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11/2019

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November, 2019

  • Dr. Brandon Cairo works on a patient in QCC's new dental lab with dental assisting student Taylor Handson.
  • QCC Dental Assistant Jocelyn Nguyen trains on new equipment in the new dental lab.
  • QCC Dental Assistant Stacey Graneyu learns to work on new equipment in QCC's dental lab.
November, 2019

Today a visit to the dentist is a far cry from one your grandparents made years ago. There is an evolution in the dental world as more and more innovative technological advances happen in the field of dentistry. Quinsigamond Community College’s dental education programs have stayed abreast of these advances. This year the College opened a new dental lab that offers QCC dental assistant and hygienist students the...

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Today a visit to the dentist is a far cry from one your grandparents made years ago. There is an evolution in the dental world as more and more innovative technological advances happen in the field of dentistry. Quinsigamond Community College’s dental education programs have stayed abreast of these advances. This year the College opened a new dental lab that offers QCC dental assistant and hygienist students the opportunity to work on state-of-the-art dental equipment used in dental materials labs across the region.This is welcome news to dentists in the region who have expressed a shortage of dental assistants in the Commonwealth; particularly those with advanced skill sets.

“This lab is part of QCC’s efforts to address Greater Worcester’s need for dental health care by creating a workforce of skilled clinicians in the field of dental hygiene and dental assisting,” said Chairman of the Worcester District Dental Society, George E. Maloney, D.M.D.

Central Massachusetts dentist, Dr. Brandon Cairo, is working with QCC instructors to help teach the College’s dental assisting students the ins and outs of what it means to be a quality dental assistant. He said the new lab is a great way for students to gain exposure to the latest in dental technology. According to Dr. Cairo, this type of hands-on education makes QCC’s dental assistants more valuable when they enter the marketplace by having more skill sets than their contemporaries. QCC’s new lab equipment such as CAD/CAM technology; digital cameras, a milling machine that can make crowns; a high-tech scanner; staining unit and oven, and other cutting-edge dental equipment gives students the ability to become proficient on equipment they might one day be working with in a dental office. In Dr. Cairo’s personal practice, his dental assistants have expanded functions and feels dental assistants with advanced skills are worth a lot more.

“The less I have to teach (dental assistants) the more valuable they are to me. Sometimes assistants bring skill sets to the office that a dentist doesn’t have,” Dr. Cairo said. “They command a pay that’s better than average and increases your worth as an employee.”

According to the state’s Executive Office of Labor and Workforce Development, the number of Massachusetts dental assistant jobs is projected to grow by 12.5% over a 10-year period ending in 2022. The pay scale for dental assistants is also on the rise. The website, DentalCareersEDU.org noted that on average a dental assistant in Central Massachusetts makes $45,074, while an experienced assistant, on average, makes $50,561.

“In New England there is a definite need for dental assistants. Most weeks I get at least two calls or emails from dentists looking for dental assistants,” said Jennifer McKeon, coordinator of QCC’s Dental Assisting program.

In addition to working in the lab, QCC’s dental assistants do externships working in both general dental offices as well as specialty offices such as orthodontics or periodontics. The students also do community-based service projects such as the KidSeal Program, which provides free dental care, including dental screenings, prophylaxis, radiographs, oral health education and fluoride varnish, to elementary school-aged children at schools in the greater Worcester area.

“You learn more here,” said current dental assisting student Taylor Handson.

QCC’s Dental Assisting program is a one year program, accredited by the Commission on Dental Accreditation (CODA), which is nationally recognized by the United States Department of Education as the sole agency to accredit dental and dental-related education programs conducted at the post-secondary level. It is the only accredited program in Worcester County. Upon graduation, QCC dental assisting students will be prepared to take the Dental Assisting National Board examination in order to achieve the Certified Dental Assistant designation.

“Accreditation also commands a higher salary,” Ms. McKeon said.

“This program here at QCC is a good one, that’s why I teach it,” Dr. Cairo added.  

To learn more visit QCC’s Dental Programs.

  • High school students from South High Community School and Burncoat High School.
  • Worcester public high school student Samantha Nordstrom shows off her Star Wars creation.
  • It was thumbs up for Worcester high school student Joseph Rajotte.
November, 2019

A short time ago in a college not so far away, Quinsigamond Community College Associate Professor of English, Michael Gormley, began teaching a cultural course on the history of the 42-year Star Wars movie franchise phenomena. In another realm, Betty Lauer, QCC’s dean of the School of Business, Engineering, and Technology was using the Star Wars movie franchise to excite ...

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A short time ago in a college not so far away, Quinsigamond Community College Associate Professor of English, Michael Gormley, began teaching a cultural course on the history of the 42-year Star Wars movie franchise phenomena. In another realm, Betty Lauer, QCC’s dean of the School of Business, Engineering, and Technology was using the Star Wars movie franchise to excite students from South High Community School and Burncoat High School in the field of STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics). These movies give students a way to see standard academics come to life.

Star Wars has transformed into a cultural phenomenon that has become firmly embedded in our society. Calling devices, such as the popular “droid,” is one example of the integration of Stars Wars into society. The droid is a registered trademark by Lucas Film (the film company founded by Star Wars creator George Lucas), which was licensed to Verizon Wireless for the company’s smartphones. Additionally, the films’ droids (robots that act like servants, pilots, technicians and soldiers in the Star Wars films) are being seen in our real technology-driven world. Many scientists and engineers have been inspired by the films. Today we have similar droid-like robots such as automated military drones, Google's driverless cars to robotic surgical assistants. Iconic Star Wars phrases such as “May the Force be with you,” have also become commonplace in our society.

The course Mr. Gormley is teaching delivers students a unique way in which they can learn and understand abstract concepts that can sometimes be difficult to grasp. Through writing and discussions, students analyze the dominant and persistent elements of Star Wars, as well as themes of morality, religion, gender, and race. The response from students to QCC’s course has been exceptional. In fact, the three-credit, humanities/liberal arts elective has become so popular that the college added additional seats to try and accommodate as many students as possible. Mr. Gormley plans to teach this course again in Fall 2020.

“Everyone seems to love that the course represents the ability to draw pop-culture into academia. I developed ‘Star Wars as Narrative and Culture’ because it’s the dream. As a kid (and often enough as an adult), I wrapped myself and my worldview in stories, usually Star Wars. In many ways, I’m still that kid who wouldn’t shut up about Star Wars,” Mr. Gormley said, adding, “Those students who do love Star Wars though, when they heard about the course, always reacted excitedly, often with double-takes or jaw-drop happiness.”

The course focuses on Star Wars as a cultural epoch spanning from 1977 to 2019 and curates a nuanced and timely look at the currents that surround and bind the Skywalker Saga with the larger franchise.

“We examine how Star Wars interacts with culture and exists as a culture unto itself. We are also reading most of Chris Taylor’s ‘How Star Wars Conquered the Universe,’ for historical and cultural context, and Ian Doescher’s ‘William Shakespeare’s Star Wars’ to examine how Star Wars interacts with culture,” Mr. Gormley continued.

The class ending will almost coincide with the December 20 release of the last Star Wars movie: Episode IX, “The Rise of Skywalker.”  The goal of the course beyond learning about the Star Wars franchise and culture, is to give students the opportunity to incorporate what they are passionate about with academics.

“This course can never happen again, in this way. We are preparing for the end of a cinematic and cultural epoch,” Mr. Gormley said. “A course like this empowers students’ visions of themselves by teaching how to turn the things they love into academic and career success.”

For the high school students who came to QCC, attending a Star Wars Lego building session at the college’s QuEST Center enabled them to look at the Star Wars phenomenon from a technology perspective.

“Star Wars is such a craze with high school students too; both female and male. This session taught students how to sharpen their spatial skills, while having fun,” Ms. Lauer said. “Many of these students are interested in STEM and this activity shows them that learning can be fun too.”

While the last Star Wars movie may be in sight, its “force” will live on in the students at QCC.

  • High school students are introduced to early college classes at QCC.
November, 2019

It’s 10 minutes after class yet not one of the 14 high school students in the class are making any attempt to leave.  This is not just any class, it’s an early college course at Quinsigamond Community College, “Introduction to Information Technologies,” taught by instructor Robert “Bob” Knox. During this particular class, students were cataloging pieces of...

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It’s 10 minutes after class yet not one of the 14 high school students in the class are making any attempt to leave.  This is not just any class, it’s an early college course at Quinsigamond Community College, “Introduction to Information Technologies,” taught by instructor Robert “Bob” Knox. During this particular class, students were cataloging pieces of music, while listening to music as they worked. 

The students are juniors and seniors from a variety of Worcester public schools who are taking part in QCC’s Early College Program. The program enables high school students to take college courses for college credit. This program gives students a chance to experience college ahead of time, with the goal of having them enroll in college after they graduate from high school. Students can earn up 12 college credits while simultaneously attending high school.

“This is my first experience with the Early College students, but I can assure you it is unusual to have 90 percent of a class engrossed to a level where they were not on their phones and not watching the clock, but were actually more concerned with the project and working together to complete it,” Mr. Knox said.

According to Mr. Knox, the students are encouraged to collaborate in class and they do so without prompting or guidance from him. The open lab time becomes one of animated conversation followed by total silence with the exception of the sounds of typing on computer keyboards.

Doherty High School Junior Joel Nanakobi said this was the first early college course he has taken at QCC.

“I really like this class. I was nervous at first because I didn’t know what to expect. It opened my eyes to technology and I think I want to go into the business world now either in finance or computer science,” he said.

Junior Jerimiah Brown is from Claremont Academy. This was also his first time being in an early college course. He said he is enjoying the class and finds it fun, as well as challenging.

“It’s hands-on and we get to work to help others learn, and we learn from each other,” he said. “It’s very different from high school.”

Burncoat High School junior Maria Bahnan is interested in majoring in some type of technology, possibly engineering or architecture when she graduates high school. Her goal is to attend QCC for two years then transfer to UMass Amherst. This was her first experience taking an early college course.

“I really like it. This is very organized compared to my high school classes. I like the project… it gets your brain juices going,” she said.  

The students all discussed the benefits of being ahead of their contemporaries by taking college classes while they were still in high school.

Amin Badmos, a junior from Burncoat High School is taking his second early college class at QCC. He had taken his first one, a statistics class, over the summer for college credit.

“These classes give you an edge over the other high school students and you don’t have to take the AP test (if you are taking AP classes),” he said.  “It’s a different environment (at QCC). When I took my statistics course the professor said he was not going to teach us like high school students.There is more respect.”

Worcester Technical High School junior Philipo Ntibazokiza is someone who has taken full advantage of the early college program. He has already taken a few early college classes and said it makes such a difference to take classes you are interested in, unlike much of high school.

“When you like something you pay better attention and you learn more,” he said.

To learn more, visit QCC’s Early College Pathways

  • QCC President Dr. Luis Pedraja and Sergeant Joseph Cecchi at last year's Stuff-A-Cruiser event.
November, 2019

Stuff-A-Cruiser has become a popular, annual tradition at Quinsigamond Community College. Each year QCC’s Campus Police accept donations of new, unwrapped toys for QCC students and their families. The program is done in conjunction with the College’s Feed Our Family initiative (formally known as Feed A Family), which has partnered with QCC’s Food Pantry and Resource Center to help QCC families in...

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Stuff-A-Cruiser has become a popular, annual tradition at Quinsigamond Community College. Each year QCC’s Campus Police accept donations of new, unwrapped toys for QCC students and their families. The program is done in conjunction with the College’s Feed Our Family initiative (formally known as Feed A Family), which has partnered with QCC’s Food Pantry and Resource Center to help QCC families in need not only during the holidays but throughout the year. Donations are tax-deductible and can make a difference for many of students, staff and faculty. This year the police will once again be accepting donations to help make the holidays a bit brighter for our students and their families.

New, unwrapped toys along with Feed Our Family donations will be accepted on:

  • Tuesday, December 3 from 11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. at QCC Southbridge in the lobby, 5 Optical Drive, Southbridge
  • Wednesday, December 4 from 11:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. at QCC’s Main Campus at the flag poles, 670 West Boylston Street, Worcester
  • Thursday, December 5 from 11:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. at QCC's Healthcare and Workforce Development Centers in the lobby, 25 Federal Street, Worcester

Interested in making a donation but can’t make those dates? Campus police will be accepting donations at the Campus Police Station, located on the College’s main campus, in the Athletic Center, Room 136.

“The holidays can often be some of the most trying times for those in need and any donation, large or small can make a huge difference,” said QCC President Dr. Luis Pedraja. “Each year our QCC family comes through for those in need and I have no doubt we will do it again this year.”

  • Gene Haas Foundation check presentation
November, 2019

For the second year in a row Quinsigamond Community College has received a $10,000 Gene Hass Foundation Grant. The grant funding is a welcome addition to QCC’s Manufacturing Technology program and one that Lee Duerden, associate professor of Manufacturing Technology at the College was hopeful would become an annual award. QCC is a Haas Technical Education Center (HTEC) approved member....

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For the second year in a row Quinsigamond Community College has received a $10,000 Gene Hass Foundation Grant. The grant funding is a welcome addition to QCC’s Manufacturing Technology program and one that Lee Duerden, associate professor of Manufacturing Technology at the College was hopeful would become an annual award. QCC is a Haas Technical Education Center (HTEC) approved member.

The Gene Haas Foundation was formed in 1999 with the primary goal of building skills in the machining industry. The Foundation provides an opportunity for schools to apply for funds annually, providing scholarships for CNC machine technology students and NIMS (National Institute for Metalworking Skills) credentials. 

“We are fortunate to work with amazing colleges including Quinsigamond Community College. The College is working constantly to help address and close the skills gap in Massachusetts,” said Toni Neary, HFO Trident, director of Education (a Haas Factory Outlet, in Windsor, Ct.) “Local manufacturers need skilled machinists in order to keep manufacturing here at home, and these scholarships remove barriers for students allowing them to complete the program.”

Ms. Neary said they look for colleges with strong pipelines for CNC pathways. QCC currently offers a CNC Technologies Certificate, as well as a Computer Aided Design Certificate, a Manufacturing Technology Certificate and an associate degree in Manufacturing Technology.

“Our goal is to help allow the next generation of machinists continually develop their skill set,” she added.

Visit QCC’s Manufacturing Technology to learn more.

  • QCC 2016 alumna Laurence Fankep
November, 2019

Overcoming the odds is nothing new to Quinsigamond Community College 2016 alumna Laurence Fankep. Ms. Fankep lives in Worcester, a far cry from her native Cameroon, where she emigrated from in 2011 with her husband and young daughter. She is poised to graduate from the Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences (MCPHS) with her pharmacy degree in May 2020 and said it’s all thanks to...

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Overcoming the odds is nothing new to Quinsigamond Community College 2016 alumna Laurence Fankep. Ms. Fankep lives in Worcester, a far cry from her native Cameroon, where she emigrated from in 2011 with her husband and young daughter. She is poised to graduate from the Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences (MCPHS) with her pharmacy degree in May 2020 and said it’s all thanks to Quinsigamond Community College, a place she fondly calls “home.”

As a native French speaker, life was not always easy when she got to Worcester and she struggled to understand the English language. In 2014, after having her second child and pregnant with her third, she decided to look into programs that could help with her English, as well as advance her education. She decided to choose QCC for its flexibility, affordability and location; enrolling in the General Studies program, while taking English as Second Language (ESL) classes.

“I wanted to do something in nursing or in the health field, but I wasn’t sure just what,” she said. “At first it was hard for me to understand and interact with people because I only spoke French. Kathy (ESL Professor Kathleen Lewando) was really so helpful to me from the start.”

Ms. Fankep attended QCC full-time throughout her pregnancy and was thriving. In fact, she was in class the day before delivering her third child; however, what should have been one of the happiest moments in her family’s life turned into a life-threatening scare when she developed a blood infection (sepsis) after giving birth to her son that next day.

“I was very sick and it was one of the worst moments of my life. I didn’t know the American term ‘sepsis’… it was so scary. My son was also sick when he was born,” she said.

Thankfully, Ms. Fankep and her son recovered and after three weeks she was released from the hospital, grateful to be O.K., but wanting to make sense of what had happened to her.

“I wanted to know what was going on. I read my health report but I couldn’t understand it and I was so depressed. I wanted to know what had happened and I told my husband I wanted to go to pharmacy school to understand about sepsis shock and the treatment and medications,” she said. “This was such a difficult moment in my life because my other children were 5 and barely 2 years old. “

While she knew the challenges she would face changing majors, particularly with three young children at home and going into an area of study (science) that she was unfamiliar with, she was not deterred.  

“I got back from the hospital on a Friday and on Monday I was back at school. I got all the material I missed, took my final exams and did well,” she said, adding, “I had wonderful, supportive professors.”

Not only did she take her exams, she also changed her major to pre-pharmacy and never looked back. Under the tutelage of Chemistry Professor and Pre-Pharmacy Coordinator Dilip Patel, Ms. Fankep excelled.

“I was so scared at first but Professor Patel said ‘you are smart and I know you can do it,” she said. “He was very, very supportive.”

Ms. Fankep said the math and writing tutoring centers, coupled with her professors, were also instrumental in her success at QCC. So successful that she was asked to become a member of the Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society (PTK) and subsequently became a PTK officer.

“The tutoring centers were great resources for me,” she said, noting that she went from using the tutoring centers to becoming a tutor herself.

Having a mentor in Dean of Compliance Liz Woods was also instrumental in her progress at QCC.

“She was always there to listen to me when I was nervous or stressed,” she said adding that PTK Advisor Bonnie Coleman was also someone she could turn to for support.

“Being a PTK officer was scary at the beginning because I’m shy, but Bonnie was there to tell me I could do it,” she said.

The Road to MCPHS

As Ms. Fankep neared graduation, she was encouraged to apply to MCPHS after discussing her options with Professor Patel. Not only did she get accepted, she also earned a $30,000 scholarship. English Professor Michael Gormley worked with her on the scholarship application.

“He reviewed my first draft and told me I had to sell myself. I came back with my second draft and he helped me again so I could get it just right,” she said.

Ms. Fankep is now in her final months at MCPHS where she has worked to complete her pharmacy degree, while raising her three children (now 9, 7 and 5) and doing her clinical rotations at area pharmacies. She is in the end stages of these rotations, and while she does not have a concrete plan yet on what she will do after she graduates in May, she has already been offered a job with one of the pharmacies that she did a clinical rotation.

A Foundation for Success

She encourages everyone to take a look at QCC. She was so enthusiastic about the College that her husband, Edris Lodue, also came to QCC and earned a Computer Systems Engineering Technology Certificate.

Her advice to others who are considering attending college is simple.

“You have all the support that you need here at QCC. Just go for it. There’s always someone to talk to.” she said. “I will always come back here to visit…QCC is where I started. I love this place.”

 

  • QCC's three-part Entrepreneur Workshops address the essentials of bunsiness ownership.
November, 2019

Have you always dreamt of running your own business but never knew where to begin?  Career Services has launched a three-part entrepreneur workshop series. The sessions focus on the steps that are needed to start your own business, from discussing the entrepreneur model, to the first steps needed and different financing options. Presenting the sessions is former entrepreneur and current Director of the Center for...

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Have you always dreamt of running your own business but never knew where to begin?  Career Services has launched a three-part entrepreneur workshop series. The sessions focus on the steps that are needed to start your own business, from discussing the entrepreneur model, to the first steps needed and different financing options. Presenting the sessions is former entrepreneur and current Director of the Center for Women & Enterprise, Michelle Miller.

Ms. Miller is the former owner of a coffee shop in Central Massachusetts. In the first workshop, held on November 21, she discussed exploring entrepreneurship and told of her own trials and errors during her time as a business owner.

“I did this on my own and learned many hard lessons,” she said.

She addressed the importance of developing a working business model and went through the steps of the entrepreneurial process, which are:

  • Identify an opportunity
  • Develop a concept
  • Determine the required resources
  • Acquire the necessary resources
  • Implement and Manage
  • Harvest the venture

“You must have a passion, patience and time. You’ll be working harder than you’ve ever worked in your life,” she continued, noting that it’s important to have a good support system.

Having good credit and knowing what your credit is are extremely important, as well as learning about alternative funding methods.

“A common factor in the fail rate of a business is not understanding the money piece,” she said.

This means having a familiarity with budget, knowing what insurance you need, marketing costs and what you need to earn to make a living.

It’s also important to have experience in the industry you are going into or at the very least be able to learn about it from someone else.

The key takeaway in Ms. Miller’s presentation was to make sure you write a business plan defining your end goal. This organizes your thoughts and is the key to getting your business off on the right foot.

There are a myriad of ways to entrepreneurship from starting something from scratch to purchasing an existing business; taking over a family business to becoming a franchise owner or an employee who works to ownership.

“Map out your idea and test it to see what’s out there. Entrepreneurship can be taught but the passion and dedication you bring can’t,” Ms. Miller said.

The second workshop, "Steps to Start a Business,” will be held on Tuesday, February 18, 2020 at 11:00 a.m. in the Harrington Learning Center, Room 109B.

Visit Career Services to learn about additional workshop opportunities.

  • QCC student veterans and their families march in the Worcester Veterans Day Parade.
  • QCC student veterans attend the Veterans Inc. breakfast.
  • American flags line the roadway way leading up to the Administration Building on QCC's main campus.
  • Director of Veteran Affairs Paula Ogen with Guest Speaker Sarah McNary
November, 2019

Each year on Veterans Day QCC veterans and active duty military personnel and their families get together to take part in Worcester’s annual Veterans Day parade. Once again our students did not disappoint and a large group of our veterans and active duty service personnel participated in the parade. Additionally, through the support of the Veteran Affairs Office and QCC Vets Club, a free veteran’s...

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Each year on Veterans Day QCC veterans and active duty military personnel and their families get together to take part in Worcester’s annual Veterans Day parade. Once again our students did not disappoint and a large group of our veterans and active duty service personnel participated in the parade. Additionally, through the support of the Veteran Affairs Office and QCC Vets Club, a free veteran’s breakfast was held at Veterans Inc. prior to the start of the parade. A particularly touching tribute in honor of Veterans Day was the lining of the roadway with American flags leading up to the College’s main campus.

Other ongoing veteran-centric initiatives include: “Operation: Care Package,” which is running until December 3. The Veterans Club is gathering items to send to currently deployed service members to make their holidays a bit brighter.  Accepted items include:

  • Cards/Letters
  • Snack nuts
  • Candy
  • Gum/Mints
  • Beef Jerky
  • Popcorn
  • Deodorant
  • Stamps
  • Phone Cards
  • Crossword Puzzles
  • Hot Chocolate Packets
  • Hair Ties
  • Toothpaste
  • Socks
  • Sunscreen
  • Chapstick
  • Lotion
  • Fuzzy socks

Drop off boxes are located in 258A, and at the main desk of QCC’s Healthcare and Workforce Development Center, 25 Federal Street, Worcester

For more information contact QCC Director of Veteran Affairs, Paula Ogden, at pogden [at] qcc.mass.edu.

  • QCC President Dr. Luis Pedraja
November, 2019

Supreme Court Begins Hearings

On November 12, the U.S. Supreme Court began deliberating on the fate of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA). This decision, which may be made as early as February 2020, will have a monumental impact on hundreds of thousands of “Dreamers,” who came to this country as young children, and is one that Quinsigamond Community College...

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Supreme Court Begins Hearings

On November 12, the U.S. Supreme Court began deliberating on the fate of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA). This decision, which may be made as early as February 2020, will have a monumental impact on hundreds of thousands of “Dreamers,” who came to this country as young children, and is one that Quinsigamond Community College President Dr. Luis G. Pedraja and other college presidents are watching closely.

On October 4, President Pedraja joined over 164 colleges and universities from across the country in signing an amicus brief supporting the roughly 700,000 young immigrants who came to the United States as children and who hold DACA status. These individuals, known as “Dreamers” have received temporary protection against deportation, and have been allowed to work and attend school legally. This “friend of the court” brief was coordinated by the Presidents’ Alliance on Higher Education and Immigration to help ensure that these children are able to continue with their lives without fear of repercussions or deportation.

“Our country was founded on the principle that all are endowed with three basic rights: life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. Parents who brought their children to this country for a better way of life and future should not have those children punished for these basic human rights,” President Pedraja said, adding,  “Our College is one of inclusivity for all and this includes the Dreamers in our community.”

QCC is a diverse community and works to ensure that everyone has access to quality, affordable, higher education. Dreamers today have become doctors, nurses, business owners, police officers, early childhood educators, scientists and others who work to strengthen our society and help it prosper. They bolster economic development and contribute to state, local and federal taxes. They are the embodiment of QCC's Wyvern mascot, whose spirit serves to guard and protect our community.

Since 2012, DACA has offered temporary protection from deportation and the ability to work legally to more than 700,000 young immigrants who came to the United States as children. The program has benefited these Dreamers, including our students, their families, their communities, and our economy tremendously. On September 5, 2017, the administration announced that they were terminating the DACA program. To date, multiple courts have kept renewals ongoing for current DACA recipients, but Dreamers have still been forced to live court case to court case, uncertain about their futures and in fear of being separated.

  • From left: QCC graduate Noelle Hemdal and current students Krysa Boyce and Norma Charles-Rodriguez
November, 2019

On November 9, the Psi Beta and Psychology Club students presented their research at the New England Psychological Association Conference at Southern New Hampshire University. The project "Staying Engaged: The Examination of Factors Related to College Course Engagement," was presented by Noelle Hemdal (QCC graduate and current tutor, now attending The American Woman’s...

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On November 9, the Psi Beta and Psychology Club students presented their research at the New England Psychological Association Conference at Southern New Hampshire University. The project "Staying Engaged: The Examination of Factors Related to College Course Engagement," was presented by Noelle Hemdal (QCC graduate and current tutor, now attending The American Woman’s College-Baypath University in Forensic Psychology)  and current QCC students Krysa Boyce and Norma Charles-Rodriguez. Ms. Boyce and Ms. Charles-Rodriguez will be graduating in December and continuing on in their psychology studies at Worcester State University.

Other research associates who were part of this project included: QCC psychology graduates Chloe M. Current, Adam A. Maarij and current QCC psychology student Leah Johnston. The Psi Beta and Psychology Club will be launching its spring research project in January. Any student who is interested in participating, should contact either Professor Valerie Clemente at vclemente [at] qcc.mass.edu or Professor Eric Mania at emania [at] qcc.mass.edu   

  • The 2019 Women’s Wyvern Basketball team
  • Wyverns get off a tough shot.
  • Wyverns drive down the court.
November, 2019

Men's and Women's Basketball 

The Men's and Women’s Wyvern Basketball teams have gotten underway to an exciting season. Men’s Head basketball coach Tishaun Jenkins has a younger team this year (nine are freshmen), but that’s not stopping the veteran coach from having his team give it their all this season.

New Women’s Head basketball coach Andrew Kupec...

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Men's and Women's Basketball 

The Men's and Women’s Wyvern Basketball teams have gotten underway to an exciting season. Men’s Head basketball coach Tishaun Jenkins has a younger team this year (nine are freshmen), but that’s not stopping the veteran coach from having his team give it their all this season.

New Women’s Head basketball coach Andrew Kupec has put his basketball prowess to good use this season working to put the Lady Wyverns on their basketball skills. Make sure and stop by to watch both Wyvern teams when they play at home on Thursday, Dec. 5.  The women’s team plays at 5:00 p.m. and the men’s will play at 7:00 p.m.

Visit Men’s Basketball and Women’s Basketball for the complete schedule.

Athletic Center Holiday Hours

The Athletic Center will be closed on Thursday, November 28 (Thanksgiving). It will reopen for normal hours of operation on Monday, December 2.

  • QCC's Harrington Learning Center shines brightly as we head into December.
  • QCC student Roanlis Toribio Jimenez at the Alden Library. Finals week begin December 11 and the library is a great place to stu
  • QCC Police Academy Cadets took part in No Shave November, an annual event for cancer awareness.
  • PTK is selling poinsettas to benefit the new Live and Learn Greenhouse.
November, 2019

November 27-December 24: Phi Theta Kappa is selling Poinsettias to support the new Live and Learn Greenhouse. Assorted colors and sizes are available in the Administration Building, room 351A. Make sure to stop by and pick up one for your desk! For questions or to reserve a plant, contact PTK Advisor Bonnie Coleman at bcoleman [at] qcc.mass...

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November 27-December 24: Phi Theta Kappa is selling Poinsettias to support the new Live and Learn Greenhouse. Assorted colors and sizes are available in the Administration Building, room 351A. Make sure to stop by and pick up one for your desk! For questions or to reserve a plant, contact PTK Advisor Bonnie Coleman at bcoleman [at] qcc.mass.edu

Monday, December 2: The Peer Mentoring Program invites all QCC students to a drop-in finals study session from 9:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m. in the Harrington Learning Center, rooms 109 A&B. Stop by for free tutoring support, food, study supplies and QCC swag. Free print card to the first 25 students. Questions? Email Associate Professor Lizette Cordeiro at lcordeiro [at] qcc.mass.edu

Wednesday, December 4: Faculty and Staff are invited to Coffee with The President Listening Session from 2:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m. at QCC’s Healthcare and Workforce Development Center, 25 Federal Street, Worcester in room 221D. Refreshments will be served.

Saturday, December 7: Quinsigamond Community College Alumni Association Advisory Board will presents a Mystery Dinner Theater featuring the Comical Mystery Tour Players in "Grandma Got Runned Over by a... Oh Dear!" at 5:30 p.m. Doors open at 5:00 p.m. and dinner is served at 6:30 p.m. Proceeds benefit the QCC Alumni Scholarship Fund. To learn more and register for the event visit, Holiday Mystery Theater Register by Monday, Dec. 2.  For questions, contact June Vo at 508.854.4235.

Wednesday, December 11- Wednesday, December 17: Final week of classes for the Fall 2019 semester!

December Spotlight: Winter Clothing Drive is going on until December 6! The cold weather is upon us and QCC’s Early Childhood Education Club (in conjunction with the Athletic Center) is currently collecting donations of new or gently used winter coats and accessories for QCC students and their children. If you haven’t already made a donation, please take a moment to consider doing so and helping out our students and their families in need. Donation boxes are located in the Child Study Center, the Second floor of the Harrington Learning Center, and in room 348 of the Administration Building. Donations are also being accepted at the Athletic Center and the President’s Office, room 132A. Suggested Jacket Sizes:

  • Children/Youth sizes 4-8
  • Adult sizes
  • Suggested Boot Sizes:
  • Children/Youth sizes 10-4
  • Adult sizes

Please make sure garments are clean and in good condition before dropping them off. Any questions, reach out to Early Childhood Club Advisor Karen O’Neill at koneill [at] qcc.mass.edu

November, 2019

Faculty from across Central Massachusetts gathered at Quinsigamond Community College on October 25, 2019 for a dynamic workshop sponsored by the Department of Higher Education’s AMCOA team. The team, whose acronym stands for “Advancing a Massachusetts Culture of Assessment, demonstrated that “assessment” is a fundamental part of teaching excellence and student success.The topic of last...

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Faculty from across Central Massachusetts gathered at Quinsigamond Community College on October 25, 2019 for a dynamic workshop sponsored by the Department of Higher Education’s AMCOA team. The team, whose acronym stands for “Advancing a Massachusetts Culture of Assessment, demonstrated that “assessment” is a fundamental part of teaching excellence and student success.The topic of last month’s free professional development event was Quantitative Literacy, and featured two highly interactive workshops.

The first workshop, by Professor Matt Salomone of Bridgewater State University, was about why students need quantitative literacy skills and how educators across the curriculum can develop their own skills at designing and delivering quality quantitative learning experiences. Quantitative fluency has never been more necessary to the community college graduate, whether they transfer for a further credential or enter today’s labor force. This is why quantitative reasoning is one of QCC’s 10 general education goals. (Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoning is also part of the MassTransfer General Education Foundation.)

The second workshop was led by Dr. Maryann Winkelmes, the nationally-regarded developer of a method for building more transparent learning experiences. The great diversity of skills and preparedness in today's students means that part of supporting their success is thinking critically about what skills we demand in our assignments, and communicating those expectations to all students clearly. Winkelmes’s national project, Transparency in Learning and Teaching (TILT), is at the forefront of equity-minded higher education.

Those in attendance, who included faculty in STEM, business, the humanities and social sciences, along with instructional designers, spent the four-hour workshop delving into the nuances of quantitative literacy and how to build it into learning experiences in their courses and departments. They also got hands-on experience “TILT-ing” an assignment, making its expectations clearer and maximizing the potential for student success.

Colleagues wishing for more information may contact Quinsigamond Outcomes Research for Excellence at QORE [at] qcc.mass.edu.

November, 2019

On November 10, 2019 Enrollment and Student Services welcomed Benedicta Aboagye as the Student Success Center Generalist.  Benedicta brings to this position over 10 years of experience. Most recently, she was the Clerk III in the Financial Aid Office at QCC. Benedicta earned a Bachelor’s of Arts Degree in Business from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

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On November 10, 2019 Enrollment and Student Services welcomed Benedicta Aboagye as the Student Success Center Generalist.  Benedicta brings to this position over 10 years of experience. Most recently, she was the Clerk III in the Financial Aid Office at QCC. Benedicta earned a Bachelor’s of Arts Degree in Business from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

On November 10, 2019 Enrollment and Student Services welcomed Caitlin Bogue as the Student Success Center Generalist. Caitlin brings to this position over 9 years of experience. Most recently, she was the Library Assistant I in the Alden Library Circulation Department at QCC. Caitlin earned a Bachelor’s of Fine Arts Degree from Lesley University and a Master’s of Business Administration from Fitchburg State University.

On November 10, 2019 Enrollment and Student Services welcomed John Monterroso as the Student Success Center Generalist. John brings to this position over 5 years of experience. Most recently, he was the Clerk III in the Financial Aid Office here at QCC. John earned a Bachelor’s Degree in Criminal Justice from Worcester State University.

Please join us in welcoming Benedicta, Caitlin and John into their new roles at QCC.