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Preparation is Key Takeaway at Workplace Etiquette Luncheon

October, 2018
  • QCC staff Brenda Kuchnicki and Giovanni Cruz with QCC student Darcie Peters.
    QCC staff Brenda Kuchnicki and Giovanni Cruz register QCC student Darcie Peters for the Workplace Etiquette Luncheon.
  • Jim Marsh, Technical Recruiter at Micro Tech Staffing and Nicole Zea, Plant Manager at Saint-Gobain Abrasives
    Jim Marsh, Technical Recruiter at Micro Tech Staffing listens to Nicole Zea, Plant Manager at Saint-Gobain Abrasives.

Supporting Quinsigamond Community College students in their academic endeavors today, also means preparing them for their future. At QCC, that future support is in the form of many programs that give students the tools they need to help them successfully enter the workforce.

The college recently put on a Workplace Etiquette luncheon for QCC students, which featured a panel of industry professionals who highlighted the skills and qualities they look for in a job candidate. This valuable program is held periodically each year.

Panelists included Darlene Heywosz, Director of Human Resources at the YWCA of Central Massachusetts; Jim Marsh, Technical Recruiter at Micro Tech Staffing; Lisa Pontbriand, Program Director at Salmon Adult Health; Joe Tomaski, Director of Human Resources at Wakefly, Inc. and Nicole Zea, Plant Manager at Saint-Gobain Abrasives.

Panelists discussed how important it was for job candidates to do their homework and learn about the companies they are hoping to work at and to make sure they can explain how they would be valuable to that company.

“Remember you’re there to help them not the other way around,” Mr. Marsh said.

One of the items discussed was gaps in work history. All the panelists agreed that gaps should always be addressed and explained.

“There’s no problem having those gaps. I think everyone has life that gets in the way of work, but it’s important to explain your reason for getting back into or getting into the workforce,” Ms. Zea said.

While all the panelists acknowledged the stress of a job interview, they said great communications skills were vital, as well as being specific and not vague during questioning in an interview.  They added that it was important to try and be relaxed, making good eye contact and having positive body language

 “Remember every ‘no’ brings you closer to a ‘yes’,” said Ms. Pontbriand. “Enjoy the interview. Be yourself.”

“Interviewing is not always the most natural things to do. Do your research, have a couple of questions and practice,” Mr. March said.

One student raised the question of what is the acceptable length of time before changing jobs. The panelists agreed one year was an acceptable amount of time, otherwise you could risk being looked at as a job hopper.

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