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December, 2020

  • QCC Practical Nursing students administer COVID-19 vaccines to Harrington Hospital frontline workers.
  • At Southbridge Armory practical nursing students become a part of history, administering COVID-19 vaccines to healthcare workers
  • QCC Practical Nursing students help keep our communities safe.
  • Practical nursing students prepare COVID-19 vaccines.
December, 2020

Quinsigamond Community College practical nursing students are becoming a part of history. On December 18, eight practical nursing students along with their instructors Margaret “Meg” Yoder, professor of Nurse Education, and faculty member Christian Ilustre helped administer approximately 100 COVID-19 vaccines to Harrington Hospital employees at the Southbridge Armory. They...

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Quinsigamond Community College practical nursing students are becoming a part of history. On December 18, eight practical nursing students along with their instructors Margaret “Meg” Yoder, professor of Nurse Education, and faculty member Christian Ilustre helped administer approximately 100 COVID-19 vaccines to Harrington Hospital employees at the Southbridge Armory. They worked with over a dozen Harrington nurses who also included a couple of QCC graduates, according to Professor Yoder.

Healthcare workers are the first to be vaccinated in the U.S. and Harrington employees who were vaccinated included doctors, nurses and other frontline workers at Harrington Healthcare and Harrington Physician Services.

“This is our community and having the opportunity to engage the practical nursing students in this historic moment, serving our community is immeasurable," said Professor Yoder. "The practical nursing students of the Class of 2021 are experiencing many firsts that will provide them with a resiliency unlike any other."

The QCC students not only administered the vaccine, they also performed intake assessments, gave educational information, and observed vaccine recipients post vaccination.

“Clinical experiences and opportunities are so important for all of our healthcare students. Harrington Hospital has been one of our most valuable partners during these past several months and we are honored to have been asked to assist at their COVID vaccine clinics,” said Dean of the School of Healthcare, Pat Schmohl. “Our practical nursing students are learning firsthand the importance of community based public health initiatives. We have procedures in place to keep our students safe while they are participating in these critical in-person clinical opportunities.”

"At a time when clinical placements are difficult to find, Harrington Hospital has remained committed to provide QCC students with face-to-face opportunities. We could not be more grateful," Professor Yoder added.

QCC students will continue to assist with the vaccination process throughout the remainder of the year and through April 2021.

"Encouraging service to our community is an integral piece of living QCC's mission, one of our core values. Today was just the beginning. All our students will be provided with this opportunity.  In the future, we will be administering the vaccine to front line workers, EMTs, police and fire, and high risk vulnerable populations,” Professor Yoder continued. "When the practical nursing students were presented with the opportunity, they echoed resoundingly... ‘Thank you!’"

Happy Holidays From QCC
December, 2020

This unprecedented year has certainly brought its share of challenges, yet through it all the determination and strength of the QCC community has been unwavering. As we head into 2021, may we all find peace and a renewed sense of purpose for a brighter future.  Happy Holidays! 

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This unprecedented year has certainly brought its share of challenges, yet through it all the determination and strength of the QCC community has been unwavering. As we head into 2021, may we all find peace and a renewed sense of purpose for a brighter future.  Happy Holidays! 

  • Hands-on learning is an important part of the educational experience at QCC.
December, 2020

Hands-on learning is an integral part of student success at QCC. Students who have the skill sets that enable them to hit the ground running in a new job are more valued when they enter the workforce. Thus, when the College transitioned to remote instruction due to the COVID-19 pandemic, many of the College’s programs developed in-home, hands-on learning modules for students to continue this important...

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Hands-on learning is an integral part of student success at QCC. Students who have the skill sets that enable them to hit the ground running in a new job are more valued when they enter the workforce. Thus, when the College transitioned to remote instruction due to the COVID-19 pandemic, many of the College’s programs developed in-home, hands-on learning modules for students to continue this important educational training.

“QCC is dedicated to providing quality education and this in-home learning module approach is a method that allows students hands-on experiences they would otherwise not be able to have in a remote environment,” said Betty Lauer, dean for the School of Business, Engineering & Technology.

Students in courses that ranged from electronics engineering technology to computer systems engineering technology, and food service, have been able to experience hands-on learning from the safety of their homes, mimicking activities they would have normally performed in an on-campus lab setting.  

“We have been reviewing our laboratory work to determine what projects can be done remotely, then modifying those projects so that students can do them at home. This is an iterative process to identify the best combinations of tasks and interaction levels for different students,” said Jacob Longacre, professor of Electronics Engineering Technology.

In some of QCC’s electronics courses, students received a learning module that included both instruments and components.  The components enabled students to build simple circuits and the instruments enabled them to make various electrical measurements. Students in the embedded microcontrollers course received components that included an Arduino programmable microcontroller, small electric motors, LEDs (single color and red-green-blue), pushbuttons, switches, a joystick, temperature sensors, and light sensors. 

“With these components students can unleash their creativity and build program projects that involve controlling light (blinking, flashing, fading, multicolor), sound, motion and temperature,” said James Heffernan, professor of Electronics Engineering Technology.

Other electronics students received “breadboards,” devices used to make up temporary circuits, as well as myDAQ, a Student Data Acquisition Device. The myDAQ is an interface that includes a comprehensive set of plug-and-play, computer-based lab instruments for hands-on student learning outside the lab.

“The myDAQ is a bit like a Swiss army knife and allows students to do a variety of problem solving and experimentation at home,” Mr. Longacre said.

In the food services programs, faculty and staff reviewed curriculum requirements and selected recipes for take-home learning modules, which demonstrated specific learning concepts and provided key academic knowledge and skills development.  The modules contained non-perishable food items, small kitchen tools and miscellaneous items to enable students to work from their homes. They were mailed to students, or students were able to pick them up at QCC at the Senior Center, where the College’s Hospitality Restaurant Management programs are housed. Students either obtained their own perishable food items or picked them up from QCC.

An example of a key learning concept in food service is the importance of cleaning protocols, required under ServSafe requirements. In the food service module, students received a “glow” powder that they sprinkled on a food prep surface they had cleaned. Then, using a mini black light also provided in the take home packet, they could see any particles that remained on the surface.

Additionally, during the upcoming Spring semester, manufacturing students will be taking certificate exams for Precision Measurement in Associate Professor Lee Duerden’s quality manufacturing course. The students will practice on measuring equipment they will receive in their “Metrology Tool Chest” that contains tools such as:

  • Tape measure
  • Rulers
  • Steel rules
  • Calipers
  • Micrometers
  • Combination sets
  • Dial Gages
  • Bore Gages

“QCC has been lucky to expand its capability and equipment in this area. Just packaging all this equipment up has proved challenging, but providing hands-on training is essential for the successful completion of this manufacturing course. It has been an incredible achievement from QCC and its faculty to provide this equipment that is so necessary to continue hands-on learning during this pandemic,” Mr. Duerden said, adding that the tool chests will be returned upon completion of the course.

“We expect to continue using this method of learning in the future. Students have really embraced the idea of learning in their own space and many students have excelled in this learning style environment,” Ms. Lauer said.

  • QCC 2018 graduate and PTK alumnae Cristina Picozzi
December, 2020

Phi Theta Kappa (PTK) Alumnae Cristina Picozzi (2018 General Studies -Public Health) has never forgotten the community that made her feel included. The adult learner PTK graduate found her calling and her people, thanks to QCC and its PTK Honor Society.

Recently, Ms. Picozzi reached out to PTK Advisor Bonnie Coleman to ask how she could help QCC students and their...

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Phi Theta Kappa (PTK) Alumnae Cristina Picozzi (2018 General Studies -Public Health) has never forgotten the community that made her feel included. The adult learner PTK graduate found her calling and her people, thanks to QCC and its PTK Honor Society.

Recently, Ms. Picozzi reached out to PTK Advisor Bonnie Coleman to ask how she could help QCC students and their families give back to a community that had given so much to her. Through her philanthropic outreach, she was able to pay for two PTK memberships for students who could not afford to pay the membership dues.  

“If we all do our part and use our privilege to support those around us, we can make tomorrow a bit better,” she said.

When contacted by the Guardian newsletter, Ms. Picozzi shared a bit of her own personal journey, which eventually led her to QCC.

What was your major at QCC and where did you go afterwards?

Like many QCC students, I was an adult learner when I studied public health at QCC. I had started my career in higher education fundraising, but my personal health journey steered me to take the leap and help others in a different way. At the time going back to school made sense, so that I could truly affect change. Today, I am a certified health coach and personal trainer, but I also have a master’s in nonprofit management.

Since completing my degree at QCC, I’ve focused on continuing to build my business as a health coach and personal trainer, using a public health framework. I partnered with the Town of Hudson offering workshops on nutrition and exercise last summer, and presented at Baystate Medical Center before the pandemic. This year, I started working as a health coach for a start-up along with my own business. I’m also finishing my prerequisites to apply for a Master of Public Health, concentrating in dietetics.

I know you were a part of PTK when you were at QCC. How was this helpful to you?

Everyone in PTK comes from all backgrounds and it is a great community that I believed I was lacking at the time. Bonnie and the PTK members quickly got me involved and helped me create the connections I wanted while being back at school.

Why did you decide to donate to PTK and help other students?

Like I mentioned, my background is higher education fundraising. My role as a fundraiser was specifically to bring in money for scholarships. Often we talk about how important college is, but only recently has there been more conversation about the cost and how that can create barriers. While I’ve worked hard, I know that I have privileges that others don’t. My hope by supporting students in this way is that there is one less barrier in their way as they focus on their future.

What were some of the important takeaways you got from attending QCC and being a part of PTK?

Don’t be afraid to ask for help. You’re absolutely encouraged to work hard, but it’s also OK to speak up and get to know your professors so they can help you when you’re stuck. They want to help you, if you’re willing to do the work too.

There are also staff members like Bonnie who are invested in you and want to see you succeed, but they can’t do it for you.

What would you tell someone who was considering attending QCC?

College is what you make of it. It’s understandable that adult learners and students who support their families don’t feel like they can get involved, but there is something for everyone. If you ask for help, if you create those connections, there is a family here at QCC to support you in tough times.

 

  • Paramedic student Maria Soja.
December, 2020

At Quinsigamond Community College, students are attaining their dreams for a higher education in less time through Credit for Prior Learning. By earning credit for life experience, students save time earning their degrees, as well as realize substantial tuition savings. In 2020, 1,472 credits were awarded to 310 students.

QCC’s Career Services and Credit for Prior Learning Office works with students...

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At Quinsigamond Community College, students are attaining their dreams for a higher education in less time through Credit for Prior Learning. By earning credit for life experience, students save time earning their degrees, as well as realize substantial tuition savings. In 2020, 1,472 credits were awarded to 310 students.

QCC’s Career Services and Credit for Prior Learning Office works with students to assist them in translating their life experiences into college credits. Students may earn college credit for acquired life experience in a variety of ways that include taking a challenge exam, having portfolio assessments, or through credentialing of prior certificates and trainings such as military service, firefighting academy and emergency medical technician training. Credit for Prior Learning offers a significant savings over QCC’s already affordable tuition rates. The program offers a savings of between $130-$205 per credit.

President Luis G. Pedraja, Ph.D. noted that these types of savings are extremely beneficial, particularly during a pandemic when many students are struggling to make ends meet. 

“While financial concerns may be exacerbated by the pandemic, credit for prior learning not only offers a way for students to save money, but also enables them to graduate earlier and enter the workforce sooner with less debt,” he said.

Student veteran Javier Viera spent 30 years serving in the Army before coming to QCC. During his first 12 years in the Army he worked as a combat engineer and the last 18 years as an Army recruiter. Mr. Viera was awarded 69 credits for prior learning, of which he used 35 credits for a human services degree.

As a former Army recruiter, Mr. Viera said he has always promoted and was aware of credit for prior learning, however, “... seeing it applied when I came to QCC was a great surprise,” he said.

Mr. Viera said that while he could have used the majority of his awarded credits for a general studies degree, he chose instead to use all applicable credits toward the human service degree he really wanted. His plan is to graduate from QCC in Fall 2021 and then work with veterans.

“I can’t say I wasn’t temped to go for a general studies degrees,” he said. “The applicability of my military time for credits blew me out of the water.”

“The Credit for Prior Learning program is a great way for students to take advantage of the knowledge they’ve gained over the years and have it pay off in a lucrative way,” Dr. Pedraja added.

To learn more, visit Credit for Prior Learning.

  • Free healthcare training delivers a clear pathway for students to enter the workforce.
December, 2020

Quinsigamond Community College's Center for Workforce Development and Continuing Education Center (CWDCE) is offering free, grant-funded Nurse Assistant/Home Health Aide and Administrative Medical Professional programs in 2021.

The free 120-hour Nurse Assistant/Home Health Aide Training program provides students with the necessary theory and entry-level skills to safely provide basic nursing assistant care...

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Quinsigamond Community College's Center for Workforce Development and Continuing Education Center (CWDCE) is offering free, grant-funded Nurse Assistant/Home Health Aide and Administrative Medical Professional programs in 2021.

The free 120-hour Nurse Assistant/Home Health Aide Training program provides students with the necessary theory and entry-level skills to safely provide basic nursing assistant care in a long-term care facility, acute care facility or home health care agency. Upon successful completion of the program, students will be eligible to take the Massachusetts Certified Nurse Assistant Competency Exam. A free virtual information session will be held January 5, 2021 via Zoom to learn more. Space is limited. For eligibility requirements or to reserve a seat in the information session, email QCC instructor Jo Sundin at jsundin [at] qcc.mass.edu. The program is funded through the Executive Office of Health and Human Services Nursing and Allied Health Initiative, SNAP Path to Work.

The Administrative Medical Professional program will prepare students for a career as a Medical Administrative Assistant in a variety of healthcare settings. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the projected employment growth rate for Medical Administrative Assistants from 2019 to 2029 is 19% more than the 4% average growth rate for all occupations. In QCC’s program, students will learn the roles and responsibilities of a healthcare team, interpersonal communication, medical records management and compliance with HIPAA, as well as diagnostic and procedural coding. The course will also include lessons in how to handle medical emergencies. After successfully completing the course, students are eligible to sit for the National Health Career Association’s (NHA) Certified Medical Administrative Assistant Certification Exam. QCC will be holding program classes remotely throughout 2021. To learn more, email Ms. Sundin at jsundin [at] qcc.mass.edu.

  • QCC alumnus Jorgo Gushi was instrumental in helping to get passed part-time student legislation.
December, 2020

As the Former QCC Student Government Association (SGA) President and Chair of the Student Advisory Council and Community Colleges Segmental Advisor to the Board of Higher Education, Jorgo Gushi is attune to the needs of community college students, most especially QCC students.

So it was an extremely proud moment for the recent QCC alumnus when he learned that the Massachusetts General Law...

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As the Former QCC Student Government Association (SGA) President and Chair of the Student Advisory Council and Community Colleges Segmental Advisor to the Board of Higher Education, Jorgo Gushi is attune to the needs of community college students, most especially QCC students.

So it was an extremely proud moment for the recent QCC alumnus when he learned that the Massachusetts General Law will now extend part-time students the same rights to serve as student trustees on college campuses as their full-time peers.

“ I consider this change a collaborative and personal achievement, since I coordinated this legislative campaign, along with my SAC members and the Massachusetts Association of Community Colleges,” Mr. Gushi said.

This is a big moment for QCC students, as 66% of the College’s students attend part-time, representing the majority of its student population. Nationally, more than 50% of community college students across the country are part-time students.

"I have encountered many full and part-time students with the will, leadership, skills and potential to contribute as student trustees and represent their peers in that role. Yet those part-time students were denied the opportunity to serve, represent and be represented because of their enrollment status,” Mr. Gushi said. “Part-time students who come from diverse backgrounds, bring a wealth of experience that other members of the Board of Trustees might not have. Their input will help institutions and the Board of Higher Education shape policies and programs that can better reflect and address the changing nature of the student population.”

Below is the news release that was drafted by the Massachusetts Student Advisory Council and issued by the Department of Higher Education on its behalf.

Budget signed by Governor Baker allows part-time college and university students to represent peers on campus Boards of Trustees

Boston, MA – December 15, 2020  – On Friday, December 11, Governor Charlie Baker signed the Fiscal Year 2021 (FY21) budget into law, making a change in state law that will allow the growing number of part-time students on public college and university campuses to serve as representatives of their student bodies. The outside section removed the requirement that students must be enrolled full-time to run for the elected position of student trustee, and this change creates new flexibility for public higher education institutions and the Department of Higher Education (DHE).

The change, championed by the Student Advisory Council (SAC) to the Massachusetts Board of Higher Education, will ensure equitable representation of student bodies, especially at the Commonwealth’s 15 community colleges where nearly 70% of students attend part-time.

“This change to the Massachusetts General Laws is a remarkable achievement for the Student Advisory Council and for the public higher education students of the Commonwealth,” said Jorgo Gushi, Chair of the Student Advisory Council and Community Colleges Segmental Advisor to the Board of Higher Education. “Part-time students, coming from diverse backgrounds, bring a wealth of experience that other members of the board of trustees might not have. Their input will help institutions and the BHE shape policies and programs that can better reflect and address the changing nature of the student population. Our students’ leadership is not related to their enrollment status.”

“I want to congratulate the Student Advisory Council for taking on this issue and succeeding in their efforts to advocate for this change,” said Carlos E. Santiago, Commissioner of Higher Education. “SAC’s hard work will be enormously beneficial in the years ahead, as it will allow a much broader population of students to become civically engaged in their college communities.”

The student trustee is a representative of the student body, elected annually, who serves on a public higher education institution’s board of trustees and helps make important decisions, including those pertaining to budget and personnel, which impact students and the community as a whole. Previously, a student hoping to run for the elected position was required to be a full-time undergraduate student. These part-time students were neither eligible to run for student trustee nor able to continue serving in their role if they dropped a course and were no longer enrolled full-time. Full-time status is 12 credits, or four courses on average.

“As a working mother and a student leader who was denied the opportunity to run for student trustee this fall due to part-time status, I am immensely proud to be part of this progressive action,” said Monica Bliss, Secretary and Public Relations Chair of the Student Advisory Council and President of Berkshire Community College’s Student Government Association. “Women can be wonderful mothers and successful student leaders. I am proof of that.”

The change to Massachusetts law will also increase opportunities for civic engagement among students of color who are more likely to attend part-time. Community colleges serve the largest population of students of color in the Massachusetts higher education system, with 66% of African American students, 62% of Latinx students, and 64% of Native American students attending on a part-time basis. The Student Advisory Council to the MA Board of Higher Education prioritized these issues surrounding equity and appropriate student representation for students on the Board of Trustees with the goal of achieving more equitable representation of public higher education’s increasingly diverse student bodies.

In December of 2019, Student Advisory Council members Caitlin Marotta and Lindzie White, respectively President and Vice President of Cape Cod Community College’s SGA, presented the Student Advisory Council with the idea of changing the law after struggling to find a student trustee who met the requirement.

"We are immensely proud of our student leaders at Cape Cod Community College and throughout the Commonwealth for working with our state legislators and addressing the eligibility of part-time students to serve as trustees," said John Cox, President of Cape Cod Community College. "By changing the law we are solving a significant equity issue. Many of our students are balancing the challenges of life with finances, family obligations and full-time jobs. We are now able to welcome these voices to the decision-making bodies of our colleges and universities. Their voices, at long last, will now be heard loud and clear."

The Massachusetts Student Advisory Council is composed of the SGA/Student Senate President and the student trustee from each of the 15 community colleges, nine state universities, and five campuses of the University of Massachusetts. The SAC, as a deliberative and recommending body to the Board of Higher Education, is empowered to make studies, reports and recommendations advocating for the rights, needs, interests and welfare of all students enrolled at public institutions in the Commonwealth.

 

 

December, 2020

The joy of the holiday season is often realized through song. So what does one do during a pandemic when social distancing makes it impossible for people to get together? Students in QCC's music programs didn't miss a beat in their quest to deliver holiday cheer to the QCC community for the holidays.

Under the direction of Professor of Music, José Castillo, music students came...

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The joy of the holiday season is often realized through song. So what does one do during a pandemic when social distancing makes it impossible for people to get together? Students in QCC's music programs didn't miss a beat in their quest to deliver holiday cheer to the QCC community for the holidays.

Under the direction of Professor of Music, José Castillo, music students came together on Zoom and sang a variety of holiday carols to bring a bit of holiday cheer in a year that was unlike any other. Please take a moment to listen to these talented students who took time out of their busy schedules to bring a bit of joy to us all. 

  • Blue Santa accepts a donation during the 2020 Stuff-A-Cruiser event.
  • Many in the QCC community stopped by to drop off a donation.
December, 2020

The College’s 2020 Stuff-A-Cruiser and Feed-A-Family event went off without a hitch as faculty, staff and members of the community came together to help those in need have a brighter holiday season. Captain Joseph Cecchi, aka “Blue Santa,” was on hand to accept donations and make sure everyone was following proper coronavirus/COVID-19 safety protocols.

This was the fifth year...

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The College’s 2020 Stuff-A-Cruiser and Feed-A-Family event went off without a hitch as faculty, staff and members of the community came together to help those in need have a brighter holiday season. Captain Joseph Cecchi, aka “Blue Santa,” was on hand to accept donations and make sure everyone was following proper coronavirus/COVID-19 safety protocols.

This was the fifth year the Stuff-A-Cruiser and Feed-A-Family event came together to help students and their families during the holiday season.

 “The QCC Campus Police Department and Police Academy partnered once again with Counseling and Wellness Services to make this event another success. I especially would like to thank Santa’s Head Elf 'Deputy Chief Reynaldo Rodriguez' for donating and volunteering his time during these events,” Captain Cecchi said.  “Everyone’s generous donations literally ‘stuffed the police cruiser’ with toys several times. I would have to say this year might have been one of the most important years so far, due to the current pandemic we are facing.”

For those unable to attend the Stuff-A-Cruiser event, toys, gifts and donations are still being accepted at the QCC Campus Police Station or by mail, addressed to “Blue Santa,” 670 West Boylston St. Worcester, MA 01606.

“It was amazing to see the importance of a positive community engagement and a rise in the amount of trust and confidence from the public, whom both the Police Department and Police Academy serve on a daily basis,” he added.

  • Assistant Professor of Human Services Anthony “Tony” Yeulenski works to make the season brighter for those less fortunate.
December, 2020

The holiday season often brings out the best in people, yet there are some who make community service a way of life and inspire us all to be better. Assistant Professor of Human Services Anthony “Tony” Yeulenski is one such person. Mr Yeulenski has quietly been helping the Webster-Dudley community as Unit Coordinator for the Webster-Dudley branch of the Salvation Army.

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The holiday season often brings out the best in people, yet there are some who make community service a way of life and inspire us all to be better. Assistant Professor of Human Services Anthony “Tony” Yeulenski is one such person. Mr Yeulenski has quietly been helping the Webster-Dudley community as Unit Coordinator for the Webster-Dudley branch of the Salvation Army.

Most everyone is familiar with the Salvation Army bell ringers, who come out each year during the holiday to raise money for those in need. However, this year has been particularly challenging for the non-profit organization due to the COVID-19 pandemic, as the need is greater and there are less volunteers. Yet there are people like Mr. Yeulenski who continue the fundraising efforts despite the challenges.

According to Professor of Human Resources Brenda Safford, his fundraising efforts have helped many including some recipients who were QCC students.

“This is Tony’s first year at QCC and he is truly an asset to our college and community. He is very humble about his work and community service. He is a great role model for our students in the Human Services Program, by teaching and showing them how to have compassion inside and outside of the classroom,” she said, adding, “Thank you, Tony for caring and sharing your compassion in the true spirit of giving.”

  • Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society
December, 2020

Since 1980, the Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society’s Alpha Zeta Theta Chapter has been making a difference in the lives of QCC students and the community. The Chapter is currently holding its membership drive until December 23, and students who have at least 12 credits of college level courses (level 100 or higher) and a cumulative GPA of 3.5 or greater are eligible to join.  

“Already 129 new...

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Since 1980, the Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society’s Alpha Zeta Theta Chapter has been making a difference in the lives of QCC students and the community. The Chapter is currently holding its membership drive until December 23, and students who have at least 12 credits of college level courses (level 100 or higher) and a cumulative GPA of 3.5 or greater are eligible to join.  

“Already 129 new members have registered since the end of September. By joining PTK, you build camaraderie with your fellow classmates, as well as participate in community service projects that make a real impact on the lives of others in our community,” said PTK Advisor Bonnie Coleman.

The Alpha Zeta Theta Chapter offers opportunities for personal growth, leadership skills, networking skills, soft skills for the workforce, scholarships and opportunities for deep thinking and researching for the bi-annual Honors Study Topic. Membership in PTK is for life. When you graduate as a PTK member, it’s recorded on your transcript. 

“This membership can have positive far-reaching impacts when it comes to transferring to a four-year institution and for prospective employers,” Ms. Coleman continued.

Members participate in numerous community service events each year that have included:

  • Lilly: The Worcester Public Library Bookmobile
  • Community Harvest Project
  • Veteran's Inc.
  • Friendly House of Worcester
  • Why Me & Sherry's House
  • Dana Farber Cancer Institute and The Jimmy Fund
  • Worcester Animal Rescue League
  • Rally Against Cancer
  • Habitat for Humanity
  • Central MA Housing Alliance
  • Convoy of Hope
  • Relay for Life

PTK is a national organization with hundreds of chapters throughout the country. Since its inception, QCC’s Alpha Zeta Theta Chapter has earned multiple national awards and was recognized nationally as one of Phi Theta Kappa's Most Distinguished Top 100 Chapters in 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, and 2017.

“I hope students will consider giving themselves an early holiday gift and register to become a PTK member,” Ms. Coleman said, adding, “The cost to join is a one-time membership fee of $85.”

For more information, visit PTK. To check on eligibility and register to join, email Ms. Coleman at bcoleman [at] qcc.mass.edu

  • Get a headstart toward your future by taking a Winter Intersession course.
December, 2020

Winter break is usually an opportunity to visit friends and enjoy quiet time at home with the family. It’s a chance to take a break from school, celebrate the holidays, attend holiday parties and relax... or at least it was. Winter break looks a little different this year, as do most things these days.

The past nine months have forced many of us to slow down, try new hobbies and find innovative ways to...

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Winter break is usually an opportunity to visit friends and enjoy quiet time at home with the family. It’s a chance to take a break from school, celebrate the holidays, attend holiday parties and relax... or at least it was. Winter break looks a little different this year, as do most things these days.

The past nine months have forced many of us to slow down, try new hobbies and find innovative ways to entertain ourselves. We bake, exercise, binge-watch Hulu, work in the yard, fix up the house, walk the dogs, play candy crush and make the best of what we have in front of us. If you’re a student (or even if you’re not), this might be the perfect time to try a Winter/Intersession class.

What’s Winter/Intersession? Winter/Intersession classes are full credit classes that run during the Winter break. These 2-week long classes save students time and money towards their degree or certificate. If you’re looking for a reason to go to your room, shut the door and escape from your quarantine buddies, Winter/Intersession could be the perfect opportunity.

Health science pre-nursing major Tracy Fiorello took her first Winter/Intersession course in January 2020. She said it was such a positive experience that she has chosen to take another intercession course this year. 

“I took English 101 over Winter/Intersession last year. The swiftness of the course helped me to cross off necessary classes in a shorter period-of-time. I recommend Winter/Intersession classes to everyone, because who wants to be in school forever,” she said.

Winter/Intersession classes at QCC are well-known in the area, not just for students already enrolled at QCC, but for students attending other colleges. The cost for a class at many of the other local or private schools can cost upwards of two to three times as much as a class at QCC. For these students, just taking a class or two at QCC transferring their credits can save hundreds, if not thousands of dollars. 

In the spirit of the holiday season and trying new things, maybe it’s time to send 2020 out on a classy note by starting 20201 with an Winter/Intersession course. Register today

  • Jennifer Bemis fills students in about the merits of QCC Mentoring at the Fall 2019 Club Rush event.
December, 2020

Research shows that college mentoring programs positively affect students’ success and graduate outcomes. According to a 2018 Gallup Alumni Survey," college graduates are almost two times more likely to be engaged at work if they had a mentor who encouraged them to pursue their goals and dreams."

The impact of mentors is undeniable. Today the need for mentors is even greater due to the...

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Research shows that college mentoring programs positively affect students’ success and graduate outcomes. According to a 2018 Gallup Alumni Survey," college graduates are almost two times more likely to be engaged at work if they had a mentor who encouraged them to pursue their goals and dreams."

The impact of mentors is undeniable. Today the need for mentors is even greater due to the challenges many community college students are now facing due to the coronavirus-COVID-19 pandemic. Some students have lost their jobs becoming housing and food insecure. Some are helping their own children with remote learning while they are also navigating their own remote learning.

QCC’s Mentoring Program has made a large impact in student success both academically and personally. The program provides a way for QCC students to connect with mentors and build positive relationships to support their college experience. Students will also develop employer desired skills, gain an understanding of workplace expectations and networking to increase their likelihood of finding a rewarding career.

“My mentor never gave up on me. This program empowers you not just as a student but as a person to overcome so many obstacles in your life that sometimes hold you back,” said student mentee Ramona Reed.

The QCC Mentoring Program is currently looking for mentors for its Spring semester, as the need for mentors is great.  Already there are over 150 mentors, who are making a difference in the lives of QCC students. Some current mentors are QCC alumni, who intimately understand the struggles and achievements of being a community college student.

“As an alumnus, I wanted to continue to find ways to support the community that has allowed me to further my education. Thanks to the QCC Mentoring Program, I have been able to do just that by sharing my experience and introducing students to all the available resources the school offers to reach one’s educational goals.  Without the amazing mentors’ support and guidance, many of our students would have to navigate the terrains of QCC alone. By joining the mentoring program, we can ensure that every student knows that we are here to offer experience, guidance, and support,” said new mentor Abel Delgado.

To learn more visit QCC Mentoring Program.

  • QCC's Director of Veteran Affairs, Paula Ogden and her granddaugher Ashlyn McCarty
  • QCC's Director of Veteran Affairs, Paula Ogden and her granddaugher Ashlyn McCarty
December, 2020

 Student Veteran Awarded $500 BBB Scholarship

The holiday season was a little bit brighter for QCC student Jonathan Niles who received an early holiday gift. He was chosen as one of the recipients of the Better Business Bureau’s (BBB) 2020 Veteran and Service Member Textbook Scholarship Program. The scholarship program awards $500 to a veteran or service member student attending a...

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 Student Veteran Awarded $500 BBB Scholarship

The holiday season was a little bit brighter for QCC student Jonathan Niles who received an early holiday gift. He was chosen as one of the recipients of the Better Business Bureau’s (BBB) 2020 Veteran and Service Member Textbook Scholarship Program. The scholarship program awards $500 to a veteran or service member student attending a university or college within BBB's service area of Central and Western Massachusetts and Northeast Connecticut. QCC has always had a scholarship winner since the program began.

Mr. Niles, an Army veteran and general studies major, received $500 to be used to help cover the cost of text books. To be eligible for the textbook scholarship, students were tested on their financial literacy through an online quiz. The scholarship is funded locally in part by BBB Accredited Businesses and in partnership with the U.S. Department of Defense Financial Readiness Campaign, BBB's Military Line.

Messages of Thanks 

Once again, QCC’s Director of Veteran Affairs, Paula Ogden, worked with Amvets Elementary School in North Attleboro to make the holidays a little bit brighter for some veterans.The students made cards honoring veterans and Ms. Ogden dropped them off to the Bristol Veterans Home located in Bristol, RI.

 

  • Bonnie Russell is one of the 'voices' of QCC.
December, 2020

In a time when we could all use a friendly voice, QCC has some very special folks in its Call Center/Solution Station. Who are the people who help our students on the phone?  Read below for a first-hand account of one person, Bonnie Russell, who is making a difference in the lives of QCC students. 

In May of 2019, after 24 years of working at the Telegram...

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In a time when we could all use a friendly voice, QCC has some very special folks in its Call Center/Solution Station. Who are the people who help our students on the phone?  Read below for a first-hand account of one person, Bonnie Russell, who is making a difference in the lives of QCC students. 

In May of 2019, after 24 years of working at the Telegram & Gazette, my position was eliminated and I found myself unemployed. Finding another job was a daunting prospect since the newspaper business was shrinking and I was approaching the age when one thinks of retiring.

One of my responsibilities at the newspaper was to write the weekly College Town column, which included news from all the area colleges, usually featuring one school as the main story and items from the others.  This required contact with the communications folks at each institution.  Although most of the contacts were by phone and email, I tried to visit each school.

During the Monday of what was to be my last week at the Telegram (although I didn’t know it), Quinsigamond Community College sent a press release about the recently held inaugural graduation ceremony of QCC’s Police Academy. I thought that would be a good lead story for College Town. Initially, my plan was to do a phone interview with then, Det. Sgt. Joseph Cecchi, the Academy’s director and program coordinator, but instead decided to go to the campus.

It was also an opportunity to finally meet Josh Martin, director of Institutional Communications and Karen Hutner, publications/press manager in person and see how much QCC had grown since I graduated many years prior.

All of that went as planned and the article was posted online Wednesday evening and appeared in print on Thursday, which was also the day that I was notified that GateHouse Media, the owner of the Telegram & Gazette, was eliminating my position.

Fast forward a few months to July when I returned from a vacation in Maine to a voicemail from Mr. Martin. He said he had an opportunity that might be of interest to me and asked if I wanted to meet to discuss it. We met the following week and Josh explained he was hiring for a part-time position, making outbound calls to students. Later, he anticipated that after training, the person hired would also provide support to students, assist the financial aid office, admissions, registrar, advising and other offices.

After considering the pros (my prior experience in communication and phone work, the value of supporting those seeking a community college education, working with students from diverse backgrounds and being able to walk to campus in a half hour or drive there in 3 ½ minutes) and cons (It was fewer hours than I hoped to work and it might become too routine and maybe even boring), I accepted the job and started August 19.

It was a good decision.  Rather than being boring, this is among the most rewarding work that I’ve engaged in throughout my career. QCC students wear many hats, not only do they attend school, but some oversee the virtual learning of children, care for loved ones, work in medical facilities such as hospitals, nursing homes, as well as grocery stores, restaurants and manufacturing facilities. They are providing essential services during the Coronavirus-COVID-19 pandemic.  I am honored that many share their stories with me, including happy news such as expecting a child or getting an “A” as a final grade, or sadder happenings, such as the loss of a loved one or the challenges of starting over in a new career.

Although the pandemic has changed my work location from a bustling campus to a home office, it hasn’t done away with another aspect of this job that I love, contact with the wonderful staff and faculty at QCC.

I really appreciate the folks who work in advising, the registrar’s office, the business office, admissions, the student success center, financial aid and the helpdesk, to name a few.  They, along with my call center/solution station co-worker Lynne Clark, patiently answer my questions and work hard to help students. I feel blessed and grateful to be a small part of this team.

 

  • The SGA holds regular meetings via Zoom.
December, 2020

QCC’s Student Government Association (SGA) provides a forum for students’ voices to be heard. The SGA works to promote the rights of students, involvement in college affairs, student input in educational matters and communications among students, faculty, and the College administration. The SGA ensures the continued advancement of an engaging student experience and is one of the many ways in which students...

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QCC’s Student Government Association (SGA) provides a forum for students’ voices to be heard. The SGA works to promote the rights of students, involvement in college affairs, student input in educational matters and communications among students, faculty, and the College administration. The SGA ensures the continued advancement of an engaging student experience and is one of the many ways in which students can be involved at QCC.

The 2020-2021 Student Government Association Officers include:

  • Josh Cole - Interim Director, Student Life and Leadership (Co-Advisory, ex officio, non-voting)
  • Jorgo Gushi - Co-Advisor 
  • Armela Xhindole - President 
  • Tara Rudolph - Vice President
  • Shauna Connelly - Secretary
  • Nicholas Turk - Public Relations
  • Zachary Carlson - Parliamentarian

Visit SGA to learn more and make sure to check out the January Wyvern Guardian to learn more about the 2020-2021 officers.

  • Quinsigamond Community College's Harrington Learning Center
December, 2020

The College will be hosting the Massachusetts Community Colleges annual Teaching, Learning, & Student Development (TLSD) Conference on Friday, April 9th, 2021. This year, the TLSD Conference will explore how community colleges are impacted by and responding to the current pandemic and the issues raised during the past year. Our theme is "Tools for the New Normal: Innovations in Access, Equity, and...

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The College will be hosting the Massachusetts Community Colleges annual Teaching, Learning, & Student Development (TLSD) Conference on Friday, April 9th, 2021. This year, the TLSD Conference will explore how community colleges are impacted by and responding to the current pandemic and the issues raised during the past year. Our theme is "Tools for the New Normal: Innovations in Access, Equity, and Student Success."

Last March, community colleges had to pivot from traditional, in-person operations to provide remote education to all students. Since that time, institutions have embraced remote and online classrooms to continue to carry out the community college mission of delivering quality education to our students. The conference is an opportunity for Massachusetts community colleges to come together to share successes, lessons learned, and best practices with one another to enhance higher education across the state.

Vice Presidents Dr. James Keane and Dr. Lillian Ortiz asked Dean of the School of English and Humanities, Brady Hammond and Director of Student Accessibility Services, Kristie Proctor to lead conference planning and preparation. Currently, the planning team consists of Nancy Berthiaume-Donahue, Barbara Zabka, Patrick Printz, Selina Boria, Emily Vogel, Ken Dwyer, Sharon Marini, and Josh Martin. To volunteer for preparation or conference day responsibilities, please email the TLSDPlanningCommittee [at] qccmass.onmicrosoft.com (subject: TLSD%20Inquiry) (TLSD Planning Committee.) 

  • Happy New Year!
December, 2020

Friday, December 18: The Nurse Evening Program will hold a virtual Pinning Ceremony at 6:00 p.m. 

Wednesday, December 23: The Nurse Day Program will hold a virtual Pinning Ceremony at 6:00 p.m. 

Friday, December 25 - Friday, January 1: The College will close for its annual winter break and reopen remotely on Monday, January 4,...

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Friday, December 18: The Nurse Evening Program will hold a virtual Pinning Ceremony at 6:00 p.m. 

Wednesday, December 23: The Nurse Day Program will hold a virtual Pinning Ceremony at 6:00 p.m. 

Friday, December 25 - Friday, January 1: The College will close for its annual winter break and reopen remotely on Monday, January 4, 2021. Happy Holidays to All!!

Monday, January 4: Winter/Intersession classes begin.

Thursday, January 14: Last Day of Winter/Intersession classes/exams.

Monday, January 18: Martin Luther King Day. No classes will be held.

Tuesday, January 19: All College Day, 8:30 – 10:30 a.m. Faculty and staff are invited to kick off the Spring Semester in a virtual celebration where the college recognizes and celebrates all we do as a community. Special guest at All College Day will be comedian Robbie Printz. For anyone interested in gathering socially prior to the start of the All College Day meeting, the Zoom session will open at 8:00 a.m. 

Wednesday, January 20: Spring semester classes begin.

  • Congratulations to the Wyverns E-Sports Team on a great first season.
December, 2020

E-Sports

We have a winner and its QCC’s own Wyvern E-Sports team! The team defeated Bunker Hill Community College in the Region XXI Championship E-Sports game on December 12. E-Sports team member Joseph Pauplis was named MVP. The team was a standout this Fall in its inaugural debut.  For those students who were unable to participate this fall, there is still time to be part of the team, as...

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E-Sports

We have a winner and its QCC’s own Wyvern E-Sports team! The team defeated Bunker Hill Community College in the Region XXI Championship E-Sports game on December 12. E-Sports team member Joseph Pauplis was named MVP. The team was a standout this Fall in its inaugural debut.  For those students who were unable to participate this fall, there is still time to be part of the team, as the official E-Sports season will begin Spring 2021 semester.

Full-time students (12 credits of more) who are interested in being part of QCC’s E-sports team, should contact Coach Nate Mello at nmello [at] qcc.mass.edu

CONGRATULATIONS to our QCC Athletics Wyvern E-Sports Team!

Zoom Yoga and Zoom Zumba

Are you planning to make a resolution to exercise more in the New Year? Let QCC’s Zoom Yoga and Zumba help get your resolution off on the right foot. Beginning the week of January 11, faculty, staff and current students can take advantage of free Yoga and Zumba.

Zoom Yoga is available every Monday – Friday, 12:00 p.m. - 12:40 p.m. This is a great way to relax and de-stress.  Email Athletic Director Lisa Gurnick for a Yoga Zoom invite at lisag [at] qcc.mass.edu.

Zoom Zumba will be held twice a week, Tuesdays from 1:15 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. and Fridays 6:00 p.m. - 6:45p.m. Email Ms. Gurnick for a Zumba Zoom invite at lisag [at] qcc.mass.edu.

December, 2020

December, 2020

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December, 2020