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June, 2020

  • QCC will continue remote instruction for the Fall 2020 semester.
June, 2020

Quinsigamond Community College will continue remote instruction for the fall 2020 semester. According to QCC President Dr. Luis G. Pedraja, the decision was made to ensure the safety of the College’s students, faculty, staff and the community.

“We did not make this decision lightly. The administration felt this was in the best interest of the QCC community with the continued...

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Quinsigamond Community College will continue remote instruction for the fall 2020 semester. According to QCC President Dr. Luis G. Pedraja, the decision was made to ensure the safety of the College’s students, faculty, staff and the community.

“We did not make this decision lightly. The administration felt this was in the best interest of the QCC community with the continued uncertainty of COVID-19,” President Pedraja said. “Due to the pandemic, we feel it’s most prudent to leverage our experience and expertise with online and remote instruction and unprecedented support. This will allow for little to no disruption of services in the Fall, should the virus spike as predicted later this year. We will continue to monitor the situation, and follow the medical advice of local, state, and national organizations. A limited number of courses, such as labs or clinical experiences that require direct hands-on participation and cannot be delivered remotely, will be offered on campus, as long as we can do so safely.”

QCC has a long history of online education and has offered hundreds of courses remotely prior to the pandemic. In early March, the College adapted quickly to the changing landscape and transitioned its in-person spring semester courses to remote instruction, in addition to delivering its full array of support services remotely.

Today, college students are facing an uphill battle as many are rethinking their fall college plans and looking for impossible guarantees from four-year schools that dorms will remain open for the entire academic year. Students looking for the “on campus” experience could find themselves back home and out thousands of dollars in a few short weeks or months, should residential schools find they must move to a remote form of education delivery, as they did this spring due to an increase in the virus. On campus classes will also have a new look and feel as masks and social distancing will be required in all public spaces.

“This pandemic is one that is transforming how we look at higher education,” President Pedraja continued. “Right now no one knows what the future holds and while we all want to be optimistic, we must be cognizant that our world may be forever changed. Making smart higher education decisions now, will pay off substantially in the future.”

For the latest information visit www.QCC.edu

  • QCC President Dr. Luis Pedraja applauds the Supreme Court's decision on DACA.
June, 2020

Quinsigamond Community College welcomed June 18th landmark decision by the United States Supreme Court that blocked the dismantling of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. The College’s President, Luis G. Pedraja, Ph.D., is a vocal advocate of the program and previously joined over 164 colleges and universities from across the country in signing an amicus brief last October...

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Quinsigamond Community College welcomed June 18th landmark decision by the United States Supreme Court that blocked the dismantling of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. The College’s President, Luis G. Pedraja, Ph.D., is a vocal advocate of the program and previously joined over 164 colleges and universities from across the country in signing an amicus brief last October, supporting the close to 650,000 young immigrants who came to the United States as children. Known as the Dreamers, these young adults have been protected against the threat of deportation under the DACA program since 2012. The program’s termination was threatened by the current administration.

“This decision was important and vital to the betterment of our nation, our community and our college. QCC stands for a diverse and inclusive community and this decision gives our DACA students the knowledge that they can pursue their education without fear of deportation,” President Pedraja said.

QCC’s student body is a reflection of the diverse cultures that represent Central Massachusetts. Dr. Pedraja said the decision is one that is a good start in working towards a more equitable society.

“The world is changing and we must make sure it changes in a positive fashion. The Dreamers are an integral part of our community. They are the healthcare providers, the first responders, the educators, the scientists and the frontline workers who are taking care of our citizens during the pandemic,” President Pedraja said. “This decision shows there is hope for a brighter future.”

  • Gateway graduate Serena Hughes and her family.
  • Gateway graduate Ninoshka “Nino” Rabell-Santana proudly shows off her diploma.
  • Gateway graduate Jared Mosely celebrates with his family.
  • Gateway graduate Brenna King shares her special moment with her dad.
  • Gateway graduate Julia Bohan and her family.
  • Gateway graduate Joe Poirier with his proud parents.
  • Gateway graduate Tyler Steward and family.
  • From left: Gateway to College Director Marci Skillings, graduate Joe Poirier and Gateway Counselor Jenna Glazer.
  • Gateway Counselor Jenna Glazer's rescue dog, Feeney, got in on the well wishes to graduates..
June, 2020

High school graduation is a special time in a student’s life but it’s even more so for those students who have overcome adversity and beat the odds. For 27 students in Quinsigamond Community College’s Gateway to College Program, the dream of graduating from high school became a reality this month and they became a part of the historic Class of 2020. 

The students were part of QCC’s...

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High school graduation is a special time in a student’s life but it’s even more so for those students who have overcome adversity and beat the odds. For 27 students in Quinsigamond Community College’s Gateway to College Program, the dream of graduating from high school became a reality this month and they became a part of the historic Class of 2020. 

The students were part of QCC’s Gateway to College Program that was developed for students between the ages of 16-21, who have dropped out of high school or are at risk of dropping out. Students accepted into the program work on obtaining their high school diplomas, while also simultaneously earning college credits.

Due to the pandemic, this year’s graduating class was unable to hold an in-person graduation ceremony; however, the Gateway staff still wanted to hold some type of special celebration to commemorate the accomplishments of the students.

“Gateway to College has always had a really personal graduation ceremony, and it was something we were all really sad to miss out on this year. Celebrating the accomplishments of our students is a great way to end the school year,” said Senior Gateway Outreach Counselor, Jenna Glazer.

QCC’s Gateway to College Director Marci Skillings came up with the idea of a “Grad 2 Go” graduation celebration that entailed the Gateway staff stopping by each graduates’ homes, taking photos and wishing them well. Prior to the Gateway staff visits, the students were sent caps, gowns, diplomas, and as well as “Class of 2020” masks to make the event feel extra special.

“What’s more personal than Gateway staff coming to your house? All together, we visited 15 of our graduates over six days. I drove 267 miles in total. One day we started at a farm and ended on a lake,” Ms. Glazer said. “High school graduation is something many of us (myself included) took for granted, but for many of our students, it seemed impossible for a long time. It was definitely not the graduation any of us expected but it felt “right,” in the sense that it was very personal and really demonstrated the relationship that we have with our students and how much we care about them. Students and their families were grateful that we took the time to visit everyone. It will be a graduation that we’ll all remember for a long time.”

Despite graduating in the midst of a pandemic and an abrupt shift to remote learning, most of the students graduated with special honors (college GPA over 3.0 or 3.7), a testament to the determination and perseverance of the Gateway students.

Gateway graduate Ninoshka “Nino” Rabell-Santana said the Gateway to College Program was a true gateway to a better life and opportunity for her.

“Being a part of the Gateway to College community made me feel it was OK to not to be perfect. It taught me it was OK to fail in life over and over again until I was finally able to succeed in life,” she said. “Gateway has been such a blessing to me and to everyone in it.”

Each year the graduates are asked to answer a survey. One of the questions posed asked them what the most important thing was that they learned while in the Gateway program. Answers ran the gamut from independence, time management and patience to understanding that their life isn’t over, it’s just beginning.

According to Ms. Skillings, most of the graduates will be staying on at QCC to complete their degrees, while others will be attending Worcester State University or UMass Amherst.

Her sentiment to the graduates is one she hopes they will remember.

“You have all balanced a new normal and graduated in the midst of a pandemic. That is so amazing and we are so proud.  You will always be a part of the Gateway to College family and have a special place in our hearts and here at QCC.  We wish you the best as you head out in a world of unknowns and we know you will succeed because you showed us you could and we believed just as you did.”

Gateway Class of 2020:

  • Mary Astorga**
  • Nate Berthiahume
  • Allyson Bishop*
  • Julia Bohan**
  • Gabby Boivin*
  • Adren Demac**
  • Emily Dodge*
  • Raykel Dufrense
  • Brittney Dziejma**
  • William Guenette
  • Deborah Holan
  • Serena Hughes*
  • Brenna King
  • Tyler Martinelli*
  • Mia Mascitelli**
  • Arvid Mikkila*
  • Isabella Monserrate*
  • Jared Mosely
  • John (JT) Phinney**
  • Joseph Poirier
  • Ninoshka “Nino” Rabell-Santana
  • Brandon Roux
  • Danielle Ryan
  • Saahil Srivastava*
  • Tyler Steward*

*Linda Huddle Award winners (GPA over 3.0)

**President’s Award Winners (GPA over 3.7)

For more information on the program visit www.QCC.edu/Gateway.

  • QCC has numerous transfer agreements with public and private 4-year institutions.
  • QCC offers an afforable pathway to 4-year institutions.
June, 2020

On June 18, over 75 students took part in Quinsigamond Community College’s first Virtual Transfer Fair. The online event held on a Zoom platform, enabled students to virtually meet with colleges and universities in the region and learn more about transfer opportunities, application requirements and other important information.

Students received an email invitation leading them to a registration link if...

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On June 18, over 75 students took part in Quinsigamond Community College’s first Virtual Transfer Fair. The online event held on a Zoom platform, enabled students to virtually meet with colleges and universities in the region and learn more about transfer opportunities, application requirements and other important information.

Students received an email invitation leading them to a registration link if they had expressed interest in the fair, and Dan de la Torre, coordinator for QCC’s Transfer and Articulation program and Transfer Counselor Beth Fullerton co-hosted the event that began in a group session for all attendees. In this opening session, students were given a quick overview on the distance of each college and university from the Worcester region, a brief recap on QCC programs that meet MassTransfer guidelines, as well as programs that have transfer agreements with private institutions and out-of-state institutions. Then, via the Zoom chat box, students received a link to a page that listed the schools and their individual zoom meeting addresses. Students could then directly connect to schools they were interested in and met directly with transfer admissions representatives.

“This was a brand new venture for us so there was a bit of uncertainty and our 'fingers crossed' so to speak," Mr. de la Torre said.

Assistant Director of Transfer Admissions for UMass Amherst, Kevin Van Develde, said this was the first virtual transfer fair he had attended.

“From our end it was very smooth and we encountered no issues,” he said, adding, “Eight students attended our portion of the event, each with great questions.”

Associate Director of Transfer Admissions for Fitchburg State University, Limari Rivera, also felt the event went well.

“I think the fact that we all met as a group before the actual event and did a practice run helped us figure out the best way to conduct the virtual fair.  We were going to do it a completely different way until we met and decided that would be too intense and confusing.  I think the way it was done was great and flowed nicely,” she said, adding, "We are easily accessible for commuter students and most of our programs align nicely with QCC's programs. We have a great working relationship with the transfer advisors at QCC, which makes the transfer process for the students easier."

Mr. Van Develde noted that since the inception of the MassTransfer program, a good amount of UMass Amherst’s community college transfer students are from QCC, demonstating the strong partnerships QCC has with its four-year partner institutions.

Ms. Fullerton said the feedback QCC has received from student participants has also been positive, with students noting how being able to personally see and chat directly with school representatives makes such a difference.

“I think that it is incredibly important for students to connect with representatives from four-year schools during a fair—students get individual attention and their questions answered about a university’s specific bachelor degrees, admission requirements, and resources,” she said, adding that plans are in the works for a Fall virtual transfer fair.

Other colleges and universities that attended the virtual fair included:

  • Anna Maria College
  • Becker College
  • Fitchburg State University
  • Framingham State University
  • UMass Amherst
  • UMass Boston
  • UMass Dartmouth
  • UMass Lowell
  • Westfield State University
  • Worcester State University

For additional information, visit QCC Transfer Department

  • Professor Jim Heffernan gives a robotic wave to the Class of 2020.
June, 2020

Many may know Quinsigamond Community College’s Professor of Electronics Engineering Technology, James Heffernan as the professor who made the amazing robotic binary graduation greeting for the Class of 2020 (with some key assistance from his wife Luisa). What many may not know is that for most of his adult life he has been educating students on the transformative powers of technology....

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Many may know Quinsigamond Community College’s Professor of Electronics Engineering Technology, James Heffernan as the professor who made the amazing robotic binary graduation greeting for the Class of 2020 (with some key assistance from his wife Luisa). What many may not know is that for most of his adult life he has been educating students on the transformative powers of technology.

Locally educated in Worcester public schools (he attended Flagg St. Elementary School, Forest Grove Jr. High, and Doherty High School), Mr. Heffernan earned a BA in Mathematics from Assumption College and a BS in Electrical Engineering from Worcester Polytechnic Institute. After graduation from both colleges in 1985, he worked as an electrical engineer for Worcester companies Micro Networks and Allegro Microsystems. Then in 1990, he and his wife decided to fulfill a dream and traveled to Ghana, West Africa where they taught school for a year.

“I taught Electrical Principles at Normal Technical Secondary School and my wife taught English part-time. We had our 2-year-old son with us, and our daughter was born while we were there. This was something my wife and I had been planning to do since we were married in 1985. Living some place very different gives you a new perspective on the world. We had a great experience overall, the people were very welcoming, we loved the food, and I learned some of the traditional Ghanaian music,” he said.

Once back in the states, Mr. Heffernan continued to teach, working at Worcester Technical Institute (WTI), a post-secondary technical school that was part of the Worcester Vocational Technical School system. He worked there for eight years before it closed. WTI’s loss was QCC’s gain and in September 1999, he began his teaching career at QCC (in addition to earning a Master’s in Computer Science at Fitchburg State University in 2005).

“I had developed the Electromechanical Technology program at WTI to prepare graduates to work as technicians in high-tech manufacturing. WTI was closed in 1999, and many of the technical programs were brought over to QCC, along with some of the WTI faculty. Electromechanical Technology eventually became Electronics Engineering Technology - Mechatronics Option,” he said.

He said one of reasons he enjoys teaching at QCC is the diversity of students that you often find in a community college setting.

“I like the variety of students that we get - different socio-economic backgrounds, different ethnicities, different ages, etc. The older students have a positive impact on the younger students, and foster a more professional climate. And in the Electronics Engineering Technology labs, I like the fact that we can provide students with an authentic hands-on educational experience,” he said.

Throughout his years at the college, Mr. Heffernan has had many inspiring, compelling and outright funny stories. His favorite one involved a robotic hand, built by one of his students using the QCC Fab lab to 3D print all of the parts for the project.

“The fingers are controlled by a person wearing a glove that has flex sensors on it. I brought the hand to a QCC Open House for recruitment, and while demonstrating it, the middle finger got stuck, so when I closed my hand I was giving everyone the finger. Fortunately, we noticed quickly and were back to normal after a quick soldering job,” he said.

While certainly a funny story, it also demonstrates the amazing advances in the technology world and the growth the industry has seen.

“I am seeing an increasing use of automation and robotics in manufacturing and other areas, and a corresponding increase in demand for technicians that can troubleshoot electronic, electrical and mechanical systems,” he said, noting that over 75 companies in the region are hiring electronics and mechatronics technicians.

He encourages people looking for an exciting career to consider Electronics Engineering Technology and QCC.

“QCC offers a path to an exciting career that pays well, without getting saddled with large college loans. We have been seeing an increasing demand for 2-year technical graduates. And many companies will reimburse students that continue their education,” he added.

When not teaching students, Mr. Heffernan is busy playing keyboards in a few local bands (you might have heard him play in the QCC Faculty Jazz Ensemble; dancing salsa or swing with his wife; or camping, hiking, backpacking or running in the woods with his faithful dog Bo).  

  • QCC’s Diversity and Inclusion Advisory Committee
June, 2020

The Black Lives Matter protests seen across the country have opened the floodgates to important conversations and even more importantly, actions. At Quinsigamond Community College, President Dr. Luis Pedraja is making sure the College is addressing the issues of systemic racism head-on, with in-depth conversations on racial issues and the impact of systemic racism on the College and community....

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The Black Lives Matter protests seen across the country have opened the floodgates to important conversations and even more importantly, actions. At Quinsigamond Community College, President Dr. Luis Pedraja is making sure the College is addressing the issues of systemic racism head-on, with in-depth conversations on racial issues and the impact of systemic racism on the College and community.

“Together as a community, in the days and weeks to follow we will be working to ensure that our practices and curriculum reflect diverse and inclusive perspectives. We will work on identifying barriers to equity, then develop and implement a strategic action plan to address them,” Dr. Pedraja said.

QCC’s Diversity and Inclusion Advisory Committee, co- chaired by QCC staff member Selina Boria and faculty member Brenda Safford, have already begun holding voluntary, remote conversational talks, “Your Voice Matters: Community Conversations,” for faculty and staff. This is an opportunity for faculty and staff to engage in open dialogue.

“The Black Lives Matter protests have prompted institutions to review how well they are cultivating a campus climate that values diversity and fosters student success,” Professor Safford said. “The Diversity and Inclusion Advisory Committee realized the need to provide a space for faculty and staff to have a platform to share concerns and to learn about racial injustices and systemic racism.”

The College is also planning similar group discussions in student services, academic affairs, staffing, campus police, administrative services, and other areas on campus “to continue the conversations and address any concerns in our community.”

“We will make certain our practices and curriculum reflect diverse and inclusive perspectives. It is imperative that we continue to educate our college community about systemic racism and amplify the voices of those who must be heard in our society in order to effect change,” President Pedraja said.

The College also plans to resume its Brave Space sessions for students in the fall, if not sooner. This ongoing program enables students to engage in constructive, courageous conversations in a safe and judgement-free environment.

Read more from President Pedraja

  • From left: Nicole Murphy, Devon Bruyer and Carol Murphy.
June, 2020

Wyvern nation’s roots run deep in the Murphy family. Since the early 80s when Accounting Professor Carol Murphy was a part-time student at Quinsigamond Community College, the college has been a part of their lives. Today, Ms. Murphy is an adjunct professor at the College, her daughter-in-law is an alum and her grandson is a current engineering student at QCC.

“I am so, so happy...

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Wyvern nation’s roots run deep in the Murphy family. Since the early 80s when Accounting Professor Carol Murphy was a part-time student at Quinsigamond Community College, the college has been a part of their lives. Today, Ms. Murphy is an adjunct professor at the College, her daughter-in-law is an alum and her grandson is a current engineering student at QCC.

“I am so, so happy they took advantage of this college. People care here, they want you to succeed as a student and a professional,” she said.

For Ms. Murphy, the path to QCC and higher education came later in life.

“In high school I attended a college prep school and at the end of sophomore year was told ‘I was not college material,’ so I transferred to a school with business courses.  I absolutely loved my bookkeeping course; just couldn't get enough of it. It made sense to me. After graduating high school, I became a full charge bookkeeper in the business world,” she said.

Eventually Ms. Murphy left that world, started a family and had two sons. Once they were in preschool, she began thinking about working part-time.

“Two friends, in one week, asked why I didn't go to college to get paid more for what I knew,” she said.

A light bulb went off and at the age of 32, she decided to try a couple of courses. 

After starting at Worcester State, she realized she needed more flexibility and decided to attend QCC, because it was the perfect fit for her schedule.

“Plus my husband graduated from QCC years before and had been successful,” she added.

She ended up taking two courses a semester at QCC, then transferring to Assumption College where she earned a bachelor’s degree in business with a concentration in accounting, at the age of 40. While attending college, she also worked as an accounting tutor in QCC’s learning center and said she loved helping students understand the courses. It was the start of a lifetime love affair of learning.

“I started in graduate school in the Nichols MBA program and asked if I could teach a course to see if I liked it,” she said, adding that when she was given the opportunity to teach she “loved it.”

She taught as an adjunct professor at QCC for a few years before applying and being hired for a full-time position in 2000. It would be a position she would hold until 2017, before going back to being an adjunct professor.

Ms. Murphy’s daughter-in-law Nicole Murphy is also a QCC alum, having come to QCC looking to advance her nursing career at Beaumont Rehabilitation and Skilled Nursing Center.

“My mother-in-law has always been a strong advocate for QCC. She is aware of how flexible the schedules can be to meet your other priorities in life while still maintaining a degree.  It gave me a sense of pride when instructors knew she was my mother-in-law. I have been at my workplace for over 20 years and I always appreciate dedication and a long history at a career. It is special to me to now be part of that with her,” Nicole Murphy said, adding “With my career and family the flexibility was key to my success.”

Nichole Murphy’s son, Devon Bruyer, has also found QCC to be the perfect place to begin his future, a fact that comes as no surprise to both mother and grandmother.

“My mother-in-law and I both felt QCC was a good fit for Devon. He is not the type to sit in a class five days a week, which is why he went to a trade school. We both know he will come out with a great degree but can also continue to work in his field for real life practice. It also makes me very happy he is still home with us,” Nicole Murphy said.

Mr. Bruyer said he researched many schools with his grandmother before deciding on QCC.

“I find QCC to be more diverse and open to the community. Most of the students feel equal with each other. QCC is close to home and an affordable option. I have seen how successful my grandmother and mother are in life. I am proud to follow in their footsteps while earning my degree,” he said. “It is a great place to get your degree, especially if you want to live at home and work in the community. QCC offers a wide variety of options to work with everyday life. “

Carol Murphy sums it up for those considering attending QCC.

“We have it all, try us out, you won't be sorry!”

  • QCC Alumnus Bobby Kapel
June, 2020

Bobby Kapel knows the value of an education. Before emigrating from Liberia, West Africa in 2012, Mr. Kapel taught high school students in a time when there was great civil unrest. Teaching in his home country would become a pivotal point in his life and one that he would do until moving to the States to realize his own dream through higher education.

“Liberia was a post war country with...

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Bobby Kapel knows the value of an education. Before emigrating from Liberia, West Africa in 2012, Mr. Kapel taught high school students in a time when there was great civil unrest. Teaching in his home country would become a pivotal point in his life and one that he would do until moving to the States to realize his own dream through higher education.

“Liberia was a post war country with limited resources for teachers and students. On many occasions I had to improvise for my class because school administration and the department of education were unable to provide the necessary resources and accommodations for students and teachers,” he said, knowing he was making a positive impact on the lives of his students and their futures.

He continued with his teaching until coming to the U.S. in 2012, living first in Pennsylvania before moving to Worcester in 2016 and working in the human services field. In 2017, he came to Quinsigamond Community College to realize a dream of furthering his education and bettering his future.

 “I met many friends at work and my community who gave me a lot of positive feedback about QCC. Based on that, I decided to take on the next chapter in my life to attend college,” he said.

It was during his first visit to QCC that he met Enrollment Counselor Eduardo Rivas.

“I first met Bobby last year in the Admissions office. I helped him with his admissions process and referred him to Gilmarie Vongphakdy (coordinator of the Future Focus program) as a good candidate for the Future Focus program. I also referred him to different offices such as the career office to get prior learning credit (he obtain prior learning for multiple classes) and the mentoring program,” Mr. Rivas said.

“QCC support services helped me reach my academic goals and careers goals. With the many support services available at QCC, I was able to take advantage of each and they help make my learning process easier,” Mr. Kapel said.

One support service that was instrumental for him was QCC’s mentoring program, where he met his mentor Kevin Campbell, the person who he considers his role model.

“I admire Kevin for his service in the Army and also his service in the community. He is always willing and available to help,” he said.

While Mr. Kapel did not qualify to apply for FAFSA due to his current status in the U.S., finances have not stopped Mr. Kapel from pursuing his education. He has been working full-time overnight to help pay for his education and was able to get funding from the Future Focus program for some of his classes.

“I met Bobby last summer, as a referral from Eduardo. From my first meeting with him, I instantly felt his passion for education and his dedication. He works overtime hours to offset the cost of classes, and seeks avenues and other resources available to him,” said Ms. Vongphakdy, adding that he also volunteers his time working with the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) program, a free tax preparation program.

For many people, balancing work, school and home life can be extremely difficult, but Mr. Kapel says it is all about time management.

“Time management is the answer to everything. I have to exercise time management because work, school and home life are all important things to consider, knowing how the three are related. Through work, I am able to take care of my financial responsibilities at school and home. I also have some extra time at work to attend to my schoolwork,” he said. “There is always time available to do a little of everything.”

In May, Mr. Kapel graduated from QCC with a General Studies degree. He is headed to Assumption College this fall, where he plans to major in Human Services and Rehabilitation Studies. He is also taking a summer course at QCC that he will transfer to Assumption to save money.

“I always want to help others and educating myself is the best way forward. My future goal is to obtain a degree in Human Service and Rehabilitation Studies and pursue my master’s degree in any human service-related field. I want to be able to help others. I find helping others a good way of giving back to my community, my school and country where I am residing,” he said.  “I also want to put aside enough time to volunteer in my community and school. Getting my degree and finding the right job will help me accomplish that.”

He encourages others to try QCC and said it is the best place to begin on your career.

“The hardworking, friendly and knowledgeable faculty and staff are always willing to help any time. Make the move and attend QCC, it will be your best decision ever.”

  • QCC alumna Michaela Prostak offers assistance at QCC's Tutoring Centers.
June, 2020

Earlier this month, QCC’s Summer I session began. Classes are being offered remotely and to support students, the QCC Tutoring Center, which encompasses the General Academic Areas Tutoring Center, Math Center, and Writing Center will also be offering its services remotely. Students have access to one-on-one and group tutoring through Blackboard Collaborate and Zoom, as well as receiving support as needed...

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Earlier this month, QCC’s Summer I session began. Classes are being offered remotely and to support students, the QCC Tutoring Center, which encompasses the General Academic Areas Tutoring Center, Math Center, and Writing Center will also be offering its services remotely. Students have access to one-on-one and group tutoring through Blackboard Collaborate and Zoom, as well as receiving support as needed via email.

The General Academic Areas Tutoring Center is a tutoring and student resource center that provides appointment-based tutoring sessions in a variety of academic subjects that are now being delivered on the Zoom platform.

Students have the option of individual one-on-one tutoring, small group tutoring, or they can choose both options. In individual tutoring students work one-on-one with a tutor to help clarify course content, work through problem areas, and enhance study skills. Group tutoring offers students the option to work with a tutor and up to three classmates. In a group tutoring session, students can learn different approaches to a particular problem, assignment, or course content from their classmates as well as the tutor.

For information on subjects, hours, and how to join a session, students should visit GAA website. For questions, email: gaa [at] qcc.mass.edu.

QCC’s Math Center’s remote tutoring provides math resources in an individual or group remote setting. The goal of tutoring is to help students strengthen math and study skills by reinforcing classroom and online learning. QCC math tutors can assist with exercise sets and examples from course textbooks, with similar questions from Pearson - MyLab Math, McGraw-Hill - Connect, and Cengage - WebAssign homework assignments. Tutors can also help students navigate the course website, textbooks and e-texts, videos, and Blackboard. The Math Center offers both individual and small-group tutoring sessions via Blackboard Collaborate.

Math tutoring sessions are held Monday – Thursday from 10:00 a.m.– 2:00 p.m., and 4:00 p.m.– 7:00 p.m., and Fridays from 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. For information on hours and how to join a session, students should visit the Math Center website. For questions, email MathCenter [at] qcc.mass.edu or call  508.854.7523.

QCC’s Writing Center offers individual and small-group tutoring sessions, as well as drop-in workshops, via Blackboard Collaborate and Zoom. The Writing Center is a tutoring and student resource center for writing, as well as those skills integral to the writing process, including reading comprehension, critical thinking, planning, and organization. Students can work with a tutor on their writing, reading, and study skills for any course. For information on hours and how to join a session or workshop, students should visit the Writing Center website. For questions, email WCInfo [at] qcc.mass.edu or call 508.854.4287

Additional Online Tutoring is available through ThinkingStorm. This online tutoring service offers live, on-demand tutoring in a variety of subjects. This free service is available to all current QCC students and can be accessed through the online tutoring link in students’ Blackboard course shell dashboard.

Email TutoringCenters [at] qcc.mass.edu (Tutoring Centers) for general questions.

  • Bringing alpacas to campus has been one of the many annual events put on by the Student Accessibility Services department.
June, 2020

It’s official! After nearly 30 years, QCC’s Office of Disability Services office has officially removed the “dis” out of disability and has a new name, Student Accessibility Services. The name is designed to better represent the College’s focus on student access.

The department has come a long way since its inception in the early 1990s, in the way in which barriers in the...

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It’s official! After nearly 30 years, QCC’s Office of Disability Services office has officially removed the “dis” out of disability and has a new name, Student Accessibility Services. The name is designed to better represent the College’s focus on student access.

The department has come a long way since its inception in the early 1990s, in the way in which barriers in the classroom, physical, and digital environments have adapted to provide access for all students.

“We have not done this alone. We have worked with faculty, staff, and students to think proactively, creatively, and inclusively to ensure that all students have access to the classroom, educational materials, support, and the full student experience. As our office mission has evolved over time, it is imperative that our name best represents the work we do- not a label,” said Kristie Proctor, director of Student Accessibility Services, adding that she is hopeful the transition will be a seamless one.

“The name, ‘Student Accessibility Services' clearly promotes our mission of equal access to higher education for all in the QCC community. We are so excited to start a new chapter of access for QCC,” she added.

For more information, visit Student Accessibility Services.

  • The 2019/20 Women's Soccer Team. Outstanding Student Athlete Award winner Haley Gordan is third from the lower left (#1).
June, 2020

E-Sports       

QCC Athletics new E-gaming team for the League of Legends has gotten underway. The highly competitive, fast paced, action-strategy game is designed for those who crave a hard fought victory. League of Legends is a team-based strategy game where two teams of five powerful champions face off to destroy the other’s base. Nate Mello, learning manager for...

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E-Sports       

QCC Athletics new E-gaming team for the League of Legends has gotten underway. The highly competitive, fast paced, action-strategy game is designed for those who crave a hard fought victory. League of Legends is a team-based strategy game where two teams of five powerful champions face off to destroy the other’s base. Nate Mello, learning manager for Interactive Media Design, as well as a part-time faculty member, is coaching this year’s inaugural team. Practice is currently underway with the goal of participating in exhibition games later this summer.

"We meet on a program called Discord. It is an app that is used in the gaming community. It is integrated well with League of Legends as you can see all the people in the Discord Chat room you are talking to on the screen while playing," said Coach Mello. "We have been meeting Mondays and Wednesday nights for practice, mostly against other people playing the game around the country, but if we get more players that want to play on a regular basis, we will be able to host practices against each other."

There is still time to be a part of the team! Those interested in playing can email Athletic Director Lisa Gurnicklisag [at] qcc.mass.edu. Interested students must be enrolled at least part-time in the Fall semester and full-time (12 credits or more) in the Spring semester. A valid (within a year) physical form and a GPA of 2.0 or higher are required in order to play.

“We plan on playing a couple of exhibition games this summer against Bunker Hill and Mass Bay Community College. Scrimmages in the Fall will be against Bunker Hill, Mass Bay, Northern Essex, Bristol and a few other MA community colleges, as well as other colleges in our NJCAA Region XXI conference,” Ms. Gurnick said.

Summer Zoom Yoga    

Get your zen on this summer with Summer Zoom Yoga! Flow into the summer months beginning on July 2. Sessions will take place every Tuesday and Thursday starting at noon.

If you are interested in getting the Zoom invite, email lisag [at] qcc.mass.edu

Outstanding Student Athlete Award 

QCC’s Women’s Soccer Wyvern, Haley Gordan received the Outstanding Student Athlete Award at the Honors and Awards presentation in May. During Haley’s two years of participation with the QCC Wyvern’s Soccer program she has demonstrated remarkable perseverance and tremendous growth, according to QCC’s Women’s Soccer Coach Josh Cole.

“Haley is someone who will always find a way to push through adversity and does it with a positive attitude,” Coach Cole added.  

 

  • The tornado of 1953 decimated what was to become QCC's Administration building.
  •  The convent at Assumption College (now QCC's Administration building) took the brunt of the F4 Tornado of '53.
  • A memorial to those who lost their lives in the June 9, 1953 tornado is located on QCC's main campus.
  • QCC's Administration Building today.
June, 2020

Early evening on June 9, 1953 an F4 tornado ravaged the City of Worcester and the Central Massachusetts region, killing 94 people and injuring close to 1,300. Worcester was one of the hardest hit areas by the deadly tornado.  During the 90 minutes it was on the ground in Central Massachusetts, it left a swath of destruction in its wake. At the convent at Assumption College (now Quinsigamond Community College...

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Early evening on June 9, 1953 an F4 tornado ravaged the City of Worcester and the Central Massachusetts region, killing 94 people and injuring close to 1,300. Worcester was one of the hardest hit areas by the deadly tornado.  During the 90 minutes it was on the ground in Central Massachusetts, it left a swath of destruction in its wake. At the convent at Assumption College (now Quinsigamond Community College’s Administration Building) the damage was severe, leaving much of the campus in total ruin. According to a report by the Boston Globe, a priest and two nuns were killed and most of the college personnel were injured, some severely.

Today, 67 years later, QCC’s Administration Building bears few remnants of the tornado. A memorial stands on QCC’s main campus as a permanent reminder of those who perished, in what is still considered one of the 25 deadliest tornados in U.S. history.  

  • Uxbridge High School Principal Mike Rubun was named High School Principal of the Year.
June, 2020

Congratulations to Uxbridge High School Principal Mike Rubun, who was named High School Principal of the Year by the Massachusetts School Administrators Association (MSAA). Additionally, Uxbridge High School was named a 2020 Best High School, based on rankings that U.S. News & World Report published in late April, 2020. Over 24,000 public high schools in all 50 states and the District of...

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Congratulations to Uxbridge High School Principal Mike Rubun, who was named High School Principal of the Year by the Massachusetts School Administrators Association (MSAA). Additionally, Uxbridge High School was named a 2020 Best High School, based on rankings that U.S. News & World Report published in late April, 2020. Over 24,000 public high schools in all 50 states and the District of Columbia were reviewed and 18,000 were ranked.

QCC’s Gateway to College is in partnership with Uxbridge High School and graduates of the Gateway program receive their high school diplomas though a partnership with the high school.

“We are fortunate to be partnered with a school system with such passionate educators,” said QCC’s Gateway to College Director Marci Skillings.

  • Open Educational Resources
  • Learning about OER.
June, 2020

In May and June, the Center for Academic Excellence and the Alden Library sponsored five virtual workshops for QCC faculty and staff on Open Educational Resources (OER). Professor of English and Academic Technology Facilitator Amy Beaudry co-presented with, alternately, Dean of Library Services Cary Morse and Librarian Michael Stevenson.The workshops reached 39...

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In May and June, the Center for Academic Excellence and the Alden Library sponsored five virtual workshops for QCC faculty and staff on Open Educational Resources (OER). Professor of English and Academic Technology Facilitator Amy Beaudry co-presented with, alternately, Dean of Library Services Cary Morse and Librarian Michael Stevenson.The workshops reached 39 QCC participants, with the Alden librarians working as “OER facilitators” – in a sense, matchmakers between faculty and a global library of high quality OER.

QCC’s leadership recognizes OER as part of the College’s commitment to social justice and student success. Given disruptions to our students’ educational and economic lives from the pandemic, access to high quality educational materials at no cost to students is more vital than ever.

“The pandemic has created a situation in which community college students are facing even more financial obstacles than before due to illness, job loss and caregiving responsibilities. OER helps these students access textbooks and other class materials at no cost, thus creating more equitable educational opportunities,” said Ms. Morse.

The Spring/Summer I workshops set the scope of the OER phenomenon following the Massachusetts's OER initiative, which uses UNESCO’s definition (teaching, learning or research materials that are in the public domain or released with intellectual property licenses that facilitate the free use, adaptation and distribution of resources) in its outreach across the state’s system of public higher education.

In each workshop, library staff navigated participants through Alden Library’s interactive LibGuide, OER for QCC. OER has so bloomed in recent years that the workshop introduced a number of aggregators that classify, review and offer OER. These aggregators are part of OER’s global, student-focused infrastructure of governments, nonprofits and commercial firms. One of the star aggregators is OpenWashington; several of the mega-sites are based at universities, or are stand-alone nonprofit organizations such as OER Commons, to which QCC contributes. 

The joint workshops were part of the broad effort to engage the QCC community in using and creating OER. Keep an eye out for an invitation to “OER DAY” at QCC on August 19. At that time, the library staff will review the State’s plans, offer additional workshops, and share real-world faculty experiences using OER.

“One of the overall goals of the OER initiative at QCC is to increase use of OER resources.  OER offers benefits for students (i.e. lower costs of education) and faculty (i.e. tailor the textbook and other OER materials to your syllabus and specific approach to course content),” Ms. Morse continued.

  • QCC's new digital sign lights up West Boylston Street.
June, 2020

Friday, July 3: The College will be closed to commemorate the July 4 holiday.

Tuesday, July 7: QCC’s next virtual Town Hall will take place at 2:00 p.m. A Zoom meeting link will be sent out prior to the Town Hall meeting, as well as a YouTube livestream link.  As a reminder, in order to avoid external interruptions, please do not share any internal meeting links...

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Friday, July 3: The College will be closed to commemorate the July 4 holiday.

Tuesday, July 7: QCC’s next virtual Town Hall will take place at 2:00 p.m. A Zoom meeting link will be sent out prior to the Town Hall meeting, as well as a YouTube livestream link.  As a reminder, in order to avoid external interruptions, please do not share any internal meeting links publicly or on social media and for security reasons, please be sure you log into all Zoom meetings with your first and last name.

Monday, July 15: Phi Theta Kappa is hosting a Virtual Friends Trivia Night from 6:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Interested in testing your trivia skills? RVSP to phithetakappa [at] qmail.qcc.edu

Tuesday, July 16: Deadline for new student acceptance in the Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society at noon.  For more information email, phithetakappa [at] qmail.qcc.edu

Friday, July 31: Phi Theta Kappa (PTK) will hold a Virtual General Meeting from 5:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. A Zoom link will be sent out the day of the meeting. PTK members interested in earning their gold stole must attend two general meeting and do two community services projects.

July Spotlight: Gateway to College Information sessions will be held on Wednesday, July 1 at 5:00 p.m. and Tuesday, July 9 at 11:00 a.m. QCC’s Gateway to College is still recruiting for new students to start in Fall 2020. Attend one of two remaining info sessions on Zoom! A link will be sent to you upon registration. To learn more, register on qcc.edu/gateway, or call and leave a message at 508-854-7587.