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03/2019

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March, 2019

  • QCC students visit AbbVie
  • QCC staff member Selena Boria and Director of Mentoring Gabriel Santner (white shirt) tour AbbVie labs with QCC students.
March, 2019

The partnership between AbbVie and Quinsigamond Community College runs deep. It all began back in 1993 when QCC reached out to Massachusetts Biomedical Initiatives to solicit industry members to help develop a biotechnology technology certificate and capstone course. Project Manager John Sauers (then an employee at BASF before the company became AbbVie in 2013) jumped at the chance to help create something for...

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The partnership between AbbVie and Quinsigamond Community College runs deep. It all began back in 1993 when QCC reached out to Massachusetts Biomedical Initiatives to solicit industry members to help develop a biotechnology technology certificate and capstone course. Project Manager John Sauers (then an employee at BASF before the company became AbbVie in 2013) jumped at the chance to help create something for students that was industry-driven. Through the partnership between the company and the college, the biotechnology technology certificate program was formed.

“It’s been a sense of great pride for myself to help QCC students,” he said. “It’s been so popular that one year we ran it three times in one year.”

Today, the capstone course and program have been a part of both AbbVie and QCC for 25 years. In 2001, the capstone course was brought directly to the AbbVie site so that students could have a hands-on opportunity to work with the very latest equipment in the industry. It’s now offered during the summer months. The course is designed to bring in subject matter experts who teach different sections (such as quality control or fermentation) of the biotechnology industry.

“Employees who work here teach various disciplines so that students get a broad exposure in many disciplines,” Mr. Sauers said. “We wanted the students to get complete exposure to biotechnology. It’s a very non-traditional course.”

Coordinating AbbVie’s onsite course is Amanda Shearstone. Ms. Shearstone gathers the very best diverse subject matter experts to help teach the course and any of those have been QCC alum, who themselves were once a part of the program. According to Mr. Sauers, approximately 100 QCC students have worked at the company since 1993.

Last year AbbVie start its own Talent Community partnering with local schools and businesses to develop a sustainable flow of qualified candidates and Mr. Sauers said, “QCC is key for this talent group.”

Another pipeline is QCC’s newly developed mentoring program, which actively involves and encourages community members to become mentors; an opportunity that AbbVie was quick to get on the bandwagon.

“We jumped all over this and 12 employees are actively mentoring QCC students,” he said. “This is another opportunity that strengthens our connections.”

Several STEM-focused programs have been undertaken with students in QCC’s mentoring program thanks to funding from the college’s STEM Starter Academy. One of those included a February 26 event at AbbVie. Over a dozen QCC student mentees, as well as QCC staff members spent the day listening to AbbVie employees in a panel forum before touring the facility. The event began with a company overview by Manufacturing Site Director Michael McDonald, who discussed career paths before turning it over to a panel of AbbVie employees. Panelists included Manager of Quality Assurance Leslie Alessandri and three QCC alums: Associate Scientist John Burns, Calibration/Metrology Technician Joshua Burlingame and Senior Production Manager Paul Duggan, who each graduated from QCC with their Biotechnology Technician Certificate.

“I made it a point of putting the panel together with QCC alum,” Mr. Sauers said, noting the powerful impact this would have on the QCC students. “It was a good example and the employees were effusive with their desire to give back.”

After the panel discussion students were given a comprehensive tour that included the production area, quality control labs and reach lab, which included manufacturing, as well as research and development. 

Absatou Amahdou was one of the QCC student mentees who toured AbbVie. Her mentor, Kim Yach, is one of the AbbVie employees who is part of QCC’s mentoring program. Ms. Amahdou is a self-described lover of all things biology related and while her dream had always been to be in the medical field of some type, she was not convinced that being a nurse or even a doctor was what she wanted to do. Currently a General Studies Healthcare major, after the tour she is considering changing her major to one that would be more in line with biology  and career opportunities at companies like AbbVie.

“I’ve always loved biology and AbbVie is helping patients in the background by making medications. It was fascinating to see the cells in real life and not just in books. It made it real,” she said, adding that seeing and hearing former QCC students was very motivating. “I can be at QCC then work in an amazing career. It was the coolest thing.”

“I’ve always really seen this program as a door to the industry. We created a program and opened a door for hundreds of students – a door to opportunities,” Mr. Sauers added.

AbbVie offers intern positions, with a limited number available for QCC students. To learn more visit AbbVie.

  • Senator Chandler and Representative O'Day attend a Town Hall event at QCC.
March, 2019

Quinsigamond Community College was host to Senator Harriette Chandler and Representative James O’Day on March 25, for a Town Hall discussion to discuss sexual violence on college campuses and the legislators' two priority bills - the sexual misconduct climate survey bill and the campus sexual violence bill, which will be coming up for consideration soon in both the House and the Senate. QCC is the first...

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Quinsigamond Community College was host to Senator Harriette Chandler and Representative James O’Day on March 25, for a Town Hall discussion to discuss sexual violence on college campuses and the legislators' two priority bills - the sexual misconduct climate survey bill and the campus sexual violence bill, which will be coming up for consideration soon in both the House and the Senate. QCC is the first college to hold a town hall meeting students and their direct representatives.

QCC’s Student Senate President Stephanie Teixeira moderated the hour and a half event, which included candid discussions, as well as questions and answers between those in attendance and the legislators.

"QCC is unique, most schools don't want to talk about it (sexual violence)," Senator Chandler said to the audience.

“I think these bills are wonderful and needed from both sides,” said QCC Professor Jerry Williams

A public hearing will be held on April 9 at the State House where the two bills will be discussed and public testimony will be introduced.

“Bring a voice from QCC. It’s that advocacy that makes things work,” Representative O’Day said. “We do have a duty that our college campuses are safe havens and hearing from you folks is very helpful.”

  • QCC student Quran “Q” Avery
March, 2019

Sometimes the best laid plans don’t always turn out the way you expect, but that’s not always a bad thing. Just ask QCC student Quran “Q” Avery, a hotel management student who it set to graduate this May.

Mr. Avery came to Quinsigamond the indirect way. A resident of Worcester, graduate of St. John’s High School in Shrewsbury and the oldest of seven children, Mr....

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Sometimes the best laid plans don’t always turn out the way you expect, but that’s not always a bad thing. Just ask QCC student Quran “Q” Avery, a hotel management student who it set to graduate this May.

Mr. Avery came to Quinsigamond the indirect way. A resident of Worcester, graduate of St. John’s High School in Shrewsbury and the oldest of seven children, Mr. Avery attended the University of Hartford after high school prepared to begin his collegiate life. There was just one problem. After a year and a half the expenses became too much.

 “I came back home and right away I thought of QCC. It was affordable and a lot family members went to there,” he said. “I’m from Worcester and I knew a lot about QCC. My dad called it, ‘Harvard on the hill.’”

Mr. Avery said he had a lot of exposure to “Quinsig” so it was a “no-brainer for me to get a fresh start.”  He did a lot of soul-searching trying to decide on what he wanted to major in (he had been a general students major at Hartford), he settled on the hospitality field.

“I love people and love helping people. I used to watch my mom set up for guests and knew I wanted to be in the hospitality industry,” he said.

Mr. Avery began attending QCC and embraced his hospitality courses and the college environment.  He plans to receive his Hospitality Management Certificate in May and in December, he expects to be done his associate degree in Hospitality and Recreation Management - Foodservice Management Option. 

His love for QCC is apparent.

“Advisors and professors are always willing to help and there’s an open line of communication. I like the work-oriented nature here. It’s really motivating to see everyone working hard,” he said, noting that no matter whatever time of day, when he goes to the library it’s always full of students who are studying.

“My gratitude is through the roof and without QCC I’m not sure where I would be,” he said.

Professor, Hospitality & Recreation Management Patricia “Pat” Hutchinson is someone who he said has been a huge role model and mentor.

“She is so inspiring and I’m learning so much. You can get in contact whenever you need her,” Mr. Avery said. “She’s helped me to take the steps of where I want to be.”

Mr. Avery is currently working a co-op job at the Doubletree hotel in Westborough, while also taking classes. His plan is to go right into the workforce after graduating, with the goal of being a general manager at a hotel (his dream location is California would be ideal!).

“I wish I came here first. I’m really very happy where I am and the field I chose,” he said, adding. “I’m glad I came home.”

QCC is glad “Q”came home too!

  • Cheryl and Ashley Marrino (L) Cheryl Marrino speaks at QCC's 2018 commencement.
March, 2019

Children often emulate their parents and for QCC alumna Cheryl Marrino that took on the form of attending Quinsigamond Community College and becoming a part of the unique fabric that has made the college home to her for more than 20 years.

Cheryl had her first taste of QCC when she was about 10 years old and her mother, QCC alumna Sandra Sorenson attended the school....

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Children often emulate their parents and for QCC alumna Cheryl Marrino that took on the form of attending Quinsigamond Community College and becoming a part of the unique fabric that has made the college home to her for more than 20 years.

Cheryl had her first taste of QCC when she was about 10 years old and her mother, QCC alumna Sandra Sorenson attended the school. Sometimes she brought Cheryl and her three other siblings to experience the campus and attend the community activities that the college occasionally held.

“I have the fondest memories of the Easter egg hunt and all the families,” she said. “I remember lots of fun things on campus from graduation to eating in the cafeteria.”

The community events stuck and when her mother graduated and went on to attend Worcester State University, it was those memories of QCC that stayed with her.

It was that sense of community, which led Cheryl to decide to register for classes at QCC. While she didn’t end up actually starting that first time she registered, she came back to school the following year, registered again and began taking classes.

“It felt like I belonged here,” she said.

Initially registered as a criminal justice major, a chance computer class she took with Professor of Computer Information Systems Charulata Trivedi changed her mind on her major choice.

“I didn’t know anything about computers and I took this class and thought ‘wow’ this is interesting. Eventually I even ended up doing web pages for the college through a co-op program. I found out who I was and what I loved and that was software,” she said. “To this day I have a forever bond with Charulata.”

While at QCC, Cheryl also became acquainted with Liz Woods (Current Dean of Compliance at the College) and worked as work study student in the Student Life offices, a foreshadowing of things to come.

“Liz Woods was a wonderful role model and I learned a lot,” she said.

At the time she was attending classes, Cheryl was a mom to four young children; often bringing them to events the same way her own mom brought her many years before.

“We’re a community here at QCC. It’s really about family and bringing people together,” she said. “To me this campus has a lot of heart and compassion from the professors and staff to the students.”

Cheryl graduated in 2004 with an Applications Specialist Certificate and started working part-time at QCC in both the Fuller Student Center and the Athletic Center. In 2008, she earned her Web Applications Certificate.

Her daughter Ashley Marrino also began helping out at the Athletic Center when she was old enough, and when she graduated high school, QCC was her college of choice. This was particularly special for Cheryl as she was able to graduate with her daughter in 2015, earning an associate degree in General studies, while her daughter earned her associate degree in Business Administration Transfer, as well as a certificate in Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management.

Today, Ashley works as a manager at a European Wax Center and Cheryl works at QCC as the Fuller Evening Supervisor; however, don’t be fooled by the job title. When she is not in the Fuller Student Center, you may find her helping out students in the Athletic Center or downtown with IDs, or visiting various QCC locations, while working on fundraising events. You see, Cheryl is also the president of the QCC Alumni Association. She has continued to advance her education at QCC, earning an associate degree in Computer Information Systems and an associate degree in Liberal Arts in 2018.  

“I want others to know that education goes on and on…as far as you can reach for it,” she said.

Sadly her mom passed away a few years ago, after retiring from working at the IRS, but the legacy of QCC lives on in the next generation. Cheryl’s youngest daughter Angelleyez is planning on attending QCC when she is old enough and follow in her grandmother, mother and big sister’s footsteps.

“I think a lot of people have a fear of going to college but QCC is different by a mile. Everyone is here to help guide you on your way,” Cheryl said.

  • QCC's first group of student peer advocates.
March, 2019

The statistics are staggering. According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), more than two in five women (43.6%) and almost one in four men (24.8%) have experienced some form of contact sexual violence during their lifetime.  Each April agencies across the country put a spotlight on sexual assault to help prevent and educate our society in the pervasiveness of sexual assault. At Quinsigamond...

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The statistics are staggering. According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), more than two in five women (43.6%) and almost one in four men (24.8%) have experienced some form of contact sexual violence during their lifetime.  Each April agencies across the country put a spotlight on sexual assault to help prevent and educate our society in the pervasiveness of sexual assault. At Quinsigamond Community College, students, staff and faulty have taken a proactive approach to educating its population and offering resources for victims.

Students at QCC are taking the lead in helping their fellow students in dealing with domestic violence and unsafe situations, by developing an Advocacy Club to bring awareness and support to those in need. QCC students Luz “Maria” Mejia and Jamilex Rivas, both Human Service Majors, are two of the driving forces behind the club. They each were part of the first group of QCC student to go through Student Peer Advocate Training for domestic violence held this past fall.  The training is designed to connect the victims of domestic violence at the college with campus and community resources. A few of the students in the first group were themselves survivors of domestic violence. Those students who have already received the Peer Advocate Certification will also be part of the club.

“What we’re trying to do is to develop a club to help victims and give them a place where they can feel comfortable with other students and we can help them with resources,” Ms. Mejia said.

While both Ms. Mejia and Ms. Rivas will both be graduating this May, they want to make sure the club is formed and well established before they leave. They each recognize that a victim of sexual assault or domestic violence often is afraid to come forward.

“I’d encourage anyone who is in need to reach out, open up and not afraid. I’m a domestic violence victim myself.  The first step is acknowledging things. There’s no judgement. This is why we are developing this club. It’s going to be a safe place for students,” Ms. Mejia said, adding, “I had an advocate at the ‘Y’ who really empowered me to speak about this and listening to other women I was able to discuss what I went through.”

Ms. Mejia said taking the Peer Advocate Training certification gave her more clarity on the issues of domestic violence.

“I feel it was healing for all of us. We were able to see what other people had gone through and there was a lot of common ground. We were really able to come together and it was a proud moment for all of us,” Ms. Rivas said.

A new round of students have already begun the Student Peer Advocate Training process this month. Training sessions are held on four Saturdays and at the end the students will receive a certificate from the YWCA of Central MA.

To learn more about the Advocacy Club, contact Dean of Compliance Liz Woods at 508.854.2791 or email or DVAdvocates [at] qcc.mass.edu. To learn what events are taking place on campus for Sexual Assault Awareness Month, visit the April Look Ahead Calendar.

  • From left: Benjamin Aryeh Marcela Rivas, Eduardo Rivas and Mauro DePasquale
March, 2019

As March gives way to April and the weather turns nicer, many people begin to think about their taxes. Not a pleasant thing for most of us, but the folks in Eduardo Rivas’s new tax assistance course may think otherwise.

Mr. Rivas is the Admissions Enrollment Counselor and Adjunct Faculty at QCC He is also the Volunteer Tax Assistance (VITA) Coordinator at QCC, a program that offers free...

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As March gives way to April and the weather turns nicer, many people begin to think about their taxes. Not a pleasant thing for most of us, but the folks in Eduardo Rivas’s new tax assistance course may think otherwise.

Mr. Rivas is the Admissions Enrollment Counselor and Adjunct Faculty at QCC He is also the Volunteer Tax Assistance (VITA) Coordinator at QCC, a program that offers free tax preparation and electronic filing to low and moderate income families who make less than $54,000 or less. This year Mr. Rivas has worked with the college to establish a Volunteer Income Tax Assistance course that introduces students to concepts and languages of the IRS and taxation. Students in the course learned these concepts in the first two weeks of class and became certified tax preparers, before volunteering to prepare federal and state taxes for low-income individuals in Worcester. The course requires students to complete 12, three-hour volunteer sessions at Main South Community Development Corporation. While still in its infancy stages, the inaugural course has already garnered a lot of attention, particularly from QCC business majors.

“I chose to participate because it allows me to gain working experience while preparing taxes for individuals. Furthermore, it is a great opportunity to give back to the community by volunteering my services,” said Business Administration Transfer student Odette Carty-Bleary said.

Business Administration Transfer student Rebeka Mehmeti said volunteering to prepare taxes was a great opportunity for people to get experience in the field of tax preparation.

“I hope to gain some accounting knowledge and gain some experience on how to handle customers,” she said.

Currently there are four locations that offer this service through the Worcester Free Tax Service Coalition: the Worcester Community Action Council, Inc., Main South Community Development Corporation (CDC), Plumley Village and Worcester State University. Mr. Rivas was also able to work with Worcester Housing Authority to offer a one tax predation event at Great Book Valley Apartments. Most of his students also volunteered at the event.

“We prepared income taxes for close to 40 clients,” Mr. Rivas said.

Mr. Rivas and two of his student volunteers, QCC Trustee and student Benjamin Aryeh and QCC student Marcela Rivas recently went on the WCCA TV produced "Soapbox" show, hosted by WCCA Executive Director, Mauro DePasquale to explain the VITA program and how it works.

“We now have 34 volunteers who are QCC students and community volunteers,” Mr. Rivas said. “As of the last report we have prepared the second most returns of the four sites in Worcester,” he said.

All the volunteers said giving back to the community was paramount.

“If someone is considering being part of this volunteer program, I would tell them to do it. This is a great experience to have not only for your school or resume, but for yourself.”

To learn more about volunteering or income tax assistance, visit VITA program. Read QCC's Beginners guide to tax forms.

  • Nick Martin heads for first after another power hit.
  • Nick Martin sends one into the outfield.
March, 2019

Former Quinsigamond Community College student and baseball standout Nick Martin, now a student at Westfield State University, has been named to the Worcester Bravehearts roster. Mr. Martin was a star player on the Men’s Wyvern baseball team during the 2018 season, playing catcher. His batting average during the regular season was an impressive 412.

“It was .368 or .370 after...

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Former Quinsigamond Community College student and baseball standout Nick Martin, now a student at Westfield State University, has been named to the Worcester Bravehearts roster. Mr. Martin was a star player on the Men’s Wyvern baseball team during the 2018 season, playing catcher. His batting average during the regular season was an impressive 412.

“It was .368 or .370 after playoffs…I got robbed,” he laughed.

Today, Mr. Martin starts for the Westfield Owls with a current batting average of .540. He’s on pace to break the school record. While he is excelling both academically and athletically, he said it was QCC that gave him that foundation and direction to get him where he is today.

He said that after high school he had a plan in place; one that he felt would help get him to his future goals. Yet sometimes plans change and through those changes new and better opportunities come. It was that way for Mr. Martin, whose original intent was to attend Suffolk University in Boston, to major in business and play baseball. He attended an orientation and left afterwards knowing the university wasn’t for him.

“It wasn’t the best fit for me, financially and personally. I’m not a city kid,” he said.

He went back home to Shrewsbury, discussed things with his family and decided to attend QCC to “figure out what I wanted to do.”

QCC was already familiar to him. QCC’s Baseball Coach, John McLaughlin had been his coach since he was 12 years old, playing Shrewsbury Legion baseball. His mother had also taken classes there.

“Coach (McLaughlin) and everyone welcomed me to QCC with open arms. He’s really good with his players. He’s such a great guy. He puts everyone in the best situation to succeed and treats everyone the same. It’s a great culture. It was the best decision to come to QCC,” he said. “The athletic department was especially helpful and gave me all the resources I needed. I had access to tutors and everything I needed. I always felt at home here.”

Mr. Martin took classes at QCC that helped him hone in on what he really wanted to study. After a year at QCC, he transferred to Westfield State University, double majoring in economics and political science. He said many of the classes he took transferred, so he was already ahead when he got there.

His dream is to continue his baseball career and take it as far as he can, and feels if he stays focused and respects the game, he has a shot at something special.

“This is my number one dream, but if it doesn’t work out I know I will never have a full-time job I don’t like,” Mr. Martin said.

He looks back on his time at QCC as the footing that got him to where his is today, and to where he is headed in the future.

“The Athletic Department at QCC; Lisa Gurnick (Director of Athletics & Fitness Center), Josh Cole (Assistant Manager of Athletics and Fitness Center and Mac (Coach McLaughlin) did so much for me, making me comfortable.They gave me everything and I will be forever grateful,” he said.

  • Ashley Forhan
March, 2019

Recent QCC graduate and Phi Theta Kappa student Ashley Forhan has been named a 2019 Coca-Cola Academic Team Gold Scholar and will receive a $1,500 scholarship. Selections as a Coca-Cola Academic Team Gold Scholar are based on scores the students earned in the All-USA Academic Team competition. The program is sponsored by the Coca-Cola Scholars Foundation and is administered by the Phi Theta Kappa...

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Recent QCC graduate and Phi Theta Kappa student Ashley Forhan has been named a 2019 Coca-Cola Academic Team Gold Scholar and will receive a $1,500 scholarship. Selections as a Coca-Cola Academic Team Gold Scholar are based on scores the students earned in the All-USA Academic Team competition. The program is sponsored by the Coca-Cola Scholars Foundation and is administered by the Phi Theta Kappa honor Society.  Students are nominated for the academic team by their college administrators, and selection is based on academic achievement, leadership, and engagement in college and community service.

“The Coca-Cola Scholars Foundation has a long history of providing financial assistance to outstanding students at community colleges,” said Jane Hale Hopkins, President of the Coca-Cola Scholars Foundation. “We are proud to partner with Phi Theta Kappa and make it possible for deserving students to achieve their educational goals.”

Ms. Forhan, who graduated in December 2018, is the former QCC Food Pantry Manager and was instrumental in getting the Food Pantry and Resource Center off the ground.

“I am truly grateful to PTK, QCC, and most importantly Bonnie Coleman (PTK Advisor) who’s incredibly hard work with the PTK students is what makes getting an award such as this one possible,” Ms. Forhan said. “QCC and PTK gave me the educational and leadership tools I needed to succeed at my four-year school and this award has eased the financial burden that comes along with transferring to a private school.”

Ms. Forhan recently began at Lasell College and is majoring in Legal Studies. She is on track to graduate next year, with the goal of attending law school.

“This award continues to prove that although I am studying at a different school, QCC will always be my home. It will always be the place where my dreams began turning into my reality,” Ms. Forhan added.

Visit QCC’s PTK Program to learn more.

  • STEM Students of the Month
March, 2019

Sometimes it is those students who are not always in the limelight; the ones who don’t always get the highest grades, but who consistently put in the effort to move forward in their lives despite opposition that make the biggest impact. The professors in QCC’s STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) program recognized the need to acknowledge the perseverance of these students and developed...

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Sometimes it is those students who are not always in the limelight; the ones who don’t always get the highest grades, but who consistently put in the effort to move forward in their lives despite opposition that make the biggest impact. The professors in QCC’s STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) program recognized the need to acknowledge the perseverance of these students and developed a new initiative known as the STEM Student of the Month program. The intention of this program is to have a new group of students recognized each month.

One student will be selected and recognized in the areas of science, technology engineering and mathematics. Students are nominated by their professors and final selections are made by each department. Selected students will be given a certificate of achievement and be invited to make something in QCC’s Fab Lab to commemorate their achievement.

Below is the first group of STEM students of the Month, with a few comments from the professors who nominated them.

The inaugural STEM students of the Month include:

Science – Emily Robinson, nominated by Biology Professor Lauren Klosowski

“Emily is a dedicated, hardworking student. She is a mom of three working toward being an Occupational Therapist. She is always prepared for class and not only prepares the work she needs to do but is ready to help other students as well,” Ms. Klosowski said.

Technology – Peter Erian, nominated by Computer Science Professor Hao Loi

“I have followed Peter’s progress with interest and come to know the many positive qualities that define him. Peter manages his schedule to balance his work life with attending classes at QCC. Peter is very approachable and his classmates look up to him,” Mr. Loi said.

Engineering – Timothy Petrides, nominated by Automotive Technology Professors Don Morin & James Krapf

“Tim is currently in his second year of automotive studies. He is working full-time at North End Subaru in Lunenburg, MA and is part of the Subaru U partnership with Subaru of New England. Tim has excelled at work and is well liked by his peers. Tim is the nephew of an alumnus of the program and is keeping auto-tech in the family,” said Mr. Krapf.

Mathematics – Daniel Diaz, nominated by Mathematics Professor Stephen Zona

“Dan is an engineering student who, after starting in developmental math, is currently enrolled in Calculus II (Fall 2018).  His impressive class participation, leadership skills, work ethic, math knowledge, and positive attitude, were demonstrated in his Trigonometry class, which was the reason he was asked to act as a volunteer tutor in my evening College Algebra class,” Mr. Zona said. (He has since successfully completed the course)

Make sure to visit the Wyvern Guardian each month for the latest STEM students of the month.

  • From left: Brian Tankersley and Alex Belisle
March, 2019

QCC’s Business Administration department hosted an informational session event at the Harrington Learning Center in late February to help students understand mortgage basics. The information session was arranged by QCC business student Vaughn Lee and was a real hit with the students looking to learn more about how mortgages work. According to Business Administration Professor Jean McLean...

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QCC’s Business Administration department hosted an informational session event at the Harrington Learning Center in late February to help students understand mortgage basics. The information session was arranged by QCC business student Vaughn Lee and was a real hit with the students looking to learn more about how mortgages work. According to Business Administration Professor Jean McLean, Mortgage Advisor Alex Belisle of SECURITY FIRST Mortgage Funding and Millbury Federal Credit Union Branch Manager (Greendale Office) Tony Romniou, worked with QCC to put the program together.

Mr. Belisle gave students an overview of the different types of mortgages and loans that are available and explained what items affect a mortgage, such as your credit score.

“I think it was very well received. There were about 30 people in the audience and they asked a lot of questions during the Q & A at the end of the presentation,”Ms. McLean said. “One of my students in my Introduction to Business class, Stephanie Pelletier, told me she really enjoyed it and learned a lot, especially about protecting your credit score.”

 “We all felt that it was a fantastic idea to have a seminar like this at Quinsigamond.  First, we want to thank Vaughn for setting this up. It was great to see such a diversified group come in to join us. It really was a reflection of Worcester as a city,” Mr. Belisle said.As far as what the attendees got out of the program, Mr. Belisle said he hoped the students realized that if they make good choices, the dream of owning a home can be a reality.

“Everyone deserves to own their own place one day,” he added.

  • Dental Hygiene students at work in QCC's Dental Clinic.
March, 2019

Quinsigamond Community College's Dental Hygiene students have been brushing up on their skills and it all comes down to this. As they prep for their clinical exams they are in need of a very important piece of the puzzle... patients!

Volunteers will receive free care if they meet the criteria. Interested? Here's how it works...            ...

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Quinsigamond Community College's Dental Hygiene students have been brushing up on their skills and it all comes down to this. As they prep for their clinical exams they are in need of a very important piece of the puzzle... patients!

Volunteers will receive free care if they meet the criteria. Interested? Here's how it works...                                     

  • Volunteers will need to schedule a screening.
  • Screenings are available on the following dates and times:
  • Monday, April 1 from 10:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m.
  • Tuesday, April 2 from 5:00-7:00 p.m.
  • Friday, April 5 from 1:00-3:00 p.m.
  • Monday, April 8 from 10:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m.
  • Tuesday, April 9 from 5:00-7:00 p.m.
  • All cleanings and necessary x-rays will be free of charge and forwarded to your dentist upon completion at your request.
  • Free toothbrushes and toothpaste will be given to anyone who takes part in the screenings.
  • All volunteers must be available to take part at the QCC Dental Clinic on Saturday, April 27.

Interested?

Contact the QCC Dental Clinic directly at 508.854.4306 to schedule your screening, or email Denise Urella at durella [at] qcc.mass.edu with questions. Your help is needed and very much appreciated. Thank you for your consideration and please help us spread the word for our hard-working students.

  • Lt. Governor Karyn Polito,along with regional workforce leaders, state and local officials visited QCC’s QuEST Center in January
March, 2019

Quinsigamond Community College is an active partner in the Central Region Advanced Manufacturing Consortium (CRAMC), one of four consortia funded by the Commonwealth’s Advanced Manufacturing Training Program. The program is designed to address the skills gap in the manufacturing industry by creating a fully-coordinated manufacturing training system that will connect residents to full-time employment,...

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Quinsigamond Community College is an active partner in the Central Region Advanced Manufacturing Consortium (CRAMC), one of four consortia funded by the Commonwealth’s Advanced Manufacturing Training Program. The program is designed to address the skills gap in the manufacturing industry by creating a fully-coordinated manufacturing training system that will connect residents to full-time employment, and meet the needs of regional industry. Funding for the consortia was announced on January 15 by the Lt. Governor Karyn Polito at an event held at QCC.

While regional in scope, the four consortia are working together with the Executive Office of Housing & Economic Development to develop a strategic plan that will be both statewide in scope and customized for each region.

CRAMC supports Worcester County. Partners include the Mass Hire offices in Central and North Central Worcester County, Quinsigamond & Mount Wachusett Community Colleges, the Regional Technical High Schools, the Blackstone Valley Educational Foundation, and the Massachusetts Manufacturing Extension Partnership (Mass MEP). Two CRAMC Manufacturing Program Specialists will be connecting prospective trainees to programs, and then to employers. Jason Walker, QCC’s Advanced Manufacturing Program Specialist who represents the college at CRAMC, is working closely with Workforce Development and MassHire in supporting the central and southern part of Worcester County.

CRAMC partner activities include:

  • Recruiting & training residents to fill currently open positions in manufacturing today
  • Training incumbent workers to move into higher level manufacturing positions
  • Creating a comprehensive training system across the area that will meet the needs of manufacturing employers for skilled workers
  • Developing and deploying a campaign to drive public interest in manufacturing as a great career pathway and to connect people with job opportunities in the industry

CRAMC partners in the southern part of Worcester County recently held a “listening session” with area manufacturers to discuss their current and emerging needs. The session was led by Ethan Brown of the Central Worcester County office of Mass Hire and Kathy Rentsch, Assistant Vice President for Workforce Readiness and Innovation at QCC. Employers from Vibram, Dexter-Russell, Metso, Trident/Hass Machine, OFS Optics and Flexcon attended and identified current needs for machinists / CNC operators, industrial engineers, inspectors, production workers, mechanical drafters and supervisors. QCC offers certificate and degree programs that prepare students for these positions. QCC’s Career Center works with these and other companies to connect QCC students with internships and employment opportunities in these high demand occupations.

  • Old time car in Cuba
  • Pastoral setting in Cuba
  • A spectacular sunset in Cuba
  • Cuban businesses
March, 2019

When people found out my partner and I were going to Cuba last month, we were met with a lot of confusion. “Can you even go there?,” my friend asked skeptically. Yes, you can go there! It took a lot of online research (and a few travel tips from President Pedraja) to get prepared, but as an American citizen all you need is a valid passport and a visa. To obtain a visa you have to travel under one of the 12...

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When people found out my partner and I were going to Cuba last month, we were met with a lot of confusion. “Can you even go there?,” my friend asked skeptically. Yes, you can go there! It took a lot of online research (and a few travel tips from President Pedraja) to get prepared, but as an American citizen all you need is a valid passport and a visa. To obtain a visa you have to travel under one of the 12 authorized categories such as: a family visit, a professional research project, or the category we chose, which was support of the Cuban people.

 We also had a lot of people ask, “Why Cuba?” Besides the obvious desire to escape New England winter and enjoy the beauty of a Caribbean island, part of the motivation was to see a place that had been off limits for so long. I was always a terrible history student in school, so when I think back to what we learned about Cuba I can only conjure the phrase, “Bay of Pigs.” What happened at the Bay of Pigs? I really had no idea until we got to one of our first stops in Havana. The Museo de la Revolución in Old Havana is only a few blocks from the ocean and was the former palace of Cuba’s presidents. Now it’s a large scale museum that details the lead up to, and aftermath of the Cuban Revolution in 1959, as well as some information on the pre-colonial period of the island.

Given the long standing tension between our two governments, I was amazed at how welcoming the Cuban people were. When people found out we were from America they were very excited to share their thoughts on Obama opening up travel, or to ask us who our favorite baseball players were. They loved to tell us about their daily lives and some of the best parts of Cuban culture, such as free higher education and a robust art scene. We stayed with one family in Viñales that had such a warm presence that I will never forget. We stayed in an outbuilding behind their home with an entrance that allowed for privacy if needed. But they insisted we join them in their kitchen for long conversations that included many misunderstandings (they often forgot my request to habla despacio -speak slowly), a sample of vegetables we’d never had before, and so many laughs that my face hurt.

I am extremely privileged to be able to travel and I try to seriously consider the social, economic, and environmental effects that travelling has on the world. The increased tourism in Cuba seemed to be welcomed by most citizens, as it provides an added income that can make a great difference in their lives. But some people noted that it comes with new challenges. One restaurant owner who we spoke with said he was ecstatic that his family and many of his neighbors were allowed to open their businesses, but that there were growing pains associated with the increasing presence of capitalism. While he didn’t go into too much detail, the main concern seems to be keeping up with infrastructure needs. My hope is that they can find a balance that works for the people, the government, and the environment. I still have a lot to learn about Cuba, and the world in general, but I am immensely thankful to the people there and for my experience abroad.    

This first-person account is written by staff member Rose D'Errico

  • Cooking Matters held a nutrition session at the QCC Food Pantry and Resource Center.
March, 2019

Knowledge is a powerful tool and the recent nutritional information session at the QCC Food Pantry and Resource Center by, Cooking Matters Massachusetts, proved that point to over a dozen QCC students. Cooking Matters programs were developed to teach parents and caregivers with limited food budgets how to make healthy food choices. Those students who receive Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits...

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Knowledge is a powerful tool and the recent nutritional information session at the QCC Food Pantry and Resource Center by, Cooking Matters Massachusetts, proved that point to over a dozen QCC students. Cooking Matters programs were developed to teach parents and caregivers with limited food budgets how to make healthy food choices. Those students who receive Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits were eligible to attend and learn about nutrition and at the end received a $20 gift card from Price Chopper.

The students who participated in, what is known as a “Cooking Matters at the Store tour” was held in a classroom on the college’s main campus. According to Cooking Matters Community Engagement Associate Kristin Cunningham, during these tours, students used visuals aids to discuss how they shop for food and what techniques they could adopt to save money, while making healthy choices

“Throughout the night, students developed skills for comparing foods for cost and nutritional value. Participants practiced identifying whole grain options; discussed how to use unit price to find the best deal; reviewed how to use the nutrition facts label to compare products; and analyzed the pros and cons when choosing among fresh, frozen, and canned produce,” Ms. Cunningham said.

One of the things that seemed to surprise the students the most was that frozen and canned fruits and vegetables retain a lot of their nutritional value, which can make them a good food choice option.

“People often think of fresh as nutritionally superior, yet this class debunked some of these preconceived notions. We discussed the fact that exposure to light, water, and air (and long travel time across the world!) can cause fresh fruits and vegetables to lose some of their nutritional value.  This led to great student discussions on how to procure food that hasn’t traveled very far (places like farm stands and farmers markets),” she continued.  

Students also shared tips on how to use their SNAP dollars at local farmers markets around Worcester. “Many farmers markets double your spending power when using SNAP at their market, which makes it affordable to buy fruits and vegetables that haven’t traveled very far,” Ms. Cunningham said

Visit QCC’s Food Pantry and Resource Center to learn more about the services that are available.

  • Dr. Peter Frost (center) discusses cell phone usage and its effects with students.
March, 2019

Smartphone usage – do we know the real story? A 2018 Pew Research study found that 77 percent of all U.S. adults have smartphones and that percentage rises to 94 percent for people between the ages of 18- 29. Do these statistics make you concerned? Are you worried your smartphone is making you less smart, or that there are potential lingering effects of Smartphone use on cognition?

A talk on March 8, by...

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Smartphone usage – do we know the real story? A 2018 Pew Research study found that 77 percent of all U.S. adults have smartphones and that percentage rises to 94 percent for people between the ages of 18- 29. Do these statistics make you concerned? Are you worried your smartphone is making you less smart, or that there are potential lingering effects of Smartphone use on cognition?

A talk on March 8, by Southern New Hampshire University (SNHU) Professor of Psychology, Dr. Peter Frost, dispelled some of the concerns associated by smartphone use. Dr. Frost and two of his research assistants explained their findings from a study of 105 students from SNHU that tested some of the reports that are in the media about cell phone use.

Dr. Frost asked those in the audience how long they thought they were on their phones each day. Answers ranged from one to two hours, to even four hours. In reality, Dr. Frost said the average was 5.5 hours, significantly higher than the students predicted. Other findings from Dr. Frost’s study had some interesting results that didn’t always line up with other published articles. One of the most interesting findings in Dr. Frost’s study was that there was no strong, lasting effects in cognition due to excessive cell phone use. The findings suggested it might be the fear of technology itself that is driving some of the articles and concerns. He cited the historical concerns man has had over new technology from calculators and email and even books when they were first made.

  • Dr. Joanne Kong
March, 2019

A new student club posed an idea to Quinsigamond Community College students, faculty and staff to consider the impact of their diet on the well-being of themselves and the world. The club, called Students for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (SETA), was formed by Kelsey Crisostomo, a first year student at QCC. Kelsey’s interest in the topic began when she performed research for a paper and found...

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A new student club posed an idea to Quinsigamond Community College students, faculty and staff to consider the impact of their diet on the well-being of themselves and the world. The club, called Students for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (SETA), was formed by Kelsey Crisostomo, a first year student at QCC. Kelsey’s interest in the topic began when she performed research for a paper and found a video on YouTube of a TEDx talk, given by Dr. Joanne Kong. Dr. Kong’s topic was, “The Power of Plant Based Eating.” Dr. Kong discussed the harmful impacts of animal agriculture on the environment; on human physical and emotional health, as well as concerns about the treatment of the animals. The message resonated with Ms. Crisostomo, who started talking to students and faculty about the topic. Some like-minded students shared Kelsey’s passion and the SETA club was formed.

Club members were so energized by Dr. Kong’s TEDx talk the students invited her to QCC to speak to the community on March 9. An engaged audience attended of QCC students, faculty, staff and members of the Worcester community attended the event.  Dr. Kong discussed Environmental impacts that included carbon and methane gas produced by animals; fecal contamination from animals in run-off water; large amounts of potable water diverted to animal agriculture, and deforestation from clearing land for grazing pastures. A group discussion followed during which participants acknowledged that change is difficult, and generated ideas for easy to prepare meals and tips to help individuals in transitioning to a more plant-based diet over time. An informal plant-based lunch was shared afterward by attendees.

The club plans to hold additional events; ideas suggested include cooking classes, speakers and possibly producing a cookbook of easy to prepare plant-based recipes. To learn more about SETA, contact Kelsey Crisostomo at krcrisostomo [at] qmail.qcc.edu or club advisor Adrienne Linnell at alinnell [at] qcc.mass.edu

  • Daniel de la Torre and Beth Fullerton
  • QCC's Fall Transfer Fair
March, 2019

Quinsigamond Community College is hosting its annual Spring Transfer Fair on Wednesday, April 3 and this year there is a bit of a twist. The college will be holding TWO separate Transfer Fairs - one for day programs and one for evening, on-line or hybrid programs.

“QCC Transfer Services has decided to try a new approach to the Transfer Fair this spring.  Many of our...

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Quinsigamond Community College is hosting its annual Spring Transfer Fair on Wednesday, April 3 and this year there is a bit of a twist. The college will be holding TWO separate Transfer Fairs - one for day programs and one for evening, on-line or hybrid programs.

“QCC Transfer Services has decided to try a new approach to the Transfer Fair this spring.  Many of our students attend part-time and/or on-line and we wanted to make sure that students who attend college in this format know that they have the opportunity to pursue their bachelor degree in the same manner.  So, on April 3 from 2:00 p.m.- 5:00 p.m., we have invited four-year schools who have continuing on-line and on-ground programs as well as a hybrid of the two,” said QCC Transfer Counselor Beth Fullerton.

Located in the Harrington Learning Center (Rooms 109 A&B), over 50 colleges and universities will be represented at the Transfer Fairs. These fairs offer the perfect way for QCC students to meet a wide variety of institutions to learn more about their transfer options. Almost half of all QCC students transfer to a four-year institution, making this bi-annual event one of the most popular on campus.

The Transfer Department encourages all QCC students to attend a transfer fair before their final semester so that students have a clear understanding of the pathways available to them before they graduate from QCC.

QCC offers a variety of transfer and articulation agreements with colleges and universities across the region and is also part of the MassTransfer program, a state-wide network of agreements between the Massachusetts Community Colleges, Massachusetts State Universities, and University of Massachusetts campuses.

Colleges and Universities Represented from 10:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m (Day Programs)

  • American International College
  • Anna Maria College
  • Assumption College
  • Bay Path University
  • Becker College
  • Bentley University
  • Boston University
  • Bridgewater State University
  • Bryant University
  • Castleton University
  • Clark University
  • Curry College
  • Dean College
  • Elms College
  • Emerson College
  • Fitchburg State University
  • Framingham State University
  • Husson University
  • Lesley University
  • Mass Maritime Academy
  • Mass College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences
  • Mass College of Art
  • Mass College of Liberal Arts
  • Merrimack College
  • National University of
  • Natural Medicine
  • New England Institute of Technology
  • Northern Vermont University
  • Pine Manor College
  • Plymouth State University
  • Roger Williams University
  • Simmons University
  • Southern New Hampshire University
  • Springfield College
  • Suffolk University
  • UMass Amherst
  • UMass Boston
  • University of Connecticut
  • UMass Dartmouth
  • UMass Lowell
  • University of New Haven
  • Wentworth Institute of Technology
  • Western New England University
  • Westfield State University
  • Worcester State University​

Colleges and Universities Represented from 2:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.(Evening/Online/Hybrid Programs)

  • Assumption: Continuing & Career Education
  • Bay Path University: One-Day-a-Week College
  • Bay State College
  • Becker College: School of Graduate & Professional Studies
  • Boston College: Woods College
  • Charter Oak State College: Online
  • Columbia University: School of General Studies
  • Eastern Nazarene College: Adult & Graduate Studies
  • Endicott College: Van Loan School
  • Fitchburg State University: Graduate & Continuing Education
  • Granite State College
  • Nichols College
  • Northeastern College of Professional Studies
  • Quinnipiac University: Online
  • Southern New Hampshire University: Online
  • Springfield College: Professional & Continuing Studies
  • UMass Amherst: University without Walls
  • UMass Lowell: Online & Continuing Education
  • Worcester State University: Continuing Education

The Transfer Services Department also offers a variety of workshops throughout the year that students can attend. They feature topics that include the application process, college search, preparing to transfer and transfer agreements. To learn more visit Transfer Services .

  • The Children's School celebrates the Week of the Child with an Art Exhibit in April.
March, 2019

Monday, April 8 – April 12:  In honor of the Week of the Young Child, visit the Children’s School Art Exhibit, located in the Administration Building hallway and Room 107A to see the art created by the preschoolers at the Quinsigamond Community College (QCC) Children’s School. The Week of the Young Child is an annual celebration sponsored by the national Association for the...

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Monday, April 8 – April 12:  In honor of the Week of the Young Child, visit the Children’s School Art Exhibit, located in the Administration Building hallway and Room 107A to see the art created by the preschoolers at the Quinsigamond Community College (QCC) Children’s School. The Week of the Young Child is an annual celebration sponsored by the national Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC).  The purpose is to focus public attention on the needs of young children and their families and to recognize the early childhood programs and services that meets those needs. The art will be displayed from April 8 – May 6, 2019.

Thursday, April 11: De-Escalation Workshop 11:00 a.m. in the Hebert Auditorium. Watch a film," Escalation," followed by a guided discussion. All are welcome to attend. 

Tuesday, April 16: Phi Theta Kappa - Alpha Zeta Theta Chapter will be holding its Induction Ceremony at 4:00 p.m. in Hebert Auditorium on QCC’s main campus. All are invited to attend.

Tuesday, April 16: Bystander Training on April 16 from 12:30 p.m. - 1:45 p.m. in the Hebert Auditorium. Watch a film: The Bystander Movement - "Transforming Rape Culture at its Roots," followed by a panel discussion. Everyone is welcome to attend. The event is put on in collaboration with the Psi Beta Honor Society, QCC Diversity Caucus and  Title IX Compliance Office. For more information or to request accommodations, contact Dean Liz Woods at lwoods [at] qcc.mass.edu

Wednesday, April 17: Celebrate Diversity Day at QCC! This is a celebration of peace and diversity through arts, culture and literacy. 11:00 there will be a PEACE Ceremony outside the Fuller Center uniting different groups of people and religions for the greater good. At noon there will be a Cultural Food Festival that includes food from around the globe, live performances, an interactive selfie booth and more! All events will be held on the lawn in Fuller Student Center.

Thursday, April 18: Fitchburg State University Campus Tour for Manufacturing and Computer Science. Students will receive general information about FSU and the two programs. Free transportation from QCC to FSU. Bus leaves at noon and is scheduled to return at 4:00 p.m. to be part of the tour or for more information, contact Diane Boudreau at the Career Placement Office at 508.854.4574 or email her at dboudreau [at] qcc.mass.edu

Friday, April 19: Pizza with the President at noon in the Fuller Student Center.

Wednesday, April 24: Denim Day at QCC's Main Campus.  Everyone is encouraged to wear denim today to help promote domestic violence awareness. Events will be happening from 9:00 a.m. - noon in front of the Fuller Student Center (inside the Fuller student center if it rains!) 

Thursday, April 25: Denim Day at QCC's Healthcare and Workforce Development Center (25 Federal Street, Worcester) – Everyone is encouraged to wear denim today to help promote domestic violence awareness. Events will be happening from 11:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.

Friday, April 26: Undergraduate Research Conference at UMass Amherst (UMass Amherst Commonwealth Honors College) from 8:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. View research projects from undergraduate students with diverse backgrounds from universities, colleges, and community colleges across the Commonwealth. A free coach bus will pick up students at the main campus (670 West Boylston Street, Worcester) at 8:00 a.m. and leave UMass at 3:30 p.m. to go back to QCC’s main campus. Seating is limited. All those who are should contact Darcy Carlson, STEM Starter Academy Project Coordinator at 508.845.4441 or email dcarlson [at] qcc.mass.edu

April Spotlight: QCC’s spring production, Shakespeare on a Bench, presented by the QCC Theater Program and directed by Kelly Stowell will be held Wednesday, April 10 – Saturday, April 13 at &:00 p.m. and on Sunday, April 14 at 2:00 p.m. in the Hebert Auditorium, 670 West Boylston St. Worcester. Tickets are $5 and can be purchased at the door. For more information email Theater Kelly Stowell, kstowell [at] qcc.mass.edu

  • The Wyverns took their practice on the road.
  • QCC coaches give instruction to their players during the Men's Baseball team's spring training in Florida.
March, 2019

Wyverns Baseball Season Is Underway 

Batter up! The Wyvern Men’s Baseball season is in full swing, thanks to some extra practice at a training facility in Cocoa Beach, Florida. For the second consecutive season the QCC Baseball team traveled to warmer weather for their spring training trip. The team played five games in three days in the warm Florida weather.

“This was a great...

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Wyverns Baseball Season Is Underway 

Batter up! The Wyvern Men’s Baseball season is in full swing, thanks to some extra practice at a training facility in Cocoa Beach, Florida. For the second consecutive season the QCC Baseball team traveled to warmer weather for their spring training trip. The team played five games in three days in the warm Florida weather.

“This was a great experience for the team and it gave them the opportunity to get a ton of innings in before their conference games begin,” said QCC Josh Cole Assistant Manager of Athletics and Fitness

The team reached the Region 21 finals in 2017 and 2018 and with a newly renovated field, Coach John McLaughlin is looking to build on the legacy of the past successes. The regular season kicked off on March 23 with two games against Community College of Rhode Island.  Visit the Wyverns 2019 baseball schedule to learn more and make sure to catch the home season opener scheduled for March 31.  Go Wyverns! 

Athletic Center Building Hours

Spring is here and summer is right around the corner, making this the perfect time to take advantage of the Athletic Center!

  • Monday: 8:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.
  • Tuesday: 8:00 a.m.- 7:00 p.m.
  • Wednesday: 8:00 a.m.- 4:00 p.m.
  • Thursday: 8:00 a.m.- 7:00 p.m.
  • Friday: 8:00 a.m.- 4:00 p.m.
  • Saturday: 10:00 a.m.- 2:00 p.m.
March, 2019

On March 4, 2019, Workforce Readiness and Innovation welcomed Jason Walker as the Advanced Manufacturing Program Specialist-Central MA Advanced Manufacturing Consortium (CRAMC). Jason brings to this position over 12 years of recruitment experience. Most recently, he was a Retail Account Manager at Eastridge. Jason earned a Bachelor of Science Degree from Fitchburg State University.

Please join...

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On March 4, 2019, Workforce Readiness and Innovation welcomed Jason Walker as the Advanced Manufacturing Program Specialist-Central MA Advanced Manufacturing Consortium (CRAMC). Jason brings to this position over 12 years of recruitment experience. Most recently, he was a Retail Account Manager at Eastridge. Jason earned a Bachelor of Science Degree from Fitchburg State University.

Please join us in welcoming Jason into his new role at QCC.