Search form

You are here

07/2020

Newsletter Banner

July, 2020

  • QCC students and alumni take care of our communites each and every day.
July, 2020

As COVID-19 became a household word and people in the region scrambled to remain safe, Quinsigamond Community College students and alumni were out on the frontlines taking care of others and keeping our communities’ essential businesses running. These are the unsung heroes who have quietly held a hand, given medical treatment, offered a kind word, and been there when our communities have needed them most.

... More...

As COVID-19 became a household word and people in the region scrambled to remain safe, Quinsigamond Community College students and alumni were out on the frontlines taking care of others and keeping our communities’ essential businesses running. These are the unsung heroes who have quietly held a hand, given medical treatment, offered a kind word, and been there when our communities have needed them most.

Dale Bickford, of Boylston, is a QCC student and an EMT. He knows what it’s like to be in the forefront of the pandemic and the fear of going to work each day. He said he does his job even in the midst of a pandemic because he loves helping people.

“Some days we deal with only COVID-19 patients and then there are days when there aren't any patients who are positive for COVID- 19. Since patients are not allowed visitors in hospitals, sometimes my partner and I are the only outside people that elderly individuals get to see and have contact with. So if I can bring a smile to their faces while helping them, then it makes me happy,” he said. “I like being able to make a difference in someone's life.”

Emeritus Professor Karen Kaletski Dufault, of QCC’s Respiratory Care program, and her students know first-hand what it’s like to selflessly help your community. She quickly recognized there was a shortage of respiratory therapists in the region and jumped into action. She petitioned and received approval from the Respiratory Care accrediting agency to allow QCC’s respiratory therapy students to work on a student license, while earning credit simultaneously. This allowed nine second-year students to work at local hospitals, while finishing their degrees.

“Obviously, there is a sense of uncertainty every time students walk into a clinical setting. Although many have told me that they are concerned that they may get COVID-19, their sense of duty, caring, professionalism and desire to help, far outweighs their fear,” Ms. Kaletski Dufault said.

Not only are QCC students helping care directly for COVID-19 patients, they are also making sure those in the community continue to receive vital life necessities.

Pre-Pharmacy student Daniesha Bailey, of Worcester, is a lead pharmacy technician for CVS. During the start of the pandemic, she continued working at the pharmacy, even though it posed an added risk to her and her family.

“It was scary thinking I could possibly bring COVID-19 home to my son and other family members, yet it was also rewarding to be there to help people during this scary time,” she said. “I have elderly grandparents, so being able to help the elderly population during this pandemic has been the most rewarding because they are at a higher risk.”

Nurse education major Monique Skipwith, of Sutton, is a licensed practical nurse (LPN) and had been working as a school nurse until the schools closed because of the virus. She quickly realized her skillset was needed and went to work at a long-term care facility in Worcester, helping some of the most vulnerable in our community.

“This was when COVID-19 cases began to rapidly increase. It was challenging because not only was I learning a new job with new nursing skills, but also I found myself in the midst of a pandemic. Every shift I would leave my children to go to work and I would say a prayer,” she said. “I have always wanted to become a nurse. I understood that regardless of a pandemic, I would be putting myself in potentially hazardous situations, yet I knew that I could not sit back and let this virus take over. I had to do my duty as an LPN and help as much as I could.”

Mobile Device Support Specialist and QCC alumnus Darius Corcoran, of Shrewsbury, works in the Millis K-12 school district. In April, he began working from home to help the school district complete the year remotely, something that was imperative in order to keep the students on track and able to finish out the school year.

“I was helping both students and teachers remotely by scheduling Google Meet or Zoom video meetings to assist with any troubleshooting that came up. I also made a lot of technical instructional videos,” he said.

In June, Mr. Corcoran went back to working in person. There are new protocols now in place, that include wearing masks, daily temperature checks prior to entering the building, as well as keeping a log of everyone he comes in contact with at the high school where he works.

“If technology did not work and with no one around to address it that would cause huge stress, especially if all the planning was being done on the fly,” he continued.  

South Grafton resident and nurse education major Christine Reid has also been working throughout the pandemic, as unit secretary in the maternity ward at Milford Regional Medical Center.

“Working in a hospital during the pandemic was surreal.  I felt that I was ‘safe’ on the maternity ward because I wasn’t in the COVID/ICU units.  I quickly realized that we were just as vulnerable, as I had checked in patients, walked them to their rooms, only to find out hours later that they had tested positive for COVID,” she said, adding, “I didn’t get into nursing or the hospital field thinking that I would be safe and healthy.  It’s just what I do, and if I don’t or won’t do it, who will?”

According to QCC’s President, Dr. Luis Pedraja, community college graduates are known to stay in the area (over 7,000 QCC alumni live in Worcester) and are heavily relied on during times of crisis, making them vital to the prosperity of our communities, particularly in today’s pandemic world.

“There was never a moment’s hesitation from our students and alumni to help our communities,” President Luis Pedraja said.” This crisis, unlike any other, has shown how essential our students, alumni, faculty, and staff are to our community.”

  • QCC President Dr. Luis Pedraja is a vocal advocate for all students.
July, 2020

The decision by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) to reverse its July decision that would have forced international students to leave the U.S., or transfer to another college or university if their school offered classes entirely online this fall, was greeted positively by QCC’s President Dr. Luis Pedraja.

“I’m glad to see that the Administration did the right...

More...

The decision by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) to reverse its July decision that would have forced international students to leave the U.S., or transfer to another college or university if their school offered classes entirely online this fall, was greeted positively by QCC’s President Dr. Luis Pedraja.

“I’m glad to see that the Administration did the right thing in allowing foreign students to take online classes and remain in the country. We welcome all international students to take the opportunity to learn and earn a degree. Our students, faculty, staff and community will all be able to benefit from the opportunities to exchange ideas and cultural experiences,” Dr. Pedraja said. “I’m proud of my fellow Presidents at our sister institutions for banding together and partnering with the Attorney General to influence the Administration. This will ensure that foreign students will not have to choose between their health and an education, so they too can have the opportunity to pursue their ‘American Dream.’”

Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey led a multistate lawsuit against the recent ICE ruling that included 40 declarations from a variety of institutions directly affected by the new guideline, including Massachusetts Community Colleges and Massachusetts State Universities.

Shortly after ICE announced its new guidelines Dr. Pedraja swiftly released a strong statement denouncing them as a “direct violation of our students’ human rights.”

QCC is continuing with remote instruction this fall and had the ruling not been reversed, over 40 QCC international students would have been affected.

“No one should have to choose between pursuing an education or deportation. Forcing students to choose between education and their health is unfathomable,” he said.

  • QCC & Phi Theta Kappa New Graduate David P. Lauzon Jr.
July, 2020

QCC & PHi Theta Kappa Alumnus David P. Lauzon Jr- Recovery Support Specialist

Often true heroes are the people who quietly work behind the scenes helping others. They do this without fanfare and without accolades. The pandemic has brought a spotlight on these people in our community, many of whom are QCC students and alumni. Each month the Wyvern Guardian will be spotlighting one of these...

More...

QCC & PHi Theta Kappa Alumnus David P. Lauzon Jr- Recovery Support Specialist

Often true heroes are the people who quietly work behind the scenes helping others. They do this without fanfare and without accolades. The pandemic has brought a spotlight on these people in our community, many of whom are QCC students and alumni. Each month the Wyvern Guardian will be spotlighting one of these remarkable people who chose QCC to assist them on their quest for a better future, and in the process, help us all have a better life.

David P. Lauzon Jr. is a new QCC and Phi Theta Kappa alumnus. He is also a retired veteran. This past May, amid the pandemic, he graduated with both a certificate and associate degree in Human Services, achieving close to a perfect GPA (3.9).  Within two weeks of graduating, he was offered a position with Recovery Centers of America as a Recovery Support Specialist, providing care for individuals recovering from substance abuse issues. 

“I love what I do because it’s helping those who need the help and most of all, want it.  I am a retired disabled veteran.  I had people who were there for me when I got back from Iraq and active duty Army, so this is much more than a job, it’s a way to pay it forward,” he said. “I also have a part-time job working as a Veterans’ Services Officer for the town of West Boylston.  I have been doing this job for two plus years now.”

However, things were not always easy for Mr. Lauzon, as a retired veteran who suffered from PTSD. Initially he began at QCC majoring in engineering and helping out in the Veterans Affairs office.

“The problem I was not dealing with was my case of PTSD,” he said, eventually leaving school for a while, until learning he still had educational benefits he could still use.

He decided to go back to QCC and this time changed his major to human services.

“I realized I was working in the human services field the whole time.  I realized that this is a better fit for me than the engineering I was trying to get into before.  I feel like this has come to me naturally,” he said. “This time around at the college, I was a work study in the Veterans Affairs office.  It was truly a blessing.  I could go there and socialize with fellow veterans and be there for those who needed my assistance.”

Today he is using what he learned at QCC to help those in the field of recovery, while adapting to the new safety protocols brought on by the pandemic.

“I do a lot of meeting with people via Zoom or other viral media sources.  I do meet with some veterans at times, but always with the proper personal protection equipment (PPE).  With the recovery work, I am wearing PPE all day long, sometimes I feel like I am back in the Army wearing my PPE,” he said.

Mr. Lauzon said he is grateful for the educational foundation and support he received from QCC, which enabled him to do what he does best, helping people.

“QCC has given me every chance to be successful in school and now as an alumni.  For the experience and the support, this is the best choice to make...  QCC has the best support services and cares for their students. The whole QCC experience has been a great experience and a very special one.” 

Make sure to read next month’s installment of “QCC’s Frontline Workers – Making a Difference in Our Communities.

If you know of a QCC frontline worker who should be spotlighted, let us know and email Karen Hutner at khutner [at] qcc.mass.edu.               

  • An example of one of QCC's census videos spoken in Vietnamese by My Nguyen.
July, 2020

Quinsigamond Community College is helping to make sure everyone in the Worcester community is counted in the United States Census. The College recently took part in a video outreach campaign to encourage people to participate in the census. QCC students and alumni recorded the videos in Spanish, Portuguese, Russian, Ga, Vietnamese, English and Albanian to represent these communities within the City of Worcester...

More...

Quinsigamond Community College is helping to make sure everyone in the Worcester community is counted in the United States Census. The College recently took part in a video outreach campaign to encourage people to participate in the census. QCC students and alumni recorded the videos in Spanish, Portuguese, Russian, Ga, Vietnamese, English and Albanian to represent these communities within the City of Worcester.

“QCC used its voice and the voice of its students to engage the community in an effort that will benefit all of Worcester,” said QCC’s Associate Vice President for External Affairs, Viviana Abreu-Hernandez. “Federal and State funding is allocated based on the population identified in the census, so it is imperative everyone is counted.”

Recognizing the importance of having everyone in the City participate in the census, in late February Ms. Abreu-Hernandez and QCC’s Director of Community Bridges Déborah L. González, met with Partnership Specialist Edward McGuire, of the Census New York Region Office, to discuss supporting the census efforts by encouraging QCC students and their families to fill out the census form.

“Mr. McGuire indicated that higher education institutions were ‘trusted voices’ in the community and that QCC’s voice will positively contribute to the efforts making sure that each and every member of the Worcester community would be counted in the 2020 Census,” Ms.  Abreu-Hernandez said.

The College immediately jumped into action, filming a variety of videos in different languages to be distributed throughout Worcester.

“One of our main goals was to help remove the concern of disseminating private information, as well as the importance of being counted in the census,” Ms. González said.

In addition to sending internal emails to the QCC community and having the information on the census prominently displayed on the QCC website, the videos were shared with other organizations in Worcester that included:  

  • Latin American Business Organization (LABO)
  • The Latino Education Institute
  • South East Asian Coalition
  • African Community Education
  • Ascentria Care Alliance
  • Worcester Public Schools
  • Worcester Interfaith Alliance
  • Worcester Public Library
  • Worcester Legal Aid
  • Worcester Community Connections Coalition
  • Literacy Volunteers of Greater Worcester

Due to the coronavirus/COVID-19, the deadline to fill out the census was moved to October 31 and on July 16 census takers began visiting homes that have not filled out the census.

“The beauty of these videos is that our students represent the Worcester County community – diverse, multi-language, and engaged,” Ms. Abreu-Hernandez said. “We hope these videos will enlighten people in our diverse communities and remove any fears they may have about filling out the census.”

To view the census videos, visit www.QCC.edu/census.

  • QCC's Director of Mentoring, Gabriel Santner holds a Zoom interview with mentor Hanan Ibraheim and mentee Ibeliz Garcia.
July, 2020

After graduating from high school in 2016, Ibeliz Garcia knew Quinsigamond Community College would be her school of choice. She had been dealing with chronic medical issues that made it necessary for her to attend college close to home and QCC fit the bill.

“When I came to QCC I learned about the mentoring program and signed up with my best friend,” Ms. Garcia said.

...

More...

After graduating from high school in 2016, Ibeliz Garcia knew Quinsigamond Community College would be her school of choice. She had been dealing with chronic medical issues that made it necessary for her to attend college close to home and QCC fit the bill.

“When I came to QCC I learned about the mentoring program and signed up with my best friend,” Ms. Garcia said.

Hanan Ibraheim is a QCC alumna who went on to earn her bachelor’s degree in mathematics, before landing a job as an insurance analyst at Hanover Insurance Group in Worcester. While she enjoyed her job at Hanover, her love for math made her realize she wanted to share her passion with others and decided to go back to school to become a math teacher.  She also came back to QCC, helping in the  Math Center as a tutor. It was at that time that she learned about the college’s mentoring program.

“I thought this was a good way for me to share my experiences,” she said.

She signed up for the program and was paired with Ms. Garcia. It quickly seemed like a very natural fit for the two. Both women had attended Worcester Public Schools - Ms. Ibraheim went to North High, while Ms. Garica went to Claremont Academy. The two both felt an instant connection on their initial meeting.

“I never had a female connection like this unless it was a family member. It was amazing the bond I had with my mentor. We could communicate about anything,” Ms. Garcia said.

“It just happened naturally. We both come from immigrant families and we are very connected with our families. It was amazing and it got us closer,” Ms. Ibraheim said. “Ibeliz is very good at communicating and putting herself out there. We talk about her experiences and her goals. She has such a positive personality. It makes the relationship very outgoing.”

Both mentor and mentee feel they are learning a lot from the partnership. Ms. Ibraheim stressed the importance of respecting the other person’s cultural beliefs, celebrating the similarities and understanding the differences. Ms. Garcia agreed, adding that respectful questions led to many positive and enlightening conversations.

She said Ms. Ibraheim enabled her to see things in a different way and helped get her out of her comfort zone.

“I am a criminal justice major; however, I also love technology. Hanan helped me to realize I loved to work with computers and I added a second major - Computer Systems Engineering Technology - Computer Forensics,” she said. “I learned from Hanan that it’s OK to take a risk and it’s never too late to change careers and make yourself happy.”

While the pandemic has shifted the way mentors and mentees meet, the mentoring partnerships people have forged have not suffered, as this mentoring partnership demonstrated.

“The first virtual meeting was a bit challenging, so we ended up talking on the phone. The second virtual meeting went great. I’m grateful for the technology,” Ms. Ibraheim said.

This new way of meeting each other is particularly beneficial to the partnership, as Ms. Ibraheim is moving to Michigan to get married, and begin a career in the education field. She feels the relationship will continue from afar.

“I feel like everyone should have a mentor,” Ms. Garcia said. “I learned from Hanan and she learned from me.”

Ms. Ibraheim agrees and encourages more people to consider being a mentor.

“The program is designed to be doable for everyone,” she said. “To leave a lasting impression on someone is an amazing feeling.”

To learn more visit QCC Mentoring.

  • PTK students make hygiene kits for QCC's Food Pantry and Resource Center. The entire QCC community is invited to participate.
July, 2020

Being a part of QCC’s Phi Theta Kappa (PTK) Honor Society means more than just good grades, it means being a part of something bigger than you are. It means helping out your community and taking part in community service projects.

While the pandemic has limited some of the available community service projects that PTK members can still do (members need two community service projects and to attend two...

More...

Being a part of QCC’s Phi Theta Kappa (PTK) Honor Society means more than just good grades, it means being a part of something bigger than you are. It means helping out your community and taking part in community service projects.

While the pandemic has limited some of the available community service projects that PTK members can still do (members need two community service projects and to attend two general meetings in order to earn their gold stole), one current service project that is ongoing is making hygiene kits for the QCC Food Pantry and Resource Center. PTK students who participate and make two complete hygiene kits will be eligible for one community service project.

According to PTK Advisor Bonnie Coleman, who plays an integral role in the food pantry and resource center, there is a great need for hygiene products at the food pantry.

“As fast as we get items in they are gone. The students are so grateful,” Ms. Coleman said, adding that the project is not exclusive to PTK students and anyone can make and donate a hygiene kit.

PTK students who are participating in order to earn a community service project must include one of all items listed below (new, factory sealed products only).

  • Soap (individually wrapped)
  • Toothpaste (individually packaged)
  • Toothbrush (individually packaged)
  • Dental Floss
  • Deodorant
  • Shampoo, Conditioner
  • Tampons, Sanitary Pads
  • Hand Sanitizer (individual size)
  • Disinfectant Wipes
  • Diapers (medium size)

Anyone who is interested in making a kit or in donating items to add to a kit, can email Ms. Coleman at bcoleman [at] qcc.mass.edu for more information about how to make a donation and properly package it.

  • QCC/PTK Alumnus Mark Hogan
  • Former PTK officers (L to R): Mary Sylvester, Tony Sanders, Maia Shalev, Mark Hogan and Kyle Mondino.
July, 2020

Mark Hogan has glowing words of praise for Quinsigamond Community College and the Phi Theta Kappa Honor (PTK) Society. The QCC engineering alumnus recently graduated from Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) and attributed much of his success to the foundation he received at QCC.

“If someone is considering attending QCC they should definitely look into it. It’s not only a great...

More...

Mark Hogan has glowing words of praise for Quinsigamond Community College and the Phi Theta Kappa Honor (PTK) Society. The QCC engineering alumnus recently graduated from Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) and attributed much of his success to the foundation he received at QCC.

“If someone is considering attending QCC they should definitely look into it. It’s not only a great experience and an awesome way to improve yourself as a person, it’s a huge help in improving your life overall. Just having an associate’s degree will open up so many more opportunities that you wouldn’t normally get without having years of experience in a field,” he said.

Mr. Hogan's foray into the engineering world began in 2015, taking classes at QCC as a way to better prepare for his future goal, which was to earn a four-year engineering degree at WPI. He had been out of school for some time and realized that while he wanted to attend WPI, he just wasn’t prepared nor did he have the knowledge, skills, or drive to handle WPI’s rigorous engineering schedule.

“I looked into QCC and talked to Engineering Professor Dadbeh Bigonahy. After doing some figuring out, I knew that QCC was the way to go,” he said.

A former roommate told Mr. Hogan about QCC’s many articulation agreements with colleges and universities, and learned that QCC had this type of agreement with WPI. It made his decision to attend QCC even more attractive.

“I started going part-time, taking three classes while I was working a full-time job as an insurance processor. This meant I had to take night classes, and did so practically the entire time I was at QCC. It wasn’t until the last two or three semesters that I was able to go during the day, as I switched jobs and was able to work from home and make my own schedule,” Mr. Hogan said, adding that he also took two classes each summer (one per semester).

“I left QCC prepared to handle anything that was thrown at me, and believe had I not gone here prior to WPI, I would have not been able to complete my degree. Dadbeh really created rigorous expectations of the engineering students, which were vital to my success. He was instrumental in setting me up for success, as he presented his students with challenges that anyone can overcome, but ones that also have benefits that surpass simply ‘doing well,’” he said.

Mr. Hogan said PTK has also had a huge impact on his life. He described joining PTK as soon as he had enough credits, maintaining a 4.0 almost his entire time at QCC; however, by his own admission he initially wasn't very active in the honor society due to his heavy work and school schedules. A  chance conversation with a PTK officer who was one of his classmates made him realize he should get more involved and he met with PTK Advisor Bonnie Coleman.

“Bonnie definitely has a super power or something because I don’t know anyone else who is that good at rallying people, or it’s just her passion for PTK! I went from an Officer-at-Large to an Executive Team Lead working as a volunteer on the Early Chapter Project, and helping start and co-lead the Burncoat Mentoring program,” he said. “It really got me focused on how to get things done, between school work and projects. It made me a better person overall, and equipped me with skills that I really needed, such as public speaking, decision making, confidence, research, networking, and so many more.”

Once Mr. Hogan graduated from QCC, he transferred to WPI’s engineering program, where he was required to do two large qualifying projects in order to earn his four-year degree. For his first project, he chose to research college greenhouses to help determine what QCC/PTK could do to make sure their next greenhouse was the best it could be, working with two fellow PTK transfer students and another WPI student. His second project involved working as the project manager for a 10-person team, creating a unique application for both patients and staff at a Boston hospital. Similar to Google maps, the application enables people to navigate inside the hospital and other buildings, has handicap accessible features and the ability to change to different languages. The program is particularly valuable, as it is interchangeable with any hospital.

Today he is posed to start a new career and said he is thankful for his time at QCC that brought him full circle in realizing his dream for the future.

“I definitely believe QCC gave me a good foundation. Again, not just as a student but as a person as well. On top of that, QCC gives you the ability to figure out how to learn. The courses aren’t ridiculously hard, and manageable to the point where you can generally take them at your own pace. I really could go on for a long time about how great the school is, how important education is, and just what an amazing time I had going here. Again, I would have gone to QCC for four years if I could have – it’s that great of a school,” he said.

Class of 2020 Ted Tech Pinning
July, 2020

Due to the pandemic, the Radiologic Technology Class of 2020 was unable to hold its traditional pinning ceremony; however, with some ingenuity by Hannah Canedy (Class Treasuruer) and Jennifer Mangrum (Class President), the class was able to experience a unique virtual pinning celebration. The two students decided to band together and make a video commemorating their program’s unique year.   

...

More...

Due to the pandemic, the Radiologic Technology Class of 2020 was unable to hold its traditional pinning ceremony; however, with some ingenuity by Hannah Canedy (Class Treasuruer) and Jennifer Mangrum (Class President), the class was able to experience a unique virtual pinning celebration. The two students decided to band together and make a video commemorating their program’s unique year.   

The Class of 2020 chose Jonathan Umana, clinical instructor for QCC students at UMass Memorial, University Campus. Mr. Umana is a 2011 QCC alumna of the Rad Tech program.

“Congratulations you did it! You should all be proud of what you’ve accomplished. You’ve all had to overcome various challenges and difficulties in order to get to this day,” he said.

In his address to the students, Mr. Umana talked about having the courage to overcome anxiety and fear as the graduates go into the world.

“Welcome to the profession. You have worked so hard to get here. Continue with that work ethic and continue to grow and I’m confident the Class of 2020 will be successful,” he said.

Visit QCC's Radiologic Technology Program to learn more. 

  • Lucey (front) and Brinley prepare for a lifetime of service.
  • Juno became Edith Morris's new service dog and lifelong companion.
July, 2020

Sometimes our most trusted and valued companions are of the four-legged variety. For some, these amazing dogs have become a person’s eyes, ears, and hands, not to mention best friend. No one knows this better than Kathleen “Kate” O'Connor, program manager for the Center for Workforce Development & Continuing Education at Quinsigamond Community College.

Since 2016, Ms...

More...

Sometimes our most trusted and valued companions are of the four-legged variety. For some, these amazing dogs have become a person’s eyes, ears, and hands, not to mention best friend. No one knows this better than Kathleen “Kate” O'Connor, program manager for the Center for Workforce Development & Continuing Education at Quinsigamond Community College.

Since 2016, Ms. O’Connor has been part of Canine Companions for Independence®, acting as a puppy raiser for the organization. The non-profit organization is dedicated to enhancing the lives of people with disabilities by providing highly trained assistance dogs to those in need at no cost.

“With coronavirus/COVID-19, now more than ever people are isolated, particularly those with a compromised immune system. They really rely on these dogs to do everything from getting a cell phone, opening the refrigerator to companionship,” she said.

Dogs have always been a part of Ms. O’Connor’s life; however, with the sad death of her last beloved family dog, she vowed she was done owning a dog. Then the unthinkable happened. A close cousin, Bill Lucey, who grew up in the same neighborhood as she did, had an accident that left him wheelchair bound. To help in navigating his new world after the accident, Mr. Lucey applied for a Canine Companions service dog through the Canine Companions organization, and in August 2016 went to the Canine Companions training center in Long Island, N.Y. to begin team training. Team Training is where the dogs are paired with a graduate during an intensive two-week team training period before going to their forever homes.

“Any family member could attend the graduation and so I went. I ended up falling in love with the organization, its mission, and how life-changing it is to the graduates,” Ms. O’Connor said.

Right then she decided to become a puppy raiser, a role that requires taking an 8-week-old puppy into a person’s home for 18 months to become socialized and learn basic commands. They train four types of assistance dogs to master over 40 specialized commands: Service Dogs, Skilled Companions, Hearing Dogs and Facility Dogs. The dog breeds used include yellow labs, black labs, golden retrievers and golden/lab mixes. In 2017, “Juno,” a yellow lab, became her first puppy and for the following year and a half, she became a part of the O’Connor family.

For 18 months, Juno went everywhere with Ms. O’Connor; even attending work meetings so she could get used to a group setting. All too quickly the time was up and Juno was returned to Long Island to attend professional training, where dogs go for six months after the time is up with their puppy raisers. In May 2019, after completing six months of professional training and the two-week team training, Juno was placed with her graduate, Edith Morris.

“You spend a lot of time with the dogs and love them so much, but you know this is puppy raising and that they must leave to find their forever home,” Ms. O’Connor said, adding, “What is so unique is that the new owner (graduate) gets to meet the puppy raiser and family, and most graduates keep in touch with their puppy raisers.”

While Ms. O’Connor was sad to see the first dog she raised leave, she keeps in touch with Ms. Morris to this day. Ms. O’Connor has gone on to raise two more puppies, Brinley and Lucey (named after her cousin). Brinley has been with her since Sept. 2018 and was due back in Long Island in May, but due to the outbreak of the coronavirus/COVID-19, just returned to Long Island on July 20 to start professional training. Lucey is the new puppy that Ms. O’Connor is now raising.

Currently there are over 400 people on the waiting list to get a dog, with close to 100 in the Northeast region alone. One of the biggest issues the Canine Companions organization faces is raising money to fund the non-profit. In addition to puppy raising, Ms. O’Connor is the current DogFest New England Vice Chair, an online event that is raising funds and awareness for the mission of the organization.

“It’s exciting to see the changes you can make in people’s lives,” she said.

  • QCC student Daniel Doroff
July, 2020

The world as we have always known it has changed. Today we are inundated with new terms, phrases and rules of interaction as we quarantine and slowly reintegrate activities we previously may have taken for granted. One big change has been higher education and how classes are now being delivered.

At QCC, we made the difficult decision to offer the Fall 2020 semester remotely (with a few slight...

More...

The world as we have always known it has changed. Today we are inundated with new terms, phrases and rules of interaction as we quarantine and slowly reintegrate activities we previously may have taken for granted. One big change has been higher education and how classes are now being delivered.

At QCC, we made the difficult decision to offer the Fall 2020 semester remotely (with a few slight exceptions). The decision was made for the safety of QCC and the entire community. Based on what is happening in other states, it certainly seems like it was the smarter choice. Students are now hearing about remote instruction and online learning but are unsure what they actually mean. Let's break it down a bit for you. 

Remote and online may sound the same, but they are delivered differently. In the case of remote, there are actually two versions. We understand the confusion, so let's get to the bottom of it. We know official definitions may seem a bit dry, but we will break it down for you later.

There are three ways you can learn "online" at QCC:

  • Online: An online course is a course that is provided entirely through the institution's Learning Management System. No on-site class meetings are required.
  • Remote synchronous (RS): Classes that will require specific "live" meeting times through technology tools, such as video conferencing, to facilitate student-faculty interaction. Assignments and assessments are completed according to the course syllabus. These scheduled classes may be recorded and uploaded to the learning management system for later review by students.
  • Remote asynchronous (RA): Classes that will not require specific meeting times. Assignments and assessments are completed according to the course syllabus. Content delivery may include prepared videos, pre-recorded lectures, or other types of online presentation.
  • Did you get all of that? Here it is in very unofficial terms...

An online class is basically 'on-demand'. It's like watching a Netflix series with due dates. Go online, get your assignments and have a specified amount of time to complete and submit them. You communicate with your professor and classmates via email and online message board discussions. It's on your time, within reason. This type of class has the least amount of "human interaction" and for some people this is exactly what they want. 

Remote Synchronous are set class times in an online meeting space. QCC uses Blackboard, which was built for education, but has "Zoom-like" meeting spaces. You can see your professor and classmates on the screen in real time. You can all talk to each other and interact, learn from a live lecture and have question and answer sessions verbally or through the chat function. Often they are recorded and uploaded, so you can go back and watch them again later if you missed something. Students will have a syllabus to follow, due dates, and everything is done virtually. This is often the best type of course for students who like structure.

Remote Asynchronous is a hybrid of the previous two. This will vary depending on the class and the professor. This type of class involves less reading and more prepared videos and presentations by your professor. There are assignments and due dates, as above, but no set "meeting" times.

We understand educational options and ways of life have changed and that there is no 'one-size fits all' for your education, your life, your lifestyle, your job, your family or even your commute... or lack of. Hopefully we have covered all the bases to make QCC convenient for anyone who wants to better their life, advance their career and attend college.

  • A trip to Las Vegas is the grand proze in the "30 Rounds in 30 Days" fundraising event.
July, 2020

The Quinsigamond Community College Foundation is holding a unique fundraising event to provide scholarships and critical basic needs security to underserved and underrepresented students. Now more than ever, QCC students are in need of assistance and support.

The event, entitled “30 Rounds in 30 Days”, is a golfer's dream.  It features 30 individual prizes, so perhaps it should be...

More...

The Quinsigamond Community College Foundation is holding a unique fundraising event to provide scholarships and critical basic needs security to underserved and underrepresented students. Now more than ever, QCC students are in need of assistance and support.

The event, entitled “30 Rounds in 30 Days”, is a golfer's dream.  It features 30 individual prizes, so perhaps it should be called 30 in 30 for 30! The grand prize package includes airfare for two to Las Vegas, Nevada, overnight accommodations at the Marriott Grand Chateau (4 nights), as well as 18 hole golf for two at Cascata Club, considered by some to be the “8th Wonder in the Golfing World.”

Other top prizes in the 30-day raffle include:

  • A trip to Naples, Florida that includes airfare and overnight accommodations for three people.
  • Golf at The Vineyards Country Club’s two link style and traditional style courses, where challenging play is available for every golfer at every skill level and handicap.
  • A getaway to Chatham on Cape Cod that includes overnight accommodations and golfing at Eastward Ho!, considered the finest course on the Cape and named one of the best courses in North America by Golf Digest.

Additional prizes include golf at one of 27 golf courses and clubs across New England to appeal to both the seasoned or beginner golfer.

The raffle is limited to 1,000 tickets, offering excellent odds to win one of 30 prizes. Each ticket is $50. The raffle will begin on September 1, 2020 and end on September 30, 2020. Winning tickets are based on the last three digits of the Massachusetts mid-day daily lottery number.

“By participating in this fundraising event, you are contributing to Central Massachusetts' recovery and economic development. You are helping students complete their college degrees. You are providing basic needs security to make a significant difference in our student's lives,” said QCC Foundation President Dr. Linda Maykel.

To purchase tickets, contact the QCC Foundation at qccfoundation [at] qcc.mass.edu or call Assistant Director of Operations, Shirley Dempsey at 508.854.4520. The deadline to purchase tickets is August 31, 4:00 p.m. No tickets can be sold after this deadline. To learn more, visit QCC.edu/30rounds

  • QCC's campus may be empty but its faculty and staff are only a phone call or email away ready to lend a helping hand.
July, 2020

Monday, August 3 - OER Virtual Drop-In Session, 3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.  August is OER Month at QCC! For those unfamiliar with OER, it stands for open educational resources. This is a resource for students, which allows them to access textbooks and other class materials at no cost. These materials are in the public domain or have been released under a...

More...

Monday, August 3 - OER Virtual Drop-In Session, 3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.  August is OER Month at QCC! For those unfamiliar with OER, it stands for open educational resources. This is a resource for students, which allows them to access textbooks and other class materials at no cost. These materials are in the public domain or have been released under a license so they can be freely used, changed, or shared with others.  To learn more about OER textbooks or other materials for a course, visit an upcoming, virtual drop-in information session!

Visit OER Information session to register. Space is limited to 10 slots per session.

Thursday, August 13 - OER Virtual Drop-On Session, 10:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. Visit OER Information session to register. Space is limited to 10 slots per session.

August Spotlight: Virtual Admissions Information Session! Thursday, August 20, 4:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Learn why QCC is the smarter option for higher education! QCC has over 100 degree and certificate programs, flexible schedule options, financing options for everyone, and transfer paths to four-year colleges that translate to significant tuition savings.

Register Today  and get all the information you need start your future this fall. For more event details, please contact the Admissions Office at 508.854.4262 or email admissions [at] qcc.mass.edu 

  • QCC's new egaming team for the League of Legends held its first exhibition game in mid July.
July, 2020

E-Sports       

QCC Athletics new egaming team for the League of Legends held its first exhibition game on July 18 against Bunker Hill Community College. The students competed in three matches and while they didn’t come away winners, it was a great opening exhibition game.

“The students had such a good time and they want to play more exhibition games...

More...

E-Sports       

QCC Athletics new egaming team for the League of Legends held its first exhibition game on July 18 against Bunker Hill Community College. The students competed in three matches and while they didn’t come away winners, it was a great opening exhibition game.

“The students had such a good time and they want to play more exhibition games this summer, so we are working on scheduling with Bunker Hill again, Northern Essex Community College and possibly Mass Bay Community College,” said Athletic Director Lisa Gurnick.

This is the first time QCC has had an esports team, which is being coached by QCC’s Learning Manager Nate Mello.

Summer Zoom Yoga    

Are you zooming this summer? Let the stress just fall away from you every Tuesday and Thursday from 12:00 p.m. – 12:40 p.m. and take a free Zoom class with Tammy Chiarizio. This is a great way to relax and enjoy the summer months. For those interested in receiving a Zoom invite, email Ms. Gurnick at lisag [at] qcc.mass.edu

July, 2020

July, 2020

More...

July, 2020

July, 2020

On May 10, 2020, Cary Morse was appointed as Dean of Library and Academic Support Services.

On June 8, 2020, Josh Cole was appointed temporary Interim Assistant Director of Student Life and Leadership.

Jessica August will be starting as full-time Dental Hygiene faculty. Jessica holds a Master of Science in Dental...

More...

On May 10, 2020, Cary Morse was appointed as Dean of Library and Academic Support Services.

On June 8, 2020, Josh Cole was appointed temporary Interim Assistant Director of Student Life and Leadership.

Jessica August will be starting as full-time Dental Hygiene faculty. Jessica holds a Master of Science in Dental Hygiene with an emphasis in Dental Hygiene Education from the University of Bridgeport – Fones School of Dental Hygiene. Through full-time teaching opportunities at Idaho State University and MCPHS University – Forsyth School of Dental Hygiene, she gained valuable experience, which has prepared her to meet the challenges of clinical and didactic teaching. Her knowledge and understanding of dental hygiene education and strong clinical dental hygiene skills will allow her to guide, mentor, engage, and instruct dental hygiene students in skill development and progression for entry into the profession of dentistry.

Keith Hirst will be starting as full-time Respiratory Care faculty. As a Respiratory Care Leader, Keith has over 20 years of clinical, leadership, research and teaching expertise. He has teaching experience in both live and on-line classes for both undergraduate and graduate courses at Rush University and Northeastern University using Blackboard and expertise in CoARC and NBRC standards and CoARC site evaluations. Keith holds a Master of Science in Respiratory Care Leadership from Northeastern University — College of Professional Studies.

Please join us in welcoming Cary, Josh, Jessica and Keith into their new roles at QCC.