satirical show that has been compared to The Daily Show; and The Out List, a documentary film that features a diverse cross-section of accomplished leaders from entertainment, business, sports and public service sharing stories about their childhood, understanding gender and sexuality and building careers while out and reflecting on the challenges facing the LGBT community. 

The events were sponsored by the Office of Student Life and the Diversity Caucus, in partnership with other student clubs and organizations.

  • Children’s School Art Show entry
  • Children’s School Art Show entry
  • Children’s School Art Show entry
  • Children’s School Art Show entry
  • Children’s School Art Show entry
April, 2017
April, 2017

Children’s School students get to show off their creativity and hard work at the QCC Children’s School Art Show.

The art show opening was held April 25, during the Week of the Young Child. This is the eighth year the Children’s School has held the popular event.

“It was a wonderful event, children, parents and grandparents and more attended to see the children’s art work,...

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Children’s School students get to show off their creativity and hard work at the QCC Children’s School Art Show.

The art show opening was held April 25, during the Week of the Young Child. This is the eighth year the Children’s School has held the popular event.

“It was a wonderful event, children, parents and grandparents and more attended to see the children’s art work,” said Janet McKeon, Associate Director of the Children’s School at QCC. “It is a great way to showcase the children’s creativity. The children get so excited to show their work.”

The artwork is on display in the hallways and classrooms, for QCC students and faculty to visit. “People walk by and say how much they love the art,” Ms. McKeon said.

There also was a slide show video shown of the students creating and working on their art shown at the opening. Light refreshments were served. Art work includes table and easel paintings, 3-D art with foam, wood and metals. Various other art with water colors, 3-D chalk, tempera paint, and bio colors used with different instruments on a variety of surfaces such as foil, filters, canvas and paper were hung in the hallways and room 107A.

In Classroom I, children helped create a kindness tree. It was a collaborative piece, children were involved in decorating the tree, and then classroom teachers would write down when the children used kind words and kind gestures and post it on the tree. The exercise was part of the curriculum and helping children learn to be kinder to others.

There are 51 children enrolled in the Children’s School. The Children’s School provides full-day programs open to students enrolled in the college with children ages two years and nine months to five years old, as well as to member of the college and community. The school also serves as a training site for students in the Early Childhood Education Program.

This event is made possible by the dedication of the teachers, faculty and ECE students. Other college departments such as Food Services, Facilities and the Print Shop support this event. The Art Exhibit would not be successful without our young artists and their family and extended family members.

For more information about the Quinsigamond Children’s School, visit the Children's School website, contact Director Nancy Knight at nknight [at] qcc.mass.edu or call 508.854.4220. 

April, 2017
April, 2017

Quinsigamond Community College, in association with Fitchburg State University, presented “12 Angry Jurors,” a powerful play about the American legal system.

Margaret Wong, Professor of English at QCC, said the production was superb. “The actors completely inhabited their respective roles. With most productions, to enjoy a play, audience members generally have to make a...

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Quinsigamond Community College, in association with Fitchburg State University, presented “12 Angry Jurors,” a powerful play about the American legal system.

Margaret Wong, Professor of English at QCC, said the production was superb. “The actors completely inhabited their respective roles. With most productions, to enjoy a play, audience members generally have to make a concerted effort to maintain a suspension of disbelief. With this performance, however, audience members had to constantly remind themselves that they were watching a play. There were many moments that I wanted to spring from my seat to argue against the bigotry of Juror No. 10 or lend a supportive word to Juror No. 8.”

She said the play’s contents were timely and relevant. The play, written by Reginald Rose, was made into a movie in 1957 “12 Angry Men” and was viewed as a powerful indictment of the trial by jury system.

Victor Somma, Assistant Vice President of Extended Campuses Operations and Community Engagement at QCC, said the QCC Theatre Club performed a stunning rendering of the play.

“You are in the room with the jurors, almost making you want to be part of their decision process. Guilty or not guilty? You will be surprised!”

Performances were held on April 27, 28 and 29 at 7:30 p.m. in the Harrington Learning Center.

The play was directed by Nick Wakely, adjunct professor of theatre production at QCC.

Special thanks to Quinsigamond Community College President Gail Carberry, Dean of Humanities Clarence Ates and Karole Hager, Director of Auxiliary Services, QCC Public Safety. From Fitchburg State University, the production wants to thank University President Richard Lapidus, Communications Media Chairperson Mary Baker, Head of Theatre Kelly Morgan, Denise Alexander and Peter Anderregg, Manager of the Fitchburg Law Library.

The production also wants to thank the Reginald Rose Foundation. 

  • six students win $50 gift certificates
April, 2017
April, 2017

Six students won $50 gift certificates to the QCC Bookstore as part of a Priority Registration raffle. The winners are:

  • Rebecca Fisher
  • Pria Nesta
  • Pamela Corriveau
  • Ashley Blackman
  • Edward Mugaragu
  • Joseph Diaz Rentas
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Six students won $50 gift certificates to the QCC Bookstore as part of a Priority Registration raffle. The winners are:

  • Rebecca Fisher
  • Pria Nesta
  • Pamela Corriveau
  • Ashley Blackman
  • Edward Mugaragu
  • Joseph Diaz Rentas
  • General Registration Postcard
April, 2017
April, 2017

QCC has several new testimonials and commercials coming out to showcase different opportunities at the college. The Marketing Office has been working on new materials, such as summer and fall semester postcards, a new 2017 enrollment guide and area of study brochures.

Those interested in finding out more about the QCC community can also check out the ...

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QCC has several new testimonials and commercials coming out to showcase different opportunities at the college. The Marketing Office has been working on new materials, such as summer and fall semester postcards, a new 2017 enrollment guide and area of study brochures.

Those interested in finding out more about the QCC community can also check out the Wyvern TV page.

You also can watch episodes of Face the Region, a weekly show about QCC events, organizations and offerings on QCC's Face the Region page.

All new brochures have been created about Student Life, Disability Services, financial aid, testing, tutoring and more. These can be seen online on the marketing collateral section.

The new commercials and testimonials have information about transfer opportunities; how QCC supports careers with flexible schedules, online courses and different locations; and how QCC supports students through career counseling and financial aid. They will be broadcast throughout the region on television and the web.

With more than 100 degree and certificate programs, full- and part-time course options, online courses, transfer paths to four-year colleges and financing options, QCC has something to offer everyone.

April, 2017
April, 2017

We are very pleased to announce the following full-time staff update:

On April 24, 2017, Administrative Services welcomed Dillon George in to a new role as Campus Police Officer I. Mr. George brings to this position a passion for law enforcement. He has a license to carry in Massachusetts, is CPR and AED certified and he is a graduate of the Worcester Police Department Academy’s basic...

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We are very pleased to announce the following full-time staff update:

On April 24, 2017, Administrative Services welcomed Dillon George in to a new role as Campus Police Officer I. Mr. George brings to this position a passion for law enforcement. He has a license to carry in Massachusetts, is CPR and AED certified and he is a graduate of the Worcester Police Department Academy’s basic training course for police officers. Mr. George earned a Bachelor’s of Science in Criminal Justice with a focus in Forensic Criminology from Anna Maria College.

Please join us in welcoming Mr. George into his new roles at QCC. 

March, 2017

  • Dr. Luis Pedraja
  • Dr. Luis Pedraja
  • Dr. Luis Pedraja
March, 2017
March, 2017

Quinsigamond Community College Board of Trustees has named Dr. Luis Pedraja as its pick to succeed President Dr. Gail Carberry when she retires at the end of the school year.

Dr. Pedraja’s nomination now must be approved by the state Board of Higher Education, which is scheduled to vote on his appointment in May.

Dr. Pedraja visited the West Boylston Street...

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Quinsigamond Community College Board of Trustees has named Dr. Luis Pedraja as its pick to succeed President Dr. Gail Carberry when she retires at the end of the school year.

Dr. Pedraja’s nomination now must be approved by the state Board of Higher Education, which is scheduled to vote on his appointment in May.

Dr. Pedraja visited the West Boylston Street campus as part of the interview process in March.

“I am deeply honored to have been chosen as Quinsigamond’s next president,” he said. “(My wife) Leigh and I truly enjoyed the warm welcome we received during our visit and are excited to join such a wonderful college and community.”

As a child, Dr. Pedraja emigrated from Cuba and grew up in a low-income Miami neighborhood. He became the first in his family to attend college; and he later earned a Ph.D. from the University of Virginia.

Currently, Dr. Pedraja serves as Interim Vice Chancellor of Academic Affairs for California’s 35,000-student Peralta Community College District, where he leads faculty, staff, and administrators to develop innovative programs and ensure student success. The district includes four colleges.

From 2011-2016, Dr. Pedraja was Provost and Vice President of Academic Affairs at Antioch University Los Angeles, a non-profit institution serving adult students with bachelor degree completion and professional graduate programs. His career has also included teaching stints at the University of Puget Sound and Southern Methodist University.

“During my visit, I could tell that Quinsigamond’s faculty and staff share my commitment to helping students succeed. I am confident that through our efforts we can continue to serve our community with distinction; and that we can achieve national recognition as a leader in ensuring student success for all our students, specifically first-generation and low-income students.”

Learn more about the presidential search and Dr. Pedraja’s qualifications on the Presidential Search page.
 

March, 2017
March, 2017

Julie de Oliveira, who is studying liberal arts at Quinsigamond Community College, recently had a poem published in Acentos Review.

Born and raised in Worcester, Ms. de Oliveira, 20, writes short stories and poetry that bring light to silenced voices of Brazilian immigrants and the fairly recent phenomena of the Brazilian diaspora in America and finding their identity within the U.S. Latino...

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Julie de Oliveira, who is studying liberal arts at Quinsigamond Community College, recently had a poem published in Acentos Review.

Born and raised in Worcester, Ms. de Oliveira, 20, writes short stories and poetry that bring light to silenced voices of Brazilian immigrants and the fairly recent phenomena of the Brazilian diaspora in America and finding their identity within the U.S. Latino community.

“I don’t see many Brazilian writers in the Latin climate, and I think it is important to create a space for that, to write about the Brazilian diaspora.”

Her parents immigrated to the United States when her mother was pregnant with her in 1995. “My parents didn’t get a green card until 2008, and that was the first time they were able to go back to Brazil to visit since leaving. I have been to Brazil a handful of time, and I have a very big family there that I keep in close contact with,” she said.

“My writing is largely influenced by members of the Brazilian community, I consider them my family more so than my actual family members in Brazil. Their stories are all different, but they still share a similar connection, of being displaced in a way. Many of them are unable to go back home to their families because of their immigration status, they are alone without access to resources like welfare or health insurance because of lack of documentation. They are the strongest people I know.”

She will be graduating in May with an associate’s degree in liberal arts. She plans to pursue a bachelor’s degree in English with a concentration in Latin American/Latino studies.

When she was taking a poetry class with Professor Trent Masiki, he encouraged her to submit her poems to various literary publications. One of her poems “Saudade” was published in the Acentos Review, a quarterly literary and arts journal that promotes and publishes LatinX work.

From her powerful poem “Saudade”:

We yearn to find the word for saudade in
English, because the definition
Of nostalgia can't come close.
We don't miss our home, but rather,
Brazil is missing from us.

“I was so excited, that was the first time I was published,” she said. “I obsess over my poems, there is a lot of editing involved.”

She said she became interested in journaling after her younger brother passed away in 2012. She then used her journaling for prose and structured poems, and uses entries to inspire her poetry.

“He was only 18 months old when he passed away a week after my 16th birthday,” Ms. De Oliveira said. “He was the only sibling I had. I’m very grateful for the time, albeit short, that I had with him.”

Ms. De Oliveira graduated from Burncoat High School in 2014. “I decided to attend QCC to give me more time to think about what I wanted to do next,” she said. “I wanted to explore my options.”

She works full-time as a receptionist at a psychiatric clinic. “At QCC, I could be more flexible with my schedule,” she said. She has taken night courses and online courses as well as day classes.

She said she has really enjoyed her classes at QCC, especially a Humanities class with Michael Gormley, assistant professor of English, where she could be creative with her work. She took two creative writing classes with John Stazinski, associate professor of English, who she said gave her space to work with her stories and improve her writing.

March, 2017
March, 2017

Members of the Alpha Zeta Theta Chapter recently attended the New England Regional PTK Conference in Concord, New Hampshire. Quinsigamond Community College PTK President Kimberly May, Vice President of Leadership Ethan O’Connell and lead faculty advisor Bonnie Coleman attended the event. The chapter received many outstanding awards, which included:

    ...
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Members of the Alpha Zeta Theta Chapter recently attended the New England Regional PTK Conference in Concord, New Hampshire. Quinsigamond Community College PTK President Kimberly May, Vice President of Leadership Ethan O’Connell and lead faculty advisor Bonnie Coleman attended the event. The chapter received many outstanding awards, which included:

  • Honors in Action Most Distinguished Chapter
  • Most Distinguished Chapter in New England Region (56 chapters)
  • College Project Award – Most Distinguished
  • Honors in Action Distinguished Theme Award – Theme 7 Innovation and Replication

“This was a team effort and without the support of our QCC Family this would not have happened,” said Ms. Coleman.

The College Project recognized was the Live & Learn Greenhouse Project on the QCC campus. Ms. Coleman said construction will be underway this spring, and they hope to have the greenhouse up and running in May, depending on the weather.

A $16,500 grant will partially fund the greenhouse, where students will grow vegetables and plants. Ms. Coleman said they plan to start with herbs, cucumbers and tomatoes and then add new items each season. There also will be a “Plant A Seed’ project with the Early Childhood Education program, where children can come in to plant a seed and watch it grow.

PTK is accepting donations of pots, potting soil, seeds, shelving, lighting or cash donations. The students will be working with a botanist, who is a part-time faculty member, to learn more about the process.

The mission of the Live & Learn Greenhouse Project is to renew connections between people and the natural environment, create a resource of healthy, nutrient-rich food for the Quinsigamond Community College community, and provide an educational resource for students, faculty, staff, and children.

Different students and programs will be able to use the greenhouse and learn more about various growing methods, such as hydroponics, to raise awareness about the natural environment. Plans are to start construction soon and then in spring 2017 bring on faculty that want to be involved.

The idea came about because of food insecurity on campus. According to Higher Education Today, many college students struggle with food insecurity. This can be especially true at community colleges, where many students are non-traditional age. Feeding America, a national nonprofit network of food banks that provides food assistance to 46.5 million individuals and 15.5 million households, estimates that nearly half (49.3 percent) of its clients in college must choose between educational expenses (i.e., tuition, books and supplies, rent) and food annually, and that 21 percent did so for a full 12 months.

Ms. Coleman said they plan for it to be a four-season greenhouse. They also plan to grow poinsettias in the future, to be sold to raise money for the project.

PTK also is in the second year of an ongoing campaign to support children’s literacy through the Worcester mobile library, bookmobile “Lilly.” With the support of the QCC Foundation, the chapter pledged to raise $100,000 to fund the continued operation of the Worcester Public Library bookmobile, which visits schools and community events.

The chapter recently donated $20,000 as part of the campaign. QCC partnered with Worcester State and the United Way of Massachusetts last spring for the makeover effort.

The purpose of Phi Theta Kappa is to recognize and encourage scholarship among two-year college students. To achieve this purpose, Phi Theta Kappa provides opportunity for the development of leadership and service, for an intellectual climate for exchange of ideas and ideals, for lively fellowship for scholars, and for stimulation of interest in continuing academic excellence.

Membership is by invitation only, to be invited the student must have a cumulative grade point average of 3.5 with 16 college credits earned at Quinsigamond Community College. Invitations are sent out in the fall and spring semesters.

QCC’s chapter has 488 active members. On April 5, PTK will host the induction of new members, welcome 188 new members, the largest induction in the history of the chapter.

Ms. Coleman will be attending the national PTK conference in Nashville, Tenn., along with outgoing PTK President Kimberly May, Vice President of Leadership Ethan O’Connell, and chapter officers Stephanie Collins and Tony Sanders. The conference will be April 6-9.

March, 2017
March, 2017

When Kimberly May began her journey at Quinsigamond Community College, she was employed full-time at Reliant Medical Group, but for her to move forward in her career, she realized she would need to pursue a higher education. Becoming a student at QCC not only led to more career opportunities, but also led to leadership roles.

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When Kimberly May began her journey at Quinsigamond Community College, she was employed full-time at Reliant Medical Group, but for her to move forward in her career, she realized she would need to pursue a higher education. Becoming a student at QCC not only led to more career opportunities, but also led to leadership roles.

Kimberly May

Having held supervisory roles in both her current and past jobs, she felt capable of performing in an upper level management position. However, she was faced with the fact that she lacked a degree. Having been turned down twice in her pursuit to obtain a higher position was what ultimately catapulted her to initiate the first step towards her higher educational journey.

 “I was fearful when I first came to QCC as a non-traditional student,” said the 45-year-old mother of two. “I suffered from reading comprehension issues during my primary and secondary years, which impacted my academic performance and often resulted in having to memorize concepts in order to perform well on exams. I was an average student who struggled.”

Upon coming to QCC, she took advantage of the services offered, such as the math lab. “I was motivated once I got here, but as soon as I began obtaining good grades, that motivated me further. As a result of my tireless efforts, I got invited to the Commonwealth Honors program and began taking honors level courses.”

Ms. May has been named a “29 Who Shine” scholar by the state of Massachusetts.

Since 2011, the state Department of Higher Education has named an annual list of outstanding graduates from the Commonwealth’s public higher education system. The winners will be celebrated at a ceremony at the Statehouse in Boston in May. Award winners are selected on the basis of their academic success as well as their records of leadership and community service.

“It has been a truly humbling experience,” she said. “I was surprised to learn I was named the recipient of this award, and I was proud of how well I performed as a non-traditional student. It goes to show that hard work really does pay off.”

During her tenure, she was involved in the TRiO Student Support Services program, a federally funded program that provides support and services to students, enabling them to achieve their academic and career goals. She was an officer of the Alpha Zeta Theta Chapter of Phi Theta Kappa, an international honor society, as well as a member of Psi Beta Honor Society for Psychology.

She originally started part-time, but became a full-time student when she entered the nursing program. While in the program, she was the Liaison for the Workforce and Development Center, a new position that was created to support PTK at the downtown campus.

But in 2015, her world was turned upside down when her 23-year-long marriage unraveled and she suffered a traumatic experience that would have an impact her schooling. “I was devastated after getting eliminated from the nursing program as a result of all the adversities that I faced. However, the support and encouragement that I received from Bonnie Coleman (faculty advisor for PTK), the members of the chapter, faculty members and from my family and friends acted as a vehicle, and motivated me to continue my studies. QCC, and PTK in particular, has been like a second family for me,” she said. “I am so grateful for all the opportunities that have been afforded to me. As a child, I was a shy individual, but the training I have received through PTK has really helped me grow personally and professionally.”

Ms. May will graduate this spring with two degrees, an associate’s degree in general studies, and an associate’s degree in general studies healthcare. She plans to transfer her credits to Northeastern University to pursue a bachelor’s degree in healthcare management.

Ms. May received scholarships through the QCC Foundation, the Paul Connell Memorial Scholarship and the Alumni Scholarship. She was also named a Women of Distinction for 2015.

“Kimberly May deserves this award because of her dedication to our chapter and our school,” Ms. Coleman said. “Kim has high academic achievement and has been a leader throughout this year in our chapter. She embraces every situation, good or bad, as a way of learning. I am extremely grateful for Kim, she has been an inspiration to all our members and her officer team.”

Being involved in PTK has led to some unique experiences, such as being on the Hank Stolz radio show, Face the Region, and filming a QCC video commercial.

“I chose to become president of PTK and devote a year of selfless service to the members of the chapter and the school, because I wanted to say thank you for all the support and encouragement that I received, not only when at my lowest ebb, but all throughout my journey,” she said.

She has been involved in the fundraising efforts to support “Lilly,” Worcester Public Library’s newest bookmobile, which visits area schools and family events. “It is a very important project,” she said. “Due to budget constraints, a lot of schools in the Worcester area no longer have libraries, so a lot of children don’t have access to library books. In Worcester, statistics show that roughly 59% of students entering the fourth grade are not reading with proficiency.”

In 2014, PTK voted to help sustain Lilly with a pledge of $100,000 over three years. The pledge is supported by the QCC Foundation.

She also has been involved with the Live & Learn Greenhouse initiative, a gardening project that aims to renew the connections between people and the natural environment, provide healthy, nutrient-rich food for the Quinsigamond Community College community, and will serve as an educational tool for students, faculty, staff and children.

“The most rewarding part of serving in a leadership capacity is the ability to cultivate new leaders and inspire others,” she said. “We’ve seen tremendous growth in our chapter this academic year, as a result of the officer team’s efforts to increase awareness here on campus.”

She will be attending the international PTK leadership conference in Nashville, Tenn., in April, where she has been bestowed the honor of representing the state of Massachusetts as flag bearer during the Parade of Flags Ceremony.

Ms. May will be the first in her family to graduate with a professional degree. She has two children, Colleen, 20, and Brianna, 23, both of whom reside in Massachusetts.

March, 2017
March, 2017

A QCC student was named one of the finalists in the College Poetry Competition.

The Worcester County Poetry Association hosted a College Poetry Competition Finalists Reading on Sunday, April 2, at the Worcester Public Library.

Julie de Oliveira was one of eight finalists named to read. The judges for the event were Jenith Charpentier and Michael Fisher.

She submitted three...

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A QCC student was named one of the finalists in the College Poetry Competition.

The Worcester County Poetry Association hosted a College Poetry Competition Finalists Reading on Sunday, April 2, at the Worcester Public Library.

Julie de Oliveira was one of eight finalists named to read. The judges for the event were Jenith Charpentier and Michael Fisher.

She submitted three unpublished poems for the competition. “I wasn’t expecting to be a finalist,” she said. “It has motivated me to look at other literary magazines to submit my work.”

At the reading, she won the Manuscript Prize. One of the three poems she submitted will be published in the Fall 2017 issue of The Worcester Review.

Ms. de Oliveira, 20, recently had a story published in the Acentos Review, a quarterly literary and arts journal that promotes and publishes LatinX work.

She will graduate from QCC in May with an Associate Degree in liberal arts. She plans to pursue a Bachelor’s Degree in English with a concentration in Latin American/Latino studies.

See related story here.