Search form

You are here

02/2020

Newsletter Banner

February, 2020

  • QCC HVAC students Jason Laraia (L) and Brian Mele (R) with Governor Charlie Baker.
  • QCC students show Governor Baker the HVAC lab at WTHS.
  • Lt. Governor Polito listens to QCC students explain the project he is working on in the HVAC lab.
  • Governor Baker and Lt. Governor Polito with students from QCC's HVAC program and WTHS's plumbing and welding programs.
  • President Pedraja with Governor Baker and Lt. Governor Polito
  • A Governor's roundtable discussion on vocational learning held at WTHS.
February, 2020

Quinsigamond Community College President Dr. Luis Pedraja was part of a roundtable discussion with Governor Charlie Baker, Lt. Governor Karyn Polito, and other state and local legislators to discuss the Governor’s new Career Technical Initiative. Held at Worcester Technical High School (WTHS), the event addressed the need for more adult programs at vocational high schools on February 12. In...

More...

Quinsigamond Community College President Dr. Luis Pedraja was part of a roundtable discussion with Governor Charlie Baker, Lt. Governor Karyn Polito, and other state and local legislators to discuss the Governor’s new Career Technical Initiative. Held at Worcester Technical High School (WTHS), the event addressed the need for more adult programs at vocational high schools on February 12. In addition to Gov. Baker, Lt. Gov. Polito and President Pedraja, other state and local officials who took part in the roundtable discussion included:

  • Massachusetts Secretary of Labor and Workforce Development, Rosalin Acosta
  • Massachusetts Secretary of Housing and Economic Development, Mike Kennealy
  • Senator Michael Moore
  • Worcester Mayor Joseph Petty
  • Worcester Superintendent of Schools, Maureen Binienda
  • Executive Director of the MassHire Central Region Workforce Board, Jeffrey Turgeon
  • WTHS Principal Kyle Brenner
  • Director of WTHS Night Life, Liz Tiley

The distinguished group toured the HVAC and plumbing programs that are held at WTHS and spoke with six students during the roundtable discussion who are in the HVAC, plumbing and welding programs.

QCC HVAC students Brian Mele, of Rutland, and Jason Laraia, of Sutton, described what it was like to be an adult learner taking part in the HVAC program in order to change careers. Mr. Laraia, currently a land surveyor, said he initially got into the program at the encouragement of his mother, who is also a QCC student. Both said they are enjoying the program and expect to use this to change and advance their careers.

QCC’s HVAC program, a partnership with WTHS and funded by a $431,900 Skills Capital Grant, was one such program that was highlighted during the roundtable discussion. The College’s HVAC program is also held at Assabet Valley Regional Technical High School through a similar partnership.

“We are very excited about this partnership with WTHS,” President Pedraja told Governor Baker, noting the partnership QCC has with other schools such as Burncoat High School, which hosts the College’s automotive technology program.

“We are now trying to see how to articulate our programs into early college,” Dr. Pedraja added.

The Career Technical Initiative is designed to train 20,000 skilled trades workers over the next four years and the governor has included $15 million in his fiscal 2021 budget for this initiative.

“There’s a lot of people who want to be able to expand their career options,” President Pedraja said.

“The bottom line is that every single business you can think of is going to be playing in the STEM space,” Governor Baker said. “This is gratifying work we’ve done, but we have a long way to go.” 

  • From left: PTK Vice President Krystle “Mixhe” Bedrick and PTK alumna Kim Lawrence
February, 2020

Mixhe Bedrick Named Newman Civic Fellow

Every once in a while you meet a person who is motivated to better not only themselves, but work for the betterment of others. Phi Theta Kappa (PTK) Vice President Krystle “Mixhe” Bedrick is one such person. The QCC sophomore is set to graduate in May and has already been making a name for herself in the Worcester community, as...

More...

Mixhe Bedrick Named Newman Civic Fellow

Every once in a while you meet a person who is motivated to better not only themselves, but work for the betterment of others. Phi Theta Kappa (PTK) Vice President Krystle “Mixhe” Bedrick is one such person. The QCC sophomore is set to graduate in May and has already been making a name for herself in the Worcester community, as well as the QCC community.  She was recently named a Newman Civic Fellow. This is a one-year fellowship experience for community-minded students, which supports the student’s personal, professional and civic development. This is the first time a QCC student was recommended for this fellowship. Each student is required to have his/her own mentor, a stipulation of the Newman Civic Fellowship. PTK alumna Kim Lawrence was asked and agreed to be Ms. Bedrick's mentor.

“It’s an honor giving back to anyone and it’s a privilege to give back to PTK,” Ms. Lawrence said.

"We are incredibly proud of Mixhe and the amazing accomplishments she has achieved. She has faced adversities in her life, but has never let those stand in the way of a brighter future," QCC President Dr. Luis Pedraja said. "She is a shining example for others." 

Ms. Bedrick was also recently chosen as a semifinalist for the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation and is one of 456 finalists, chosen from over 1,500 applicant from across the nation. Winners for the award will be announced in April.

Ms. Bedrick attributes much of what she has accomplished at QCC to being an active member of the PTK, QCC's honor society.

“Phi Theta Kappa has been the platform that has lifted me up. As a person with many intersecting marginalized identities, it has been difficult to find success. My membership, outside of marrying my spouse and having children, has been the most challenging but fulfilling part of my life,” Ms. Bedrick said.” I have always enjoyed being a student and learning, but Phi Theta Kappa gave me the opportunity to be part of something greater, a global consciousness that is focused on improving the lives of all people. My life is changed for the better, and I will be forever grateful.”

Ms. Bedrick said it was the invitation to join PTK that was the catalyst for change within her life.

“It's difficult to say everything I feel for Phi Theta Kappa. I was extended an invitation to join the Honor Society and was thrilled, and then, melancholy. I knew that I did not have the money to pay for the membership fee, but still felt compelled to follow through. When I walked into the PTK office I told the advisors that I did not have the money to join, but still very much wanted to be a part of the organization. I said something to the effect of, "If this is for me, then it will be.”

Being part of PTK was "meant to be" for Ms. Bedrick, who was offered a scholarship to cover the cost of membership and encouraged to run for an officer position.

“I felt elated. I felt seen. PTK was already taking the time to tell me that I am deserving, and that made me feel welcomed. I found a place to grow as a leader as I was elected as Vice President of Leadership after coming in second in the race for the presidency,” she said.

The officer position offered Ms. Bedrick opportunities to expand her horizon and broadened her experience academia.

“The research that I have participated in has spurred my advocacy and activism. It is because of what we discovered during research that pushed me into my civic engagement. I have been active in advocating for transportation equity in my community, as a way to combat poverty and systemic oppression. Phi Theta Kappa opened the door for me to be able to become a voice for my community. It has given me the foundation and backing to be taken seriously as a student advocate,” she said.

Today Ms. Bedrick sits on the Worcester Regional Transit Authority (WRTA) Board as a representative for the QCC population, working to help reduce fare rates for all college students, as well as working to get public transportation closer to those who are incarcerated in the Worcester County Jail and House of Correction.

“Currently the closest WRTA stop is 1.7 miles away,” she said, noting that studies have shown that visitation helps to reduce recidivism.

The next group of PTK officers will soon be elected and Ms. Bedrick wants to encourage others to take a chance and run for office.

“My membership, plainly stated, has changed the trajectory of my life forever. The opportunities that I have been able to take advantage of, the accolades, achievements and scholarships I have received, and the networking connections that I have made have all come from being active in my Chapter,” she said. “I am the first person in my family to attend college. I will be the first to graduate, and I'm slated to transfer to an Ivy League institution, something I never thought possible before joining PTK.”

For more information, visit Phi Theta Kappa.

  • From left: Kristen Foster and Matt Foster receive an award in memory of Whit Foster from Professor Charulata Trivedi.
  • QCC grads and current employees of Storm Petrel, Story DuVall and Daniel Margolis, interview a QCC student.
February, 2020

It’s been close to 10 years since Quinsigamond Community College’s Computer Information System (CIS) Department began its cooperative/internship program. In that time, 72 QCC students have taken part in internship and co-op opportunities that have led many to careers in the technology space.

One local company, which has played a major role in QCC’s program is Avatar Computing, Inc. For close...

More...

It’s been close to 10 years since Quinsigamond Community College’s Computer Information System (CIS) Department began its cooperative/internship program. In that time, 72 QCC students have taken part in internship and co-op opportunities that have led many to careers in the technology space.

One local company, which has played a major role in QCC’s program is Avatar Computing, Inc. For close to 10 years, the company, which does a great deal of R&D work for the U.S. government, has been hiring QCC students to work on achievable projects that have enabled them to learn valuable, real world skill sets.

“We saw this as an opportunity to test the waters,” said Avatar’s CIO, Matt Foster. “The government was also willing to give the students feedback.”

This became a perfect partnership for both QCC and Avatar, and one that both felt was mutually beneficial. To date, a half dozen QCC graduates have been hired, with two or three still working for the company.

“Avatar helped us to keep going with the program and gave us an opportunity to continue the program,” said Charulata Trivedi, professor of Computer Information Systems.

One person who was intimately involved with the internship program with QCC was Avatar COO Whitney “Whit” Foster. Sadly, last October, Mr. Foster passed away from an illness. In honor of his contribution to the program, QCC honored him posthumously at the Annual Tech Apprentice Breakfast, held on February 26 at the Harrington Learning Center, located on QCC's main campus.

QCC’s Vice President of Academic Affairs, James Keane, presented a plaque to Mr. Foster’s brother Matt and wife, Kristen at the breakfast in honor of his amazing contributions.

“We want to recognize the special partnership we’ve had with the Avatar family and one of its founding members, Whitney Foster,” said Mr. Keane. “The impact he’s had on our students has been invaluable.”

 “He was very proud of the program,” Matt Foster said.

Another company that has played an instrumental role in the program is Storm Petrel LLC, a Vermont-based company that has been bringing on QCC students as interns. Often these interns are hired when they graduate. In fact, in 2016 the company did a Skype interview with a perspective QCC student intern and ended up ultimately hiring the student upon her graduation. Subsequently that student has come back to QCC and hired another QCC student, with the cycle repeating.

Two QCC 2019 grads, Story DuVall and Daniel Margolis were part of this hiring cycle. They both started out as interns before being hired part-time, then full-time by Storm Petrel. Both graduates were recruited by another former QCC intern, Raul Gomez, a 2018 QCC graduate of the CIS program, who ended up getting hired by Storm Petrel LLC as a programmer. He was back last year as an employer for the company and recruited Ms. DuVall and Mr. Margolis.

“I started as an intern unpaid, went to part-time and then full-time,” Ms. DuVall said. “I was hired as a programming trainee and now I’m migrating away from that a bit.”

“I took the same path to Storm Petrel,” said Mr. Margolis, who is working as a corporate administrator for the company. “I came to QCC after having my masters. My job had ended so I came to QCC to change career tracts.”

After an informational presentation by Ms. Trivedi, students were able to do a type of “speed interviewing” spending seven minutes with each employer before moving onto the next one.

“This is a real great opportunity,” said Michael Jennette, internship coordinator for the Worcester County District Attorney’s Office. “We certainly like working with Quinsig.”

Companies taking part in this year’s program include:

  • Worcester County District Attorney’s Office
  • Avatar
  • QCC
  • Art Reach
  • Storm Petrel
  • Center for Applied Behavioral Instruction
  • Table Talk
  • Dr. Pedraja addresses legislators at ACC's Annual Legislative Breakfast.
  • QCC Student Government Association President Jorgo Gushi
  • PTK Vice President Krystle “Mixhe” Bedrick
  • Legislators, students, faculty and staff at the 2020 Legislative Breakfast
  • QCC student speakers from left: Mustafa Bowden, Tabithia Leber, Jorgo Gushi and Krystle “Mixhe” Bedrick
February, 2020

Melodic sounds by Quinsigamond Community College student Yozue Davila and Music Program Coordinator Jose Castillo set the tone for the College’s annual Legislative Breakfast held on Friday, February 7 at the Harrington Learning Center. Over a dozen legislators or their representatives from across the region, in addition to QCC faculty and staff, spent part of their morning...

More...

Melodic sounds by Quinsigamond Community College student Yozue Davila and Music Program Coordinator Jose Castillo set the tone for the College’s annual Legislative Breakfast held on Friday, February 7 at the Harrington Learning Center. Over a dozen legislators or their representatives from across the region, in addition to QCC faculty and staff, spent part of their morning learning about what makes QCC so unique, from the people who can speak to this best – the students.

Phi Theta Kappa (PTK) Honor Society Vice President, Krystle “Mixhe” Bedrick,  gave an emotional and heartfelt accounting of her life as a first generation college student, whose experience at QCC she said, has been “wonderful and life changing.” She told those in attendance about an upbringing of intergenerational poverty. Today, poised to graduate in May with an Early Childhood Education degree, Ms. Bedrick is hoping to attend Smith College this fall.  Already the scholarships and awards are stacking up for her. She is the college's first Newman Civic Fellow, a semifinalist for the Jack Kent Cooke Scholarship, and a recipient of the MLK Scholarship, Fuller Foundation Scholarship and the Roland Lajoie Scholarship.

“I never believed in my entire life I could attend college,” she said. “I stand before you having worked incredibly hard to be worth the accolades bestowed on me today.”

“QCC lifts you up and I’m proud to be a student here.  When I graduate from QCC I will be the first in my family to graduate college,” Ms. Bedrick continued, proudly adding, “I have Ivy League institutions emailing me!”

QCC President Dr. Luis Pedraja told the legislators, “What we do here we do for our students. We are always striving to assist students in fulfilling their dreams.”

QCC’s Student Government Association President Jorgo Gushi, a bilingual engineering student from Albania, and a member of PTK, told the legislators of the metamorphosis he experienced when he began at QCC.

“QCC was the place where I grew as a student leader and individual,” he said.

Mr. Gushi is hoping to transfer to Worcester Polytechnic Institute or an Ivy League school in the fall to continue his education and told the legislators it is the pathway that QCC has paved for him that has transformed his life. “QCC is about far more than attending classes,” he said, noting that for him it was also about building confidence and acquiring leadership skills. “My voice was fostered by the QCC family. Many of the skills that are making me a good leader were developed and taught at QCC.”

Another student speaker, PTK President Tabitha Leber described her journey to QCC as a 21-year-old single mom who had experienced a debilitating, on-the-job injury and as a result could no longer work. Having to still take care of herself and child, she began working in her daughter’s kindergarten classroom and realized how fulfilling that was. A chance conversation with her daughter’s kindergarten teacher made her realize she wanted to become a teacher. She began taking classes at QCC part-time, while continuing to work for Worcester Public Schools. Today she is a full-time student, telling those in the audience of the amazing initiatives the College’s honor society works on such as the QCC Food Pantry and Resource Center and the PTK Live and Learn Greenhouse.

“We are so grateful for Dr. Pedraja who supports us through these initiatives, which helps students return to college and the community at large,” she said.

QCC Foundation Board President Dr. Linda Maykel addressed the inequity in the current state funding formula, which affords community colleges only 25 percent of higher education funding. She addressed the ways in which QCC is working to help students attend college by working to increase scholarships, expanding daycare, and even looking at an emergency fund for students who experience events that might preclude them from coming back to college.

QCC’s Student Trustee Mustafa Bowden, an immigrant from Libya, expounded on the issues students face, addressing one of the common obstacles – purchasing textbooks.

“Here we have the most dedicated, committed students who step over every barrier there is, yet the biggest barrier we face is paying for a $500 textbook,” he said.

Mr. Bowden went on to discuss the Open Educational Resources (OER) that offers students the ability to access online textbooks for free.

“This alternative will be an accessible way for our students to have better grades in college. I represent 7,000-plus students and close to 50 percent of them are facing hunger and close to 12 percent are facing homelessness insecurity. If we can take that $500 book cost away then no one will have to choose between a meal or the cost of a book,” he said. “We ask for your help, endorsement and support of the OER initiative so more students can pursue higher education.”

While President Pedraja explained the many projects and programs that are going on at QCC, he reminded the legislators of the quality workforce QCC has delivered to the Commonwealth, through the students of QCC.

“I’ve talked to employers who like having our students.They know our students are dedicated. It says a lot about what we are all about. We need to continue to invest in higher education to ensure the Commonwealth succeeds,” he said.

“Education is a way to release those bonds so that our dreams can be a reality. This can’t happen without legislative support,” Ms. Bedrick said, pointedly telling legislators, “Without this institution I would not be the person I am today.”

WBZ visits QCC Food Pantry and Resource Center
February, 2020

It was “lights, camera, action” for Quisigamond Community College’s QCC Food Pantry and Resource Center. The food pantry and resource center, along with Phi Theta Kappa’s Live and Learn Greenhouse were recently featured by our local CBS News Affiliate WBZ/Channel 4, in a “4 Your Community” segment.

PTK student Farah Mohamad, along with QCC President...

More...

It was “lights, camera, action” for Quisigamond Community College’s QCC Food Pantry and Resource Center. The food pantry and resource center, along with Phi Theta Kappa’s Live and Learn Greenhouse were recently featured by our local CBS News Affiliate WBZ/Channel 4, in a “4 Your Community” segment.

PTK student Farah Mohamad, along with QCC President Dr. Luis Pedraja and community member Ingrid Murphy were interviewed by WBZ Anchor Kate Merrill for the television spot that highlighted the plight of students in need. 

Visit the QCC Food Pantry and Resource Center to learn more about the services and support services available. 

  • QCC's newest Fulbright Scholar Dr. Ingrid Skadberg
February, 2020

Quinsigamond Community College’s Dean of Institutional Research and Planning, Dr. Ingrid Skadberg, has received a Fulbright Scholar Award. She is the fourth person from QCC to be honored as a Fulbright Scholar, and is one of only six from the U.S. who will be visiting Russia for two weeks in April. The Fulbright Program is the U.S. government’s flagship international educational exchange...

More...

Quinsigamond Community College’s Dean of Institutional Research and Planning, Dr. Ingrid Skadberg, has received a Fulbright Scholar Award. She is the fourth person from QCC to be honored as a Fulbright Scholar, and is one of only six from the U.S. who will be visiting Russia for two weeks in April. The Fulbright Program is the U.S. government’s flagship international educational exchange program and is designed to build lasting connections between the people of the United States and the people of other countries. It operates in over 160 countries worldwide. Recipients of Fulbright awards are selected on the basis of academic and professional achievement, as well as record of service and demonstrated leadership in their respective fields.

Dr. Skadberg holds a Ph.D. in sociology from the City University of New York (CUNY), specializing in immigration studies and education, and has been a QCC staff member since 2006. In addition to her duties as dean of Institutional Research and Planning at QCC, she is the co-chair of the College’s strategic plan.

During her two-weeks in Russia she will spend time in Moscow, Tula and Volgorad, in a variety of academic, business and cultural settings learning about Russia’s educational processes, as well how their educational system is working to meet industry demands. She will also do a presentation about QCC and its programs.

“Exposure to various viewpoints will enable me to approach my work from a different perspective and be more effective in shaping institutional policy,” Dr. Skadberg said. “There is a lot that we could learn from Russia’s approach to education. One challenge that many countries encounter is how to better align workforce development with industry needs. Many of Russia’s challenges in workforce development are similar and I’m interested in learning how and what they are doing.”

Dr. Skadberg is one of over 800 U.S. citizens who will teach, conduct research, and/or provide expertise abroad for the 2019-2020 academic year through the Fulbright U.S. Scholar Program. QCC's other Fulbright Scholars include: English Professor Trent Masiki; Assistant Vice President for Workforce Readiness and Innovation, Dr. Kathleen "Kathy" Rentsch; and Business Administration Professor Flo Lucci.

  • Respiratory Care students
February, 2020

Recently three Quinsigamond Community College respiratory care students, Megan Marie Hufault, Tracey Mannix and Federico Ortiz were inducted into the Lambda Beta Society, a prestigious national honor society sponsored and maintained by the National Board for Respiratory Care (NBRC). The students were chosen on the basis of high academic achievement, service, and...

More...

Recently three Quinsigamond Community College respiratory care students, Megan Marie Hufault, Tracey Mannix and Federico Ortiz were inducted into the Lambda Beta Society, a prestigious national honor society sponsored and maintained by the National Board for Respiratory Care (NBRC). The students were chosen on the basis of high academic achievement, service, and strength of character. This is the first time QCC has had a chapter in the Lambda Beta Society.

Ms. Hufault came to QCC straight from high school and is currently in her last semester in the Respiratory Care program. Throughout her time at QCC she has earned many industry-recognized certificates such as Basic Life Support, Advanced Cardiac Life Support, and Pediatric Advanced Life Support. In April, she will become certified as an American Academy of Pediatrics Neonatal Resuscitation provider. She is currently in the process of completing her senior project, which is a requirement for each respiratory care student in their sophomore year. Her senior project is working as a lab assistant for the respiratory care freshmen class.  

“This is a very challenging program and I have worked hard to maintain a 3.96 GPA,” she said, adding that she was able to apply for her student license after her first year in QCC’s program and is currently employed by UMass Memorial Hospital as a student respiratory therapist. “I am proud of these accomplishments. The Respiratory Care program at QCC has provided me with the opportunity to be a caring, competent and accomplished health care professional.”

Ms. Mannix is a respiratory care student who came to the profession late in life after a 24 year career working in the telecommunications industry. She is also set to graduate this spring and embark on a new career.

“I chose respiratory care because of my personal experience with the profession. My grandmother was diagnosed with congestive heart failure. I went to Florida to make sure that she was receiving the proper care. Respiratory therapists came in every day to work with her,” she said. “I saw what amazing people they were and how important their job was. The respiratory therapists were instrumental in making sure that my grandmother was comfortable. At one point, one of the respiratory therapists asked me if I ever considered a career in respiratory care. I thought about it for a while and then decided it was not only what I wanted to do but…it was what I was meant to do.”

Today, like Ms. Hufault, she has earned a multitude of industry-recognized certificates and said this has been the "most rewarding undertaking I have ever accomplished.”  

Ms. Mannix is currently working in the Pulmonary Function Laboratory at UMass Hospital University campus for her senior project.

“I am very proud of the accomplishments that I have made at QCC. The Respiratory Care Program has allowed me to realize my goals. I look forward to beginning my career when I graduate in May,” she said.

The final respiratory care student inducted into the Lambda Beta Society is Mr. Ortiz, who is the first in his family to pursue a degree in the medical field.

“It has taken a considerable amount of hard work and dedication, but I can proudly say that I have maintained a 3.87 GPA. My educational achievements have allowed me to become a member of Phi Theta Kappa, Psi Beta, and Lambda Beta Honor Societies,” he said. “Last fall, I was awarded one of two scholarships presented to Quinsigamond Community College students by the Massachusetts Society of Respiratory Care. After this, I was offered a student respiratory therapist position at UMass Memorial Hospital.”

Mr. Ortiz said that for his required senior project, he has been able to mentor freshmen students entering the respiratory care program.

“This was a great opportunity as I was able to teach the skills I had mastered, mentor members of the freshmen class and share my tools for success. I feel as though my academic achievements, hands-on experience and classroom success at Quinsigamond Community College has not only built a great reputation for myself, but has also set a strong foundation for a bright future in the field of respiratory care," he said.

Visit QCC’s Respiratory Care program to learn more.

  • Milexie Evri and Shannen Jimenez
February, 2020

Two peas in a pod…that’s what most people think of when they meet South High School students Milexie Evri and Shannen Jimenez. The seniors, who have been friends and virtually inseparable since high school, have recently been taking part in Quinsigamond Community College’s Early College Program. They are currently on-track to complete their fifth class this semester...

More...

Two peas in a pod…that’s what most people think of when they meet South High School students Milexie Evri and Shannen Jimenez. The seniors, who have been friends and virtually inseparable since high school, have recently been taking part in Quinsigamond Community College’s Early College Program. They are currently on-track to complete their fifth class this semester, which will earn them a total of 15 college credits before they even graduate high school.

QCC’s Early College program gives high school students the ability to take college courses for college credit at no cost. The program gives students a chance to experience college ahead of time, with the goal of having students enroll in college after they graduate from high school. The program allows students to earn college credits while simultaneously attending high school as is the case for Ms. Evri and Ms. Jimenez.

According to Ms. Jimenez, both students are currently taking AP classes at their high school; however, when they found out about the opportunity to take college courses for credit at no cost, they each jumped at the chance.

The students say they find the college courses challenging, but both said they are enjoying the independence.

“You have to be independent and you either do the work or you don’t. You are treated as adults,” Ms. Evri said. “Being able to experience college, the classes, and the college environment for credit, and for free, has been great.”

“As my parents said, ‘if you do it, do it right,’” Ms. Jimenez continued.

Both young women have already taken a variety of courses together that included art, psychology, business law and introduction to microcomputer applications. This semester they are each taking a different mathematics course. They come to QCC each day on a Worcester school bus and travel home at the end of the day by way of the city bus.

Their schedule is incredibly busy and they each put in hours nightly doing homework, yet the two don't seemed phased by the work load.

“We’ve got it down and we know how to manage our time,” Ms. Jimenez said.

The early college experience has been one that both young women say has been a positive one, noting the support they have been receiving from their QCC instructors.

“The teachers are very nice and a lot of them are really encouraging. They understand we have other things in our lives and high school too,” Ms. Jimenez continued. “They make you feel comfortable and listen to you.”

According to Ms. Jimenez, her older sister has also started QCC and her mom is now interested in coming to QCC for nursing.

While Ms. Evri and Ms. Jimenez have applied to several colleges along with QCC, they both believe they will end up attending QCC.

“The faculty are here for you if you need anything,” Ms. Jimenez added. “This has been a good experience.”

To learn more, visit QCC’s Early College Program.

  • QCC Student Government Association President, Jorgo Gushi becomes President Pedraja for a day.
  • President Switch Day
  • Dr. Luis Pedraja and Jorgo Gushi during President Switch Day.
  • QCC Student Government Association meeting that President Pedraja presided over.
February, 2020

QCC’s President, Dr. Luis Pedraja, and President of the QCC Student Government Association, Jorgo Gushi got the chance to find out what it was like to spend a day in each other “shoes,” during President Switch Day, held in late February.

Mr. Gushi spent the day going from meeting to meeting seeing exactly how Dr. Pedraja spends his...

More...

QCC’s President, Dr. Luis Pedraja, and President of the QCC Student Government Association, Jorgo Gushi got the chance to find out what it was like to spend a day in each other “shoes,” during President Switch Day, held in late February.

Mr. Gushi spent the day going from meeting to meeting seeing exactly how Dr. Pedraja spends his days. The engineering major, who is a sophomore this year, was kept on his toes all day as he navigated the president’s schedule.

"President’s Switch Day has been one of the most fascinating and exciting experiences I have ever had as a student and leader," he said. "The first day, when I shadowed President Pedraja, was intense. It all started with a cup of coffee at the president’s office (believe me, much more than a cup is needed to be ready for such a day!). A series of meetings followed, starting with the Executive Team, continuing with the Leadership Team and ending up with the Board of Trustees meeting. Through every meeting I attended and every discussion that I participated in, I realized the uniqueness of the responsibilities somebody has as college president; the hard decisions, the lengthy meetings, but also the fun and excitement of serving 7000-plus students."

"The most thrilling part of the day, was when I had the opportunity to make an executive decision on behalf of the President’s Office. I was able to make available one of the staff/faculty parking spots to a different student every month," Mr. Gushi continued. "A student success survey will be released on the first Monday of each month via student email and students can complete the monthly survey to have their name entered into the drawing to win this parking spot."

During his time in Presidents Switch Day, Dr. Pedraja went back in time, becoming a college student once again. He took one of Mr. Jorgo’s courses with Engineering Professor Dadbeh Bigonahy; spent time socializing in the Fuller Student Center, and co-chaired a Student Government Association meeting with Mr. Gushi.

“This was truly enlightening for both of us,” said Dr. Pedraja. “Not only was it fun, but we also walked away learning something valuable about each other’s day-to-day life on campus. It was a terrific experience and one that I hope to do again in the future.”

  • From left: QCC student Destiny Fausta, Ryan Rios, Bridgett Hylton, Esq., Professor Brenda Safford and President Luis Pedraja
February, 2020

February is Black History Month and at QCC on February 25, the college’s Black Student Union and the League of Women Voters in Worcester hosted a program by Bridgett Hylton, Esq. that highlighted the history of the black vote. Ms. Hylton is the assistant director of the Counseling and Assessment Clinic of Worcester, a clinic that provides mental health services to the residents of Central...

More...

February is Black History Month and at QCC on February 25, the college’s Black Student Union and the League of Women Voters in Worcester hosted a program by Bridgett Hylton, Esq. that highlighted the history of the black vote. Ms. Hylton is the assistant director of the Counseling and Assessment Clinic of Worcester, a clinic that provides mental health services to the residents of Central Massachusetts. She attended Dartmouth College and received her law degree from Harvard Law.

QCC students Ryan Rios, president of the Black Student Union, and Destiny Fausta, vice president of the Black Student Union, introduced Ms. Hylton, who represents the League of Women Voters in the Worcester Area and gave a bit of background on the 1965 Voting Rights Act.

The program began with a video, “Bridging History: Selma and the Voting Rights Act of 1965,” describing what has historically been known as “Bloody Sunday.” Out of these injustices came the 1965 Voting Rights Act, which created a significant change in the status of African Americans throughout the South. The Voting Rights Act prohibited the states from using literacy tests and other methods of excluding African Americans from voting. Prior to this, there was only an estimated 23 percent of voting-age African Americans who were registered nationally, but by 1969 that number had jumped to 61 percent.

“Ms. Hylton shared a timeline of events to help students understand how important voting is in our country and how their vote can help with our identity, decision-making and judgment. History provides models of good and responsible behavior, as well as teaching us how to learn from the mistakes of others,” said Associate Professor of Human Services Brenda Safford, who is also the advisor for the Black Student Union.

  • From left: QCC Alumni President Cheryl Marrino and Assistant Director of Operations, Shirely Dempsey.
  • Kristy Proctor's Salted Chocolate Caramel Cookies took home first prize at the College's main campus.
  • QCC Rad Tech student, Jennifer Mangrum, took home second prize at the college's main campus contest.
  • QCC Financial Aid Counselor, Kirstie Leonard, won third place in the Bake-Off contest at QCC's West Boylston campus.
February, 2020

It was a tough way to judge a contest but students, faculty and staff were up to the challenge during the recent Alumni Association Bake-Off. No one crumbled under the pressure, unless it was the pressure of choosing their favorite sweet treat, with students, faculty and staff turning out for the tasty voting. After a hard fought battle that brought in close to $800 for QCC Alumni Scholarship Fund,...

More...

It was a tough way to judge a contest but students, faculty and staff were up to the challenge during the recent Alumni Association Bake-Off. No one crumbled under the pressure, unless it was the pressure of choosing their favorite sweet treat, with students, faculty and staff turning out for the tasty voting. After a hard fought battle that brought in close to $800 for QCC Alumni Scholarship Fund, thanks in part to a simultaneous bake sale and raffle drawing, the following people were crowned the 2020 QCC Bake-Off winners from the college’s main campus:

  • 1st Place: Salted Chocolate Caramel Cookies, created by Director of Disability Services, Kristie Proctor
  • 2nd Place: Reese’s Peanut Butter Cookies, created by QCC Rad Tech student, Jennifer Mangrum
  • 3rd Place: Cheesecake Brownies, created by QCC Financial Aid Counselor, Kirstie Leonard

QCC Healthcare and Workforce Development Center Bake-Off Contest Winners included:

  • 1st Place:  Strawberry Rhubarb Cheesecake Squares created by QCC Alumna, Cheryl Letson
  • 2nd Place:  Carrot Cake created by Professor of Nurse Education, Patricia Creelman
  • 3rd Place: Gluten-Free Cheesecake created by Bronwyn Teixeira, Math & Science Department

Winners received an exclusive QCC cutting board, custom-made for the event in QCC Fab lab.

 

  • Veterans at Museum
February, 2020

Quinsigamond Community College's Veteran Affairs department recently learned that it has earned the 2020-2021 Military Friendly® School designation. Institutions earning the Military Friendly® School designation were evaluated using both public data sources and responses from a proprietary survey. More than 1,000 schools participated in the 2020-2021 survey with 695 earning...

More...

Quinsigamond Community College's Veteran Affairs department recently learned that it has earned the 2020-2021 Military Friendly® School designation. Institutions earning the Military Friendly® School designation were evaluated using both public data sources and responses from a proprietary survey. More than 1,000 schools participated in the 2020-2021 survey with 695 earning the designation.

"This is an honor to be designated as a military friendly institution. We try our best and do whatever it takes to help our student vets be successful," said Paula Ogden, director of Veteran Affairs.

Methodology, criteria, and weightings were determined by Viqtory with input from the Military Friendly® Advisory Council of independent leaders in the higher education and military recruitment community. Final ratings were determined by combining each institution’s survey scores with the assessment of the institution’s ability to meet thresholds for student retention, graduation, job placement, loan repayment, persistence (degree advancement or transfer) and loan default rates for all students and, specifically, for student veterans.

QCC's Veteran Affairs and Veterans Club offer veterans a robust array of services that range from academics, fellowship and comradery to social events and social service activities.To learn more visit Veteran Affairs

 

  • Veronica Morson (L) and Alyssa Durham
February, 2020

At Quinsigamond Community College we see many smiling faces on campus. These are the smiles of over 7,000 students,working in a smarter way to better their futures through higher education that is affordable, accessible and supportive.

We want to let the world know of the amazing accomplishments of our students, which is why we have begun the newly created, QCC‌ ‌SMILE...

More...

At Quinsigamond Community College we see many smiling faces on campus. These are the smiles of over 7,000 students,working in a smarter way to better their futures through higher education that is affordable, accessible and supportive.

We want to let the world know of the amazing accomplishments of our students, which is why we have begun the newly created, QCC‌ ‌SMILE‌ ‌program‌. The program uses social media to highlight QCC students, and allows them to tell their story and be an inspiration for others who are considering their college options. The purpose is to put the spotlight on QCC students, friendships, relationships, activities, learning, sports, clubs, study groups and all of the other little moments that make QCC the smartest higher education experience in the region. It’s all of these things that build a sense of community and inspire others to be a part of it. This program is a way to inspire those who are thinking about going to college and to have them consider QCC. Additionally, the program is a way to inspire students already at QCC to be more actively engaged.

For students interested in taking part in the QCC SMILE program, below are some ideas on how to be a part of the program:

  • Ask friends to participate with you
  • Attend campus events and take group photos and selfies
  • Send us interesting things you may have learned here
  • Send us a photo of something on campus that made you smile or laugh or think
  • Photos of your favorite place on campus – tell us why
  • Photo of you and your favorite professor (Why does he/she inspire you?)
  • Tell us who inspires you and why

Participating ‌students‌ ‌will‌ also ‌get‌ ‌a‌ ‌professional‌ ‌portrait‌ ‌to‌ ‌use‌ ‌for‌ ‌LinkedIn,‌ ‌their ‌resume‌, ‌or‌ ‌whatever‌ ‌else‌ ‌they ‌choose‌ ‌to‌ ‌use‌ ‌it‌ ‌for‌…who knows, a few students might even become famous!  Students who take part in the QCC SMILE program may be featured in a QCC ad campaign that can range from print advertising, a Hulu spot, a TV or radio commercial, to social media, website and signage.

Already the response from students has been great! Meet Veronica Morson and Alyssa Durham, both Liberal Arts Music majors who are part of the SMILE program. Both students in this dynamic duo came to QCC to save money and get a quality education. Today they are making beautiful music together and fulfilling their dreams. Make sure to look for them in an upcoming QCC promotional spot.

Anyone who is interested in being a part of the QCC SMILE program can reach out to Marketing Manager Gina Cone, at gcone [at] qcc.mass.edu.

We hope to see your smiling faces soon so you too and tell the world how QCC is college made smarter. 

QCC Cheerleaders
February, 2020

QCC Cheerleaders Bring Out Team Spirit

QCC’s Cheerleaders took to the courts at halftime during the Wyvern Men’s Basketball games, bringing a sense of community and camaraderie to the team and its spectators. The cheering squad performed dynamic dance routines, as well as mounts that showed the team’s skill and dexterity. Go Team Wyvern! 

Wyverns Rallied to End their Season on...

More...

QCC Cheerleaders Bring Out Team Spirit

QCC’s Cheerleaders took to the courts at halftime during the Wyvern Men’s Basketball games, bringing a sense of community and camaraderie to the team and its spectators. The cheering squad performed dynamic dance routines, as well as mounts that showed the team’s skill and dexterity. Go Team Wyvern! 

Wyverns Rallied to End their Season on a High Note

The QCC Men’s Basketball team started off the year a bit slowly, but everything jelled in the second half of their season for the Wyverns, falling just shy of making the playoffs.

“They played hard, fast and with heart. Completing their season with a record of 10-11,” said Director of Athletics & Fitness Center, Lisa Gurnick.

The last game of the season featured Wyvern sophomore student athletes during the annual “sophomore game,” where the students presented a parent or guardian with flowers.

Standouts from the season included Victor Florentino, who averaged 12.3 points and 9.5 rebounds per game, and Brendan Dion, who ranked first in the NJCAA, Region XXI 3-point field goal percentage.

 

February, 2020

We are very pleased to announce the following full-time staff updates:

On January 27, 2020 Administrative Services welcomed Jason Graves as the Network Administrator. Jason brings to this position over 10 years of experience. Most recently, he was the Interim Network Administrator at QCC. Jason earned an Associate’s Degree in Computer Systems Engineering Technology from Quinsigamond...

More...

We are very pleased to announce the following full-time staff updates:

On January 27, 2020 Administrative Services welcomed Jason Graves as the Network Administrator. Jason brings to this position over 10 years of experience. Most recently, he was the Interim Network Administrator at QCC. Jason earned an Associate’s Degree in Computer Systems Engineering Technology from Quinsigamond Community College and a Bachelor’s Degree in Information Technology with a minor in Business from University of Massachusetts, Lowell.

On February 2, 2020 Academic Affairs welcomed Renae Owens as the Clerk IV-Educational Partnerships and Early College. Renae brings to this position over 10 years of experience. Most recently, she was the International Account Manager with Kidde Fire Suppression. Renae earned an Associate’s Degree in Business from Quinsigamond Community College and a Bachelor’s Degree in Business Administration from Worcester State University.

On February 23, 2020 Administrative Services welcomed Karen West as the Accountant I- Workforce & Grants. Karen brings to this position over 20 years of experience. Most recently, she was the Accountant I at QCC.

Please join us in welcoming Jason, Renae and Karen into their new roles at QCC.