Search form

You are here

01/2019

Newsletter Banner

November, 2019

  • Dr. Brandon Cairo works on a patient in QCC's new dental lab with dental assisting student Taylor Handson.
  • QCC Dental Assistant Jocelyn Nguyen trains on new equipment in the new dental lab.
  • QCC Dental Assistant Stacey Graneyu learns to work on new equipment in QCC's dental lab.
November, 2019

Today a visit to the dentist is a far cry from one your grandparents made years ago. There is an evolution in the dental world as more and more innovative technological advances happen in the field of dentistry. Quinsigamond Community College’s dental education programs have stayed abreast of these advances. This year the College opened a new dental lab that offers QCC dental assistant and hygienist students the...

More...

Today a visit to the dentist is a far cry from one your grandparents made years ago. There is an evolution in the dental world as more and more innovative technological advances happen in the field of dentistry. Quinsigamond Community College’s dental education programs have stayed abreast of these advances. This year the College opened a new dental lab that offers QCC dental assistant and hygienist students the opportunity to work on state-of-the-art dental equipment used in dental materials labs across the region.This is welcome news to dentists in the region who have expressed a shortage of dental assistants in the Commonwealth; particularly those with advanced skill sets.

“This lab is part of QCC’s efforts to address Greater Worcester’s need for dental health care by creating a workforce of skilled clinicians in the field of dental hygiene and dental assisting,” said Chairman of the Worcester District Dental Society, George E. Maloney, D.M.D.

Central Massachusetts dentist, Dr. Brandon Cairo, is working with QCC instructors to help teach the College’s dental assisting students the ins and outs of what it means to be a quality dental assistant. He said the new lab is a great way for students to gain exposure to the latest in dental technology. According to Dr. Cairo, this type of hands-on education makes QCC’s dental assistants more valuable when they enter the marketplace by having more skill sets than their contemporaries. QCC’s new lab equipment such as CAD/CAM technology; digital cameras, a milling machine that can make crowns; a high-tech scanner; staining unit and oven, and other cutting-edge dental equipment gives students the ability to become proficient on equipment they might one day be working with in a dental office. In Dr. Cairo’s personal practice, his dental assistants have expanded functions and feels dental assistants with advanced skills are worth a lot more.

“The less I have to teach (dental assistants) the more valuable they are to me. Sometimes assistants bring skill sets to the office that a dentist doesn’t have,” Dr. Cairo said. “They command a pay that’s better than average and increases your worth as an employee.”

According to the state’s Executive Office of Labor and Workforce Development, the number of Massachusetts dental assistant jobs is projected to grow by 12.5% over a 10-year period ending in 2022. The pay scale for dental assistants is also on the rise. The website, DentalCareersEDU.org noted that on average a dental assistant in Central Massachusetts makes $45,074, while an experienced assistant, on average, makes $50,561.

“In New England there is a definite need for dental assistants. Most weeks I get at least two calls or emails from dentists looking for dental assistants,” said Jennifer McKeon, coordinator of QCC’s Dental Assisting program.

In addition to working in the lab, QCC’s dental assistants do externships working in both general dental offices as well as specialty offices such as orthodontics or periodontics. The students also do community-based service projects such as the KidSeal Program, which provides free dental care, including dental screenings, prophylaxis, radiographs, oral health education and fluoride varnish, to elementary school-aged children at schools in the greater Worcester area.

“You learn more here,” said current dental assisting student Taylor Handson.

QCC’s Dental Assisting program is a one year program, accredited by the Commission on Dental Accreditation (CODA), which is nationally recognized by the United States Department of Education as the sole agency to accredit dental and dental-related education programs conducted at the post-secondary level. It is the only accredited program in Worcester County. Upon graduation, QCC dental assisting students will be prepared to take the Dental Assisting National Board examination in order to achieve the Certified Dental Assistant designation.

“Accreditation also commands a higher salary,” Ms. McKeon said.

“This program here at QCC is a good one, that’s why I teach it,” Dr. Cairo added.  

To learn more visit QCC’s Dental Programs.

  • High school students from South High Community School and Burncoat High School.
  • Worcester public high school student Samantha Nordstrom shows off her Star Wars creation.
  • It was thumbs up for Worcester high school student Joseph Rajotte.
November, 2019

A short time ago in a college not so far away, Quinsigamond Community College Associate Professor of English, Michael Gormley, began teaching a cultural course on the history of the 42-year Star Wars movie franchise phenomena. In another realm, Betty Lauer, QCC’s dean of the School of Business, Engineering, and Technology was using the Star Wars movie franchise to excite ...

More...

A short time ago in a college not so far away, Quinsigamond Community College Associate Professor of English, Michael Gormley, began teaching a cultural course on the history of the 42-year Star Wars movie franchise phenomena. In another realm, Betty Lauer, QCC’s dean of the School of Business, Engineering, and Technology was using the Star Wars movie franchise to excite students from South High Community School and Burncoat High School in the field of STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics). These movies give students a way to see standard academics come to life.

Star Wars has transformed into a cultural phenomenon that has become firmly embedded in our society. Calling devices, such as the popular “droid,” is one example of the integration of Stars Wars into society. The droid is a registered trademark by Lucas Film (the film company founded by Star Wars creator George Lucas), which was licensed to Verizon Wireless for the company’s smartphones. Additionally, the films’ droids (robots that act like servants, pilots, technicians and soldiers in the Star Wars films) are being seen in our real technology-driven world. Many scientists and engineers have been inspired by the films. Today we have similar droid-like robots such as automated military drones, Google's driverless cars to robotic surgical assistants. Iconic Star Wars phrases such as “May the Force be with you,” have also become commonplace in our society.

The course Mr. Gormley is teaching delivers students a unique way in which they can learn and understand abstract concepts that can sometimes be difficult to grasp. Through writing and discussions, students analyze the dominant and persistent elements of Star Wars, as well as themes of morality, religion, gender, and race. The response from students to QCC’s course has been exceptional. In fact, the three-credit, humanities/liberal arts elective has become so popular that the college added additional seats to try and accommodate as many students as possible. Mr. Gormley plans to teach this course again in Fall 2020.

“Everyone seems to love that the course represents the ability to draw pop-culture into academia. I developed ‘Star Wars as Narrative and Culture’ because it’s the dream. As a kid (and often enough as an adult), I wrapped myself and my worldview in stories, usually Star Wars. In many ways, I’m still that kid who wouldn’t shut up about Star Wars,” Mr. Gormley said, adding, “Those students who do love Star Wars though, when they heard about the course, always reacted excitedly, often with double-takes or jaw-drop happiness.”

The course focuses on Star Wars as a cultural epoch spanning from 1977 to 2019 and curates a nuanced and timely look at the currents that surround and bind the Skywalker Saga with the larger franchise.

“We examine how Star Wars interacts with culture and exists as a culture unto itself. We are also reading most of Chris Taylor’s ‘How Star Wars Conquered the Universe,’ for historical and cultural context, and Ian Doescher’s ‘William Shakespeare’s Star Wars’ to examine how Star Wars interacts with culture,” Mr. Gormley continued.

The class ending will almost coincide with the December 20 release of the last Star Wars movie: Episode IX, “The Rise of Skywalker.”  The goal of the course beyond learning about the Star Wars franchise and culture, is to give students the opportunity to incorporate what they are passionate about with academics.

“This course can never happen again, in this way. We are preparing for the end of a cinematic and cultural epoch,” Mr. Gormley said. “A course like this empowers students’ visions of themselves by teaching how to turn the things they love into academic and career success.”

For the high school students who came to QCC, attending a Star Wars Lego building session at the college’s QuEST Center enabled them to look at the Star Wars phenomenon from a technology perspective.

“Star Wars is such a craze with high school students too; both female and male. This session taught students how to sharpen their spatial skills, while having fun,” Ms. Lauer said. “Many of these students are interested in STEM and this activity shows them that learning can be fun too.”

While the last Star Wars movie may be in sight, its “force” will live on in the students at QCC.

  • High school students are introduced to early college classes at QCC.
November, 2019

It’s 10 minutes after class yet not one of the 14 high school students in the class are making any attempt to leave.  This is not just any class, it’s an early college course at Quinsigamond Community College, “Introduction to Information Technologies,” taught by instructor Robert “Bob” Knox. During this particular class, students were cataloging pieces of...

More...

It’s 10 minutes after class yet not one of the 14 high school students in the class are making any attempt to leave.  This is not just any class, it’s an early college course at Quinsigamond Community College, “Introduction to Information Technologies,” taught by instructor Robert “Bob” Knox. During this particular class, students were cataloging pieces of music, while listening to music as they worked. 

The students are juniors and seniors from a variety of Worcester public schools who are taking part in QCC’s Early College Program. The program enables high school students to take college courses for college credit. This program gives students a chance to experience college ahead of time, with the goal of having them enroll in college after they graduate from high school. Students can earn up 12 college credits while simultaneously attending high school.

“This is my first experience with the Early College students, but I can assure you it is unusual to have 90 percent of a class engrossed to a level where they were not on their phones and not watching the clock, but were actually more concerned with the project and working together to complete it,” Mr. Knox said.

According to Mr. Knox, the students are encouraged to collaborate in class and they do so without prompting or guidance from him. The open lab time becomes one of animated conversation followed by total silence with the exception of the sounds of typing on computer keyboards.

Doherty High School Junior Joel Nanakobi said this was the first early college course he has taken at QCC.

“I really like this class. I was nervous at first because I didn’t know what to expect. It opened my eyes to technology and I think I want to go into the business world now either in finance or computer science,” he said.

Junior Jerimiah Brown is from Claremont Academy. This was also his first time being in an early college course. He said he is enjoying the class and finds it fun, as well as challenging.

“It’s hands-on and we get to work to help others learn, and we learn from each other,” he said. “It’s very different from high school.”

Burncoat High School junior Maria Bahnan is interested in majoring in some type of technology, possibly engineering or architecture when she graduates high school. Her goal is to attend QCC for two years then transfer to UMass Amherst. This was her first experience taking an early college course.

“I really like it. This is very organized compared to my high school classes. I like the project… it gets your brain juices going,” she said.  

The students all discussed the benefits of being ahead of their contemporaries by taking college classes while they were still in high school.

Amin Badmos, a junior from Burncoat High School is taking his second early college class at QCC. He had taken his first one, a statistics class, over the summer for college credit.

“These classes give you an edge over the other high school students and you don’t have to take the AP test (if you are taking AP classes),” he said.  “It’s a different environment (at QCC). When I took my statistics course the professor said he was not going to teach us like high school students.There is more respect.”

Worcester Technical High School junior Philipo Ntibazokiza is someone who has taken full advantage of the early college program. He has already taken a few early college classes and said it makes such a difference to take classes you are interested in, unlike much of high school.

“When you like something you pay better attention and you learn more,” he said.

To learn more, visit QCC’s Early College Pathways

  • QCC President Dr. Luis Pedraja and Sergeant Joseph Cecchi at last year's Stuff-A-Cruiser event.
November, 2019

Stuff-A-Cruiser has become a popular, annual tradition at Quinsigamond Community College. Each year QCC’s Campus Police accept donations of new, unwrapped toys for QCC students and their families. The program is done in conjunction with the College’s Feed Our Family initiative (formally known as Feed A Family), which has partnered with QCC’s Food Pantry and Resource Center to help QCC families in...

More...

Stuff-A-Cruiser has become a popular, annual tradition at Quinsigamond Community College. Each year QCC’s Campus Police accept donations of new, unwrapped toys for QCC students and their families. The program is done in conjunction with the College’s Feed Our Family initiative (formally known as Feed A Family), which has partnered with QCC’s Food Pantry and Resource Center to help QCC families in need not only during the holidays but throughout the year. Donations are tax-deductible and can make a difference for many of students, staff and faculty. This year the police will once again be accepting donations to help make the holidays a bit brighter for our students and their families.

New, unwrapped toys along with Feed Our Family donations will be accepted on:

  • Tuesday, December 3 from 11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. at QCC Southbridge in the lobby, 5 Optical Drive, Southbridge
  • Wednesday, December 4 from 11:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. at QCC’s Main Campus at the flag poles, 670 West Boylston Street, Worcester
  • Thursday, December 5 from 11:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. at QCC's Healthcare and Workforce Development Centers in the lobby, 25 Federal Street, Worcester

Interested in making a donation but can’t make those dates? Campus police will be accepting donations at the Campus Police Station, located on the College’s main campus, in the Athletic Center, Room 136.

“The holidays can often be some of the most trying times for those in need and any donation, large or small can make a huge difference,” said QCC President Dr. Luis Pedraja. “Each year our QCC family comes through for those in need and I have no doubt we will do it again this year.”

  • Gene Haas Foundation check presentation
November, 2019

For the second year in a row Quinsigamond Community College has received a $10,000 Gene Hass Foundation Grant. The grant funding is a welcome addition to QCC’s Manufacturing Technology program and one that Lee Duerden, associate professor of Manufacturing Technology at the College was hopeful would become an annual award. QCC is a Haas Technical Education Center (HTEC) approved member....

More...

For the second year in a row Quinsigamond Community College has received a $10,000 Gene Hass Foundation Grant. The grant funding is a welcome addition to QCC’s Manufacturing Technology program and one that Lee Duerden, associate professor of Manufacturing Technology at the College was hopeful would become an annual award. QCC is a Haas Technical Education Center (HTEC) approved member.

The Gene Haas Foundation was formed in 1999 with the primary goal of building skills in the machining industry. The Foundation provides an opportunity for schools to apply for funds annually, providing scholarships for CNC machine technology students and NIMS (National Institute for Metalworking Skills) credentials. 

“We are fortunate to work with amazing colleges including Quinsigamond Community College. The College is working constantly to help address and close the skills gap in Massachusetts,” said Toni Neary, HFO Trident, director of Education (a Haas Factory Outlet, in Windsor, Ct.) “Local manufacturers need skilled machinists in order to keep manufacturing here at home, and these scholarships remove barriers for students allowing them to complete the program.”

Ms. Neary said they look for colleges with strong pipelines for CNC pathways. QCC currently offers a CNC Technologies Certificate, as well as a Computer Aided Design Certificate, a Manufacturing Technology Certificate and an associate degree in Manufacturing Technology.

“Our goal is to help allow the next generation of machinists continually develop their skill set,” she added.

Visit QCC’s Manufacturing Technology to learn more.

  • QCC 2016 alumna Laurence Fankep
November, 2019

Overcoming the odds is nothing new to Quinsigamond Community College 2016 alumna Laurence Fankep. Ms. Fankep lives in Worcester, a far cry from her native Cameroon, where she emigrated from in 2011 with her husband and young daughter. She is poised to graduate from the Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences (MCPHS) with her pharmacy degree in May 2020 and said it’s all thanks to...

More...

Overcoming the odds is nothing new to Quinsigamond Community College 2016 alumna Laurence Fankep. Ms. Fankep lives in Worcester, a far cry from her native Cameroon, where she emigrated from in 2011 with her husband and young daughter. She is poised to graduate from the Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences (MCPHS) with her pharmacy degree in May 2020 and said it’s all thanks to Quinsigamond Community College, a place she fondly calls “home.”

As a native French speaker, life was not always easy when she got to Worcester and she struggled to understand the English language. In 2014, after having her second child and pregnant with her third, she decided to look into programs that could help with her English, as well as advance her education. She decided to choose QCC for its flexibility, affordability and location; enrolling in the General Studies program, while taking English as Second Language (ESL) classes.

“I wanted to do something in nursing or in the health field, but I wasn’t sure just what,” she said. “At first it was hard for me to understand and interact with people because I only spoke French. Kathy (ESL Professor Kathleen Lewando) was really so helpful to me from the start.”

Ms. Fankep attended QCC full-time throughout her pregnancy and was thriving. In fact, she was in class the day before delivering her third child; however, what should have been one of the happiest moments in her family’s life turned into a life-threatening scare when she developed a blood infection (sepsis) after giving birth to her son that next day.

“I was very sick and it was one of the worst moments of my life. I didn’t know the American term ‘sepsis’… it was so scary. My son was also sick when he was born,” she said.

Thankfully, Ms. Fankep and her son recovered and after three weeks she was released from the hospital, grateful to be O.K., but wanting to make sense of what had happened to her.

“I wanted to know what was going on. I read my health report but I couldn’t understand it and I was so depressed. I wanted to know what had happened and I told my husband I wanted to go to pharmacy school to understand about sepsis shock and the treatment and medications,” she said. “This was such a difficult moment in my life because my other children were 5 and barely 2 years old. “

While she knew the challenges she would face changing majors, particularly with three young children at home and going into an area of study (science) that she was unfamiliar with, she was not deterred.  

“I got back from the hospital on a Friday and on Monday I was back at school. I got all the material I missed, took my final exams and did well,” she said, adding, “I had wonderful, supportive professors.”

Not only did she take her exams, she also changed her major to pre-pharmacy and never looked back. Under the tutelage of Chemistry Professor and Pre-Pharmacy Coordinator Dilip Patel, Ms. Fankep excelled.

“I was so scared at first but Professor Patel said ‘you are smart and I know you can do it,” she said. “He was very, very supportive.”

Ms. Fankep said the math and writing tutoring centers, coupled with her professors, were also instrumental in her success at QCC. So successful that she was asked to become a member of the Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society (PTK) and subsequently became a PTK officer.

“The tutoring centers were great resources for me,” she said, noting that she went from using the tutoring centers to becoming a tutor herself.

Having a mentor in Dean of Compliance Liz Woods was also instrumental in her progress at QCC.

“She was always there to listen to me when I was nervous or stressed,” she said adding that PTK Advisor Bonnie Coleman was also someone she could turn to for support.

“Being a PTK officer was scary at the beginning because I’m shy, but Bonnie was there to tell me I could do it,” she said.

The Road to MCPHS

As Ms. Fankep neared graduation, she was encouraged to apply to MCPHS after discussing her options with Professor Patel. Not only did she get accepted, she also earned a $30,000 scholarship. English Professor Michael Gormley worked with her on the scholarship application.

“He reviewed my first draft and told me I had to sell myself. I came back with my second draft and he helped me again so I could get it just right,” she said.

Ms. Fankep is now in her final months at MCPHS where she has worked to complete her pharmacy degree, while raising her three children (now 9, 7 and 5) and doing her clinical rotations at area pharmacies. She is in the end stages of these rotations, and while she does not have a concrete plan yet on what she will do after she graduates in May, she has already been offered a job with one of the pharmacies that she did a clinical rotation.

A Foundation for Success

She encourages everyone to take a look at QCC. She was so enthusiastic about the College that her husband, Edris Lodue, also came to QCC and earned a Computer Systems Engineering Technology Certificate.

Her advice to others who are considering attending college is simple.

“You have all the support that you need here at QCC. Just go for it. There’s always someone to talk to.” she said. “I will always come back here to visit…QCC is where I started. I love this place.”

 

  • QCC's three-part Entrepreneur Workshops address the essentials of bunsiness ownership.
November, 2019

Have you always dreamt of running your own business but never knew where to begin?  Career Services has launched a three-part entrepreneur workshop series. The sessions focus on the steps that are needed to start your own business, from discussing the entrepreneur model, to the first steps needed and different financing options. Presenting the sessions is former entrepreneur and current Director of the Center for...

More...

Have you always dreamt of running your own business but never knew where to begin?  Career Services has launched a three-part entrepreneur workshop series. The sessions focus on the steps that are needed to start your own business, from discussing the entrepreneur model, to the first steps needed and different financing options. Presenting the sessions is former entrepreneur and current Director of the Center for Women & Enterprise, Michelle Miller.

Ms. Miller is the former owner of a coffee shop in Central Massachusetts. In the first workshop, held on November 21, she discussed exploring entrepreneurship and told of her own trials and errors during her time as a business owner.

“I did this on my own and learned many hard lessons,” she said.

She addressed the importance of developing a working business model and went through the steps of the entrepreneurial process, which are:

  • Identify an opportunity
  • Develop a concept
  • Determine the required resources
  • Acquire the necessary resources
  • Implement and Manage
  • Harvest the venture

“You must have a passion, patience and time. You’ll be working harder than you’ve ever worked in your life,” she continued, noting that it’s important to have a good support system.

Having good credit and knowing what your credit is are extremely important, as well as learning about alternative funding methods.

“A common factor in the fail rate of a business is not understanding the money piece,” she said.

This means having a familiarity with budget, knowing what insurance you need, marketing costs and what you need to earn to make a living.

It’s also important to have experience in the industry you are going into or at the very least be able to learn about it from someone else.

The key takeaway in Ms. Miller’s presentation was to make sure you write a business plan defining your end goal. This organizes your thoughts and is the key to getting your business off on the right foot.

There are a myriad of ways to entrepreneurship from starting something from scratch to purchasing an existing business; taking over a family business to becoming a franchise owner or an employee who works to ownership.

“Map out your idea and test it to see what’s out there. Entrepreneurship can be taught but the passion and dedication you bring can’t,” Ms. Miller said.

The second workshop, "Steps to Start a Business,” will be held on Tuesday, February 18, 2020 at 11:00 a.m. in the Harrington Learning Center, Room 109B.

Visit Career Services to learn about additional workshop opportunities.

  • QCC student veterans and their families march in the Worcester Veterans Day Parade.
  • QCC student veterans attend the Veterans Inc. breakfast.
  • American flags line the roadway way leading up to the Administration Building on QCC's main campus.
  • Director of Veteran Affairs Paula Ogen with Guest Speaker Sarah McNary
November, 2019

Each year on Veterans Day QCC veterans and active duty military personnel and their families get together to take part in Worcester’s annual Veterans Day parade. Once again our students did not disappoint and a large group of our veterans and active duty service personnel participated in the parade. Additionally, through the support of the Veteran Affairs Office and QCC Vets Club, a free veteran’s...

More...

Each year on Veterans Day QCC veterans and active duty military personnel and their families get together to take part in Worcester’s annual Veterans Day parade. Once again our students did not disappoint and a large group of our veterans and active duty service personnel participated in the parade. Additionally, through the support of the Veteran Affairs Office and QCC Vets Club, a free veteran’s breakfast was held at Veterans Inc. prior to the start of the parade. A particularly touching tribute in honor of Veterans Day was the lining of the roadway with American flags leading up to the College’s main campus.

Other ongoing veteran-centric initiatives include: “Operation: Care Package,” which is running until December 3. The Veterans Club is gathering items to send to currently deployed service members to make their holidays a bit brighter.  Accepted items include:

  • Cards/Letters
  • Snack nuts
  • Candy
  • Gum/Mints
  • Beef Jerky
  • Popcorn
  • Deodorant
  • Stamps
  • Phone Cards
  • Crossword Puzzles
  • Hot Chocolate Packets
  • Hair Ties
  • Toothpaste
  • Socks
  • Sunscreen
  • Chapstick
  • Lotion
  • Fuzzy socks

Drop off boxes are located in 258A, and at the main desk of QCC’s Healthcare and Workforce Development Center, 25 Federal Street, Worcester

For more information contact QCC Director of Veteran Affairs, Paula Ogden, at pogden [at] qcc.mass.edu.

  • QCC President Dr. Luis Pedraja
November, 2019

Supreme Court Begins Hearings

On November 12, the U.S. Supreme Court began deliberating on the fate of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA). This decision, which may be made as early as February 2020, will have a monumental impact on hundreds of thousands of “Dreamers,” who came to this country as young children, and is one that Quinsigamond Community College...

More...

Supreme Court Begins Hearings

On November 12, the U.S. Supreme Court began deliberating on the fate of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA). This decision, which may be made as early as February 2020, will have a monumental impact on hundreds of thousands of “Dreamers,” who came to this country as young children, and is one that Quinsigamond Community College President Dr. Luis G. Pedraja and other college presidents are watching closely.

On October 4, President Pedraja joined over 164 colleges and universities from across the country in signing an amicus brief supporting the roughly 700,000 young immigrants who came to the United States as children and who hold DACA status. These individuals, known as “Dreamers” have received temporary protection against deportation, and have been allowed to work and attend school legally. This “friend of the court” brief was coordinated by the Presidents’ Alliance on Higher Education and Immigration to help ensure that these children are able to continue with their lives without fear of repercussions or deportation.

“Our country was founded on the principle that all are endowed with three basic rights: life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. Parents who brought their children to this country for a better way of life and future should not have those children punished for these basic human rights,” President Pedraja said, adding,  “Our College is one of inclusivity for all and this includes the Dreamers in our community.”

QCC is a diverse community and works to ensure that everyone has access to quality, affordable, higher education. Dreamers today have become doctors, nurses, business owners, police officers, early childhood educators, scientists and others who work to strengthen our society and help it prosper. They bolster economic development and contribute to state, local and federal taxes. They are the embodiment of QCC's Wyvern mascot, whose spirit serves to guard and protect our community.

Since 2012, DACA has offered temporary protection from deportation and the ability to work legally to more than 700,000 young immigrants who came to the United States as children. The program has benefited these Dreamers, including our students, their families, their communities, and our economy tremendously. On September 5, 2017, the administration announced that they were terminating the DACA program. To date, multiple courts have kept renewals ongoing for current DACA recipients, but Dreamers have still been forced to live court case to court case, uncertain about their futures and in fear of being separated.

  • From left: QCC graduate Noelle Hemdal and current students Krysa Boyce and Norma Charles-Rodriguez
November, 2019

On November 9, the Psi Beta and Psychology Club students presented their research at the New England Psychological Association Conference at Southern New Hampshire University. The project "Staying Engaged: The Examination of Factors Related to College Course Engagement," was presented by Noelle Hemdal (QCC graduate and current tutor, now attending The American Woman’s...

More...

On November 9, the Psi Beta and Psychology Club students presented their research at the New England Psychological Association Conference at Southern New Hampshire University. The project "Staying Engaged: The Examination of Factors Related to College Course Engagement," was presented by Noelle Hemdal (QCC graduate and current tutor, now attending The American Woman’s College-Baypath University in Forensic Psychology)  and current QCC students Krysa Boyce and Norma Charles-Rodriguez. Ms. Boyce and Ms. Charles-Rodriguez will be graduating in December and continuing on in their psychology studies at Worcester State University.

Other research associates who were part of this project included: QCC psychology graduates Chloe M. Current, Adam A. Maarij and current QCC psychology student Leah Johnston. The Psi Beta and Psychology Club will be launching its spring research project in January. Any student who is interested in participating, should contact either Professor Valerie Clemente at vclemente [at] qcc.mass.edu or Professor Eric Mania at emania [at] qcc.mass.edu   

  • The 2019 Women’s Wyvern Basketball team
  • Wyverns get off a tough shot.
  • Wyverns drive down the court.
November, 2019

Men's and Women's Basketball 

The Men's and Women’s Wyvern Basketball teams have gotten underway to an exciting season. Men’s Head basketball coach Tishaun Jenkins has a younger team this year (nine are freshmen), but that’s not stopping the veteran coach from having his team give it their all this season.

New Women’s Head basketball coach Andrew Kupec...

More...

Men's and Women's Basketball 

The Men's and Women’s Wyvern Basketball teams have gotten underway to an exciting season. Men’s Head basketball coach Tishaun Jenkins has a younger team this year (nine are freshmen), but that’s not stopping the veteran coach from having his team give it their all this season.

New Women’s Head basketball coach Andrew Kupec has put his basketball prowess to good use this season working to put the Lady Wyverns on their basketball skills. Make sure and stop by to watch both Wyvern teams when they play at home on Thursday, Dec. 5.  The women’s team plays at 5:00 p.m. and the men’s will play at 7:00 p.m.

Visit Men’s Basketball and Women’s Basketball for the complete schedule.

Athletic Center Holiday Hours

The Athletic Center will be closed on Thursday, November 28 (Thanksgiving). It will reopen for normal hours of operation on Monday, December 2.

  • QCC's Harrington Learning Center shines brightly as we head into December.
  • QCC student Roanlis Toribio Jimenez at the Alden Library. Finals week begin December 11 and the library is a great place to stu
  • QCC Police Academy Cadets took part in No Shave November, an annual event for cancer awareness.
  • PTK is selling poinsettas to benefit the new Live and Learn Greenhouse.
November, 2019

November 27-December 24: Phi Theta Kappa is selling Poinsettias to support the new Live and Learn Greenhouse. Assorted colors and sizes are available in the Administration Building, room 351A. Make sure to stop by and pick up one for your desk! For questions or to reserve a plant, contact PTK Advisor Bonnie Coleman at bcoleman [at] qcc.mass...

More...

November 27-December 24: Phi Theta Kappa is selling Poinsettias to support the new Live and Learn Greenhouse. Assorted colors and sizes are available in the Administration Building, room 351A. Make sure to stop by and pick up one for your desk! For questions or to reserve a plant, contact PTK Advisor Bonnie Coleman at bcoleman [at] qcc.mass.edu

Monday, December 2: The Peer Mentoring Program invites all QCC students to a drop-in finals study session from 9:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m. in the Harrington Learning Center, rooms 109 A&B. Stop by for free tutoring support, food, study supplies and QCC swag. Free print card to the first 25 students. Questions? Email Associate Professor Lizette Cordeiro at lcordeiro [at] qcc.mass.edu

Wednesday, December 4: Faculty and Staff are invited to Coffee with The President Listening Session from 2:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m. at QCC’s Healthcare and Workforce Development Center, 25 Federal Street, Worcester in room 221D. Refreshments will be served.

Saturday, December 7: Quinsigamond Community College Alumni Association Advisory Board will presents a Mystery Dinner Theater featuring the Comical Mystery Tour Players in "Grandma Got Runned Over by a... Oh Dear!" at 5:30 p.m. Doors open at 5:00 p.m. and dinner is served at 6:30 p.m. Proceeds benefit the QCC Alumni Scholarship Fund. To learn more and register for the event visit, Holiday Mystery Theater Register by Monday, Dec. 2.  For questions, contact June Vo at 508.854.4235.

Wednesday, December 11- Wednesday, December 17: Final week of classes for the Fall 2019 semester!

December Spotlight: Winter Clothing Drive is going on until December 6! The cold weather is upon us and QCC’s Early Childhood Education Club (in conjunction with the Athletic Center) is currently collecting donations of new or gently used winter coats and accessories for QCC students and their children. If you haven’t already made a donation, please take a moment to consider doing so and helping out our students and their families in need. Donation boxes are located in the Child Study Center, the Second floor of the Harrington Learning Center, and in room 348 of the Administration Building. Donations are also being accepted at the Athletic Center and the President’s Office, room 132A. Suggested Jacket Sizes:

  • Children/Youth sizes 4-8
  • Adult sizes
  • Suggested Boot Sizes:
  • Children/Youth sizes 10-4
  • Adult sizes

Please make sure garments are clean and in good condition before dropping them off. Any questions, reach out to Early Childhood Club Advisor Karen O’Neill at koneill [at] qcc.mass.edu

November, 2019

Faculty from across Central Massachusetts gathered at Quinsigamond Community College on October 25, 2019 for a dynamic workshop sponsored by the Department of Higher Education’s AMCOA team. The team, whose acronym stands for “Advancing a Massachusetts Culture of Assessment, demonstrated that “assessment” is a fundamental part of teaching excellence and student success.The topic of last...

More...

Faculty from across Central Massachusetts gathered at Quinsigamond Community College on October 25, 2019 for a dynamic workshop sponsored by the Department of Higher Education’s AMCOA team. The team, whose acronym stands for “Advancing a Massachusetts Culture of Assessment, demonstrated that “assessment” is a fundamental part of teaching excellence and student success.The topic of last month’s free professional development event was Quantitative Literacy, and featured two highly interactive workshops.

The first workshop, by Professor Matt Salomone of Bridgewater State University, was about why students need quantitative literacy skills and how educators across the curriculum can develop their own skills at designing and delivering quality quantitative learning experiences. Quantitative fluency has never been more necessary to the community college graduate, whether they transfer for a further credential or enter today’s labor force. This is why quantitative reasoning is one of QCC’s 10 general education goals. (Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoning is also part of the MassTransfer General Education Foundation.)

The second workshop was led by Dr. Maryann Winkelmes, the nationally-regarded developer of a method for building more transparent learning experiences. The great diversity of skills and preparedness in today's students means that part of supporting their success is thinking critically about what skills we demand in our assignments, and communicating those expectations to all students clearly. Winkelmes’s national project, Transparency in Learning and Teaching (TILT), is at the forefront of equity-minded higher education.

Those in attendance, who included faculty in STEM, business, the humanities and social sciences, along with instructional designers, spent the four-hour workshop delving into the nuances of quantitative literacy and how to build it into learning experiences in their courses and departments. They also got hands-on experience “TILT-ing” an assignment, making its expectations clearer and maximizing the potential for student success.

Colleagues wishing for more information may contact Quinsigamond Outcomes Research for Excellence at QORE [at] qcc.mass.edu.

November, 2019

On November 10, 2019 Enrollment and Student Services welcomed Benedicta Aboagye as the Student Success Center Generalist.  Benedicta brings to this position over 10 years of experience. Most recently, she was the Clerk III in the Financial Aid Office at QCC. Benedicta earned a Bachelor’s of Arts Degree in Business from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

...

More...

On November 10, 2019 Enrollment and Student Services welcomed Benedicta Aboagye as the Student Success Center Generalist.  Benedicta brings to this position over 10 years of experience. Most recently, she was the Clerk III in the Financial Aid Office at QCC. Benedicta earned a Bachelor’s of Arts Degree in Business from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

On November 10, 2019 Enrollment and Student Services welcomed Caitlin Bogue as the Student Success Center Generalist. Caitlin brings to this position over 9 years of experience. Most recently, she was the Library Assistant I in the Alden Library Circulation Department at QCC. Caitlin earned a Bachelor’s of Fine Arts Degree from Lesley University and a Master’s of Business Administration from Fitchburg State University.

On November 10, 2019 Enrollment and Student Services welcomed John Monterroso as the Student Success Center Generalist. John brings to this position over 5 years of experience. Most recently, he was the Clerk III in the Financial Aid Office here at QCC. John earned a Bachelor’s Degree in Criminal Justice from Worcester State University.

Please join us in welcoming Benedicta, Caitlin and John into their new roles at QCC.

October, 2019

  • 2019 H.A.C.E. Awards
  • From left: Dolly Vazquez, Senator Michael Moore, Eric Batista, Sheila del Bosque, Nacho González Nappa
  • QCC President Dr. Luis Pedraja greets student Johathan Mora.
  • From left:Sheila del Bosque, Dr. Viviana Abreu-Hernández and Gilmarie Vongphakdy
October, 2019

Since 1985, 735 Hispanic youth have been recognized and celebrated for their achievements in leadership, academics, sports, arts and civic engagement, thanks to business and community leaders in the Worcester community. On October 9, 36 senior high school students from public and private high schools throughout Worcester and Southbridge were honored at the 34th Hispanics Achieving and Celebrating Excellence (H.A....

More...

Since 1985, 735 Hispanic youth have been recognized and celebrated for their achievements in leadership, academics, sports, arts and civic engagement, thanks to business and community leaders in the Worcester community. On October 9, 36 senior high school students from public and private high schools throughout Worcester and Southbridge were honored at the 34th Hispanics Achieving and Celebrating Excellence (H.A.C.E) Youth Awards, held at Quinsigamond Community College.

This year was the first time students from Southbridge (which has a 56 % Latinx population) were honored with this distinction.

“I’m so proud…it’s incredible that you’re being recognized. You have so much skill to bring to America and the world,” said Jeffery Villa, receiver for Southbridge Public Schools and a Cuban immigrant himself. “We’re going to show what Latinxs can do in this country. “

Worcester Mayor Joseph Petty proclaimed October 9 H.A.C.E. Day in the City of Worcester and recognized the students for their hard work and contributions to their communities.

“You’re an important part of this community. Make sure to come back to this community and make it a better place,” Mayor Petty told the students.

Dr. Déborah L. González, chair of H.A.C.E. and director of Community Bridges at QCC, told the students that all the accolades they were receiving  (citation from the House Committee, Proclamation from Mayor Petty, citation from Senator Harriette Chandler and citation from Senator Michael Moore) will make important additions to their portfolios. 

"This validates all your hard work," she said.

Keynote speaker for this year’s event was world-renowned Cuban flutist Sheila del Bosque, an expert in Latin jazz and Cuban music. Ms. del Bosque performed at the award ceremony before speaking to the students. She spoke from the heart, detailing her struggle as a young child in Cuba with virtually nothing and described how she worked and persevered to get where she is today.

“When you have a dream tell people, share it. Ask, how can you help me? Be proactive. Listen to the voice inside you; it will always tell you the truth. Study more, apply for scholarships…don’t be afraid,” Ms. del Bosque said.

The 2019 H.A.C.E.  Award winners include:

  • Herwin Godinez Figueroa, Burncoat Senior High School - Athletics
  • Isaiah Gomez, Burncoat Senior High School - Art
  • Sebastian Lima, Burncoat Senior High School - Leadership
  • Maria Tapia Betancourt, Burncoat Senior High School - Academics
  • Jasmine Miletti, Claremont Academy - Arts
  • Latreyu Ojeda, Claremont Academy - Athletics
  • Kimberly Patrocinio, Claremont Academy - Leadership
  • Daniel Ponce, Claremont Academy - Academics
  • Alberto (AJ) Barrera, Jr., Doherty Memorial High School - Athletics
  • Isabella Piedrasanta, Doherty Memorial High School - Arts
  • Lennox Santiago, Doherty Memorial High School - Leadership
  • Francisco Luc Zafon-Whalen, Doherty Memorial High School - Academics
  • Abigail De La Cruz, North High School - Academics
  • Alanis Perez Rivera, North High School – Leadership
  • Davanyel Romero, Baez North High School - Athletics
  • Angel Sotomayor, North High School - Arts
  • Mauricio Manuel Blanco, South High Community School - Academics
  • Alexa June Diaz, South High Community School - Athletics
  • Victoria Malmquist-Ribeiro, South High Community School - Leadership
  • Ivy Nieves, South High Community School - Arts
  • Damian Bermudez-Cruz, Southbridge High School - Arts
  • Stephany Breton Rodriquez, Southbridge High School - Leadership
  • Johansi Santana, Southbridge High School - Athletics
  • Joelis Velez Diaz, Southbridge High School – Academics
  • Julio Del Valle, St Peter-Marian Catholic High School - Academics
  • Daniel Jimenez, St Peter-Marian Catholic High School - Leadership
  • Emmanuel Vargas, St Peter-Marian Catholic High School - Academics
  • Ezenia Diaz-Lembert, University Park Campus School - Academics
  • Gabriella Guzman-Jerry, University Park Campus School - Leadership
  • Jonathan Mora, University Park Campus School - Athletics
  • Michel Salazar, University Park Campus School - Arts
  • Jose Ramon Curet III, Worcester Technical High School – Athletics
  • Willeisha Rodriguez, Worcester Technical High School - Academics
  • Jason Sanchez, Worcester Technical High School - Academics
  • Janely Santana Trinidad, Worcester Technical High School - Athletics
  • Paul Hernandez, Jr., Latino Education Institute - Leadership

 

  • Quinsigamond Community College student and Phit Theta Kappa President Tabitha Leber
October, 2019

Quinsigamond Community College student Tabitha Leber found herself in an elite group of college students when she received a Mechanics Hall Collegiate Apprentice Award, during the 2019 Celebration of Excellence event, held at Mechanics Hall in Worcester on October 5. This is the first time the Worcester County Mechanics Association has given this type of colligate award to exemplary student leaders...

More...

Quinsigamond Community College student Tabitha Leber found herself in an elite group of college students when she received a Mechanics Hall Collegiate Apprentice Award, during the 2019 Celebration of Excellence event, held at Mechanics Hall in Worcester on October 5. This is the first time the Worcester County Mechanics Association has given this type of colligate award to exemplary student leaders within Worcester’s higher education community. Students were chosen for their demonstrated leadership, creativity and innovation, excellence in academics and community involvement within Worcester or the student’s hometown.

“Tabitha exemplifies what a QCC student is and we are honored that she has received this prestigious award as a student leader at our college,” said QCC President Dr. Luis G. Pedraja.

Ms. Leber, an Elementary Education major, personifies the definition of a Mechanics Hall Collegiate Apprentice award winner. She is president of QCC’s Alpha Theta Zeta Chapter of Phi Theta Kappa’s (PTK) Honor Society, overseeing the chapter’s research projects; working on developing goals for the chapter, representing PTK at all its functions, as well as playing an integral role in the PTK Live and Learn Greenhouse on QCC’s main campus.

“Tabitha is an exceptionally hardworking and committed student whose dedication, generosity and work ethic make her a shining example for all QCC and PTK students,” said PTK Advisor Bonnie Coleman.

According to Ms. Leber, she wasn’t always as focused as she is today. Before coming to QCC, she said she felt her life lacked direction and while being a mom to her daughter was fulfilling, she knew something was missing.

“When my child was in kindergarten, I was volunteering on a daily basis in her classroom. Her teacher saw how well I did with the students and told me she believed I would make a great teacher. It was her gentle nudge that inspired me to go back to school,” she said. “Knowing that going back to school would set a better example for my child, I jumped in head first.” 

Ms. Leber said she chose QCC because it was close to her home and offered a flexible class schedule that worked with her and her family. She began taking classes at the college and in 2018, after attending a PTK Open House, decided to join the organization. It was a decision that not only solidified her desire to teach, but also gave her a community and connections that she would have for a lifetime.

“I learned about the PTK/ Burncoat Mentoring Program and that's when I knew I had to get involved in PTK,” she said. “What drives my passion for community service is that I am putting good out into the world. As a member of PTK, the work that we do here on campus and out in our local communities has inspired me to do more and be better.”

Her drive, passion and academic excellence were not lost on those at QCC, which was why the college nominated her for the award.

“When I found out I had been selected to receive this award I was in disbelief. I emailed my advisor Bonnie Coleman to confirm that it was real. The things I do, I do because I am passionate about them, not for any recognition,” she said.

Ms. Leber, who aspires to be a first grade teacher,  plans to graduate in spring 2020 then transfer to a four-year university to complete her bachelor’s degree and then move on to attain her master’s degree.

One student from each college and university in the Worcester region was selected by their respective institutions to be part of the inaugural class of award winners.

  • Community College Student Advocacy Day
  • Department of Higher Education Commissioner Carlos Santiago
October, 2019

More than 200 Massachusetts community college students, faculty, staff, and presidents gathered at the State House on October 23 for Community College Student Advocacy Day. They met with members of the Legislature and urged them to support the state’s community college system in providing a better funded, more accessible, high-quality education for its students.

The event was hosted by the...

More...

More than 200 Massachusetts community college students, faculty, staff, and presidents gathered at the State House on October 23 for Community College Student Advocacy Day. They met with members of the Legislature and urged them to support the state’s community college system in providing a better funded, more accessible, high-quality education for its students.

The event was hosted by the Massachusetts Association of Community Colleges and featured a speaking program that included testimonials of support from community college students, as well as Department of Higher Education Commissioner Carlos Santiago, Senate Committee on Ways and Means Chair Michael Rodrigues, and co-chairs of the Joint Committee on Higher Education Senator Anne Gobi and Representative Jeffrey Roy. Dr. Gentile served as the MC for the program.

“It’s terrific to see such passionate public advocacy from our community college students, who represent the largest and most diverse sector of our public higher education system,” said Carlos E. Santiago, Commissioner of Higher Education. “These are the students – so many of whom are raising children and working multiple jobs while pursuing their degrees - who represent the future citizenry and workforce in our state. I’m delighted so many took time to share their stories with legislators.”

QCC student Jorgo Gushi was on hand at the daylong event with several students from Quinsigamond Community College. Mr. Gushi is president of the College’s Student Government Association and chair of the Student Advisory Council.

Community College Student Advocacy Day was one of the most important and exciting events that ever happened to community college students. It was the first time that all student leaders and administrators of community colleges gathered at the Massachusetts State House to share stories of how our journeys at a community college transform our lives,” Mr. Gushi said. “Quinsigamond Student Government Association had one-to-one meetings with four representatives and one senator to address issues and concerns that students of community colleges face.”

The Massachusetts Community College system serves more than 156,000 students across 15 institutions in all regions of the Commonwealth. The colleges offer wide-ranging programs, workforce training, arts courses, campus athletics, clinics for community members, and much more. A common theme throughout the day was the reality that many community college students face significant non-academic challenges that often get in the way of their educational success such as homelessness, food insecurity, full-time jobs, and the extensive costs of transportation and childcare.

“At QCC we recognize that the challenges our students may face can transcend academics. This is why we have put in place initiatives such as the QCC Food Pantry and Resource Center,” said QCC President Dr. Luis Pedraja. “Today’s event gives us a further perspective into the lives and subsequent issues our community college students are up against and an opportunity to discuss ways in which we can assist them.”

  • QCC students visit Table Talk Pies during Manufacturing Month.
  • QCC students learn about food manufacturing during a visit to Table Talk Pies.
October, 2019

A group of Quinsigamond Community College students had the opportunity to visit the Table Talk facilities during Manufacturing Month. The event, which was coordinated by Walmart, showcased the importance of manufacturers creating innovative new jobs in U.S.

“Manufacturing—particularly food manufacturing—is a strong part of Massachusetts economy and we are proud to be a part of it,” said...

More...

A group of Quinsigamond Community College students had the opportunity to visit the Table Talk facilities during Manufacturing Month. The event, which was coordinated by Walmart, showcased the importance of manufacturers creating innovative new jobs in U.S.

“Manufacturing—particularly food manufacturing—is a strong part of Massachusetts economy and we are proud to be a part of it,” said Harry Kokkinis, president of Table Talk Pies. "We look forward to continue to work with local colleges, including Quinsigamond Community College, to attract and train future generations of students interested in manufacturing, including working at Table Talk Pies.”

QCC students who attended the event are enrolled in the College’s Programmable Logic Controllers class. They received a behind-the-scenes look at how Table Talk manufactures their pies and were also introduced to possible career opportunities with the company.

“We want to thank Table Talk Pies for hosting our students and giving them the opportunity to experience this part of the manufacturing industry during Manufacturing Month. The manufacturing industry is a vibrant one in the Commonwealth and QCC works closely with manufacturers in our region to ensure there is a well-educated pipeline of skilled workers. We are training our students not only for the jobs of today, but also the jobs of the future,” said Quinsigamond Community College President Dr. Luis G. Pedraja.

To learn more visit QCC Manufacturing .

  • AbbVie Project Manager John Sauers greets a QCC student at the recent QCC Job Fair.
  • Students stopped into the QCC Job Fair to learn about employment opportunities and career options.
  • Table Talk Pies was a popular booth at QCC's Job Fair.
  • Unum was at QCC's Job Fair speaking with students about career opportunities.
October, 2019

Quinsigamond Community College students looking for a job had the opportunity to visit with 25 companies when the College hosted its Fall Job Fair in late October. For over 10 years, QCC has brought in a myriad industries to its job fair with the goal of making connections and finding potential employees.

Westaff, a professional staffing organization, has participated in QCC’s Job Fairs for the...

More...

Quinsigamond Community College students looking for a job had the opportunity to visit with 25 companies when the College hosted its Fall Job Fair in late October. For over 10 years, QCC has brought in a myriad industries to its job fair with the goal of making connections and finding potential employees.

Westaff, a professional staffing organization, has participated in QCC’s Job Fairs for the last five years or so, according to Leominster Branch Manager Jonathan Simms. He said that while the objective was to find potential full-time job candidates, many students at the fair were only looking for part-time employment.

“Although, we are trying to work with some viable candidates to match up multiple part-time candidates at one of our clients. For example, two people working part-time equals one full-time,” he said. “It was a good turnout, however in temporary staffing and recruiting it’s usually hit or miss and that is not a negative reflection on the candidate or QCC or the turnout for each job fair. We just may not have the right job to offer the candidate."

Human Resources Recruiter for Securitas, Ashleigh Grice, said the company has been participating in QCC Job Fairs for several years; however, this was her first year personally participating.

“It was an extraordinary experience for me as I had not been to a job fair like that one before. Being at QCC's Job Fair brought out some great potential candidates who would fit perfectly into Securitas program, especially with some of them not having any security experience. With some candidates who don’t have security experience, we have the opportunity to mold and groom each candidate into our ideal security officer,” she said.  

First-time company participant AbbVie, a research-driven biopharmaceutical company, was new to QCC’s Job Fair but not new to hiring QCC graduates.

“Since 1993 when I helped QCC launch their Biotech Certificate Program, we have hired probably in excess of 100 QCC graduates. Just about all of those hires resulted from their participation in the capstone course, ‘Techniques in Biotech,’ which has been taught continuously since 1993 by employees here at our site,” said AbbVie Project Manager John Sauers.

When looking for potential candidates, all the employers were quick to offer some words of advice to students in order to make the best impression possible.

“First and foremost, the students need to understand the importance of job fairs and come prepared (resumes, elevator speeches, research on the companies participating, etc.),” Mr. Sauer said.

“We look for dependability, accountability, a good work ethic and good communication,” Mr. Simms said.

They stressed bringing resumes to the job fair, having an “elevator speech” prepared that promotes the student as a viable job candidate; wearing proper attire (business casual); asking questions, and make sure to have a confident, positive and eager attitude.

"For future references just having a resume on hand and maybe 20 minutes of their time to conduct a brief interview," Ms. Grice suggested, adding, "It was a phenomenal experience and I can’t wait to be invited back for a second round."

Mr Saur said his company looks for students with good grades (minimum of 3.0), accomplishments outside of work, as well as an understanding of what AbbVie does, and an interest in specific interests within the company. While AbbVie personnel did not find any potential job candidates at this job fair, Mr. Saur said he discussed a return visit to QCC.

“I spoke with some of the event organizers about considering a targeted site visit by AbbVie staff who could present on our company, what we do, job openings and such and also treat the visit as an opportunity for students to submit resumes and let us know what opportunities they are interested in,” Mr. Sauer said.

Other companies that attended the job fair included:

  • 1st Advantage Dental
  • Autism Learning Partners
  • Bud’s Goods & Provisions
  • Charter Spectrum
  • Chick-fil-A
  • Connection
  • Continental Pools
  • CoWorx Staffing
  • Cumberland Farms
  • Fastenal
  • FedEx Ground
  • Invoice Cloud
  • Open Sky Community Services
  • Renewal by Andersen
  • Salmon Health & Retirement
  • Scribe America
  • Table Talk Pies
  • The Home Depot
  • UMass Memorial
  • Unum
  • Valet Park of America
  • Wegmans
  • YMCA of Central MA

To learn more about career opportunities, visit QCC’s Career Services & Credit for Prior Learning.

  • Game-minded students work with QCC's Fab Lab instructors to create models of characters, scenery and props for their games.
  • Students brainstorm in the Fab Lab with instructor Bryan DeConte (blue shirt).
  • Instructor Bryan DeConte works with a student on a gaming character.
  • 3D creations for gaming
October, 2019

If you walk into the Fab Lab in the QuEST Center on most Tuesday afternoons, more often than not you will find a dedicated group of gamers and anime fans hard at work, energized by their passion for play. On Thursday afternoons you most likely will find the college’s theater troupe buzzing with enthusiasm, while they design and create props, sets, and signage for their upcoming productions.

Into its...

More...

If you walk into the Fab Lab in the QuEST Center on most Tuesday afternoons, more often than not you will find a dedicated group of gamers and anime fans hard at work, energized by their passion for play. On Thursday afternoons you most likely will find the college’s theater troupe buzzing with enthusiasm, while they design and create props, sets, and signage for their upcoming productions.

Into its fourth year of operation, QCC’s Fab Lab has become a magnet for students, faculty and staff who have a passion for creating and making things. The Fab Lab management team of Nick Bold and Bryan DeConte are excited that lab use has expanded, with members of the college community pursuing their personal interests in the maker space. Noting that both clubs and individuals have been taking advantage of the lab’s resources, Mr. Bold cited numerous examples of projects done in the lab.

Projects included QCC’s cheerleaders learning to use the digital embroidery machine to personalize their uniforms; budding staff entrepreneurs who created tee shirt designs, then printed and affixed them to shirts, as well as a QCC student who decorated tote bags using environmental awareness designs drawn by children. A group of gamers have gone a step further, using the Fab Lab as a hub not only for making, repairing and finishing game pieces, character models and costumes but also playing a game using those items each week.

Mr. DeConte explained that as game-minded students started working on individual projects and were exchanging ideas in the lab, he and Mr. Bold decided to offer a weekly workshop focused on gaming and role-playing on Tuesday afternoons from 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. During the workshop, students are coached in using 3D printers to create models of characters, scenery and props of varying sizes; painting and put the finishing touches on models; making props for their models, and creating costumes and props for humans who role play characters. Whether working at tables or on equipment, these animated gamers, while engrossed in their work, are busy helping one another and sharing ideas on how to make all of their models better.

An avid gamer himself, Mr. DeConte proposed conducting weekly game playing sessions following the workshop right in the Fab Lab, and the response from students was an overwhelming “Yes!"

Christian Bacelis is a dedicated gamer who is majoring in Computer Systems Engineering Cybersecurity at QCC. He has taken on the role as game leader. Mr. Bacelis said he references different Dungeons and Dragons (D&D) guide books in planning a story and setting the background for games.

"The games typically begin by 5:00 p.m. and end a few hours later, when everyone feels the time is right. If people are enjoying a game, it may carry over to the next week; if not, a new game may be started. Together we decide what is working well and what we want to do differently," he said.

“Everyone is very flexible and supportive of each other. I tend to be on the quiet side, but I am very comfortable here. I really enjoy working and playing with this group,” added Robert O’Shea, a QCC student who is majoring in Electronics Engineering (Mechatronics option). 

Having the support of Mr. Bold and Mr. DeConte in the Fab Lab has helped the group form, hone and advance their skills, noted Engineering major Justin Balanca-Hawkes, adding that both staff members are “very open to sharing their knowledge and their creativity gives us inspiration”.

In a different spin on gaming, Computer Science major Vincent Strzelecki pursued his interest in electronic games in the Fab Lab by building an arcade housing, researching, designing and installing the electronic systems needed to run a game and then downloading electronic game code on it. Mr. Strzelecki explained that “there is a lot of open source coding for electronic games available online”, and said he plans to try loading a variety of games into the system he built.

The Fab Lab offers workshops on Tuesdays, Wednesday and Thursday afternoons. Wednesday focuses on the building of Fab Lab skills. Thursday afternoons are geared towards building props and sets for QCC’s theater troupe, while Tuesday afternoon workshops are dedicated to Gaming & Role Playing.  Workshops are open to everyone and no specific skills or knowledge is required, just an interest in learning and some curiosity are recommended. The Fab Lab also offers open hours Monday through Friday, from 10:00 a.m.- 4:00 p.m. 

Visit QCC's Fab Lab to learn more. 

  • Quinsigamond Community College student Luceily “Lucy” Ortiz
  • Damaged caused by Hurricane Maria.
  • Hurricane Maria's destruction of a nearby gas station.
  • Surveying the damage caused by Hurricane Maria.
October, 2019

On September 20, 2017, Hurricane Maria, one of the deadliest category 5 hurricanes in recorded history, hit the island of Puerto Rico leaving death and destruction in its wake. For many on the island the hurricane took loved ones, leveled homes and took away basic life necessities that are still being felt today. The storm also displaced thousands of people who came to the United States seeking shelter. Over 400...

More...

On September 20, 2017, Hurricane Maria, one of the deadliest category 5 hurricanes in recorded history, hit the island of Puerto Rico leaving death and destruction in its wake. For many on the island the hurricane took loved ones, leveled homes and took away basic life necessities that are still being felt today. The storm also displaced thousands of people who came to the United States seeking shelter. Over 400 hurricane-displaced students initially entered the Worcester school systems and today some of those students have graduated from high school and begun college.

One such student is Quinsigamond Community College student Luceily “Lucy” Ortiz.  Ms. Ortiz and her family are from Las Piedras, Puerto Rico, a town of approximately 38,000.  The town took an almost direct hit from the eye of the hurricane. The town had already experienced Hurricane Irma, a category 5 hurricane a scant two weeks prior to Maria. While initially Ms. Oritiz’s family (which consisted of herself, her mother, step-father, brother and sister) was without power, they rode out the storm fairly well.

“Since we had warning about Hurricane Maria we thought it would be like Irma. Yet when Maria hit it was completely devastating…life-changing,” Ms. Ortiz said. “The landscape was completely different. We had strong winds and we got a lot of flooding inside the house. It was a scary moment.”

Hurricane Maria’s full effects came during the night so the utter carnage was not visible until the next day. Ms. Ortiz said that while her family’s home was still standing many homes, even those made from cement were destroyed. The family was able to get in the car and drive around on streets that were sometimes impassable assessing the damage.

“The trees were all burned and there was no power. The damage was massive,” she said. “We lived near a mall and it was so flooded it looked like an ocean. It was all destroyed.”

The family would spend the next days and weeks trying to find supplies and waiting in lines for hours at one of the few supermarkets that was still open. Lines for gas stretched for miles and no one in the area was able to get cell phone service, so they would have to drive a distance to get a signal. Ms. Ortiz’s father lived 20 minutes away and due to the lack of service it took a while before she knew that he was all right.

After a month of living this way the strain became too much for the family and the decision was made to move to the United States and in with her step-father’s mother in Worcester until they got their own home. They waited at the airport for an entire day until they were finally able to board a plane on November 1 that would take them to the states.

“A lot of people on the plane were crying leaving everything behind,” she said.

Five days after arriving in Worcester Ms. Ortiz and her sibling began school in Worcester.

A New Beginning

Ms. Ortiz attended Doherty Memorial High School as a senior along with other students who had also left Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria.

“We are stable now and have our own place but it was rough in the beginning,” she said, acknowledging the support she received from her teachers and counselors to help her become acclimated. “Our quality of life has greatly improved and we’ve taken a bad experience and made it a great experience.”

In June 2018 Ms. Ortiz graduated from Doherty. Having learned about college and college options while at Doherty, she decided to attend QCC as a psychology major. Her goal is to transfer to a four year school when she completes her studies at QCC.

“I decided to come here because I liked the smaller campus and the transportation was easy. It really was the perfect place to start,” she said.

Since being at QCC, Ms. Ortiz said her entire perspective on things has changed. She has become a Phi Theta Kappa member and volunteers at many of their events. She also has a work study position in QCC’s Food Pantry and Resource Center and is this year’s vice president of the Psi Beta honor Society and the Psychology Club.

“My experience has been a really good one. Everyone is really supportive and patient, from advising to financial aid,” she said. “I don’t regret moving here. I’m doing great at QCC. Things happen for a reason and we got something positive by moving here.”

 

  • QCC student Jorogo Gushi with former U.S. Secretary of Education John King Jr.
  • 2019 Student Advisory Council
  • QCC President of the Student Government Association and Student Advisory Chair Jorgo Gushi
October, 2019

Life is pretty sweet for Jorgo Gushi. The Quinsigamond Community College sophomore came to the U.S. and QCC right after his high school graduation, beginning his life on U.S. soil at QCC. Recently he was elected as the Student Advisory Chair of the Student Advisory Council (SAC) in Massachusetts. Mr. Gushi, who is also QCC’s President of the Student Government Association, was elected by 25...

More...

Life is pretty sweet for Jorgo Gushi. The Quinsigamond Community College sophomore came to the U.S. and QCC right after his high school graduation, beginning his life on U.S. soil at QCC. Recently he was elected as the Student Advisory Chair of the Student Advisory Council (SAC) in Massachusetts. Mr. Gushi, who is also QCC’s President of the Student Government Association, was elected by 25 of his peers from colleges and state universities across the state. He will lead the SAC’s Executive Team that also includes QCC Student Trustee Mustafa Boweden as the Public Relations Committee Chair/Secretary. Initiatives that are being discussed include Open Educational Resources such a free texts books in digital form; how to improve retention rates at all colleges and universities, as well as campus safety and sexual assault.  The SAC was created by the state in order to foster communication between student leaders from every public college and university in Massachusetts and the Board of Higher Education.

“This is the second year in a row that a QCC student has led the SEC Executive team,” Mr, Gushi said, referencing QCC alumna Stephanie Teixeira.

Government and education hold special places for Mr. Gushi. As a fifth grader in Albania he was a part of the student government and was a student senator for his class. In his senior year of high school he was class president. At 18, he came to the U.S., where he lives with his grandparents and sister. While his parents are still in Albania, they are both very supportive of his future. He said his love of education has always been an important part of his life. Everyone in his family has college experience. His sister is currently attending Worcester State University, his grandparents were both teachers and his mother, who is a headmaster and teacher, was his teacher when he was in the first grade.  

“I got my love of education from my mom,” he said.

His father is a government official in Albania and his aunt is a judge in Albania, which certainly seems to explain why he is so connected to student government.

Mr. Gushi initially had applied to Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) when he came to the states, but changed his mind when he found out about QCC.

“I thought WPI was expensive and why go to WPI to take classes that you can take at QCC for a better price,” he said.

He began at QCC in 2017 as an engineering major and while he acknowledged he was afraid at the beginning he quickly found his way.

“All my professors supported me in every way. Particularly my English Professor Lisa Palmer and Elena Fenici, my math professor in my first semester,” he said. “Also, Professor Dadbeh Bigonahy who is my advisor.”

Today, Mr. Gushi is set to graduate in spring 2020 (he currently has a 4.0 GPA and is a member of the Phi Theta Kappa honor Society) and will be one of the speakers at commencement. His plan is to transfer to a school such as Cornell or Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

“I’ve always loved education and after my bachelors I’d like to get my masters and PhD. Since I love engineering and sciences and am keen on being a leader, I might want to start a company so that I can do both,” he said.

When he is not in class or in a student government meeting, you may find him working for Student Life or in the college’s Math Center.

When asked what his favorite part of his journey is since he started at QCC he was quick to answer.

“I’ve loved growing as a leader, but the most important and interesting part of being at QCC is all the people I’ve met and all the hospitality. It’s been really good from the first day I came here. It’s going so fast,” he said, adding that after graduation, “a part of us will still always be here.”

  • The team of "Stumbling Forward" came from last to first and won the trivia contest.
  • The Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society raised over $1,500 for the Live and Learn Greenhouse.
  • From left: PTK students Tabitha Leber, Thi Tran and Krystle Bedrick
  • PTK student Jorgo Gushi enjoys the evening.
  • It was a packed house at PTK's first-ever Triva Night with the Wise Guys.
October, 2019

Seemingly useless knowledge isn’t quite so useless in today’s world of trivia competitions. On Friday, October 18, the Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society hosted a night of Trivia with the Wise Guys. The sold-out event was held in the Harrington Learning Center and delivered students, faculty, staff and friends of QCC a night of fun-filled, good natured competition, coupled with raffle prizes, giveaways and...

More...

Seemingly useless knowledge isn’t quite so useless in today’s world of trivia competitions. On Friday, October 18, the Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society hosted a night of Trivia with the Wise Guys. The sold-out event was held in the Harrington Learning Center and delivered students, faculty, staff and friends of QCC a night of fun-filled, good natured competition, coupled with raffle prizes, giveaways and light refreshments.

Questions ranged the gamut from music, to Stephen King, sports and Halloween trivia. Two teams, “The Ghost Busters,” and “Stumbling Forward,” battled it out for the top spot, with “Stumbling Forward” ultimately stumbling to victory.

All the funds raised from the event will go toward QCC’s new Live and Learn Greenhouse. The College will be adding a new full-size greenhouse, which is anticipated to break ground next Spring.

“Everyone had a terrific time and enjoyed themselves for such a good cause. This was one of our most successful events raising $1,550, and we plan to host another one again in the future,” said PTK Advisor Bonnie Coleman.

  • Director of Disability Services Kristie Proctor (L) and Associate Director of Disability Services Terri Rodriguez
October, 2019

Thirty years ago three offices serviced Quinsigamond Community College’s students who had disabilities. Today, those offices have evolved into one office, dedicated to taking the “dis” out of disability and paving the way for an inclusive, accessible collegiate experience for all. Director of Disability Services Kristie Proctor and Associate Director of Disability Services ...

More...

Thirty years ago three offices serviced Quinsigamond Community College’s students who had disabilities. Today, those offices have evolved into one office, dedicated to taking the “dis” out of disability and paving the way for an inclusive, accessible collegiate experience for all. Director of Disability Services Kristie Proctor and Associate Director of Disability Services Terri Rodriguez have spent countless hours educating the QCC community about disability services: its mission, the services, what it means when someone has a disability, and now, creating accessibility for the classes, online and face-to-face courses, and the campus environment.

“The ‘D’ in disability services stands for diversity. Disability is an aspect of diversity,” said Ms. Proctor. “QCC has a diverse population and in our population, as with all populations, there are those with disabilities. It crosses all boundaries, age groups, ethnicities, socio-economic groups, etc. No group is excluded.”

Disabilities can run the gamut from invisible disabilities to cognitive and physical disabilities. While many may think that disabilities begin when a person is born or is very young this is often not the case. A person can acquire a disability as they go through life, whether that’s due to a debilitating accident, illness or other life-changing events.

“Many people also don’t realize you can have a disability that’s hidden. Many of our students with hidden disabilities are incredibly bright and gifted, Ms. Proctor said. “These students are also some of our best advocates.”

“For some, their disability is their superpower,” Ms. Rodriguez added.

College can sometimes be the first place that a person must figure out how to deal with his or her disability. This is when the Disability Services department comes into play. Unlike high school, where the school has the responsibility to deliver needed services to students with disabilities, the approach is much different when a student enters college. Colleges do not seek out students who are in need of services, rather the students themselves must disclose and provide documentation of a disability to the institution’s Disability Services office, where one will find out what type of services are available. At QCC, students who are eligible for services must have an initial intake done and then a check-in each semester in order to figure out what barriers they are experiencing in the classroom and how to mitigate these with accommodations. While this sounds straightforward, there are times when students do not disclose their disabilities.

“There are still stigmas attached with disability services and sometimes students don’t disclose a need when they come to college. They want to try it on their own,” Ms. Rodriguez said.

This can sometimes backfire on a student who is in need of an accommodation and both women strongly encourage students to stop by the Disability Services office in order to get the information they need to make informed decisions.

“Don’t ever hesitate to call to ask us a question,” Ms. Rodriguez said. “Come in and talk to us about what you need. Tell us what barriers you’ve experienced in the past and let’s plan ways to lessen them.”

The field of disability services is continuing to evolve and service delivery practices are changing. QCC’s Disability Services office has already taken a holistic approach in how it operates. The Disability Services staff works collaboratively on problem-solving with students, faculty and staff in order to offer inclusive, accessible education for all students.

“We work on what we can do for the student, which will give him or her access to higher education the same as any other student,” Ms. Proctor said. “There is not a one-size-fits-all solution. It’s a case-by-case interactive process.”

Beginning in July 2020, QCC’s Disability Services will become Student Accessibility Services as a way to clearly promote their mission of equal access for higher education to all in the QCC community.  “We are taking steps to reframe our office as being proactive in terms of access, and building partnerships with faculty and staff to ensure the barriers in the campus learning environment are removed for the student.”

To learn more visit Disability Services.

  • STEM
October, 2019

Quinsigamond Community College engineering student Maryssa Leone, was recently named one of 25 students in the Commonwealth to receive a $1,000 scholarship from Keolis Commuter Services (Keolis), the MBTA’s operating partner for Commuter Rail. This year a total of $25,000 was awarded through the 2019 Keolis Scholars program. The funds are designed to help to offset the cost of post-secondary education or job...

More...

Quinsigamond Community College engineering student Maryssa Leone, was recently named one of 25 students in the Commonwealth to receive a $1,000 scholarship from Keolis Commuter Services (Keolis), the MBTA’s operating partner for Commuter Rail. This year a total of $25,000 was awarded through the 2019 Keolis Scholars program. The funds are designed to help to offset the cost of post-secondary education or job training.

The scholarships were awarded during STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) Week, which is organized by the Executive Office of Education to help boost interest STEM-related career opportunities. Visit QCC Engineering to learn more about the College's engineering program opportunities. 

  • From left: Sharon Marini, Michelle Tufau Afriyie, President Dr. Luis Pedraja, Laurie Teece and Michelle Sheehan
October, 2019

On October 29, four Quinsigamond Community College staff members were honored at a reception to commemorate receiving a citation by the Commonwealth for recognition of outstanding performance.

Each year this special award is given out to QCC faculty, staff and administration who were were nominated by their peers, supervisors and professional colleagues. This year’s honorees included:

  • ...
More...

On October 29, four Quinsigamond Community College staff members were honored at a reception to commemorate receiving a citation by the Commonwealth for recognition of outstanding performance.

Each year this special award is given out to QCC faculty, staff and administration who were were nominated by their peers, supervisors and professional colleagues. This year’s honorees included:

  • Sharon Marini - Administrative Secretary I
  • Michelle Sheehan -  Clerk IV/Educational Partnerships & Early College Initiatives
  • Laurie Teece - Evening/Weekend Nurse Education Laboratory Coordinator
  • Michelle Tufau Afriyie - Interim Assistant Vice President of Student Success/Title III Coordinator
  • From left: Professor Valerie Clemente with Certified Peer Support Specialist Shayn McDonald.
October, 2019

The Psi Beta and Psychology Club Guest Speaker Series and Social Justice Speaker Series have been hosting a variety of speakers and topics designed to inform and inspire. In late September, inclusiveness was a big part of the discussion in a lecture by Certified Peer Support Specialist Shayn McDonald.

Ms. McDonald is a young adult peer mentor with Zia Young Adult Access Center. She works with others who have...

More...

The Psi Beta and Psychology Club Guest Speaker Series and Social Justice Speaker Series have been hosting a variety of speakers and topics designed to inform and inspire. In late September, inclusiveness was a big part of the discussion in a lecture by Certified Peer Support Specialist Shayn McDonald.

Ms. McDonald is a young adult peer mentor with Zia Young Adult Access Center. She works with others who have experienced traumas that are relatable to her own experiences. Ms. McDonald told her personal story of how she had struggled with toxicity at home, as well as being actively being assaulted at school. This led her to ask her mom to see a therapist. She described the ensuing days and months of being treated both as an in-patient and out-patient with multiple diagnoses. She told how she found the most helpful people during this time in her life were those people who were experiencing similar issues.

“My experiences were finally seen as valid and understandable,” she said, adding that it was their stories that inspired her to get into the field of psychology.

Today she is certified as a peer support specialist, a designation that is currently a life certification in Massachusetts. As a peer support specialist, there is a mutuality between the peer specialist and the person they are working with, according to Ms. McDonald.

“You don’t assume any authority or intelligence over another person. There is no power differential,” she said.

In late October, Dr. Katie Gabriele-Black did a talk titled, “It’s not contradictory things you know?”: Experiences of LGBTQ emerging adults from Evangelical Christian backgrounds. Dr. Gabriele-Black addressed experiences of LGBTQ+ emerging adults who grew up in conservative Evangelical communities. Dr. Gabriele-Black is a graduate of Houghton College, has a Masters in Applied Developmental and Educational Psychology from Boston College, and a Masters and PhD from Clark University in Developmental Psychology. She’s worked on a range of research studies over the years, from participatory action research projects with undocumented immigrants in Boston and Providence, to a longitudinal adoption study with gay, lesbian, and heterosexual parents, to projects with trans and gender nonconforming college and graduate students.

For additional information on the Psi Beta and Psychology Club Guest Speaker Series and Social Justice Speaker Series, contactvclemente [at] qcc.mass.edu ( Professor Valerie Clemente.)

  • Amy Kaiser and Daniel Larrabee
  • From left: Jonah Wicklund, Sama Abdulrazzaq and Jadvyga (Jackie) Jonaviciute
October, 2019

Each month, the professors in QCC’s STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) programs recognize and acknowledge the perseverance of one student in their perspective STEM areas. Below are the September 2019 STEM Students of the Month with a few comments from the professors who nominated them. They include:

ScienceAmy Kaiser, nominated by...

More...

Each month, the professors in QCC’s STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) programs recognize and acknowledge the perseverance of one student in their perspective STEM areas. Below are the September 2019 STEM Students of the Month with a few comments from the professors who nominated them. They include:

ScienceAmy Kaiser, nominated by Professor and Coordinator of QCC Liberal Arts Environmental Science (LAES) Program, Anita Soracco.

“Amy first came to QCC intending to major in Communications, but was still seeking her true passion. She switched into the Liberal Arts-Environmental Science Option, and has been pursuing this dream since.  Her ultimate goal is to work as a scientist doing data analysis, environmental permitting and field work,” Ms. Soracco said. “Amy is an example of someone who realized what her true interests are at QCC, and made the bold decision to pursue that goal and excel.  Amy will make a wonderful scientist and do great things for our planet.”

Technology Jonah Wicklund, nominated by Lee Duerden, professor and Coordinator of QCC Manufacturing Technology Programs and Damian Kieran, professor of Manufacturing Technology.

According to both professors, “Jonah is a dedicated student who has been making steady progress towards his degree in Advanced Manufacturing Technology while working full time at IPG.” Professor Kieran noted that Jonah’s presentation on Manufacturing Safety was great,  adding that he offers real world examples in class based on his work experiences.

Engineering - Jadvyga (Jackie) Jonaviciute and Sama Abdulrazzaq nominated by Engineering Professor Dadbeh Bigonahy. 

“When they learned of the opportunity of receiving a 10-week Research Experiences for Undergraduates grant (“REU”) available at WPI during the summer months, both Sama and Jackie jumped at the chance. They each applied, and were both selected to be research fellows for the summer 2019,” Mr. Bigonahy said. “As research fellows, Jackie and Sama became members of different project teams. In addition to their research, they participated in a summer program held at WPI where they acted as mentors to a group of middle school girls. I am so pleased that the work done by Sama and Jackie will be recognized at the BMES conference. They are both talented students with bright futures.”

MathematicsDaniel Larrabee​, nominated by Mathematics Professor Andreana Grimaldo.

According to Grimaldo, Ms. Daniel Larrabee began his studies at QCC during Summer 2018.  Prior to QCC, he had a unique high school experience and spent six years in China where he was home-schooled.  Coming to QCC was an adjustment but he has found success.  He began by taking MAT 122 Statistics during summer 2018 and then moved into taking MAT 233 Calculus I during Fall 2018.  He found he enjoyed the challenge of math and science and soon declared his major as Bio-medical Engineering.  Over summer 2019, he continued his math studies in Calculus II.  Coming into Fall 2019, he is well-vested in the engineering program and currently taking Calculus III along with other engineering courses.   Daniel has consistently made Dean's List and, recently was nominated and accepted into the Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society.  During his free time, you can find Daniel tutoring math to fellow QCC students in the Math Center.  "Daniel is a hardworking student and his grades show it,” she added.

  • Sankofa Lecture Series
  • From left: Co-Chair of the Caucus Brenda Safford, Film Director A.B. Webster and Co-Chair of the Caucus Selina Boria.
October, 2019

Finding a space where you can speak openly, honestly and respectfully in an unbiased setting is the premise behind Brave Space/Courageous Conversations, a monthly group meeting open to all Quinsigamond Community College students. The meetings, put on by the QCC Diversity Caucus, are designed for people to speak freely about things such as race and racism, gender, sexism, ableism and ageism.  The Diversity Caucus...

More...

Finding a space where you can speak openly, honestly and respectfully in an unbiased setting is the premise behind Brave Space/Courageous Conversations, a monthly group meeting open to all Quinsigamond Community College students. The meetings, put on by the QCC Diversity Caucus, are designed for people to speak freely about things such as race and racism, gender, sexism, ableism and ageism.  The Diversity Caucus explores and celebrates the broad spectrum of diversities, including age, race, gender, ability, religious convictions, socio-economic status, ethnic heritage, and sexual orientation through discussions and special events. Co-Chairpersons of the Caucus are Brenda Safford, associate professor of Human Services and Selina Boria, executive assistant to the President for Policy, Governance & Diversity.

Each month enlightening events take place to bring increased awareness on all aspects of diversity. This month’s special events included two Sankofa Lecture Series talks, by Dr. Jarvis Givens and Dr. May Hicks. Dr. Givens’ presentation before a packed audience, focused on the life of Carter G. Woodson as a “rank and file schoolteacher,” then leader and theorist within the professional world of black educators during the Jim Crow era.

Dr. Hicks' talk detailed the seafaring activities of enslaved Africans and Atlantic Creoles who redefined the nature of transatlantic commerce. Dr. Hicks has served as a Jefferson, Ford and Hutchins Fellow at Harvard University.

To learn more visit Diversity Events.