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October, 2020

  • Assistant Professor of Music José Castillo (playing guitar) and QCC students Veronica Morson and Jonathan Duque .
October, 2020

For the last 35 years, Quinsigamond Community College has hosted the Hispanics Achieving and Celebrating Excellence (H.A.C.E) Youth Awards. The annual event, held this year on October 21, paid homage to the achievements of public and private Worcester and Southbridge Hispanic high school students in the areas of Academics, Leadership, Arts and Athletics.

This year’s event honored 19 students at a virtual...

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For the last 35 years, Quinsigamond Community College has hosted the Hispanics Achieving and Celebrating Excellence (H.A.C.E) Youth Awards. The annual event, held this year on October 21, paid homage to the achievements of public and private Worcester and Southbridge Hispanic high school students in the areas of Academics, Leadership, Arts and Athletics.

This year’s event honored 19 students at a virtual celebration attended by civic and community leaders. To date, 754 students have been honored with scholarship awards totaling $186,950.  The H.A.C.E. Youth Awards were created in 1985 by faculty and staff at QCC, along with business and community leaders in the Worcester community.

QCC President Dr. Luis Pedraja told the students about his own success story, describing how he came to the U.S. as a young boy from Cuba and today is a college president thanks to education.

“Education opens doors you never imagined. Everything you hope for and dream about you can accomplish. You are already an example of excellence and the sky’s the limit,” he said. “Never let anything stand in your way, not even a pandemic. Our future depends on you.”

Keynote speaker for the event was nationally recognized youth motivational speaker, Jorge Sierra, a self-change advocate who was left a paraplegic from gang-related violence at the age of 17. Today he is a business owner, and a college student at the age of 44.

“Your decisions design your destiny,” he said, adding, “Education is power.”

Worcester Mayor Joseph Petty gave a citation to the students proclaiming October 21 as H.A.C.E. Day in the City of Worcester and asked students to “come back to Worcester and make it a better community.”

Other words of congratulations were given by Superintendent of Worcester Public Schools, Maureen Binienda, Receiver/Superintendent of Southbridge Public Schools, Dr. Jeffrey Villar, and Co-Chairs for the event, QCC’s Director of Community Bridges, Dr. Déborah L. González and Coordinator of the Future Focus Program, Gilmarie Vongphakdy. Entertainment was provided by Assistant Professor of Music José Castillo, and QCC students Veronica Morson and Jonathan Duque.

Special Awards included:

  • Marlyn Reyes Memorial Community Leadership  Award - Liceidy Terrero, North High School, Worcester
  • Dolly Vázquez Cultural Award - Ronnette Cruz, Doherty Memorial High School, Worcester
  • Olga López-Hill Community Leadership Scholarship - Luceily Ortiz, Quinsigamond Community College, Worcester

Academic Awards:

  • Rodolfo Pineda, Doherty Memorial High School, Worcester
  • Nahriyah Alejandro, North High School, Worcester
  • Marlon Oyervide, South High Community School, Worcester
  • Juliana Beaudry, Southbridge High School, Southbridge
  • Isabella Cabrera, Southbridge High School, Southbridge
  • Briana Herrera, St. Peter Marian High School, Worcester
  • Kathy Martínez Domínguez, University Park Campus School, Worcester
  • Isabela Cruz, Worcester Technical High School, Worcester
  • Novian Wright, Worcester Technical High School, Worcester

Arts Award:

  • Ronnette Cruz, Doherty Memorial High School, Worcester

Athletics Awards:

  • Jonathan Mejía Zelayandia, Doherty Memorial High School, Worcester
  • Arlyenis Garrastegui, Noeth High School, Worcester
  • Mariela Mirón Domínguez, University Park Campus School, Worcester

Leadership Awards:

  • Jessica Poyser, Doherty Memorial High School, Worcester
  • Liceidy Terrero, North High School, Worcester
  • Alizea Atherley, South High Community School, Worcester
  • Germania Balbuena Marte, University Park Campus School, Worcester
  • Genesis Bernabel, Worcester Technical High School, Worcester
  • QCC will contine with remote instrcution for its Winter Intersession and Spring semesters.
October, 2020

Quinsigamond Community College will continue with remote instruction for its Winter Intersession and Spring semesters. Classes will remain fully remote with only a select few courses offered on campus, such as labs or clinical experiences that require direct hands-on participation or specialized equipment.

“We made this decision based on the increased COVID-19 cases we are currently seeing locally,...

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Quinsigamond Community College will continue with remote instruction for its Winter Intersession and Spring semesters. Classes will remain fully remote with only a select few courses offered on campus, such as labs or clinical experiences that require direct hands-on participation or specialized equipment.

“We made this decision based on the increased COVID-19 cases we are currently seeing locally, regionally and nationally. Many models project an increase in COVID-19 cases during the colder months, and based on this information, we have chosen to stay with our current mode of remote instruction,” QCC President Dr. Luis Pedraja said. “Our concern, first and foremost, is the safety of the QCC community and our region.”

QCC’s online experience is vast, and is receiving national attention. OnlineU.com ranked the College's Associate Degree programs 5th best in the country for return on investment. This past summer, all QCC faculty attended comprehensive remote instruction training to learn additional key strategies for helping students succeed in a remote learning environment. The College has maintained all its support services, transitioning all departments and services to a remote format. Services such as admissions, advising, financial aid, tutoring, transfer services, student life and accessibility services are delivered remotely through emails, phone, or virtual meeting platforms. Support services, such as QCC’s Food Pantry and Resource Center, as well as counseling and wellness are also delivered remotely to provide vital support to those in need.

“We will continue to listen to local, state and federal experts to ensure our plans are in line with best practices and protocols, and reassess as applicable,” President Pedraja stated.

  • QCC alumnus and new Foundation Director Jorgo Gushi presents his census video at the virtual Legislative Town Hall.
  • Each week volunteers from the QCC Food Pantry pick up 2,000 lbs. of food to distribute to students in need.
October, 2020

Quinsigamond Community College student Tabitha Leber defined the past six months during the COVID-19 pandemic as a time of resiliency. Ms. Leber was one of a group of current and former students and college administrators who took to the virtual airways recently for a Legislative Town Hall to discuss the pandemic, remote learning and what it means to be a student at QCC. Ms. Leber said she and her...

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Quinsigamond Community College student Tabitha Leber defined the past six months during the COVID-19 pandemic as a time of resiliency. Ms. Leber was one of a group of current and former students and college administrators who took to the virtual airways recently for a Legislative Town Hall to discuss the pandemic, remote learning and what it means to be a student at QCC. Ms. Leber said she and her fellow classmates have learned to be prepared and resilient, thanks to the skills they were taught at the college.

Attending the event were Senator Michael Moore, Senator Anne Gobi, Representative James O’Day; Representative Natalie Higgins, Representative Hannah Kane; Melissa Olesen, regional director of Central & Western Massachusetts for Senator Edward Markey; Yael Langer, legislative director for Senator Anne Gobi; and Emily Johnson, on behalf of Representative Paul Frost.

Moderating the event was Mason Wheaton, a first-generation college student who kicked off the event with her inspirational parody song, “We Can Fight the Virus.” Ms. Wheaton described her time at QCC as transformative.

“I am so grateful to have come here. Every day I have more experiences than I could have ever imagined. Without QCC I would have never attended college and life would have looked a lot different,” she said. “So many students like me came here to have a better life.”

The college recently announced it was going remote for its spring semester, and the students who participated in the event gave praise to the proactive way in which the college has supported its students.

Ms. Leber presented statistics on the needs of QCC students during the pandemic and told of the positive impact the QCC Foundation’s Student Emergency Fund has made on their immediate, basic life needs.

“​All QCC students qualified for the Student Emergency Fund: associate degree seeking students, certificate and workforce development students, adult students’ programs, undocumented, international, part-time, full-time,” Ms. Leber said, noting that the CARES Act Fund stipulations excluded many students.

The Student Emergency Fund has currently assisted 526 students. In a study of those who received this aid, 81% were women, 66% were parents or had other dependents, 63% were students of color​ and 43% were foreign born.

“I myself, as a single mother and a full-time student, am represented in this data,” Ms. Leber said, telling of her own experiences coming to QCC as a single mother after a catastrophic injury. Today she is a dual major and working on a third degree in the current remote learning environment, while also helping her daughter with her own remote schooling.

She went on to explain that the emergency aid was critical for students to stay in college and complete the spring 2020 semester (93% of those who received aid did not withdraw during the spring semester). However, with a minimum aid award of $100, and a maximum of $250, the aid was not enough.​

“It’s heartbreaking how many of our students have been impacted by the pandemic,” President Dr. Luis Pedraja said. “Many of the students we serve are living on the margins and the pandemic has put them in survival mode. You cannot think about education when you are in survival mode. My fear is this population, which benefits greatly from education, is being affected the most by the pandemic and further increasing the equity gap.”

“We need to continue to raise funds to provide emergency aid to our students during the COVID-19 pandemic.​ QCC is trying to make our lives and the lives of our families better,” Ms. Leber said.

Board Chair Sue Mailman reminded legislators that community colleges receive only 25% of the state’s education funding, while UMass universities receive 50% of funding and state universities receive the other 25% of the state funding.

“If there was ever a time to rethink that formula it’s now,” Ms. Mailman said. “This school matters in this region for our students and for employers.”

Recent 2020 graduate Jorgo Gushi, an electrical and computer engineering student at Worcester Polytechnic Institute, addressed QCC’s continued commitment to its students and their success, in addition to its strong community engagement, such as in its recent census and voting campaigns.

“I was recently elected as a member of the QCC’s College Foundation’s Board of Directors. I am also serving as the Chair of the Student Advisory Council to the Board of Higher Education and sitting on this board in a non-voting advisory capacity. Some of you might be surprised by the level of engagement I have in student leadership, advocacy and community service; however, this is common for QCC students,” he said. “We enter QCC with a goal, a dream, and along the way we acquire skills needed to be successful in the workforce, and in life. We are taught confidence, communication, teamwork, humanity and awareness of our community.”

QCC student Veronica Morson and alumna Nelly Medina are also active in the college community and beyond. They both introduced their voting campaign videos and discussed the importance of voting, as well as being engaged members of the community.

“QCC is not a college in Worcester; QCC is Worcester’s college. QCC is our community’s college and it strives day after day to make it better for its students and the community’s residents,” Mr. Gushi said.

“QCC supports all of their students because we are a community,” Ms. Leber added.

Representative Kane, whose district includes Shrewsbury and Westborough, commended the work the college has done transitioning to remote learning.

“I really like the Worcester college comment,” she said during the event. “I certainly believe QCC is our community college as well and take great pride in all that you are doing.”

  • QCC's online degree programs were named fifth best in the nation.
October, 2020

Quinsigamond Community College’s online associate degree programs have been named the fifth best return on investment (ROI) for online associate degrees nationwide, according to OnlineU, an unbiased rankings organization that compares all online colleges and universities in the country.

QCC was the only community college listed in the top five, and one of only two community...

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Quinsigamond Community College’s online associate degree programs have been named the fifth best return on investment (ROI) for online associate degrees nationwide, according to OnlineU, an unbiased rankings organization that compares all online colleges and universities in the country.

QCC was the only community college listed in the top five, and one of only two community colleges in the top 10 of its recent 2020 rankings list. 

College and university online programs are ranked based on:

  • median salary and mean debt numbers found in the U.S. Department of Education’s College Scorecard
  • graduates’ salaries and debt payments for 10 years after graduation, accounting for standard salary growth and interest on debt payments

Each school is given an "ROI score" that reflects how the salary and debt of the programs compare to similar ones. The rankings also include an annual tuition comparison of each school, based on out-of-state tuition rates unless in-state rates are offered to all students.

QCC’s ROI ranking of 95.9% is based on its out of state annual tuition. Fall 2020 out of state tuition is $411 per credit, as compared to in-state tuition of $205 per credit.

“Our programs are some of the most affordable and lucrative in the country as shown in this national ranking study. Our online programs are as robust as our in-person programs, without any additional cost differential. At QCC, our goal is 100 percent student success for all, and part of that success means making sure our students have an affordable education that leads them into a productive future,” President Luis G. Pedraja, Ph.D. said.

  • RT students from left: Hansi Confer, Gary Beauchemin, Richard Abankwah, Emmanuel Ebeh, Denise Schwartz, Melissa Hirons
  • QCC RT second year students (green Scrubs) and St. Vicent's RT Group (blue and black scrubs).
October, 2020

Quinsigamond Community College honored those who are vital to our health and safety during national Respiratory Care Week, held this year from October 25- 31.

As the oldest Respiratory Care Program in the state of Massachusetts, QCC’s program has been leading the way in the region. This was never more evident than during the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, when the College received approval...

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Quinsigamond Community College honored those who are vital to our health and safety during national Respiratory Care Week, held this year from October 25- 31.

As the oldest Respiratory Care Program in the state of Massachusetts, QCC’s program has been leading the way in the region. This was never more evident than during the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, when the College received approval from the program’s accrediting agency to allow QCC respiratory care students to simultaneously work on their student licenses and earn credits. This added a dozen students to the workforce, increased the Respiratory Therapists in Worcester by 10 percent and brought much needed medical resources to an extremely stressed healthcare system.

“From the moment QCC went remote, the program and the students worked diligently to explore new and effective avenues to complete educational requirements. Their team spirit and professionalism demonstrated that they had indeed transformed from lay persons to the professionals that they had aspired to become,” said Amy Hogan, assistant professor of the College’s Respiratory Care program. “All sophomores graduated on time, achieved Registered Respiratory Therapist credentials, and secured Respiratory Therapist positions post-graduation.” 

This fall, there are 10 full-time students in the program, four second-year students and six first-year students. The second-year students are working on their clinicals at St. Vincent Hospital, Worcester and first-year students are at UMass Memorial Campus, Worcester.  While the students are not directly caring for COVID-19 patients, they are administering aerosolized medications, evaluating, and titrating oxygen therapy, caring for patients on mechanical ventilation, and providing various other therapies to optimize the lung health of their patients.

“COVID-19 has brought Respiratory Therapists to the forefront of the healthcare profession.  Respiratory Therapists are the only medical specialists specifically trained in the cardiopulmonary system. As such, they are uniquely qualified to manage not only patients with COVID-19, but also any patient who has breathing issues,” said QCC’s Respiratory Care Program Coordinator, Keith Hirst.

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the 2019 median salary for Respiratory Therapists was $61,330 and employment projections of 26 percent are anticipated in the next several years, due to an aging population that will lead to increased cases of respiratory issues.

“In Worcester County, with a population of approximately 830,839, approximately 97,500 (12%) of adults have some form of chronic lung disease. Now, with the COVID-19 virus, even more people are in need of these types of professionals. This is why Respiratory Care programs such as QCC’s are so essential,” Mr. Hirst said.

Respiratory Care Week was established by President Ronald Regan in Sept 1983, due to the care that he received by respiratory therapists when he was shot, as well as to acknowledge the impact that chronic lung disease has on the population. 

To learn more at QCC Respiratory Care program, visit www.QCC.edu/respiratory-care

  • Student Lamar Brown-Noguera is often at QCC's main campus working with AIDS Project Worcester's COVID-19 drive-thru testing
October, 2020

Quinsigamond Community College student Lamar Brown-Noguera personifies the phrase “service before self.” Caring for others seems to come naturally to the Jamaican-born student. Whether it was helping those in his native country as a front of the house agent in the hospitality industry, to his advocacy with LGBTQ issues, or his work in an AIDS hospice in Jamaica, Mr. Brown-Noguera is...

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Quinsigamond Community College student Lamar Brown-Noguera personifies the phrase “service before self.” Caring for others seems to come naturally to the Jamaican-born student. Whether it was helping those in his native country as a front of the house agent in the hospitality industry, to his advocacy with LGBTQ issues, or his work in an AIDS hospice in Jamaica, Mr. Brown-Noguera is passionate about helping others.

“Working in hospice care in Jamaica fulfilled the idea of what I wanted to put my energy into. One patient who I spent the day taking care of was a young woman at the end of her life. At the end of our time together she told me to never stop living life to the fullest and helping others,” he said. “I fostered that passion for helping others that was inspired by this interaction.”

In 2014, Mr. Brown-Noguera came to the U.S. Initially on a vacation, he decided to seek asylum in a country that he felt would give him more opportunities. Today, while still in the rigors of the asylum-seeking process, he has embedded himself in the Worcester community, advocating for LGBTQ issues with both the Supporters of Worcester Area Gay and Lesbian Youth (SWAGLY) and Queer The Scene (QTS), while attending QCC part-time. He also works as Community Relations Manager for AIDS Project Worcester.

His pathway to higher education came by way of the Clemente Course program at the Worcester Art Museum, which provides educational opportunities for under-privileged students. It was through this program that he became familiar with QCC.

“QCC was the best overall value.  As an asylum-seeker I cannot get financial aid; but the affordability of QCC made it easier for me to transition into the college and attend part-time, while also working in the human services industry,” Mr. Brown-Noguera said, adding that when he struggled to pay a bill the College worked with him so that he could remain in school.

Now his work with AIDS Project Worcester, a job that he said is “a marriage made in heaven," has taken him to QCC in a different capacity, where he is in charge of the COVID-19 drive-thru testing on the College’s main campus and four other Worcester sites. Testing at this site averages between 80-90 people per week. Testing is continuing four-days-a week through the end of October.

“Our biggest testing day thus far was when the flu clinic was also on campus. We tested 172 people that day,” he said.

While working full-time and attending QCC part-time, he has also found the time to stay engaged in the College community. He is a member of the Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society, the Black Student Union, a staunch advocate for the LQBTQ community, and even participated in the College’s #QCCVotes campaign.

“Voting is important to me because while I can’t vote, all the issues on the ballot relate to me and the people I serve and interact with on a daily basis. It’s so important for those who have the ability and opportunity to vote. I want to encourage them to use their civic right and vote,” Mr. Brown-Noguera said.

Today he is in his last semester at QCC and will be graduating in Spring 2021, with an Associate Degree in Human Services. He plans to transfer to Worcester State University and major in Urban Studies, concentrating in public policy and youth services. He dreams of one day being a part of a socially conscience organization like the World Health Organization, and hopes to inspire others to take the leap into higher education.

“I encourage everyone, including asylum seekers, to take advantage of all the opportunities here at QCC. There is so much that is readily available. My professors were willing to knock on doors for me that I never knew existed,” he said. “QCC’s infrastructure is designed to support you and help you reach your best potential. The programs are designed to help you succeed not fail.”

  • A 2019 QCC graduate has the sentiments of many students in 2020. Donate to QCC and help a student succeed.
October, 2020

Quinsigamond Community College is asking for the support of the community in helping its students during a time when their need is greater than ever before. The College has rolled out an aggressive fundraising campaign in conjunction with the national campaign GivingTuesday, in an effort to help the most vulnerable of its student population.

QCC is an integral part of the City of Worcester. In...

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Quinsigamond Community College is asking for the support of the community in helping its students during a time when their need is greater than ever before. The College has rolled out an aggressive fundraising campaign in conjunction with the national campaign GivingTuesday, in an effort to help the most vulnerable of its student population.

QCC is an integral part of the City of Worcester. In 2019, there were 32,118 alumni, with close to 23,000 living in Massachusetts and almost 7,000 living in the  Worcester.

“By donating to QCC’s GivingTuesday campaign, you are helping a friend or a neighbor who may be one of the many front-line workers helping to keep us safe and our essential businesses operating,” said Associate Vice President for External Affairs, Dr. Viviana M. Abreu-Hernandez.  “Your gift can help students pay their rent, utilities, feed their families, or provide laptops and WiFi so they can continue to learn remotely. A donation, no matter the size, makes a big difference to a student in need.”

Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, student need has greatly increased as jobs have been lost or severely cut and students are struggling to make ends meet.  While the college received CARES Act funding like most in the country, the stipulations for students to receive aid precluded many, due to their part-time status or other disqualifiers.

“Many of our students were unable to access the CARES Act aid, which was why the QCC Foundation began a Student Emergency Fund. This has already helped well over 500 students,” said President Dr. Luis Pedraja.

A survey of those who received Student Emergency Fund aid noted that 47% of working students lost their jobs, 72% of working students had a reduction in their working hours, and 33% had out of pocket medical expenses related to COVID-19.

“Of those surveyed 93% who received aid did not withdraw from QCC during the Spring semester. This is a testament to the effectiveness of the Student Emergency Fund as well as the incredible need our students face,” President Pedraja said. “We have almost exhausted our raised funds, yet the need continues to grow as the pandemic deepens and we enter the colder months. It’s imperative that we help those who need us most.”

QCC’s GivingTuesday campaign is running for the entire month of November, with a goal of raising $30,000. To be a part of QCC’s GivingTuesday initiative, visit www.QCC.edu/qccgives

The College is challenging all its alumni to help meet the $30,000 fundraising goal by asking each graduate to donate at least one dollar.

"Can you imagine if all of our 30,000-plus alumni made a donation? We could make such a positive impact on our students and send them a resounding message of hope, support and encouragement," Dr. Abreu-Hernandez said.

GivingTuesday is a global generosity movement unleashing the power of people and organizations to transform their communities and the world. GivingTuesday was created in 2012 as a simple idea: a day that encourages people to do good. Over the past eight years, it has grown into a global movement that inspires hundreds of millions of people to give, collaborate, and celebrate generosity.

QCC mentee Ramona Reed was the student presenter at QCC's virtual mentoring kick-off event.
October, 2020

QCC student mentee Ramona Reed credits the QCC Mentoring program with giving her the skills to become a stronger person. Ms. Reed was the student presenter at the virtual October 13 QCC Mentoring kick-off event. In addition to Ms. Reed, other speakers included President Dr. Luis Pedraja and keynote speaker Board of Trustees Chair Sue...

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QCC student mentee Ramona Reed credits the QCC Mentoring program with giving her the skills to become a stronger person. Ms. Reed was the student presenter at the virtual October 13 QCC Mentoring kick-off event. In addition to Ms. Reed, other speakers included President Dr. Luis Pedraja and keynote speaker Board of Trustees Chair Sue Mailman.

Over 160 mentees and mentor attended the event that focused on the power of mentoring. QCC Mentoring matches QCC students with staff, faculty, and professionals from the Greater Worcester Community to build one-on-one mentoring relationships. The relationships focus on academic encouragement, professional skill building, and social connections.

Mentors who sign up will meet once per month with a QCC student for the duration of the academic year. The program also has core partners, which are organizations or companies that commit to sending 10 or more mentors to participate in the program. Core partners receive several key benefits, including onsite mentor training and recruitment, and a dedicated pipeline of mentees in a chosen field. This year, in addition to core partners, AbbVie, the City of Worcester, UMass Memorial Medical Center and the Hanover Insurance Group, the mentoring program has added two additional core partners, Cityblock Health and the Worcester County Bar Association.

“We started the semester with 141 matches, and still have several mentors and students on the waiting list. That is the largest group of matches we have had yet,” said Director of Mentoring Gabe Santner.

Ms. Reed, who faces difficulties with her hearing, described her experiences in the program and how her mentor was able to not only support her, but also understand the difficulties she had with communication and adjust accordingly.  She said her mentor encouraged her to pursue to goals and when she questioned herself, her mentor was there to encourage and cheer her on.

“My mentor never gave up on me. This program empowers you not just as a student but as a person to overcome so many obstacles in your life that sometimes hold you back,” she said.

Ms. Reed wants people to know how life changing a program such as this one is to students, noting the many people she has met through the program both at QCC and outside of QCC. She described a job interview that she had shortly after the pandemic began and said if it wasn't for the support of the mentoring program and her mentor, she might never have taken that chance. 

Ms. Reed, who has been a mentee since 2019, encourages other students to consider being a part of the program.

“I started off not sure of the mentoring program, but now I am absolutely sure the mentoring program helped me to evolve into the person you see right now. This program will make you a better person if you allow it to; if you give it your all you will see the benefits of it,” Ms. Reed said.

To learn more on how to be a mentee or a mentor, visit QCC Mentoring Program.  

Student Anthony "Tony" Barnardo encourages people to vote.
October, 2020

Election Day is right around the corner in Massachusetts and QCC has taken an active role in encouraging its community to get out and vote through motivational student videos that encourage people to vote.

In Massachusetts, there is more on the ballot than choosing a president, vice president and other elected officials. Registered voters are also being...

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Election Day is right around the corner in Massachusetts and QCC has taken an active role in encouraging its community to get out and vote through motivational student videos that encourage people to vote.

In Massachusetts, there is more on the ballot than choosing a president, vice president and other elected officials. Registered voters are also being asked to decide on two binding statewide ballot questions- wireless vehicle data and ranked-choice voting.          

Adjunct Faculty member Mark Bashour recently discussed rank-choice voting with his State and Local Government class and the Wyvern Guardian. 

What exactly is Question 2?

Question 2 is a referendum, which calls for a change in how we vote on Election Day. The change that Question 2 proposes would apply to primary elections as well as to the general election.

What is being proposed?

Ranked Choice Voting lets voters to rank candidates on the ballot in order of preference: first, second, third, etc. If one candidate receives a majority (more than 50%) of the first-choice votes, they win! If not, the candidate with the fewest votes is dropped, and those votes count instantly towards the next choice on each voter’s ballot. This process repeats in rounds (a runoff) until one candidate has a majority, according to the website yeson2rcv.com. 

What election races would this process be used?

This process would be used to determine the races for all of our state legislators, as well as our statewide officers from the governor to state auditor.  It would also be used to determine our US senator and representative races.

Why do you believe people are opposed to this change?

The opponents say that this will be too confusing to ever work. I think that perhaps with some fine- tuning it could work very well. The problem is the public has not had the process clearly explained to them, and it is hard to vote for something so important that you do not fully understand.

Do you feel both sides have given good arguments as to why this process should be used moving forward?       

The proponents of this referendum should be much more specific about the logistics of their process. The opponents have been far from convincing in why it would be detrimental to have such a system.      

QCC wants to ensure your vote is heard so make sure to get out and vote on November 3, if you haven't already! To learn more visit, QCC Votes.       

  • QCC's Food Pantry drive-thru services are being offered in the back the Administration Building for the winter months.
October, 2020

Beginning on Wednesday, October 28, QCC’s Food Pantry moved its drive-thru services to the back of the College’s Administration Building on its main campus. The weekly drive-thru services will now be offered every Wednesday at the back of the Administration Building for the winter months. Two to three vehicles at a time will be allowed down to the food distribution area, where volunteers will be...

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Beginning on Wednesday, October 28, QCC’s Food Pantry moved its drive-thru services to the back of the College’s Administration Building on its main campus. The weekly drive-thru services will now be offered every Wednesday at the back of the Administration Building for the winter months. Two to three vehicles at a time will be allowed down to the food distribution area, where volunteers will be waiting to load food into students’ cars.

Already over 400 students have registered to use the food pantry and with the colder weather fast approaching, it’s anticipated that number will increase. Each week in addition to feeding QCC students, the food pantry is helping feed hundreds of family members.

At the start of the pandemic, QCC’s Food Pantry partnered with the Worcester County Food Bank (WCFB). Since that time, each week College staff go to the WCFB to pick up 2,000 lbs. of food.

“We pick up fresh fruits, vegetables and other food staples. This past week there were cantaloupes, grapes and butternut squash. Each week is different and the students are thrilled to have this fresh produce,” said Bonnie Coleman, weekly food pantry volunteer and Phi Theta Kappa (PTK) Honor Society advisor. “The students are so grateful for this food. It’s gratifying to know we are able to help them.”

For more information on how to get help, please fill out the Food Pantry application. For additional questions, send an email to foodpantry [at] qcc.mass.edu

  • Choose the type of remote learning that works best for you.
October, 2020

As Quinsigamond Community College continues with remote instruction for the Winter Intersession and Spring Semesters, making sure everyone understands what remote instruction actually means is critical to students' success. While the courses students' choose may not include all these options, below is a description of each modality.

Online Remote:

This...

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As Quinsigamond Community College continues with remote instruction for the Winter Intersession and Spring Semesters, making sure everyone understands what remote instruction actually means is critical to students' success. While the courses students' choose may not include all these options, below is a description of each modality.

Online Remote:

This instruction is provided by your professor through a web-based learning management system and is not held in real time. Students interact with their faculty and classmates and participate in activities, and complete assignments working on their own time while meeting course due date requirements throughout the semester. It’s important to note that class meetings are not held in real time. Online remote courses are set up with assignments and activities that must be completed by certain due dates. Students will not see days or times when selecting courses.

Real Time Remote:

This instruction is provided through a live, virtual class experience for the hours assigned by the faculty. Students will access their class via the internet through a link that will be provided by the instructor. Faculty may reduce some virtual live instruction time to provide students an opportunity to work on class assignments during course time. Students will see all day and time remote meeting times when selecting courses, during which they must be available to participate.

Hybrid:

Hybrid classes provide some of the instruction in a remote modality via the internet and some instruction in person, on campus. These courses are for certain clinical, lab or practicum experiences. The number of on campus meetings will vary for each course. Students will see the days and times they need to come to campus when selecting courses, which they must be available to attend.

  • The Wyvern is hanging with a few recognizable friends this Halloween.
  • This is one house that you can't miss during Halloween time.
October, 2020

Victor Somma, former assistant vice president of extended campuses operations, is at it again! Known as the "director" of QCC’s Halloween Headquarters, his home has a few scary creatures visiting for the upcoming Halloween festivities.

If you check closely, you might even spot the Wyvern cavorting with a few of his Halloween friends, Frankenstein, Dracula and the...

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Victor Somma, former assistant vice president of extended campuses operations, is at it again! Known as the "director" of QCC’s Halloween Headquarters, his home has a few scary creatures visiting for the upcoming Halloween festivities.

If you check closely, you might even spot the Wyvern cavorting with a few of his Halloween friends, Frankenstein, Dracula and the creature form the Black Lagoon.

Have you caught sight of the elusive Wyvern out lately? If so, please send your photos and descriptions through the newsletter submission form

Happy Hauntings from the Wyvern! 

  • QCC students are invited to join the new Active Minds Club.
October, 2020

It’s not easy out there today. We are all coping with the COVID-19 pandemic, which is challenging everyone’s daily lives in ways we could never have anticipated. At QCC, we want to let students know there are ways to cope with mental health issues and find support. 

The new Active Minds Club is a great way to connect with others, build awareness and help change the conversation around...

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It’s not easy out there today. We are all coping with the COVID-19 pandemic, which is challenging everyone’s daily lives in ways we could never have anticipated. At QCC, we want to let students know there are ways to cope with mental health issues and find support. 

The new Active Minds Club is a great way to connect with others, build awareness and help change the conversation around mental health for college students. Managed by Director of Counseling and Wellness, Tina Wells, and MSW intern Abiola Olubode.  Active Minds is looking for students who want to create an open, accepting environment where classmates will not be afraid to seek help.

The premise of the club is to help remove the stigma around mental health and get the word out that it’s OK to not be OK. Active Minds is a national organization founded by a college student after the suicide of her only sibling, so that people do not  have to suffer in silence.

To learn more about the club, or to sign up to be a member email counselingandwellnessoffice [at] qcc.mass.edu

Weekly Zoom meetings are set to begin soon.

  • QCC’s Scarecrow contest submission
October, 2020

Monday, November 2 -  November 16: VIP registration for returning/active students for Spring 2021 semester.  Students should register early to ensure they get the classes they want.

Monday, November 2 - November 30: AIDS Project Worcester will continue its COVID-19 drive-thru testing for the month of November. Tests are by appointment only. For days,...

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Monday, November 2 -  November 16: VIP registration for returning/active students for Spring 2021 semester.  Students should register early to ensure they get the classes they want.

Monday, November 2 - November 30: AIDS Project Worcester will continue its COVID-19 drive-thru testing for the month of November. Tests are by appointment only. For days, times and how to schedule an appointment visit COVID-19 .

Friday, November 6: The Psi Beta & Psychology Club & Social Justice Guest Lecture Series, in collaboration with the Diversity Caucus is hosting a virtual talk by Dr. Linda Tropp, University of Massachusetts, Amherst from 11:00  a.m. – 12:00 p.m., titled: "Using Academic Research in the Pursuit of Social Justice: Contemplating Our Past and Envisioning Our Future.” Zoom Meeting link:

https://zoom.us/j/99806592818?pwd=Vm13ZVMyV1dsSlJHNEJvbmFXV1FaQT09

Meeting ID: 998 0659 2818

Passcode: 810285

Wednesday, November 11: Veterans Day – there will be no classes due to the holiday.

Tuesday, November 17: new student registration begins.

Thursday, November 26 - November 29:The College will hold its annual Thanksgiving recess. Happy Thanksgiving to all! 

Month of November  - QCC’s Transfer Department is hosting month-long transfer events with four-year colleges and universities. Learn what schools are visiting this month by visiting QCC’s Transfer Department.  

November Spotlight: Gateway to College is currently recruiting students for the Spring 2021 semester. Prospective students between the ages of 16-21, looking for a second chance at completing their High School Diploma. Gateway to College accepts students from all over Massachusetts. Prospective students can apply even if they have a GPA below 2.0, have dropped out of high school, or need a more mature environment with wrap around services. Interested students are required to register for a Zoom information session. Everyone is welcome to attend. Deadline is Friday, December 11.

Available sessions include:

  • Tuesday, November 3, 5:00 p.m.
  • Tuesday, November 10, 2:30 p.m.
  • Tuesday, November 17, 5:00 p.m.
  • Tuesday, December 1, 2:30 p.m.
  • Tuesday, December 10, 5:00 p.m.

Students/Parents/Guardians may also text Gateway to College staff at 508-205-9133.

  • QCC's new Student Government President is Armela Xhindole.
October, 2020

Student Life is going strong at Quinsigamond Community College. Students enrolled full-time or part-time have been taking advantage of many clubs and virtual activities this fall. Joining a club is the perfect way to stay engaged in the college community.

Recently the Student Government Association (SGA) elected its 2020-2021 president, sophomore Biomedical Engineering/Engineering major ...

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Student Life is going strong at Quinsigamond Community College. Students enrolled full-time or part-time have been taking advantage of many clubs and virtual activities this fall. Joining a club is the perfect way to stay engaged in the college community.

Recently the Student Government Association (SGA) elected its 2020-2021 president, sophomore Biomedical Engineering/Engineering major Armela Xhindole. On Thursday, November 5, at 3:00 p.m. elections will be held to fill the positions of vice president, secretary, treasurer and parliamentarian. All SGA meetings are held Thursdays at 3:00 p.m. via Zoom.  Any QCC student who attends two SGA meetings in a row may vote in the election. Email SGA Co- Advisor Josh Cole at jcole [at] qcc.mas.edu, or Co-Advisor Jorgo Gushi at jgushi [at] qcc.mas.edu for more information and a Zoom link to the SGA meetings.

Other clubs are also in full swing this fall. Students interested in participating in any of the following clubs can email the club advisor listed below:

Active Minds Club – This club is seeking members who want to create an open, accepting environment where classmates will not be afraid to seek help. Join peers to help build awareness around mental illness and let others know it’s OK to not be OK. Contact counselingandwellnessoffice [at] qcc.mass.edu to join or learn more.

Creative Writing Club –This is a club for students with a passion for writing. Contact Professor James Brennan at jbrennan [at] qcc.mass.edu 

Psychology Club –This is a club for Psychology majors or those interested in psychology. Contact Professor Valarie Clemente vclemente [at] qcc.mass.edu 

Campus One 80 Club – This is a club for Christians. Contact Val Nordbye at vnordbye [at] campusone80.com 

Veterans Club – This club provides an array of support for veterans, their family members and students who are serving in the armed forces. Contact Director of Veteran Affairs Paula Ogden at pogden [at] qcc.mass.edu 

Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society (PTK) –This is a club for students with 12 credits of college level courses (level 100 or higher) and cumulative GPA of 3.5 or greater. For more information contact PTK Advisor Bonnie Coleman at BColeman [at] qcc.mass.edu

Visit Student Life to learn more.

  • Wyvern E-Sports Team is having a fun first season.
October, 2020

Wyverns E-sports

QCC Athletics Wyvern E-sports team is having an exciting first season! The next League of Legends scrimmage for the Wyverns is Friday, October 30 at 8:30 p.m. against Bristol Community College. You can watch the game and support the Wyverns right from the comfort of your home! Simply log on to the streaming platform “...

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Wyverns E-sports

QCC Athletics Wyvern E-sports team is having an exciting first season! The next League of Legends scrimmage for the Wyverns is Friday, October 30 at 8:30 p.m. against Bristol Community College. You can watch the game and support the Wyverns right from the comfort of your home! Simply log on to the streaming platform “Twitch,” to cheer on your Wyvern athletes.                                         

The second week of e-sports Region XXI games just finished, with QCC besting Mass Bay Community College 3-0.

Current league standings:

  1. Bunker Hill - 2 wins
  2. Bristol - 1 win/1 loss
  3. Quinsigamond - 1 win/1 loss
  4. Mass Bay - 2 loses

If you are a full-time student (12 credits of more) this Fall semester, or you know of a student that is full-time and may be interested in being part of QCC’s E-sports team, contact Coach Nate Mello at nmello [at] qcc.mass.edu

Free Virtual Yoga

Namaste! QCC’s Yoga is offered virtually through Zoom at no charge, Monday - Friday 12:00 p.m. -12:40 p.m. for the Fall 2020 semester. Current students, as well as faculty and staff are invited to participate. This session began in mid-August and will run through December 18. Email Athletic Director Lisa Gurnick for a Zoom invite at lisag [at] qcc.mass.edu

Zumba is Underway

Are you someone who loves dance and are looking for a way to stay fit this fall? Then QCC’s new, free Zoom Zumba is the perfect way to get your dance moves on and stay in shape. Classes are held twice a week, Tuesdays 1:15 p.m.-2:00 p.m. and Fridays 6:00 p.m.-6:45p.m.. To receive a Zoom invite, email Athletic Director Lisa Gurnick at lisag [at] qcc.mass.edu

Live with Josh and Lisa!

Each week Athletic Director Lisa Gurnick or Interim Assistant Director of Student Life and Leadership, Josh Cole will answer your sport of fitness questions (or other questions you need help with) on Blackboard Collaborate.

The hour-long session is held every Thursday from 1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. and students can log on to Blackboard Collaborate to ask questions.

October, 2020

October, 2020

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October, 2020