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Students Become Workforce Ready with Industry Certifications

January, 2020
  • Students in Assistant Professor Lee Duerden's (far right) classes who received either MACWIC Level 1 or Level 2 Certifications.
    Students in Assistant Professor Lee Duerden's (far right) classes who received either MACWIC Level 1 or Level 2 Certifications.
  • MACWIC Level 1 receipients
    MACWIC Level 1 receipients from left: Maxwell Karg, Cameron Forbes-LeBeau, Kirkland Conill, Ryan O'Bara and Lee Cozzens.

In late December a group of advanced manufacturing students received certificates for passing either the Level 1 or Level 2 of the Manufacturing Advancement Center Workforce Innovation Collaborative (MACWIC) credentialing/certification program. This MACWIC credentialing is a stackable system that continues to build on students’ manufacturing skill sets as they advance through the various levels. The credentialing plays a big part in QCC’s advanced manufacturing program and gives students a great foundation for when they enter the workforce. The College has been using this credentialing system for over four years.

Students who have completed MACWIC Level 1, have demonstrated the fundamental skills to work in a production environment. The certification shows that students are competent with basic mathematical skills, can use precision measurement equipment, and can interpret technical information from a blueprint. Additionally, they are aware of general safety protocols in place for most manufacturing companies.

“Students who have completed MACWIC Level 2, provide employers with the confidence that these individuals can set up and run CNC machines and can understand and write the CNC code at a beginner’s level,” said Assistant Professor of Manufacturing Technology, Lee Duerden. “These individuals are also knowledgeable with LEAN concepts and understand how important continuous improvement and quality is to the profitability and success of a company. They also have a more advanced knowledge of blueprint reading and can handle more complex problem solving techniques.”

To learn more, visit QCC’s manufacturing programs.

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