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04/2019

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April, 2019

  • Outgoing PTK Officers
  • PTK students
  • Students listen to speakers during the PTK induction ceremony.
  • PTK Alumni Advisor Kayla Paterson gestures to the new PTK Alumni Board members.
  • New PTK students get sworn into the Alpa Theta Zeta Chapter of the PTK Honor Society.
  • QCC President Dr. Luis Pedraja speaks at the 39th PTK Induction Ceremony.
April, 2019

A new class of QCC students joined the ranks of the college’s Phi Theta Kappa (PTK) Alpha Zeta Theta (AZT) Chapter at the 39th PTK Honor Society Induction Ceremony, held on April 16. Dean of Students Theresa "Terry" Vecchio opened the ceremony by reminding people of the four tenants of PTK – scholarship, leadership, service and fellowship and how special it is to be part of the...

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A new class of QCC students joined the ranks of the college’s Phi Theta Kappa (PTK) Alpha Zeta Theta (AZT) Chapter at the 39th PTK Honor Society Induction Ceremony, held on April 16. Dean of Students Theresa "Terry" Vecchio opened the ceremony by reminding people of the four tenants of PTK – scholarship, leadership, service and fellowship and how special it is to be part of the PTK community.

“Thirty-nine years ago we inducted 11 students and today we are inducting 190. Overall we have 698 students involved in this organization,” she said. “These are the movers and shakers of QCC and undoubtedly the leaders of tomorrow.”

QCC President Dr. Luis Pedraja congratulated the students, acknowledging that he himself was just shy of being inducted into an honor society.

“I didn’t make it but I’m still here as president, imagine what you can do,” he said.

This year’s outgoing PTK members have made incredible strides within QCC and the surrounding communities to help better the world. They have worked on a mentoring program with students from Burncoat, helping them to prepare for like after high school; have served meals at the VA; worked in Worcester’s community garden as well as grown QCC’s own greenhouse and helped to stave off elderly loneliness by hosting many events including a senior prom at the Oasis at Dodge Park.

During the induction outgoing PTK President Dan Underwood, Outgoing PTK Live and Learn Greenhouse Manager (and the 2019 current 29 Who Shine honoree) Vanessa Hanger and Outgoing PTK Executive Director of Mentoring (and current Food Pantry & Resource Center manager) Max German all gave speeches about their time as members of PTK, before handing over the reins to the new officers.

The Alpha Zeta Theta officers for 2019-2020 include:

  • Tabitha Leber – President
  • Krystle Bedrick – Vice President of Leadership
  • Lisa Renaud – Executive Team Leader
  • Ronald Nneji – Executive Vice President of Scholarship
  • Roanlis Toribio – Vice President of Scholarship
  • Murillo Gomes – Treasurer
  • Melissa Intravia – Secretary
  • Aglae Bornhausen – PTK Live & Learn Greenhouse Manager

During the induction ceremony, Ms. Vecchio made it a point to mention PTK Advisor Bonnie Coleman, the “heart and soul of PTK,” informing those in attendance she has worked tirelessly for the PTK students for the past 14 years.

“Truly her name is truly synonymous with Phi Theta Kappa,” Ms. Vecchio added.

An addition to this year’s program was the swearing in of the first PTK Alumni Association Board. In November, 2018 PTK founded the PTK AZT Alumni Association and its executive board was officially recognized. They include:

  • Allen Phillips – President
  • Kimberly May –  Vice President
  • Tony Sanders – Treasurer
  • Laura Loranger – Secretary
  • Sean Lauziere – Officer-At-Large
  • Kayla Paterson - Advisor 
  • Live & Learn Greenhouse
  • Blueprint for the PTK Greenhouse
  • PTK's Greenhouse team
April, 2019

The approval has been given, the plans are in place, and all that’s left to finalize is the location before a new Phi Theta Kappa (PTK) Live & Learn Greenhouse will be up and running later this year. The exciting news is the culmination of a lot of hard work by the Phi Theta Kappa Greenhouse team, led by current Greenhouse Manager Vanessa Hanger and PTK Advisor Bonnie Coleman...

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The approval has been given, the plans are in place, and all that’s left to finalize is the location before a new Phi Theta Kappa (PTK) Live & Learn Greenhouse will be up and running later this year. The exciting news is the culmination of a lot of hard work by the Phi Theta Kappa Greenhouse team, led by current Greenhouse Manager Vanessa Hanger and PTK Advisor Bonnie Coleman.

The current PTK Live & Learn Greenhouse was opened July 2017 with a mission to renew connections between people and the natural environment, create a resource of healthy, nutrient-rich food for the Quinsigamond Community College community, and provide an educational resource for students, faculty, staff, and children. Located in a former bus shelter, the greenhouse has been busting at its seams with produce that has been donated to QCC’s Food Pantry & Resource Center. 

The new greenhouse will be three times the size of the current greenhouse, according to Ms. Coleman. It will have a sloped roof that has extra wide roof vents, allowing for proper ventilation. This will give the college the ability to grow a lot more produce for the food pantry.

“The current greenhouse has issues with humidity and temperature, since it was a repurposed bus stop. This is an actual greenhouse that will regulate humidity and temperature, which is vital to help things grow,” said Ms. Hanger. “We are thankful to President  Luis Pedraja and the college community for supporting this endeavor.”

Once a site is chosen for the new greenhouse, a foundation will be made and prep work will be done before the greenhouse can be installed. The plan is to also have a meditation garden in front of the new greenhouse that will hopefully be a new location for the mindful meditation sessions during the milder weather.

“We will still use our old greenhouse to start our seeds ideally; then the new greenhouse will accommodate our larger plants, as well as hopefully the meditation garden,” Ms. Hanger said.

PTK is running a greenhouse sale on Thursday, May 2, Friday, May 3, after 2:00 p.m. and Monday May 6 - Friday, May 10, 10:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m.outside the patio area between the Administration Building and the Quest Center. Annuals and hangers will be available for purchase. Prices range from $3.75 - $32 (hangers).

“We are working with Matt Olson (former PTK member from another chapter) of Olson’s Gardenhouses, who will be selling us plants at whole sale prices. Any money we raise will go toward the new greenhouse,” Ms. Coleman said. “These are great plants and we hope everyone will decide to buy their plantings from us.”

While Ms. Hanger has been working tirelessly with other PTK greenhouse team members on making the new greenhouse a reality, she will be handing over the reins as greenhouse manger to incoming PTK student Aglae “Aggie” Blanco.

“The new greenhouse is an exciting project for our QCC campus for many reasons. An adequately equipped, full-size greenhouse would shower our community with benefits. From strengthening the connection between inner-city culture with environmental awareness, giving a variety of people around campus an opportunity for community involvement, to sending our locally-grown produce to the food pantry, there is so much this greenhouse can offer,” Ms. Blanco said.

According to both Ms. Hanger and Ms. Blanco, volunteers are always needed and are the backbone of the making the greenhouse what it is today.

“Involvement in the greenhouse can be an inspiration to live a healthy and nutritious lifestyle, as well as a friendly environment for interacting with fellow students who we might not have had the chance to otherwise meet,” Ms. Blanco said. “Building connections through meaningful work can end up turning into the some of the strongest bonds we'll hold onto, which in turn encourages the retention of students and therefore the growth of our alumni community. I am very honored and pleased to be a part of such a purposeful project in which our students themselves can reap the benefits they worked hard for!”

  • Gateway to College Students with Fab Lab Manager Bryan DeConte (blue shirt)
  • Gateway to College students proudly show off their project.
  • Students work on finalizing one of their three projects.
  • Watching the magic of technology in action.
  • A Gateway to College student working on a design using CAD/CAM technology.
April, 2019

Collaboration and partnerships both on and off campus are an important part of the educational process in the Gateway to College Program, according to Gateway to College Manager Marci Skillings.This is why classes such as the Introduction to Fab Lab Science are so vital. Recently 16 Gateway to College students completed the course, which was funded through a grant from the Stem...

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Collaboration and partnerships both on and off campus are an important part of the educational process in the Gateway to College Program, according to Gateway to College Manager Marci Skillings.This is why classes such as the Introduction to Fab Lab Science are so vital. Recently 16 Gateway to College students completed the course, which was funded through a grant from the Stem Starter Academy (SSA).

“The SSA funded the faculty member who taught the program. For two years now we have funded this class,” said STEM Starter Academy Project Coordinator Darcy Carlson. “It’s been wonderful every time we’ve done this Fab Lab class.”

Exposure to STEM is a win-win for the SSA and Gateway to College students.

“Since the program started, 80% to 85% of students continue on to earn their degree here at QCC.This is a great opportunity for us to collaborate on campus,” Ms. Skillings said.

The 10-week program offered students exposure to the college’s Fab Lab, STEM careers and associated technologies. Learning in the class was project-based and students were charged with making three projects in the 10-weeks allotted. The class is credited as a high school science course.

“So many of our students would have never gone to the Fab Lab and now they have this great exposure through this course,” Ms. Skillings said. “These are all undeclared students working on their credentialing for high school and we want to give them the opportunity to become interested in the STEM fields.”

During the class students received exposure to CAD/CAM programming, 3D printing, laser cutting, and woodworking.

“They all did well in this class, with the class average in the 80s,” Ms. Skillings said. “Out of this group, four students talked to us about their interest in a STEM-field.”

To learn more, visit QCC’s Gateway to College.

Associate Professor of Electronics Engineering TechnologyJacob longacre
April, 2019

Sci-fi movies are following the advances of real world technology at a startling rate. Today’s Marvel super heroes have evolved from using electricity to using light as a source of power. In fact, the latest super hero Captain Marvel, can be seen shooting photonic blasts from her fingers in the current sci-fi adventure. This technology is nothing new to Quinsigamond Community College’s own super hero,...

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Sci-fi movies are following the advances of real world technology at a startling rate. Today’s Marvel super heroes have evolved from using electricity to using light as a source of power. In fact, the latest super hero Captain Marvel, can be seen shooting photonic blasts from her fingers in the current sci-fi adventure. This technology is nothing new to Quinsigamond Community College’s own super hero, Jacob Longacre, associate professor of Electronics Engineering Technology.

Mr. Longacre has taken his background in optics with the Navy and entrepreneurship in the toy industry, to new heights, and while he may not have the power of flight, super-strength or the photonic blasts of Captain Marvel, what he does possess is even more valuable, the power of educating students about the latest advances in photonics.

Photonics technology has become prevalent in almost every aspect of day-to-day life and the advances in the technology are growing at a rapid rate, with professors such as Mr. Longacre leading the crusade to help build that knowledge base for the next generation of workers. For the last five years the professor has been demystifying science and mathematics for community college students; after having been enticed to come to the college when it started a photonics program. QCC currently offers an associate degree and certificate in photonics.

“Optics and photonics are incredibly exciting and doing it on a tech level, where you are introducing a whole new area to students that you can link back to other areas (electronics, manufacturing and application work), to me is really exciting,” Mr. Longacre said.

A Visionary Culture

At QCC, the students learn about photonics through the lens of their professor’s past experiences that included a goal of working in nuclear fusion after earning his Bachelor of Science in Physics from Muhlenberg College. However, after starting work on his masters’ in nuclear fusion at the University of Michigan, he quickly decided it was not for him.

“I realized this would be all research and I just didn’t want to do that,” he said.

He changed gears, earning Master of Science degrees in Nuclear Engineering and Electronics at Michigan before beginning a career with the U.S. Navy, working on underwater lasers. In the Navy, he did studies of optical properties on snow and ice, working in such barren and arctic regions as Point Barrow, Alaska and Resolute, Canada. He said it was this type of hands-on, technical research that he truly enjoyed. He even got his name on a few patents; however, as time went on his job with the Navy changed.

“It became more managerial and less technical. They had me get my MBA (at Cornell University),” he said, adding that while useful, it wasn’t the career path he wanted.

Eventually the lure of the technical side became too much and he decided to leave the government and follow what had become his passion when he wasn’t working…developing toys.

“It was a hobby at first. I created toy cars and planes in my own style,” he said.

His entrepreneurial designs paid off and eventually a company asked him to help redesign a toy airplane, which began a 10-year career in the toy industry, working with several companies and developing innovative toy submarines, cars and airplanes. He helped create some of the first mass-marketed backyard radio-controlled airplanes, and developed an air powered toy submarine.

Throughout his career, learning has always been front and center and so, when an opportunity presented itself in academia, he jumped at the chance.

“I had always liked teaching and so I applied and got the offer to come here to QCC. I wanted to come here to teach and also to learn,” he said. “Getting the chance to hopefully have an impact on students is what’s kept me learning at QCC. I love working to find ways to express this to such a broad range of students.”

The diversity that community colleges have in its student body is one of the challenges that truly excites Mr. Longacre. The large disparity between students who may have strong educational backgrounds, or those who don’t have much experience in a formal education background is particularly challenging, and rewarding. In fact, he said some of his greatest achievements are when a student has that “aha” moment and understands the concepts he is teaching. He has seen it time and again when students recognize the cell phones they are carrying use different optical processes in order to operate. Photonics at work!

“At bigger four-year institutions students have lots more confidence. Part of the job here at a community college is to get students to realize how much potential they have. They come here for two years and they realize they can do whatever they want to do,” he said, adding that his students have gone on to immediately enter the workforce with lucrative careers, or have continued their education at top four-year universities.

The power of working together

Mr. Longacre has been instrumental in helping to propel students and businesses forward, which is why he has become an important component in the new AIM Photonics Academy Lab for Education & Application Prototypes (LEAP) facility, developed as a collaboration between AIM Photonics, AIM Academy, QCC, Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI), the Mass Tech Collaborative through the Massachusetts Manufacturing Innovation Initiative (M2I2), and the Department of Defense. 

“We have a very broad spectrum of students and that is where we come into this, as a gateway to people, students and industry who are not fully cognizant of how this (photonics) works,” he said. “We want to broaden the awareness of this technology to other areas.”

A collaborative lecture was recently held with Mr. Longacre’s Photonics Technology class and WPI Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Yxiang “Shawn” Liu. Most of the students in Mr. Longacre’s class are already working in some aspect of the optical technology field, which added a unique perspective to the lecture.

“WPI brings more of the research and development perspective, while we (QCC) bring more of a ‘how can this be practically applied on the manufacturing floor,’ perspective,” Mr. Longacre said. “This collaboration is looking at how integrated photonics can be applied in the future workforce. We are identifying ways to support emerging technologies from research through production with this work. This is the future and QCC is front and center.”

41019_photonics_qcc-wpi069-thumb.jpg

  • QCC Public Health student Jatnna Perez
April, 2019

You can see the excitement in Jatnna Perez’s eyes when she talks about her educational journey. The Quinsigamond Community College healthcare student is poised to graduate in May with an associate degree in public health and ready to take on the future. She said her time at QCC began after a friend suggested she check out the college, when she moved to Worcester from New York. She...

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You can see the excitement in Jatnna Perez’s eyes when she talks about her educational journey. The Quinsigamond Community College healthcare student is poised to graduate in May with an associate degree in public health and ready to take on the future. She said her time at QCC began after a friend suggested she check out the college, when she moved to Worcester from New York. She came to the U.S. seven years ago from the Dominican Republic, and after graduating high school in New York, knew she wanted to continue her education. After researching QCC online and thinking it sounded convenient, affordable, and seemed easy to enroll, she decided to make a visit to the college's main campus to check things out.

“When I first came to QCC I knew right away that I wanted to be a student here.The campus has such a great vibe and feels so welcoming,” she said. “The college has many great programs that are flexible and very affordable compared to other schools.”

She said she initially enrolled in the college’s general studies program. However, one of her professors, Hirul Patel, encouraged her to take something more specific and since she really enjoyed biology and loved being involved in the community, the public health program seemed the perfect fit. A class she took in global public health confirmed that this was the degree program she wanted to pursue.She quickly earned a Public Health Certificate, before continuing on to get her associate degree.

Ms. Perez is currently working full-time as a pharmacy technician at Walgreens in Worcester, and is also in the last couple of weeks of her public health cooperative externship, working with New England Donor Services. She found out about the organization through her Professor Anne Marie Winslow.

“Organs are scarce, so many people die while waiting for a liver transplant. Living liver donation is a hope for many. I shared with several of my students my passion for organ donation,” Ms. Winslow said.

Ms. Perez was immediately interested and Ms. Winslow put her in touch with Jennifer Cray, Volunteer Services Program Manager at New England Donor Services, who quickly found a place for her volunteering at area events. Today, Ms. Perez is a staunch advocate for organ donation, participating in events throughout Worcester, informing people on the merits of tissue and organ donation.

“I try to educate people to get them to sign up and become organ donors,” she said, adding, “QCC has many professors who do more than teach a subject. One of the main things I will take away with me after I graduate is all the encouragement and support I have gotten from my professors here.”

After graduating in May, Ms. Perez hopes to begin working in a public health position that will allow her to “put into practice” what she has learned at QCC, while continuing to pursue a bachelor’s degree.

“The best thing about QCC is that it is a school for everyone regardless of their age, income or background. The college has room for everyone who wants to succeed. There is support here to help everyone grow and boost their career paths,” she said.  “This place is very special to me. I’ve learned so many things and grown as a student.”

  • Shakespeare on a Bench
  • Shakespeare on a Bench
  • Sonnet 96 (Youth) Daniel Warner
  • Sonnet 73 (Pantaloon) Melesia Swanston-Alonzo
  • Sonnet 143 (Baby) Ari Strout
  • Sonnet 8 (Youth) George Baraklilis
  • QCC students Lex Guertin and Mike Daniel
  • QCC student Nate Wilson
April, 2019

Often mere words, spoken with intention can make the most impact. While the words of William Shakespeare were written well over 400 years ago, they still resonate today. The recent school play, “Shakespeare on a Bench,” held April 10 – 14, gave testament to that with a series of segments from Shakespeare’s sonnets, and a variety of Shakespeare’s plays, which drew rave reviews from...

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Often mere words, spoken with intention can make the most impact. While the words of William Shakespeare were written well over 400 years ago, they still resonate today. The recent school play, “Shakespeare on a Bench,” held April 10 – 14, gave testament to that with a series of segments from Shakespeare’s sonnets, and a variety of Shakespeare’s plays, which drew rave reviews from all who attended.

Directed by Kelly Stowell and Assistant Director Amber Charest, the production was the culmination of a lot of hard work and dedication of both cast and crew, made up of both current and former QCC students. The cast was a mix of both veteran and beginner actors that included:

  • Ari Strout
  • George Baraklilis
  • Daniel Warner
  • Vidalyssi Nuñez
  • Tris Sackman
  • Genesis Sanchez
  • Letty Ramirez
  • Anye Ngwaah
  • Mike Daniel
  • Amber Charest
  • Melesia Swanston-Alonzo
  • David Rodriguez
  • Lex Guertin
  • Nate Wilson

This production was also entered in the Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival (KCACTF). This national theater education program identifies and promotes quality in college-level theater production. Productions entered on the participating level are eligible for invitation to the KCACTF regional festival, and may also be considered for national awards recognizing outstanding achievement in production, design, direction and performance.

Last year more than 1,300 productions were entered in the KCACTF involving more than 200,000 students nationwide. By entering this production, QCC’s theater department is sharing in the KCACTF goals to recognize, reward, and celebrate the exemplary work produced in college and university theaters across the nation.

  • QCC President Dr. Luis Pedraja addresses scholarship recipients.
  • Nhat Le, Chief Operating Officer of MOBD (standing) shares remarks.
April, 2019

A reception was held on April 22 to recognize 20 QCC students who each received a $1,000 scholarship this spring to support their studies in STEM programs. These scholarships were made possible through funding received from two state agencies: the Executive Office of Housing and Economic Development, which sponsored students through the Central Region Advanced Manufacturing Consortium; and the Massachusetts...

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A reception was held on April 22 to recognize 20 QCC students who each received a $1,000 scholarship this spring to support their studies in STEM programs. These scholarships were made possible through funding received from two state agencies: the Executive Office of Housing and Economic Development, which sponsored students through the Central Region Advanced Manufacturing Consortium; and the Massachusetts Office of Business Development (MOBD), which sponsored students through the Massachusetts Biomedical Initiative (MBI). These agencies are investing in developing the workforce in advanced manufacturing and the life sciences industry, two high growth engines of the Massachusetts economy.

QCC President Dr. Luis Pedraja and QCC Assistant Vice President for Workforce Readiness and Innovation Kathy Rentsch hosted the reception and welcomed the students and guests. Guests included: Nhat Le, Chief Operating Officer of MOBD and Jon Weaver, President and CEO of MBI.

In her remarks to the group, Ms. Le explained that she was the first in her family to attend college and had no one close to advise her. She empathized with the difficulties students face in navigating college and recommended the students take advantage of campus advising and mentoring programs. Mr. Weaver also addressed the group, noting that life sciences and bio-manufacturing are rapidly growing businesses in the greater Worcester area and encouraged students to consider careers in these industries.

The life sciences scholarship recipients, who were hosted by QCC Professor Jessica Crowley, are: Samara Ahmed, Hannah Gonzalez, Regan Guillot, Dureid Homade, Seyedashkan Hosseini, Boris Ludena, Piro Mihilli, Kriols Mohareb, Leslie Bonsu and Ryan Singer.

The advanced manufacturing scholarship recipients, who were hosted by QCC Professor Jacob Longacre, are: Johanny Polanco, Danny Banh, Prakash Bhandari, Yamil Hernandez, Jah’maal Memnon, Jonathan Pintado, Davon Taylor, Andres Tavares, Jay Mason and Dhalin Lutaaya.

Mr. Bhandari, who is originally from Nepal, noted how helpful the scholarship funding was in allowing him to focus on his studies. Mr. Hernandez shared that he is juggling family responsibilities along with his college studies and working full-time, stating the scholarship was a huge help to him.

For more information on these grant programs, contact Adrienne Linnell, Program Administrator for STEM initiatives at Alinnell [at] qcc.mass.edu 

  • Dragon
  • The tying of the Peace pole.
  • Lucinda Costa and Selena Boria
  • President Pedraja and QCC staff
  • "Dave" the alpaca gives a big smile to all who came to QCC's Diversity Day.
  • Mascots and President Pedraja
  • The South East Asian Coalition Imperial Lion Dance Team who performed a dragon dance to the beat of drums.
  • It was a magical day at QCC's Diversity Fair.
  • QCC Music Club/Music Ensemble
April, 2019

Celebrating and honoring our differences was the premise behind the April 17, Diversity Day 2019. Funded by The Diversity Caucus & Student Life Office, the daylong event featured a celebration of peace and diversity through the arts, culture and literacy. The event began with a Peace Ceremony at the campus peace pole in the Athletic Center, where different groups of people came together for a ribbon tying to...

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Celebrating and honoring our differences was the premise behind the April 17, Diversity Day 2019. Funded by The Diversity Caucus & Student Life Office, the daylong event featured a celebration of peace and diversity through the arts, culture and literacy. The event began with a Peace Ceremony at the campus peace pole in the Athletic Center, where different groups of people came together for a ribbon tying to celebrate living together in peace. A cultural food festival, complete with entertainment was held after the ceremony.

The alpacas from Angel Hair Farm (always a hit when they visit campus) were in front of the Athletic Center to greet people as they went into the festival. Twice a year these friendly faces stop by the college to bring joy and happiness to students, faculty and staff.

The festival featured food from around the globe thanks to donations by:

  • Niko's House of Pizza
  • Sake Bomb Bistro
  • Live, Love, Nutrients
  • Wraps & Bowls
  • Brisas Restaurant
  • Kabab & Tandoor Grill
  • Stop & Shop
  • Corporate Chefs
  • Fatima's Cafe
  • Nola Cajun Kitchen
  • Bushel & Peck
  • Cafe Reyes
  • Polar Beverages

This year’s Diversity Day also featured music, dance, entertainment and merriment from community groups and over 25 QCC clubs. Area mascots, "Paws" & "Sox" from the Pawtucket Red Sox, along with Worcester Railers mascot, “Trax” greeted those in attendance, while dancers from Ritmos Academy performed. Other performances included the QCC Music Club/Music Ensemble; the South East Asian Coalition Imperial Lion Dance Team, who performed a dragon dance to the beat of drums and Salome Strange, who performed, "This is Me,”  from the Greatest Showman. 

Other Community Sponsorships and attendees included:

  • Worcester / Boston  = Cumulus Radio Station  104-5 XLO
  • QCC Alumni Association &  Mentoring for Perkins Programs
  • Worcester’s football team, the Massachusetts Pirates,
  • Texas Road House, Lincoln Street, Worcester
  • Worcester-based Drag Queen Worcester Youth Pride & Worcester Pride
  • City of Worcester Cultural Development Division
  • Worcester Cultural Coalition
  • Worcester PopUp public
  • Harr, Berryl "Bev" Pettiford & Drink Donations
  • USA , Air Force, SSgt. Isata Tucker  
  • TTLB Mirror Me Photo
  • Maurice Horton, QCC  Man's Basketball Alumni 
  • QCC Student Trustee Mustafa Boweden
  • QCC Student Gocernment Association President Jorgo Gushi
April, 2019

Quinsigamond Community College had a changing of the guard with the election of Mustafa Boweden as Student Trustee and Jorgo Gushi as the Student Government Association (SGA) President for 2019-2020.

Mr. Boweden will serve as the student trustee on QCC’s 11-member Board of Trustees. Members of the Board are all appointed to a five-year term, with the exception of...

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Quinsigamond Community College had a changing of the guard with the election of Mustafa Boweden as Student Trustee and Jorgo Gushi as the Student Government Association (SGA) President for 2019-2020.

Mr. Boweden will serve as the student trustee on QCC’s 11-member Board of Trustees. Members of the Board are all appointed to a five-year term, with the exception of the student trustee who is elected to a one-year term. In the role of student trustee, Mr Boweden will represent all students of the college. Student trustees are also assigned to serve on the Strategic Planning Committee and are expected to attend, all committee and regular meetings as well as the annual trustee retreat.

“One of my goals as trustee is to have students become involved in something other than just school work,” Mr. Boweden said. “I’d like to help move the school forward to a more socialized community.”

As the new SGA President, Mr. Gushi will represent and preside over the SGA both on and off campus, coordinate all SGA activities, serve on campus as a representative on the Activities Programming Committee, Student Services Council, and Governance Steering Council, in addition to serving off campus on the Student Advisory Council to the Board of Higher Education. Mr. Gushi was also recently elected as Interim Chair of the Student Advisory Council to the Board of Higher Education.

“I pledge, along with the whole SGA group, to work to improve student experience through advocacy and collaboration with other campus offices and organizations,” Mr. Gushi said. “Our intention is to faithfully and actively represent the engaged student body by providing transparency, fostering inclusivity, setting endurance, and promoting diversity through visible outreach, creative initiatives, and dedicated teamwork among all members of SGA.”

  • Pratt Whitney was a newcomer to QCC's Spring Job Fair.
  • A QCC student networks with a potential employer.
  • QCC students drop off their resumes to companies at the college's annual Spring job Fair
April, 2019

The saying, “build it and they will come” is a familiar one to QCC’s Career Services department.  For the past 10 years the college has hosted job fair and the employers have come. This year’s Spring Job Fair brought in 25 companies from the New England area to meet with QCC students, who stopped by during the three-hour event to drop off their resumes and network with the companies. One...

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The saying, “build it and they will come” is a familiar one to QCC’s Career Services department.  For the past 10 years the college has hosted job fair and the employers have come. This year’s Spring Job Fair brought in 25 companies from the New England area to meet with QCC students, who stopped by during the three-hour event to drop off their resumes and network with the companies. One company new to QCC’s Job Fair, Pratt Whitney, came all the way from North Berwick, Maine. The company produces aerospace engine parts at the North Berwick facility and is the largest manufacturing facility in Maine. It has locations in Arkansas Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Michigan, as well as overseas in Greece, Turkey, China and Singapore.

Pratt Whitney’s Human Resources Client Manager Maggie Miller said there was a lot of interest from students who attended the fair.

“We have many full-time positions in different plants. It is good to get the word out to students and teach them what’s out there,” she said, adding that the company plans to come back to QCC for its next job fair.

Another first-time company to the job fair was Citizens Bank. Shrewsbury Branch Manager Linda Podmostka said the bank was currently only looking for full-time employees.

“We had a lot of students looking for part-time hours, but we did have four potential candidates interested in full-time,” she said. “I’m happy we came here today and I would like to come back.”

One of the familiar faces at the job fair was Wakefly, Inc.. The digital marketing and web development agency has hired QCC grads over the years. The company was on-hand looking for qualified employees to fill a variety of positions that include a junior web developer, web development intern, digital marketing intern and sales intern.

“We have seen a few people of interest,” said QCC alumnus Zack Berridge. Mr. Berridge graduated from QCC in 2016 and began working at Wakefly as a web developer.

Other companies at the job fair included:

  • BB&T Recruiting & Talent Acquisition (Insurance Division)
  • Big Y Foods
  • BNY Mellon
  • Bravo Technical Services
  • Coghlin Companies
  • Continental Pools
  • Department of Youth Services
  • Esler Companies (Renewal by Anderson)
  • FedEX Ground
  • Phoenix Marketing & Advertising
  • Randstad at Hanover Insurance
  • Resourcesoft Inc.
  • ScrubaDub Auto Wash
  • Securitas
  • Spectrum
  • Taco Bell
  • Technical Needs
  • The Center for Autism & Related Disorders
  • The Home Depot
  • Valet Park of America
  • Wegmans Food Markets
  • Westaff
  • QCC is addng a General Studies - Pre-Nursing Option this fall.
April, 2019

Quinsigamond Community College has added four new programs to its fall line-up of degree and certificate offerings.  On April 8 students can start registering for any of the new programs that begin in the 2019 fall semester.

“Our goal is to continuously listen to the needs of our students, as well as stay attuned to which jobs and careers are in demand, both now and in the future,” said QCC...

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Quinsigamond Community College has added four new programs to its fall line-up of degree and certificate offerings.  On April 8 students can start registering for any of the new programs that begin in the 2019 fall semester.

“Our goal is to continuously listen to the needs of our students, as well as stay attuned to which jobs and careers are in demand, both now and in the future,” said QCC President Dr. Luis G. Pedraja.

Recognizing industry demand, QCC will now be offering a General Studies - Pre-Nursing Option that gives students the opportunity to prepare for QCC's nursing programs and then transfer to four-year institutions. This program also educates students to work in various aspects of healthcare, including hospitals and other healthcare facilities. Healthcare continues to remain one of the most in-demand job markets. According to the U.S. Department of Labor Bureau of Labor Statistics Job Outlook, from 2016-2026 the need for registered nurses will increase 15% faster than the average growth rate of 7% of all jobs. A similar finding for licenses practical nurses shows the average growth rate of 12% faster than the average growth rate of all jobs.

Other fall programs include: 

The Criminal Justice - Transfer Option associate degree program, which provides students with a broad academic background in the area of criminal justice and the opportunity to develop the skills needed for pursuing a public service career in policing, corrections, courts, probation, parole, federal agencies, or the private sector. This program is specifically designed for students interested in the MassTransfer Program, which ensures the full transfer of credit into the criminal justice and general education courses in bachelor degree programs within the Massachusetts public education system.

The QCC Liberal Arts - Media Communications Option associate degree program provides students with foundational courses in media communications required by four-year colleges and universities, enabling students to transfer to a bachelor degree program as juniors in media communications/journalism and/or a related field.

A new Accounting Certificate focuses on the accounting skills and knowledge needed in business. Upon graduation, students will be prepared for entry-level accounting jobs in a variety of business settings or may move seamlessly into the Business Administration Career associate degree program.

To learn more about these new programs, visit www.QCC.edu.

  • High Five - Shirley Dempsey and June Vo
April, 2019

Quinsigamond Community College “high fived” its way in making the dream of higher education a reality for more people. On National High Five Day (April 18), donations made to the QCC Foundation in increments of $5 were matched dollar for dollar. The daylong event raised a total of $2,000, which was doubled to $4,000.

All gifts on High Five Day went into the QCC Foundation lifelong...

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Quinsigamond Community College “high fived” its way in making the dream of higher education a reality for more people. On National High Five Day (April 18), donations made to the QCC Foundation in increments of $5 were matched dollar for dollar. The daylong event raised a total of $2,000, which was doubled to $4,000.

All gifts on High Five Day went into the QCC Foundation lifelong scholarship fund, to help more students attain their dream of attending college. This one-day of matched giving was designed to make charitable donations go further. The lifelong scholarship fund is placed in the endowment and held in perpetuity, with 50% of the net income awarded to students annually. Endowments help to guarantee a financial future for QCC's mission of educating students and is an important source for scholarships at a time when less than 30% of QCC's budget is funded by state appropriations.

“In honor of High Five Day, we asked all QCC alumni to celebrate the day by giving a ‘high five and $5’ to support the QCC Foundation’s efforts to bring affordable, quality education to everyone in our community,” said QCC’s Executive Director of Advancement, Karen Rucks. “Thanks to all who donated.”

For more information or to learn how you can still donate, visit QCC Foundation.

  • QCC’s Men’s Basketball Coach Tishaun Jenkins
  • Basketball clinic students
  • Dribbling down the court.
  • QCC basketball players demonstate a technique.
  • QCC’s Men's basketball Assistant Coach Kevin Pettway (foreground) and Coach Jenkins.
April, 2019

Giving back to the community is something that is second nature to QCC’s Men’s Basketball Coach Tishaun Jenkins. For the last five years Mr. Jenkins has devoted many hours to building awareness of the college’s basketball program. A former point guard for Salem State University, he was named to the all-tournament team at the 2000 NCAA Division III Final Four and was named the NCAA...

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Giving back to the community is something that is second nature to QCC’s Men’s Basketball Coach Tishaun Jenkins. For the last five years Mr. Jenkins has devoted many hours to building awareness of the college’s basketball program. A former point guard for Salem State University, he was named to the all-tournament team at the 2000 NCAA Division III Final Four and was named the NCAA Northeast player of the year that same season. He has earned numerous accolades in basketball, from being named MASCAC Player of the Year in 1999 and 2000, to earning the Bob Cousy award as the best player under six feet in New England.

Yet what stands out more than all his basketball accomplishments is his dedication to the Worcester community that he calls home. He was the head coach for one season at Worcester Technical High School before taking the head coaching job at QCC. He said he waited until the QCC coaching position became available and immediately applied, feeling he could make the most difference.

“QCC gives me the easiest access to kids in my community who need me,” he said.

He has already seen some amazing results in his time as the college’s head coach, with players going on to earn their bachelor’s degree (and play ball) at state universities and local colleges.

“QCC is such a great choice. They can go here and then transfer all of their credits,” he added.

Mr. Jenkins keeps in touch with all his players, both current and former and takes pride in their accomplishments.

“It may be basketball but it’s more like a family,” he said, adding that a recent first-time alumni basketball game drew 22 former players.

During the Commonwealth’s K-12 April vacation week, Mr. Jenkins, along with QCC’s Men's basketball Assistant Coach Kevin Pettway, and Mr. Jenkins' brother (former Kansas Jayhawk point guard Naadir Tharpe), along with several of his QCC basketball players held a basketball clinic for youths. The week-long clinic was divided into morning and afternoon sessions. The two sessions were broken out into age groups (6 – 12 and 13 and up) and abilities. The sessions involve basic basketball skills and practice scrimmages. According Mr. Jenkins, money raised from the clinic goes towards the QCC Men’s Basketball team.

“This is our first April vacation week that we’ve done at the school,” he said, adding clinics have been held in the past at the school on Tuesday and Thursday evenings.

Mr. Jenkins said that part of what makes this clinic so special is the help that he receives from his players: Victor Floriento, Josh Falero, Steven Chivallatti, Jordan Carter and upcoming graduate Dana Mordi, a point guard for QCC who videotaped the sessions. All the other players will be returning in the fall.

“This will be our best year ever with returning players,” he said.

Mr. Jenkins has spent the better part of 10 years helping to train children in the art of basketball and each summer holds a summer basketball academy summer camp at Eagle Hill School in Hardwick. Many of his QCC basketball players also help him out at the camp. He is also planning to hold a summer clinic from Monday – Thursday (8:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.) at the college.

While basketball season is a few months away, already Mr. Jenkins is actively recruiting QCC students to play. Those interested in playing for the 2019/2020 season can contact Director of Athletics & Fitness Center Lisa Gurnick at 508.854-4582 or email lgurnick [at] qcc.mass.edu, or Assistant Manager of Athletics and Fitness Center Josh Cole at 508.854. 4317 or email jcole [at] qcc.mass.edu. For additional information, visit QCC Student Athletics.

  • QCC student at the QCC Human Services Fair.
  • QCC's Human Services Fair.
April, 2019

Human service jobs provide a service to society. They are often those positions that make a true life-altering difference in a person’s life. On April 9, the college hosted its annual Human Services Fair to help support its human services program.The fair drew representatives from over 25 human service agencies across the region, who discussed both intern and job opportunities with QCC...

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Human service jobs provide a service to society. They are often those positions that make a true life-altering difference in a person’s life. On April 9, the college hosted its annual Human Services Fair to help support its human services program.The fair drew representatives from over 25 human service agencies across the region, who discussed both intern and job opportunities with QCC students.

“This is a wonderful opportunity for our human service students, and other QCC students, to interact with agencies,” said Professor of Human Services Jean Kennedy. “It’s a wonderful opportunity for our students to network and understand the kinds of service delivery we have in Worcester. Worcester has an amazing amount of non-profit agencies.”

Ms. Kennedy said that while the human service industry is “really large,” the need is great. She said the fair allows not only the students, but also the agencies to become familiar with the college and all it has to offer.

“I think it is a win-win for both the college and the industry,” she continued, noting that “there are direct care workers who don’t have a college degree and they can think about coming here and getting their credentialing. It’s a nice feeder for both.”

One of the agencies represented at the fair was LUK Inc. LUK is a not-for-profit social service agency located in central Massachusetts dedicated to improving the lives of youth and their families. Hilary Amedy, Coordinator for the agency’s youth mentoring program (ages 6-17) was on hand at the fair to recruit interns to help out with the youth mentoring program.

“We especially like interns in the human service field because we know we are giving them some of the experiences they need,” she said. “We’ve had interns from QCC before and they’ve worked out fabulously.”

While it was the LUK mentoring program that was on-hand at the fair, Ms. Amedy said there are numerous other programs (such as foster, residential, prevention etc.) within the agency.

“There may be job opportunities or internship in other programs as well,” she added.

Victor Carrasquillo, one of the students who attend the fair, said the fair will help him to further his career and future goals.

“This is very helpful,” he added.

  • QCC Fire Science grad with fire truck
  • Firefighters demonstrate rescue techniques
April, 2019

Since the early 1990s Quinsigamond Community College has quietly and effectively been helping to make the areas that we live and work in safe through graduates from its fire science program. In fact, recent data of QCC’s fire science graduates showed 75% were employed in Massachusetts. Today firefighters, while not required to have a degree must be well-rounded in order to compete in today’s workforce...

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Since the early 1990s Quinsigamond Community College has quietly and effectively been helping to make the areas that we live and work in safe through graduates from its fire science program. In fact, recent data of QCC’s fire science graduates showed 75% were employed in Massachusetts. Today firefighters, while not required to have a degree must be well-rounded in order to compete in today’s workforce. QCC’s fire science associate degree program prepares students for a career or promotion within fire and emergency service organizations as well as careers in the private sector.

According to Program Coordinator Michael Gonyor, career paths for today’s firefighters can run the gamut from traditional firefighters, fire investigation, fire inspectors and fire engineers, to jobs in the insurance industry or even the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Fire science also offers students the foundation to enter into emergency services. At QCC, basic emergency medical technology is part of the curriculum.

“I highly suggest the students take the EMT certificate course and 95% of them end up taking it,” he said, adding that many continue on and earn their paramedic technology certificate.

The fire science program at QCC is unique, according to Mr. Gonyor. In the early 2000s the program became aligned with the Fire and Emergency Services Higher Education (FESHE) initiative, a network of emergency services-related education and training providers. The college’s program is now aligned with a national standard.

“Not every school is aligned with FESHE,” he said. “FESHE makes sure you have up-to-date subject matter in the industry. By going to a FESHE school you learn the same as the other schools. When our students leave here and are ready to transfer to a four-year school, there’s no question of what they’ve learned, everything transfers easily.”

However, what makes the program truly special is its instructors. Each instructor in the college’s fire science program also works within the fire science industry.  Mr. Gonyor works as a part-time firefighter in Southbridge, and all of his staff at QCC are currently different types of firefighters within the state. This direct workforce experience is a unique benefit to QCC students.

“Helping a student get set up in a profession is what we do best, since we live it and breathe it. If we don’t know someone, we know someone who knows someone. Some of our instructors are chiefs, fire officers, firefighters (with specialties such as hazmat).  We also have someone who is a fire inspector in the Fire Marshall’s office,” Mr. Gonyor said. “We are subject matter experts and have contacts that can help point students in the right direction.”

One of the aspects of the program Mr. Gonyor is most proud of is the personal touch that he and his staff offer students, helping them to differentiate fact versus myth within the industry. One change within the industry is the addition of more women in the industry. Historically the profession has been male-dominated, Mr. Gonyor said; however, QCC is seeing more female fire science students.

“We’ve been able to connect female students with other female firefighters in the profession,” he said.

Industry Experts

As industry experts who are in the field, the QCC fire science instructors offer more than lessons in a book.  They can substantiate and give credence to what the students are learning because they have done it.

“This means something to students,” Mr. Gonyor said.

Every 10-weeks the Massachusetts Firefighting Academy graduates a new set of cadets and while they have the basics to begin a career in firefighting, unless they continue their education, they will lack a competitive edge that, in many departments, can mean bonuses, stipends or other incentives.

“A degree makes you a better-rounded employee and makes you more marketable,” he said. “There becomes a point in your profession where you really can’t be considered for a promotion until you have a minimum of an associate degree. You have to be adaptable to what’s going on because it’s not just firefighting anymore it’s everything.”

To learn more, visit QCC’s Fire Science Program

  • CSET Students and instructor
April, 2019

Last summer a group of Computer Systems Engineering Technology (CSET) students went through a new student orientation to learn the ins and outs of college life at QCC; toured the campus and visited the labs; learned how to use the applications that will be a part of their curriculum, and discussed the different degree options. The two-day orientation was funded by a STEM Starter Academy Grant and those students who...

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Last summer a group of Computer Systems Engineering Technology (CSET) students went through a new student orientation to learn the ins and outs of college life at QCC; toured the campus and visited the labs; learned how to use the applications that will be a part of their curriculum, and discussed the different degree options. The two-day orientation was funded by a STEM Starter Academy Grant and those students who participated received a Microsoft Surface Go laptop.

Today, CSET jobs are some of the fastest growing jobs. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics noted an 11% job increase from 2016-2026, faster than the 7% average job growth rate. In 2017, the median salary for Computer Support Specialists was $52,810. Professor of Computer Systems/Engineering Technology, NT Izuchi said there is a growing need to find qualified candidates to do these type of CSET jobs.

“Companies just can’t find qualified candidates to do these jobs,” he said, which makes programs such as the new CSET student orientation so valuable.

QCC CSET student Daikersu Mulbah said he was actually attending another community college near Boston for nursing, when he decided to change gears. A search of IT programs in the region brought him to QCC. He said it was just the program he was looking for and went through the summer new student orientation. He ended up leaving Boston, buying a home in Worcester and began to take classes at QCC in fall 2018.

“I searched online, found QCC and left my email address,” Mr. Mulbah said. “Now I’m here.”

  • Professor Sheiba Mas-Oud explains math concepts
April, 2019

At Quinsigamond Community College, student success is the number one priority, and making sure students have a solid academic foundation is paramount. The College’s mathematics department has tailored its program in order to make sure that foundation is rock solid, by offering a variety of support services that will give students the footing they need to succeed in mathematics as they move forward in their lives...

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At Quinsigamond Community College, student success is the number one priority, and making sure students have a solid academic foundation is paramount. The College’s mathematics department has tailored its program in order to make sure that foundation is rock solid, by offering a variety of support services that will give students the footing they need to succeed in mathematics as they move forward in their lives. Once again the college will be offering its Math Boot Camps to help QCC students succeed in their math placements test and in their required college mathematics courses. The week-long sessions are free to QCC students.

Mathematics Professor Sheiba Mas-Oud teaches the majority of the courses and has been instrumental in making the program a huge success. Each boot camp session lasts for a week and each class is four hours long. During the sessions Mr. Mas-Oud will go over all three developmental mathematics classes (MAT 090,095 and 099). Mr. Mas-Oud’s classes are designed to help students understand the math concepts they will need to succeed in college mathematics. Each day students are given two 45-minute lectures on various math topics, often giving humorous real-world examples that enable students to grasp the concepts he is teaching. Students will also have a study plan created for them on MyMathLab based on his/her placement test scores, along with appropriate tests on basic mathematics. In order for students to retake the math placement test, students are expected to complete at least 80% of their study plan.

The 2019 Summer Math Boot Camp Session Weeks will be held at QCC’s main campus 670 West Boylston Street, Worcester in the Administration building, with the exception of the week of July 22-July 26 when a session will be held at the college’s main campus and QCC Southbridge. Below are the summer 2019 session weeks:

  • July 8 - July 12 (Monday - Friday) 8:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. room 180A
  • July 8 - July 12 (Monday - Friday) 12:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. room 180A 
  • July 8 - July 12 (Monday - Friday) 4:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. room 180A
  • July 22 - July 26 (Monday - Friday) 8:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. room 180A
  • July 22 - July 26 (Monday - Friday) 12:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. QCC Southbridge, room 102
  • July 29 - August 2 (Monday - Friday) 8:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. room 180A
  • July 29 - August 2 (Monday - Friday) 12:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. room 180A
  • July 29 - August 2 (Monday - Friday) 4:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.  room 180A
  • Aug. 26 - Aug. 30 (Monday - Friday) 8:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. room 180A
  • Aug. 26t - Aug. 30 (Monday - Friday) 12:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. room 180A

Space is limited. To register for a session visit the Math Boot Camp website.

  • Wyvern's Pitcher Paul Wydom is backed up by Misael Gutzman.
  • Wyverns Charles Callender is all smiles during a recent game.
  • Misael Guzman rounds the base with Hunter Guinto following closely on his heels.
  • Head Coach John McLaughlin talks with his team.
April, 2019

QCC looking like a Gem on the Diamond so far at NJCCA Regional Tourney

On Saturday, May 11, QCC will be hosting the NJCAA Region XXI 2019 Baseball Tournament. Games will be held at 11:00 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. The Wyverns are currently ranked second in the tourney and have been pulling out all the stops to make this one exciting season.

QCC will also be host to the championship game held the following...

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QCC looking like a Gem on the Diamond so far at NJCCA Regional Tourney

On Saturday, May 11, QCC will be hosting the NJCAA Region XXI 2019 Baseball Tournament. Games will be held at 11:00 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. The Wyverns are currently ranked second in the tourney and have been pulling out all the stops to make this one exciting season.

QCC will also be host to the championship game held the following day, on Sunday, May 12 at 12:00 p.m. Wyvern nation is asked to come and support their Wyverns Baseball team as they swing their way into the record books! Go Wyverns!!

New Sports Teams Added in Fall 2019

This fall there will be some exciting additions to the Wyverns sports teams. The college is adding two NJCAA Intercollegiate sports teams: Women’s Volleyball and Men’s Soccer. For more information, contact either Lisa Gurnick, Director of Athletics & Fitness Center at 508.854.4582 or email gurnick [at] qcc.mass.edu, or Assistant Manager of Athletics and Fitness Center Josh Cole at 508.854.4317 or email jcole [at] qcc.mass.edu .

Renew Your Body and Your Mind with a Yoga Session

The Athletics Department will be offering a four-week Yoga class/session, beginning May 7 – May 30, Tuesdays and Thursdays at 12:00 p.m. Cost for the four-week session is $47.  At least six participants will need to join for this class to be held. Those who are interested can sign-up at the QCC Athletic Center or the Business Office. Any questions, please call the Athletic Office at 508.854.4317.

Tone Your Way to a Healthier You

A more toned you is just a month away when you sign up for a Full-Body Toning four-week session. Classes begin on May 6 and will run until May 31, on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays at 12:30 p.m. Cost for this session is $60.Those who are interested can sign-up at the QCC Athletic Center or the Business Office. Any questions, please call the Athletic Office at 508.854.4317.

  • From left: Erika Pillco and Rachael Cormier
  • Juslyn Codjoe
April, 2019

Each month, the professors in QCC’s STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) program recognize and acknowledge the perseverance of one student in their perspective STEM programs. Below is the second group of STEM Students of the Month with a few comments from the professors who nominated them. They include:

Science – Erika Pillco, nominated by Assistant...

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Each month, the professors in QCC’s STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) program recognize and acknowledge the perseverance of one student in their perspective STEM programs. Below is the second group of STEM Students of the Month with a few comments from the professors who nominated them. They include:

Science – Erika Pillco, nominated by Assistant Professor of Biology Opeyemi Odewale.

“Ms. Erika Pillco has a genuine interest to learn. She always comes to class prepared and is always willing to participate in class. She is self-motivated and although she might find some topics difficult, she always challenges herself to do her very best,” Mr. Odewale said.

Technology – Rachael Cormier, nominated by Assistant Professor of Computer Systems Engineering Technology Dean Polnerow.

“Rachael completed her associate degree in Enterprise Information Technology at QCC, while also working as a member of the QCC IT Help Desk support staff. After attending a conference at Northeastern University in Spring semester 2018, she became very interested in cybersecurity. In fact, Rachael became so interested that she decided to pursue a second associate degree at QCC in Cybersecurity. She expects to complete that degree this May, and plans to transfer to Northeastern to work on furthering her education in Information Technology. I think she is a great example of how students can be successful at QCC,” Mr. Polnerow said.

Engineering – Nicholas McGovern, nominated by Associate Professor of Manufacturing Technology Damian Kieran.

“Nicholas is an excellent student. He participates well in class and asks great questions. He produces great assignments and gets everything done on time. He is curious and was excited to work on projects in the Fab Lab,” Mr. Kiernan said.

Mathematics – Juslyn Codjoe, nominated by Professor of Mathematics Donna Dominguez.

“Juslyn is a very dedicated student who put in consistent effort, and a lot of it, throughout the semester to learn the material. She kept up with assignments on a timely basis, was thorough in their completion and, although on the quieter side, was a willing participant in class discussions.  Juslyn's homework on transformations of functions was a work of art, color-coded and all! Her grade for the semester was one of the top in the class,” Ms. Dominquez said.

Make sure to visit the Wyvern Guardian next month for the latest STEM students of the month.

  • QCC STEM students looking to transfer to a 4-year institution can take advantage of the summer transfer bridge program.
April, 2019

A new program designed to support Massachusetts community college students in making a successful transition into public 4-year universities as transfer students is launching this summer, as part of the STEM Starter Academy. Students transferring from one of the 15 community colleges in Massachusetts to a state college or university in order to pursue a bachelor’s degree in a STEM field, can apply to a...

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A new program designed to support Massachusetts community college students in making a successful transition into public 4-year universities as transfer students is launching this summer, as part of the STEM Starter Academy. Students transferring from one of the 15 community colleges in Massachusetts to a state college or university in order to pursue a bachelor’s degree in a STEM field, can apply to a summer STEM Transfer Bridge Program. 

Each summer transfer program is unique, and was designed by each individual university, with input from community college partners. The programs vary in specific content (such as the courses being offered, the dates when they meet, etc.); however, all programs will allow students the opportunity to get a jump start on their bachelor's degree. Students who participate in a summer bridge program will:

  • Meet other STEM transfer students
  • Get to know faculty who will be teaching their classes in the fall
  • Take a free class that applies to their major
  • Learn where and how to access key resources on campus

Students who are interested in participating in the STEM Transfer Bridge program should apply to the bridge program at the institution where they intend to enroll for the Fall 2019 semester. Students who have applied to more than one institution but do not know where they will be attending, may apply to more than one summer transfer bridge program.  However, students should only attend the program at the institution they will be attending in the fall. 

To apply, download and complete the application. Please note that the application deadlines are not the same for every institution; however many programs have application deadlines of May 17, with the program beginning May 28. Completed applications should be emailed to the contact listed for each college/university of interest.

For details of the transfer bridge program at Worcester State University (which begins on May 28),  contact Adrienne Linnell, QCC STEM Initiatives Program Administrator at alinnell [at] qcc.mass.edu

For details of the transfer bridge program at Fitchburg State University (which begins on May 28), please contact Darcy Carlson, STEM Starter Academy program Coordinator at Dcarlson [at] qcc.mass.edu

General questions may be addressed to Allison Little, Assistant Commissioner of P-16 Alignment and Outreach, at alittle [at] dhe.mass.edu or the contact for the specific program of interest. All university contacts are listed on the program’s website.

  • From left: Caylie Whiteside, Parlee Jones, Claire Schaffer-Duffy, Tina Gaffey, Regina Edmonds, Associate Professor of Human Serv
  • QCC students hold a Stand Against Racism Banner.
  • QCC students sign the Stand Against Racism banner to promote their stance against racism.
April, 2019

Stand Against Racism is a signature campaign of YWCA USA to build community among those who work for racial justice and to raise awareness about the negative impact of institutional and structural racism in our communities. On April 26, Quinsigamond Community College joined with the local YWCA and other colleges, organizations, temples, churches, and schools throughout Central Massachusetts in taking a Stand Against...

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Stand Against Racism is a signature campaign of YWCA USA to build community among those who work for racial justice and to raise awareness about the negative impact of institutional and structural racism in our communities. On April 26, Quinsigamond Community College joined with the local YWCA and other colleges, organizations, temples, churches, and schools throughout Central Massachusetts in taking a Stand Against Racism. 

Students, faculty and staff joined the Diversity Caucus for lunch and to sign the Stand Against Racism banner. A moving presentation and dramatic reading of civil rights texts excerpted from Hands on the Freedom Plow:  Personal Accounts by Women in SNCC (Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee) was performed, followed by a question and answer session.

  • Professor Jacob Longacre demonstrates photnics at the Avanza STEM Expo
  • Students check out 35 mm slides as Professor Longacre explains the technology behind them..
  • QCC STEM Ambassador Brandon Won explains 3D printing.
April, 2019

On April 18, QCC staff and faculty brought STEM to life at the spring Avanza STEM Expo held by the Latino Education Institute at Worcester State University. The Expo offered seminars in various STEM topics along with a science fair event featuring different types of “hands-on” STEM experiences. Avanza translates roughly to “Get Moving," and the Expo certainly had people...

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On April 18, QCC staff and faculty brought STEM to life at the spring Avanza STEM Expo held by the Latino Education Institute at Worcester State University. The Expo offered seminars in various STEM topics along with a science fair event featuring different types of “hands-on” STEM experiences. Avanza translates roughly to “Get Moving," and the Expo certainly had people moving and trying out all sorts of STEM activities.

Brandon Won, QCC STEM Ambassador, set up a table with a running 3D printer and brought additional samples of what 3D printers are able to create. He demonstrated a mechanical hand that responds to movements; and had numerous “Creopop” colored pens that create 3D items such as eyeglass frames from materials made with an extruded gel and cured with UV light. Mr. Won noted that the students were eager to learn and didn’t hesitate to test everything he had brought.

Jacob Longacre, QCC Professor of Electronics Engineering and Photonics, shared the science of optics and photonics using a variety of toys and everyday products including 35 mm slides, a digital camera, 3-D glasses, picture books, remote controls using infrared light, and the ever popular View-Master.

Eduardo Rivas, QCC Admissions Counselor, gave a well-attended seminar on STEM Careers and explained the QCC programs available. Mr. Rivas noted that attendees were very impressed with the high salaries available in STEM fields. QCC’s participation in the Avanza STEM Expo was supported through the Massachusetts Biomedical Institute and STEM Starter Academy funding.

  • Alden Librarian Carlyn "Cary" Morse
April, 2019

Alden Librarian Carolyn “Cary” Morse has been honored as the inaugural community college recipient of the MALTA award: the Massachusetts Commonwealth Consortium of Libraries in Public Higher Education Institutions (MCCLPHEI) Academic Librarian Travel Award. This is a generous travel grant awarded to one Massachusetts community college librarian to support attending a national conference....

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Alden Librarian Carolyn “Cary” Morse has been honored as the inaugural community college recipient of the MALTA award: the Massachusetts Commonwealth Consortium of Libraries in Public Higher Education Institutions (MCCLPHEI) Academic Librarian Travel Award. This is a generous travel grant awarded to one Massachusetts community college librarian to support attending a national conference. Ms. Morse will participate in the American Library Association (ALA) annual conference in Washington, D.C., in June, and present a summary of the conference proceedings at a MCCLPHEI professional development workshop in 2019-2020. Her participation in the ALA conference is also supported by QCC Staff Development funds.

The ALA Conference offers librarians an unmatched professional development opportunity. At the conference, Ms. Morse will attend workshops, discussions and poster sessions about key issues such as information literacy instruction for first-generation college students and usability of library websites. Conference key-note speakers will include Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden and Nigerian-American author Tomi Adeyemi.

Ms. Morse is particularly excited to participate in two ALA reference research workshops offered by a team of librarians from the University of Southern California. The team conducted focus group research to better understand their students’ habits, attitudes and needs in relation to research help. The Los Angeles team also studied chat reference with an emphasis on balancing student expectations with the mandates of the information literacy framework adopted by ACRL (Association of College and Research Libraries) in 2015.

Ms. Morse expects to return from ALA with new skills and knowledge, an expanded professional network and a rejuvenated commitment to serving the in-formation literacy needs of QCC students, faculty and staff.  She is eager to share her learning about new trends and innovations with colleagues both at QCC and at other sites across the Commonwealth.

This article was written by Librarian Michael Stevenson.

  • Spring Flowers
  • Artwork adorns the hallway.
April, 2019

Wednesday, May 1: Student Diversity Dialogue - Brave Space, 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m., Room 109A in the Harrington Learning Center.

Thursday, May 2: Admissions Information Night! 6:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m. in the Welcome Center. All who are interested in learning more about QCC should attend. 

Monday, May 6: Surgical Technology Program Pinning, 6:00 p.m...

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Wednesday, May 1: Student Diversity Dialogue - Brave Space, 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m., Room 109A in the Harrington Learning Center.

Thursday, May 2: Admissions Information Night! 6:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m. in the Welcome Center. All who are interested in learning more about QCC should attend. 

Monday, May 6: Surgical Technology Program Pinning, 6:00 p.m., Room 109A in the Harrington Leaning Center.

Friday, May 10: The first Municipal Police Training Committee Reserve Intermittent Recruit Officer Course Commencement

Monday, May 20: Radiologic Technology Program Pinning, 6:00 p.m. in the Hebert Auditorium.

Tuesday, May 21: Dental Hygiene and Dental Assisting Pinning, 5:30 p.m. in the Hebert Auditorium.

Wednesday, May 22: Respiratory Care Program Pinning, 5:00 p.m., QCC at the Worcester Senior Center, 128 Providence Street, Worcester.

Tuesday, May 28: Gateway to College Honors Recognition Ceremony in the Harrington Learning Center, Room 109A at 5:00 p.m. The ceremony will recognize academic excellence and outstanding academic achievement for graduates for the Spring 2019 term.

Thursday, May 30: Gateway to College Graduation, 5:00 p.m. in the Hebert Auditorium.

May Spotlight: It’s the most exciting time of the year at QCC - Commencement 2019!  Thursday, May 23, 1:00 p.m. at the DCU Center, 50 Foster Street, Worcester. Make sure to come and cheer on our incredible graduates!

  • The Wyvern visits the Bahamas
April, 2019

The QCC Wyvern was spotted hanging out in the Bahamas with Assistant Director of Operations Shirley Dempsey. During this damp and dreary spring we are pretty jealous of his adventures! 

Have you seen the Wyvern out and about lately? Is so, please send your photos and descriptions through the newsletter...

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The QCC Wyvern was spotted hanging out in the Bahamas with Assistant Director of Operations Shirley Dempsey. During this damp and dreary spring we are pretty jealous of his adventures! 

Have you seen the Wyvern out and about lately? Is so, please send your photos and descriptions through the newsletter submission form . 

April, 2019

We are very pleased to announce the addition of the following new full-time staff member to Quinsigamond Community College:

On April 7, 2019, Academic Affairs welcomed Georgette Chiasson as Director of Children’s School Early Childhood Program. Georgette brings over 17 years of early childhood experience to this role. Previous to joining the QCC family, Georgette served as the...

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We are very pleased to announce the addition of the following new full-time staff member to Quinsigamond Community College:

On April 7, 2019, Academic Affairs welcomed Georgette Chiasson as Director of Children’s School Early Childhood Program. Georgette brings over 17 years of early childhood experience to this role. Previous to joining the QCC family, Georgette served as the Preschool and Family Services Director at the West Suburban YMCA in Newton, MA.  Proceeding that, Georgette served as the Regional Program Administrator in the Child Development Branch at the YMCA of Greater Boston.  Georgette is a graduate of Westfield State University, where she earned her Bachelor of Science in Physical Education and a Master’s of Science in Early Childhood Education from Salem State University.

On April 12, 2019, The Center for Workforce Development and Continuing Education Department welcomed Maureen Dubois as the Program Assistant for Early Childhood Career Pathway. Maureen brings over 10 years of experience to this position. Most recently, she had a part-time Administrative Support role with the Center for Workforce Development and Continuing Education department here at QCC. Prior to her work at QCC, she was an Administrative Assistant at the College of the Holy Cross in the Office of Grants and Corporate & Foundation Giving.

On April 16, 2019, Information Technology welcomed Amy Harding as an Audiovisual Equipment Technician I. Amy brings to this position over 10 years of audiovisual industry experience. Most recently, she was a Video Production Assistant at Natick Pegasus Inc.. Amy earned a Bachelor of Arts Degree from The Evergreen State College.

On April 21, 2019, Facilities welcomed Vernon Stitt as the HVAC Refrigeration Mechanic II. Vernon brings to this position over 25 years of experience. Most recently, he was a Senior Data Center Engineer/DCS-UCS Senior Engineer at Dimension Data Americas. Vernon earned an Associate Degree from Wentworth Institute of Technology.

Please join us in welcoming Georgette, Maureen, Amy, Vernon into their new roles at QCC.