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07/2019

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July, 2019

  • QCC Student Ana De la Torre talks to children at the Children's School.
July, 2019

Quinsigamond Community College has been helping to advance career opportunities for over 30 early childhood education workers, thanks to funding from a $296,904 Career Pathways Grant from the Department of Early Education and Care (EEC).  Aimed at creating opportunities for career growth, QCC is working to advance students in careers in early childhood education and child care. The goal of the grant is to promote...

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Quinsigamond Community College has been helping to advance career opportunities for over 30 early childhood education workers, thanks to funding from a $296,904 Career Pathways Grant from the Department of Early Education and Care (EEC).  Aimed at creating opportunities for career growth, QCC is working to advance students in careers in early childhood education and child care. The goal of the grant is to promote and expand professional development opportunities and higher education certificate and degree attainment for the early childhood education and out-of-school time workforce.

“A lot of licensed early education providers are seeking to move up and this offers them an opportunity to do so,” said QCC’s Director of Early Childhood Career Pathway Kyla McSweeney.

Thus far the Career Pathways funds have provided opportunities for two college level courses to over 20 students who would otherwise have been unable to afford most entry level certification courses. By offering these opportunities to existing childcare workers, it gives them the ability to access higher paying positions.

Additionally, 10 students are taking part in a pre-college course focusing on student-based skills and introducing them to early childhood education topics and terminology. After they complete the course in the fall these students will transition over to college level early childhood education courses, where they will receive financial and other support services designed to help them succeed.

To learn more about these programs, contact QCC Admissions at 508.854.4262 or email admissions [at] qcc.mass.edu 

  • QCC Professor of Environmental/Physical Science Anita Soracco's (top right) environmental science students on a field trip.
July, 2019

Quinsigamond Community College (QCC) and Assumption College have forged a new transfer agreement that will offer graduates of QCC’s Liberal Arts Environmental Science associate degree program a seamless way to transfer as juniors to Assumption’s Environmental Science bachelor degree program. This agreement is just another way that QCC and Assumption have strengthened their partnership to help facilitate...

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Quinsigamond Community College (QCC) and Assumption College have forged a new transfer agreement that will offer graduates of QCC’s Liberal Arts Environmental Science associate degree program a seamless way to transfer as juniors to Assumption’s Environmental Science bachelor degree program. This agreement is just another way that QCC and Assumption have strengthened their partnership to help facilitate student success. QCC already has two transfer agreements with Assumption in Business Administration, as well as an agreement in Computer Science and one Human Services.

“Our long-established relationship with Assumption College is something that has given many of our students a clear and financially-feasible pathway to further their education,” said QCC President Dr. Luis G. Pedraja.

Benefits of these types of agreements include the thousands of dollars students will save by starting at QCC and then transferring to a four-year college or university.

“These types of articulation agreements are a great way to earn a higher education that won’t break the bank for students,” Dr. Pedraja added.

QCC offers a multitude of articulation agreements with public and private institutions, both in-state as well as out-of-state. For a current list of articulation agreements and programs visit the transfer agreements page.

  • Sutton Fire Department District Fire Chief Robin Dresser during trench rescue training.
  • Sutton Fire Department District Fire Chief Robin Dresser (L) and Sutton Selectman Jess Limanek (R) during ice rescue training.
  • Sutton Fire Department District Fire Chief Robin Dresser during a boat rescue.
  • QCC Fire Science grad and Sutton firefighter Robin Dresser goes into action during a structure fire.
  • Sutton Fire Department District Fire Chief Robin Dresser
July, 2019

The saying “mother knows best” may just be true in the case of Sutton Fire Department District Fire Chief Robin Dresser. Mr. Dresser is a 2005 graduate of QCC’s Fire Science program and his mother, Edna Dresser, is a 1978 graduate of QCC where she majored in accounting. According to Mr. Dresser, it was his mom who helped him to consider QCC when he had graduated from...

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The saying “mother knows best” may just be true in the case of Sutton Fire Department District Fire Chief Robin Dresser. Mr. Dresser is a 2005 graduate of QCC’s Fire Science program and his mother, Edna Dresser, is a 1978 graduate of QCC where she majored in accounting. According to Mr. Dresser, it was his mom who helped him to consider QCC when he had graduated from high school.

“Growing up I had always wanted to get into public service- be it firefighter or police officer. When I hit my early teens I decided I wanted to be a firefighter,” he said.

Knowing he wanted to get into fire science, Mr. Dresser said his choices of colleges were limited because it was not a degree option a lot of colleges offered.

“I didn’t want a mess of student loans and at the time spending a lot money on a degree and then going into an entry-level position didn’t make sense,” he said. It was then that his mother suggested he consider looking at QCC.  “They did offer fire science as a major, so it worked out well,” he said.

While being a firefighter did not require him to get a college degree, Mr. Dresser said most communities require that a firefighter have some form of degree in order to advance in their career and move up the chain of command, adding that some departments do offer incentives or an increase in pay if a firefighter has an advanced degree. Mr. Dresser said he was able to earn his degree without incurring any debt, working while attending classes. 

“The class schedule worked out for me, since I was working full time while attending. I had some day classes, but most of the classes had been evening classes,” he said, adding that the professors he had were all either current or retired from the fire science industry.

“They were not just instructors, they lived being firefighters and experienced it personally,” he said.

Once he graduated from QCC, Mr. Dresser went right into the workforce, having already been a call firefighter with the Sutton Fire Department.

“In 2005 I applied for full-time at the department and was hired. I have continued to move up in rank and this past May was promoted to District Chief,” he said, adding that while it wasn’t necessary for him to have a degree within his department it was “a bonus and helped me out.”

Mr. Dresser said he does plan to one day continue his education and obtain his bachelor’s degree, but will stay in the fire science field.

“I’m happy with what I do. I love my job and love going to work every day,” he added.

*Photos courtesy of the Sutton Fire Department.

  • Class of 2019 Practical Nursing graduates
  • Practical Nursing graduates get ready to receive their pin.
  • Practical Nursing Class Valedictorian Tori Landry speaks to her fellow graduates.
  • Practical Nursing grads prepare for the next chapter in their future.
  • A QCC Practical Nursing grad is all smiles as he gets his pin.
July, 2019

On July 1, it was the end of a journey and the beginning of another for 59 Practical Nursing graduates who received their pins during a pinning ceremony, held at QCC’s Hebert Auditorium. A tradition that has been a part of nursing since the days of Florence Nightingale, known as the “lady with the lamp" (known for her nightly sojourns taking care of injured soldiers),  the 59 graduates...

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On July 1, it was the end of a journey and the beginning of another for 59 Practical Nursing graduates who received their pins during a pinning ceremony, held at QCC’s Hebert Auditorium. A tradition that has been a part of nursing since the days of Florence Nightingale, known as the “lady with the lamp" (known for her nightly sojourns taking care of injured soldiers),  the 59 graduates were honored by staff, faculty, family and friends.

During the ceremony each graduate received a pin, which conveys the bond of the school they graduated from and is distinctive of that school. Dean of the School of Healthcare, Pat Schmohl, congratulated the graduates and encouraged them to share their unique journeys with others.

“You need to tell your story when you get out there. Be proud of who you are and what you’ve accomplished,” Mr. Schmohl said.

Class Valedictorian Tori Landry told her fellow graduates to use the fear many of them felt when they began the program as motivation going forward.

“Fear can be an amazing asset. Those fears are what make us work a little harder and dream a little bigger,” she said. “Let fear push you into that uncomfortable place and be your motivation.”

During the pinning ceremony special awards were given to graduates that included:

  • Academic Excellence - Valedictorian Tori Landry
  • Academic Excellence - Salutatorian Diana Mwangi
  • Clinical and Academic Excellence - Regina Chaakum
  • Clinical and Academic Excellence - Abena Adjei
  • Clinical Excellence - Jordana Panarelli
  • Clinical Excellence - Prince Gopea
  • Spirit of Nursing - Ashlyn Woodcock
  • Spirit of Nursing - Jill Ann Godbout
  • Marie Heffernan Award - Mavis Antwi Asante
  • William Hogan (L) demonstrates the FANUC robot to QCC President Dr. Luis Pedraja.
  • Professor James Heffernan's Industrial Robots class.
  • Dean Betty Lauer listens intently as Hunter Boudreau explains how he programmed the FANUC robot.
  • Hunter Boudreau programs the FANUC robot to pick up and move a water bottle.
July, 2019

Robots have become a part of our everyday lives. When we think of robots, often the video of a “Roomba” floor cleaning robot being ridden around the house by a cat in a shark costume may come to mind. However, it is industrial robots that are making some of the largest impacts on our society today. Industrial robots perform a wide range of tasks that can include anything from assembly, material removal,...

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Robots have become a part of our everyday lives. When we think of robots, often the video of a “Roomba” floor cleaning robot being ridden around the house by a cat in a shark costume may come to mind. However, it is industrial robots that are making some of the largest impacts on our society today. Industrial robots perform a wide range of tasks that can include anything from assembly, material removal, material handling (machine tending, picking, packing and palletizing) to tasks such as painting, dispensing and welding. In today's technology-driven world, people who are skilled at making robots do these tasks are in high demand and earn competitive salaries.

As students in Professor Jim Heffernan’s Industrial Robots ELM 260 course have learned, making a robot do the work is not as easy as it sounds. In fact, Professor Heffernan points out that it takes attention to detail, a fair amount of trial and error, and a lot of persistence to program an industrial robot to successfully perform a desired task. In the Industrial Robots course at QCC, students explore robotic systems and learn various methods of programming robots that are used in industry today, developing their knowledge and skills along the way.

In late spring at an Open House, QCC students Sam Nessenthaler, Dan Dickman, Zachary Suprenor, Bill Hogan, and Hunter Boudreau learned the intricacies of computer programming. Using state of the art FANUC robots, they completed their capstone projects and demonstrated their accomplishments to the college community. At the end of the course all five students received their FANUC CERT Certification, which is an internationally-recognized robotics certification.

  • Student Trustee Mustafa Boweden
  • Student Trustee Mustafa Boweden takes a selfie with Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker.
July, 2019

Mustafa Boweden has been elected Quinsigamond Community College’s new student trustee for the coming year. Mr. Boweden will serve on QCC’s 11-member Board of Trustees acting as a representative for the college’s student body. Student trustees are elected to the Board for a one-year term. As the student trustee, Mr. Boweden will also serve on the college’s Strategic Planning...

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Mustafa Boweden has been elected Quinsigamond Community College’s new student trustee for the coming year. Mr. Boweden will serve on QCC’s 11-member Board of Trustees acting as a representative for the college’s student body. Student trustees are elected to the Board for a one-year term. As the student trustee, Mr. Boweden will also serve on the college’s Strategic Planning Committee.

“I’ve been to my first meeting of the trustees and I love it. I’m excited to be part of the team and representing our student body,” he said.

Mr. Boweden and his family moved from Libya in 2014 and in Fall 2017, began taking classes part-time at QCC. He has already become a recognizable figure to students, faculty and staff on the college campus. Prior to being elected the college’s student trustee, he was the 2018/2019 Vice President of the Student Government Association and along with his two brothers who have also attended QCC, has been active in student events.  He said one of his main goals is to work on engaging more student involvement that goes beyond academics.

“If you look at our campus you can see it is very inclusive, diverse and has a fine infrastructure. The college is so successful in developing academic programs and I would like to help take that even further by enhancing the student experience and increasing extra-curricular activities,” he said. “When students have other things to do in addition to academics, they become more vested in college and that can help with retention. We already have more resources than a lot of other community colleges and I’d like to increase this.”

One item that he has been passionate about is developing a men’s soccer team. Soccer been very important to Mr. Boweden and helped him acclimate to the U.S. when he first came to this country. Currently the college has a women’s team, which began competing in fall 2016. Thanks to Mr. Boweden’s tenacity he was able to generate so much student interest that a men’s team will be starting up this fall.

In addition to the men’s soccer team, Mr. Boweden said he’d also like to see more students become involved in student government.

“I also want to help students get involved in administration on campus. This would look great on their resumes and help them when they go into the workforce,” he said.

While Mr. Boweden’s term is only a year, he is confident that he can affect positive change for the student body and the college as a whole.

“As a representative for the students I hope to provide them and the Board of Trustees with needed information to help advance the mission of the college,” he said, adding, “It’s going to be very hard to leave here.”

Mr. Boweden is a General Studies major who plans to transfer to a four-year college when he graduates QCC and major in international law.

  • QCC alumni Nick Murray
July, 2019

Confidence building is how alumnus Nick Murray first describes his time at Quinsigamond Community College. A 2013 graduate with an associate degree in Criminal Justice, Mr. Murray equates his present successes to the foundation he received at QCC.

“I had been out of high school for three to four years already and QCC was the perfect option to gain back confidence in myself regarding...

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Confidence building is how alumnus Nick Murray first describes his time at Quinsigamond Community College. A 2013 graduate with an associate degree in Criminal Justice, Mr. Murray equates his present successes to the foundation he received at QCC.

“I had been out of high school for three to four years already and QCC was the perfect option to gain back confidence in myself regarding my college education, without breaking the bank,” he said.

While not only affordable, conveniently located and providing a variety of class schedule options so he could work (if he chose to), Mr. Murray said he found going to QCC boosted his GPA enabling him to earn merit-based scholarships.

Noting that while he had some family members who were in law enforcement, the field was completely new to him and he looked toward his professors for guidance.

“The professors I had during my time at QCC cared about the students,” he said. “Many students were in the same situation as me, a little bit older than the average person coming right out of high school, just trying to find their interests and obtain a degree. If you had questions or needed further clarification on any subject, the professors were there to help guide you.”

In December 2013 he obtained his associate degree in Criminal Justice and transferred to Anna Maria College where he pursued his Bachelor's Degree in Criminal Justice.

“Many of my professors even wrote me letters of recommendation in order for me to get into Anna Maria College and obtain several internships years later," he said. "Also, my writing skills prior to QCC were sub-par and by the time I had left, I was much more confident and prepared for transferring to Anna Maria College to obtain my Bachelor’s in Criminal Justice.”

His QCC foundation was such that after earning his bachelor's degree, he also earned his MBA from Anna Maria and became an insurance adjuster at Hanover Insurance in Worcester. In October, 2017 he joined the military.

Today, Mr. Murray is stationed at Fort Bragg, North Carolina where he is a Logistics Officer and Paratrooper in the 82nd Airborne Division.  He serves as a Platoon Leader and Maintenance Control Officer in an Infantry Battalion.

“I oversee the Maintenance program, insuring that all weapons, vehicles, and equipment are readily deployable at all times. We directly support the Infantry with logistical services to help them fight, essentially. My platoon was just named the best Maintenance Program in the entire 82d Airborne Division for the first fiscal year of 2019, which is out of 160 different programs,” he proudly stated.

Mr. Murray said he wants those students who are considering attending QCC, but are afraid to take that first step to a higher education to take note of his story.

“I would tell them to not be afraid of failure. Before I enrolled in classes at QCC I personally felt terrified that I was not going to do well in my classes. After my first semester of classes, I had straight 'A's' and found myself graduating with High Honors and being part of the Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society,” he said.  “It really is all about how you apply yourself and your eagerness to learn. You can only help yourself by enrolling now, because you will only wish you did sooner down the road.”

  • New Women's Basketball Coach Andy Kupec
July, 2019

QCC’s High School to College Linkages Specialist Andrew "Andy" Kupec has been helping to advance the college’s presence in the early college arena since he began his position at the college earlier this year. This fall, the Wyverns women’s basketball team may just have a little leprechaun magic in them this season thanks to Mr. Kupec, the college’s new women...

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QCC’s High School to College Linkages Specialist Andrew "Andy" Kupec has been helping to advance the college’s presence in the early college arena since he began his position at the college earlier this year. This fall, the Wyverns women’s basketball team may just have a little leprechaun magic in them this season thanks to Mr. Kupec, the college’s new women’s basketball head coach.

In 1983, Mr. Kupec was poised to begin an NBA career as a point guard for the Boston Celtics. Drafted in the  NBA draft in the10th round, the Bentley University graduate had been a standout on the Bentley team, starting all four years and captaining his senior year, before being chosen by the Celtics. He spent the summer of 83’ at Red Auerbach’s basketball camp in Marshfield, MA being coached by K.C. Jones. He practiced and scrimmaged at the Celtics camp against NBA legends that included M.L. Carr, Gerald Henderson and Dennis Johnson. While he would end up getting cut before ever playing in an NBA game, he said the experience was a truly memorable.

“I was very proud of how I performed at camp. It was intense but fun and I felt I belonged that week. Every basketball player has a dream of playing in the NBA,” Mr. Kupec said.

Although the NBA was not meant to be, he continued to remain close to the game, coaching briefly for the high school where he ended up being the director of guidance for over 25 years. He also coached his son and daughter’s teams when they were younger.

“I love the game and know it pretty well. I’ve been doing it all my life,” he said, noting that back when he was in high school on Long Island he played on the all-county team against the Russian team (and beat them!).

Mr. Kupec grew up in a sports-minded family. His oldest brother played basketball and baseball at Adelphi University and two other older brothers were starting quarterbacks at the University of North Carolina (UNC) in the 1970s. Both brothers set records at UNC and one ended up being a draft choice for the Buffalo Bills, while the other signed as a free agent with the Seattle Seahawks. His younger brother was a quarterback at Long Island University (LIU) CW Post and is a LIU Post Football Hall of Fame member. He also has two sisters, one of which played tennis in college, and his son was the starting quarterback for Assumption College his junior and senior year.

“He was part of the team that had the biggest upset in Assumption history when they beat Fordham University,” said the proud father.

While the Wyverns season isn’t underway just yet, Mr. Kupec is already gearing up for an exciting season and looks forward to putting his sports acumen to good use.

“I’ve already started talking to some of the players,” he added.

Anyone looking to join the team or to learn more can shoot him an email at akupec [at] qcc.mass.edu or call him at 508.854.7418.

  • QCC's Bike Patrol Unit.
  • Deputy Chief of Administration Reynaldo Rodriguez and Deputy Chief of Operations Stephen DiGiovanni
  • QCC Campus Police Chief Kevin Ritacco
July, 2019

In today’s tumultuous world too often you only hear about a college’s campus police department after a tragedy has occurred. The primary mission for a college’s campus police is to provide a safe and secure campus for all and QCC’s Campus Police Department is no exception. While the department works as one entity, the force is broken out into different, distinct units that have their own...

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In today’s tumultuous world too often you only hear about a college’s campus police department after a tragedy has occurred. The primary mission for a college’s campus police is to provide a safe and secure campus for all and QCC’s Campus Police Department is no exception. While the department works as one entity, the force is broken out into different, distinct units that have their own specialties, offering the QCC community a multitude of services that make it unique in the college policing arena.

The department is led by Police Chief Kevin Ritacco, Deputy Chief of Operations Stephen DiGiovanni and Deputy Chief of Administration Reynaldo Rodriguez. There is a fire safety unit, an internal affairs unit, training unit, a detective unit, a bike patrol unit, a Clery Unit (the Clery Act is a consumer protection law that works to provide transparency around campus crime policy and statistics), security unit, patrol unit, academy unit, community service unit, in addition to an accreditation unit.

The department made history in 2017 when they became the first community college police department to receive official accreditation from the Massachusetts Police Accreditation Commission (MPAC). This is the Commission’s highest award. While not mandatory to become accredited, by doing so it shows a level of complete transparency for the officers and entire QCC community, and demonstrates to the courts that each and every procedure has been followed correctly and accurately. Every three years the department must go through a reaccreditation process to show that it is maintaining the accreditation standards.

“We’re very proud of this accreditation,” said Chief Ritacco. “We have better communication, better reports, more programs and full transparency of our policies and procedures.”

Another source of great pride is the department’s Police Academy, which launched in 2018. This is an entry-level training program that is geared to those interested in becoming a part-time reserve or intermittent police officer. QCC is the only Massachusetts community college that is running its own police academy.

Another community-oriented change happened in spring 2019, when one of the more familiar faces on the force, Community Resource Police Officer Kate Dixon, moved into an office in the Administration building (Room B59A) on the college’s main campus. The move was designed to provide students and staff with easier accessibility for trainings on safety and to disperse information on personal safety and CPR. Office hours are Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays from 8:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.

“We are here to teach students as well,” Chief Ritacco said. “We’ve always had a good relationship with the student body. It’s why we do ‘Coffee with A Cop’ every year and other safety trainings.”

QCC Campus Police also have strong ties with the Worcester Police Department, the Massachusetts State Police, Southbridge Police, Marlborough Police, Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency (MEMA), Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), FBI and Homeland Security.

“We have great outside relationships,” added Chief Ritacco, noting that the department is involved in monthly meetings with many of the state and Federal agencies.

What many may not know is that the Campus Police are not only responsible for the college’s West Boylston Street Worcester location, they are also responsible for the Healthcare and Workforce Development Center on Federal Street in Worcester; QCC at the Worcester Senior Center on Providence Street in Worcester; Burncoat High School in Worcester (where the Automotive Technology program is located); the Community Learning Hubs in Great Book Valley Apartments in Worcester and Catholic Charities in Worcester, as well as back up for Southbridge Police for any issues at QCC Southbridge. QCC at Assabet is monitored by Marlborough Police Department.

“Our department is here for the QCC community every step of the way,” Chief Ritacco said.

More about Campus Police.

  • QCC's new Men's Soccer Coach Frank Balcarcel
  • QCC New Women’s Volleyball Coach Emily Boutilette with "Trax" of the Worcester Railers.
  • The 2019 Women's Basketball team with Coach Gabe Santner and NJCAA Region XXI Honorable Mention player Kayla Morrison (#3).
July, 2019

Congrats to Wyvern Player Kayla Morrison- AKA Steph Curry!

Women’s Basketball player Kayla Morrison (#3) was NJCAA Region XXI Honorable Mention for the 2018-2019 women’s basketball season. She was a tenacious player on both offense and defense and was a leader in running the Wyverns’ offense, according to her coach.

“Kayla has been one of the...

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Congrats to Wyvern Player Kayla Morrison- AKA Steph Curry!

Women’s Basketball player Kayla Morrison (#3) was NJCAA Region XXI Honorable Mention for the 2018-2019 women’s basketball season. She was a tenacious player on both offense and defense and was a leader in running the Wyverns’ offense, according to her coach.

“Kayla has been one of the most positive and committed members of the QCC women’s basketball team,” said Coach Gabe Santner. “I cannot recall her ever missing a practice or saying a negative word to a teammate.  It doesn’t hurt that she shoots like Steph Curry. It was a pleasure coaching her, and I am sure she has more basketball in her future.”

QCC New Women’s Volleyball Team Gets Assist from Its New Coach

QCC’s new women’s volleyball coach is all things volleyball. Emily Boutilette has played the sport for over 33 years and has been coaching volleyball for 15 years in all levels- high school, college and club level. In addition, she is the owner of a junior Olympic volleyball club in Worcester, the Dragons Volleyball Club.  QCC welcomes Ms. Boutilette and looks forward to an exciting volleyball season. Interested in joining? There’s still time! Contact the Athletic Center at 508.854.4317 for more information.

Men’s Soccer gets Underway this Fall with Seasoned Coach

QCC will be starting its new men’s soccer team with a season veteran in Coach Frank Balcarcel. Mr. Balcarcel spent four years with the Massachusetts Olympic Developmental Program and is active in the community as the Technical Director for Central Falls Youth Soccer.  He also coaches Premier at Bayside FC and InterAmerica Futsal. He holds an NSCAA Premier Diploma, a USSF National “C” license, Regional Level 2 Futsal and USSF Referee level 8. Coach Balcarcel is an active member of the National Soccer Coaches Association of America. To learn more on how you can be a part of QCC history and be a part of the men’s soccer team call the Athletic Center at 508.854.4317 for more information.

Learn more about QCC Athletic Center and Student Athletics

  • Student Murillo Gomes enjoys a lovely summer day on QCC's main campus.
  • QCC staff are ready to help students get ready for the fall semester.
July, 2019

Tuesday, August 20: Free training for employers and employees! Informational session at Marlborough Chamber of Commerce, 11 Florence Street, Marlborough, from 8:00 a.m. - 9:30 a.m. To register or for more information, contact Business Services Specialist Christine McNally at 508.751.7900 or Instructor Eileen Morgan at 508.751.7929.

Wednesday, August 21...

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Tuesday, August 20: Free training for employers and employees! Informational session at Marlborough Chamber of Commerce, 11 Florence Street, Marlborough, from 8:00 a.m. - 9:30 a.m. To register or for more information, contact Business Services Specialist Christine McNally at 508.751.7900 or Instructor Eileen Morgan at 508.751.7929.

Wednesday, August 21: Free training for employers and employees! Informational session at QCC Southbridge, 5 Optic Drive, Southbridge, from 8:00 a.m. - 9:30 a.m.. To register or for more information, contact Business Services Specialist Christine McNally at 508.751.7900 or Instructor Eileen Morgan at 508.751.7929.

Thursday, August 22: Free training for employers and employees! Informational session at QCC's Center for Workforce Development and Continuing Education, 25 Federal Street, Worcester, from 8:00 a.m. - 9:30 a.m.. To register or for more information, contact Business Services Specialist Christine McNally at 508.751.7900 or Instructor Eileen Morgan at 508.751.7929.

Saturday, August 24: It's another “Super Saturday” event! This special registration event is designed for those students unable to register for classes during the week and will be held in the QCC Welcome Center, located on the college’s main campus, 670 West Boylston Street, Worcester, from 900 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.

August Spotlight: The Fall Semester is almost here…are you ready?  

Thursday, August 22 - Southbridge Campus Orientation from 5:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.

Monday, August 26 - Academic and Student Services Fair will be held on QCC’s 670 West Boylston Street Worcester campus from 6:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m. in the Athletic Center.

Tuesday, August 27 - Academic and Student Services Fair will be held on QCC’s 670 West Boylston Street Worcester campus from 1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. in the Athletic Center.

Wednesday, August 28 - Academic and Student Services Fair will be held on QCC’s 670 West Boylston Street Worcester campus from 1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. in the Athletic Center.

Thursday, August 29 -  Academic and Student Services Fair will be held on QCC’s 670 West Boylston Street Worcester campus from 1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. in the Athletic Center.

Summer Hours are in effect through August 16. The college will resume normal Friday hours on August 23.

  • All College Day speakers
  • Coordinator, Career & Academic Planning Services Henry Ritter engages a group of QCC employees during a workshop session.
July, 2019

The Center for Academic Excellence (CAE) has been busy during the spring and summer semesters. In addition to the teaching and academic technology workshops they offer year-round, the CAE held several larger events that QCC employees could attend: a Using Technology in the Classroom Conference in January; a presentation on All College Day by Sophie Lampard Dennis and Dorothy Osterholt, Associate Professors of...

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The Center for Academic Excellence (CAE) has been busy during the spring and summer semesters. In addition to the teaching and academic technology workshops they offer year-round, the CAE held several larger events that QCC employees could attend: a Using Technology in the Classroom Conference in January; a presentation on All College Day by Sophie Lampard Dennis and Dorothy Osterholt, Associate Professors of Education at Landmark College; and the Innovations and Best Practices Showcase in June. (See the February 2019 Wyvern Guardian for further information about the Using Technology in the Classroom Conference.)

Approximately 60 faculty members attended Lampard Dennis’ and Osterholt’s All College Day presentation, which was titled, “Assessing and Addressing Barriers that Impact Engagement and Work Completion Among Today’s College Students.” The two presenters spoke about the impact of four domains of learning on students’ classroom engagement and ability to keep up with the demands of college. Attendees participated in active engagement activities to learn about specific curricular and classroom activities they could immediately implement in their classrooms.

“I found the training and model to be so relevant to college student’s need to focus on assessing their individual strengths and challenges to allow them to improve their college performance,” said Professor of Management and Marketing Flo Lucci. “I enjoyed the training and plan to use the model in first class meetings next semester as well as a post discussion during the last class meeting.”

The Innovations and Best Practices Showcase also was a well-attended event with faculty and staff from across various areas of the College as both audience members and presenters. The day began with Interim Vice President of Academic Affairs Nancy Schoenfeld giving some welcoming remarks, followed by presentations that included: 

  • “Top 5 Answers on the Board: An Advising Services Overview” by Lupe Lomeli (Director of Advising), Henry Ritter (Coordinator, Career & Academic Planning Services - Health Careers), and Eric Saczawa (Coordinator, Career & Academic Planning Services, Technology & Web-Based Services)
  • “Syllabus Hacks: Transforming Early Communication with Students” by Gaelan Benway (Professor of Sociology and Academic Assessment Facilitator) and Judy Colson (Professor of Psychology)
  • “Faculty Innovations for Civic Literacy Inclusion” by Tiger Swan (Coordinator of Library Reference and Instruction)
  • “StartRIGHT: What You Need to Know” by Ray Lawless (CAPS Advisor) and Tenisha Mincey (Coordinator of Instructional Technology and Assessment)
  •  “Managing Student Communication” by Jennifer Guzman-Gayflor (CAPS Advisor) and Marty Muysenberg (CAPS Advisor)
  •  “ENG 102: Four Freedoms Reimagined” by Karen Bento (English Instructor)
  •  “Using Question Pools & Tests in Bb” by Robert Knox (Computer Information Systems Instructor)

The day ended with a tour of the Student Success Center led by Anila Nagle of the Advising Center, and a tour of the Library led by librarians Cary Morse and Tiger Swan.

Currently, the CAE is ramping up for the 2019-2020 academic year. Stay tuned for information about our annual events as well as some new workshops, a nonfiction reading group, a revamped website, and other exciting developments.

  • The Wyvern enjoyed a morning at the Louvre Museum (L) but only wanted to see the Eiffel Tower from a distance.
  • The Wyvern made himself at home at the Louvre Museum.
  • The Wyvern took a bus tour to the Palace of Versailles.
  • The Wyverns of Edinburgh, Scotland
July, 2019

Record-breaking heat didn’t stop the QCC Wyvern for visiting the sights in Paris this month. The Wyvern got a chance to visit the Louvre Museum and the Palace of Versailles, but was too scared to go to the top of the Eiffel Tower with QCC’s Publications/Press Manager Karen Hutner (Yours truly!).

The Wyvern's cousins were also spotted in Edinburgh,...

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Record-breaking heat didn’t stop the QCC Wyvern for visiting the sights in Paris this month. The Wyvern got a chance to visit the Louvre Museum and the Palace of Versailles, but was too scared to go to the top of the Eiffel Tower with QCC’s Publications/Press Manager Karen Hutner (Yours truly!).

The Wyvern's cousins were also spotted in Edinburgh, Scotland earlier this month by QCC's Associate Director of Disability Services, Terri Rodriguez and her family. The entrance to Wardrop's Court is adorned with the two Wyvern dragons and dates back to 1890s.

Have you seen the Wyvern out and about lately? If so, please send your photos and descriptions through the newsletter submission form.

July, 2019

We are very pleased to announce the following full-time staff updates:

On May 17, 2019,  Information Technology welcomed Jason Graves as the Interim Network Administrator. Jason brings to this position over 9 years of experience. Most recently, he was the Network Support Engineer here at Quinsigamond Community College. Jason earned a Bachelor’s Degree in Information Technology from...

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We are very pleased to announce the following full-time staff updates:

On May 17, 2019,  Information Technology welcomed Jason Graves as the Interim Network Administrator. Jason brings to this position over 9 years of experience. Most recently, he was the Network Support Engineer here at Quinsigamond Community College. Jason earned a Bachelor’s Degree in Information Technology from the University Of Massachusetts Lowell.

On June 30, 2019,  Enrollment Management, Student Engagement and Community Connections welcomed Kristine Campbell as the Coordinator of Records and Registration. Kristine  brings to this position over 6 years of experience. Most recently, she was a Registrar at Lincoln Technical Institute. Kristine earned a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Psychology from The University of Massachusetts and a Master of Arts in School Counseling from Assumption College.

On July 1, 2019, Academic Affairs welcomed Tenisha Mincey as the Coordinator of Instructional Technology and Assessment. Tenisha brings to this position over 7 years of experience. Most recently, she was an Academic Advisor here at Quinsigammond Community College. Tenisha earned a Bachelor of Arts Degree in English from Worcester State University.

On July 7, 2019  Career Services and Credit for Prior Learning welcomed Nichole Wheeler as the Coordinator, Career Services & Credit for Prior Learning (Senior Special Programs Coordinator). Nichole brings to this position over 13 years of experience. Most recently, she was the Career Development Counselor here at Quinsigamond Community College. Nichole earned a Bachelor of Science Degree in Psychology and a Master’s Degree in Business Management from Fitchburg State University.

On July 7, 2019, Community Connections welcomed Keith McKittrick as the Assistant Director of Advancement Programs and Services. Keith brings to this position over 20 years of experience. Most recently, he was the Director of Development at Holyoke Community College Foundation, Inc..  Keith earned a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Political Science from Westfield State University and a Master of Arts Degree in Public Administration.

On July 14, 2019, The School of Math and Science welcomed Dr. Benjamin Benton as the Interim Dean of the School of Math and Science. Benjamin brings to this position over 35 years of experience. Most recently, he was the Professor of Biology/Coordinator of Biotechnology Program here at Quinsigamond Community College. Benjamin earned a Bachelor’s of Science Degree in Biochemistry and a Doctor of Philosophy Degree in Tumor Cell Biology, both from Michigan State University.

On July 21, 2019, The Office of Institutional Research and Planning welcomes Veronica DeWolfe as the Administrative Secretary I. Veronica brings to this position several years of experience. Most recently, she was a Clerk III for Administrative Services here at Quinsigamond Community College. Veronica earned a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Business Administration from Flagler College.

Please join us in welcoming Jason, Kristine, Tenisha, Nichole, Keith, Benjamin and Veronica into her new role at QCC.