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December, 2018

QCC nursing students
December, 2018

It’s “all aboard” for 40 eligible participants in Quinsigamond Community College’s Training Resources and Internship Networks (TRAIN) program. The college and its partners were awarded $206,000 from the Massachusetts Department of Higher Education in collaboration with the Executive Office of Labor and Workforce Development, to provide educational training and hands-on experience to individuals...

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It’s “all aboard” for 40 eligible participants in Quinsigamond Community College’s Training Resources and Internship Networks (TRAIN) program. The college and its partners were awarded $206,000 from the Massachusetts Department of Higher Education in collaboration with the Executive Office of Labor and Workforce Development, to provide educational training and hands-on experience to individuals who are considered long-term unemployed (one year or longer), or under employed. This training will enable participants to become either nursing assistants or pharmacy technicians.

“Our vision for this project is to help long-term unemployed, low-income individuals build their economic self-sufficiency through an innovative program that includes workforce readiness training, skills training, education, internships, job placement, and comprehensive wraparound support services situated at QCC’s Healthcare and Workforce Development Center,” said Dean of the Center for Workforce Development and Continuing Education, Kathleen Manning.

Beginning in January 2019, QCC will offer two 120-hour, non-credit, nurse assistant training classes and two 75-hour pharmacy technician training classes. The nurse assistant training program is classroom-based, instructor-led, and is under the supervision of a registered nurse. The training consists of lectures and hands-on lab work in the Massachusetts DPH state approved training lab.

The pharmacy technician training program is provided in collaboration with QCC partner, CVS Health. The program will blend the CVS Health pharmacy technician training curriculum with QCC classroom-based pharmacy technician and ESL (English as Second Language) training programs, as well as 30 hours of apprenticeships.

The classroom component of both training programs will simulate the way students are expected to behave in a workplace setting. During training, students will be paid an hourly stipend to help financially support them while they are in the program.

TRAIN program participants will receive additional support services resources from:

  • The Mass Hire Workforce Board, which will offer readiness training to help participants conceive and execute a more positive approach to personal and career goal attainment.
  • Mass Hire Career Center, which will provide career counseling and a host of workshops that are available to job seekers.
  • Worcester Community Action Council, which will provide comprehensive wraparound support services to help meet the diverse needs of at-risk, low-income populations in our community.
  • Worcester Credit Union, which will offer financial literacy training.

There are still openings for eligible individuals. For more information on these training programs, email Center for Workforce Development and Continuing Education Program Manager, Kathleen O'Connor at cce [at] qcc.mass.edu

  • The first graduating class of Student Peer Domestic Violence Advocates
December, 2018

At Quinsigamond Community College taking care of the whole student is the way the college is working to ensure student success for all. To that end, QCC has developed a Student Peer Advocate Training for domestic violence, designed to connect the victims of domestic violence here at QCC to both campus and community resources to assist them in gaining perspective and heathy responses to this issue. 

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At Quinsigamond Community College taking care of the whole student is the way the college is working to ensure student success for all. To that end, QCC has developed a Student Peer Advocate Training for domestic violence, designed to connect the victims of domestic violence here at QCC to both campus and community resources to assist them in gaining perspective and heathy responses to this issue. 

“We know students are experiencing intimate partner violence, and that there are times when they discuss those issues with their fellow students here at QCC,” said Dean of Compliance Liz Woods.

According to Associate Professor of Human Services Brenda Safford, students are referred by faculty in Healthcare, Criminal justice, Human Services, Psychology and the biannual training is open to all interested students. The next training session will be held in the spring.

Nine students participated in the training, which was offered this fall from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. for four Saturdays. After the completion of all four training sessions, each student received a certificate from the YWCA of Central MA. 

“I volunteered to ‘add tools to my toolbox’ and to meet and learn from classmates. The behind the scenes systems set up to help those living with domestic violence was informative” said QCC student Charles Ketter, who is majoring in Human Services.

QCC Human Services student Darcie Peters said her own experience with domestic violence was the impetus for becoming a student peer advocate.

“I wish someone could’ve been aware of what I was going through. Then maybe it wouldn’t have lasted so long. I want to be that person to help others when they need the assistance of getting out of a domestic violence relationship,” Ms. Peters said. “I feel this training has given me the ability and tools to help others because of the resources that were brought to my attention. As well as the different ways to identify when domestic violence is occurring.

“I decided to volunteer to be a peer advocate both because as a human service worker it’s amazing experience and because I know how important representation is when seeking help so having more queer and male advocates helping in any location is important,” said QCC student Tomas Steinbrecher. “I feel like for the most part your capacity to help others comes from you. But the training gave me the tools and knowledge to help classmates with domestic violence on campus.”

Many of the students who took this training will be moving into careers that put them in contact with individuals and families experiencing these issues.

“The YWCA certification will prepare them to engage appropriately in their professional careers,” Ms. Woods said.

The students said they not only learned that domestic violence so wide spread, but that there were many resources and ways to help someone in need.

“I would definitely recommend students to be advocates, the more hands on deck we have, the healthier students’ peer relationships can be. The training gives you a lot of information on what domestic abuse looks like and can help you have insight on your own relationships and behaviors,” said Mr. Steinbrecher.

“I would strongly urge anyone interested in learning how to be an ally to those affected by domestic violence to take this training,” Mr. Ketter added.

Ms. Woods said she is confident that this type of training will continue in the future.

“Congratulations to our first class of Domestic Violence Advocates here at QCC,” Ms. Woods added.

Anyone interested in the program should reach out to Ms. Safford at bsafford [at] qcc.mass.edu or Ms. Woods at lwoods [at] qcc.mass.edu

“I would completely recommend other students to become student advocates. The more awareness there is of domestic violence, the more likely more people could get help. Sometimes people slip through the cracks because of the lack of awareness,” Ms. Peters said.

  •  From left: Adrienne Linnell, QCC student Maame Amoah-Dankwah and Darcy Carlson
December, 2018

A dream to go to Harvard University is what initially led QCC student Maame Amoah-Dankwah to Worcester and Quinsigamond Community College.  A native of Ghana, Ms. Amoah-Dankwah came to the U.S. to live with her mom after graduating from high school, with dreams of attending medical school and an even bigger sense of purpose that one day she would help others.

“My parents...

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A dream to go to Harvard University is what initially led QCC student Maame Amoah-Dankwah to Worcester and Quinsigamond Community College.  A native of Ghana, Ms. Amoah-Dankwah came to the U.S. to live with her mom after graduating from high school, with dreams of attending medical school and an even bigger sense of purpose that one day she would help others.

“My parents separated when I was 11 or so. My mom went to the U.S. with my younger brother who was sick and I stayed in Ghana with my dad,” she said.

In Ghana, Ms. Amoah-Dankwah said every high school student takes an exam at the end of their high school career, which basically decides their career path.

“My goal was to get into medical school with eight ‘As’ and I got six out of eight so the medical school path was blocked for me,” she said, which gave her the drive to move with her mother to the U.S..”I thought I might have a shot at medical school.”

Once in the U.S. Ms. Amoah-Dankwah realized she would need to take the SATs in order to even be considered for Harvard, but would have to wait a year to take them.

“I didn’t want to do that and since my mother was here at QCC in the nursing program, I thought it would be a great start to go to QCC,” she continued. “She said, ‘why wait a whole year when you can go to QCC now.’”

Ms. Amoah-Dankwah heeded her mother’s suggestion and took the Accuplacer test and entered QCC, initially as a pre-pharmacy student. A chemistry class she took from QCC Chemistry Professor Tetteh Abbeyquaye solidified her interest in chemistry and she quickly changed to a chemistry major.

“This was not planned, but here I am two years later majoring in Chemistry. QCC was a great start and helped me to learn how the (educational) system worked. QCC was much more flexible and I got to learn what it was like in college,” she said.

While Harvard may not be in the cards today, Ms. Amoah-Dankwah has set her sights on Johns Hopkins University after graduating from QCC.

“My goal is still to become a doctor but I’m now open to other things like research,” she said.

Her interest in research came after working on the development of a new drug for Type 1 diabetes through a scientific research project she did this past summer at Boston University (BU).The project was funded by a Research Experiences for Undergraduates grant (“REU”), a program she found out about from QCC alumna and friend Narda Bondah, a friend she has known since high school in Ghana. Ms. Bondah did a project (through the REU program) – preventing regurgitation of blood in tissue engineered heart valves at Worcester Polytechnic Institute.

 Ms. Amoah-Dankwah has applied to different colleges and universities and said the summer project solidified her interest in research, but it still “ties in” with her life goals.

 “I’m glad I started here at QCC. There are so many opportunities. You can start here and go anywhere. If I went anywhere else, I wouldn’t have had the opportunities,” she said. “Everyone here cares and it’s tremendous. I had support no matter what office or classroom I walked into. Everyone here is great and I am very grateful.”

  • PTK alumna Kayla Patterson
December, 2018

To meet Quinsigamond Community College alumna Kayla Paterson is like meeting a breath of fresh air. A former Phi Theta Kappa (PTK) Alpha Zeta Theta Honor Society Chapter president of the college, Ms. Paterson has never truly left QCC, even though she officially graduated with her associate degree in Elementary Education (EE) in 2016.

Today, she holds a bachelor’s degree in EE from Anna...

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To meet Quinsigamond Community College alumna Kayla Paterson is like meeting a breath of fresh air. A former Phi Theta Kappa (PTK) Alpha Zeta Theta Honor Society Chapter president of the college, Ms. Paterson has never truly left QCC, even though she officially graduated with her associate degree in Elementary Education (EE) in 2016.

Today, she holds a bachelor’s degree in EE from Anna Maria College and is working as a paraprofessional with third and fourth graders at a nearby school district. She is also working several hours each week in the PTK office, a place she fondly refers to as “home.”

Ms. Paterson took the circuitous route to QCC. She said her lifelong dream was to become a teacher and after high school, enrolled in a four-year institution as an elementary education major.

“I was commuting to school and also working full-time. Then life happened and I dropped out. I wasn’t ready for it (college),” she said.

She continued working full-time but knew that she needed to go back to school if she was ever to fulfill her dream of becoming a teacher.

“I knew I could do a two-year college, but wasn’t ready for a four-year commitment. I did my research and chose QCC because it was affordable, was an easier drive, and I had heard good things about it,” she said.

Although she had a great love for teaching, her first collegiate experience had made her a bit gun-shy to major in elementary education at QCC; instead deciding to get her degree in deaf studies. Ms. Paterson quickly became immersed in the college and the deaf studies program, enjoying the classes, professors and her classmates. She was excelling academically, which got her an invitation to become a member of PTK. She was inducted into PTK in 2015 at the same time she was elected the honor society’s president. It was during this timeframe that she was asked by one of her professors if she wanted to become a tutor in the writing center. She jumped at the chance.

She loved the experience so much that when one the students she was tutoring, who happened to be an elementary education student, suggested she become a teacher, a light bulb went off in her head.

“It made me so happy. I loved working with the students and tutoring them. I went home, woke up the next day and came to school and switched my major to elementary education,” she said.

Her core classes in deaf studies transferred easily into the elementary education program and the only classes she had left to take were the education classes. In her education classes, she went to schools in Worcester where she was able to observe teachers in action, which solidified her desire to one day become a teacher. In 2016, she entered Anna Maria College as a junior, excited to complete the next chapter of her education.

“I felt so prepared when I entered Anna Maria. It was a smooth transition. All my education courses were accepted and I started there as a junior. QCC has such a good program. I felt there was nothing I missed out on or didn’t know. Some of the professors at QCC work in the school district and they had so much real-word teaching experience, which was just great,” she said. “I graduated from Anna Maria and I was ready to go into teaching.”

Ms. Paterson also continued working in the PTK office as the Fundraising/Event Specialist part-time, having forged a legacy there by raising thousands for the PTK chapter and its community service projects.

After graduating from Anna Maria she began substitute teaching, while she applied for full-time teaching positions. A short two-week stint as a legal administrative assistant and then a three-week, longer-term substitute teaching position for an area sixth grade class confirmed to her that teaching was the only job she wanted to do.

“Working with the sixth graders during those three weeks was the most tiring of my life, and also the most awesome and rewarding,” she said.

Sadly, the position ended the Friday before Columbus Day; however, as luck would have it, she was offered and accepted a paraprofessional (teaching assistant) in a nearby school district. She began her new position the Tuesday after Columbus Day and hopes to one day to be a teacher and have her own classroom.

She had also previously given up her part-time position in the PTK office at QCC, but the draw of QCC, PTK, and her mentor and friend PTK Advisor Bonnie Coleman, eventually drew her back to the college where she works several hours a week in the PTK office after her teaching job.

“I love working here. QCC and PTK are my home,” she said, adding, “Everyone should start at QCC. It’s affordable, it connects you to so many things and you are getting the best education. Even if you don’t know what you want to do, there is a program here for you. There’s so much variety you will find a program.”

You may also find a “home away from home,” just like Ms. Paterson did.

  • QCC students and siblings Mahmoud, Mustafa and Mohamed Boweden
December, 2018

Quinsigamond Community College is a place that many students find to be a nurturing and encouraging environment and siblings Mustafa, Mohamed and Mahmoud Boweden couldn’t agree more. The brothers, who are each attending QCC part-time, have quickly become embedded in the college community not only attending classes, but also becoming an integral part of QCC student life.

Oldest brother...

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Quinsigamond Community College is a place that many students find to be a nurturing and encouraging environment and siblings Mustafa, Mohamed and Mahmoud Boweden couldn’t agree more. The brothers, who are each attending QCC part-time, have quickly become embedded in the college community not only attending classes, but also becoming an integral part of QCC student life.

Oldest brother Mustafa is a general studies major, middle brother Mohamed is a general studies major with a focus on healthcare, and youngest brother Mahmoud is majoring in computer information systems - web development and programming option. 

While the three have seamlessly integrated into QCC, the brothers have only been in the U.S. a relatively short time, having moved with their parents and two younger brothers from Libya in 2014 when they were all in high school. They came to the U.S. close to Thanksgiving (and saw their first snow) moving first to Connecticut, then Revere, Mass. before finally settling in Hopedale.

“It was hard when we came here. I knew very basic (English) words. It was hard being in a classroom and not know what the other students were saying,” Mohamed said. “In high school we were trying to get used to the system.”

Oldest brother Mustafa said that while he was supposed to be a senior in high school, he was kept back initially so that he could work on his English.

“After a semester in an ESL (English as a Second Language) class, I received a certificate for outstanding ESL learner. It was a very exciting moment for me,” he said.

After high school graduation Mustafa first went to Bunker Hill Community College, since it was closer to his former home. When his family moved to Hopedale, he looked into transferring to a closer college.

“I looked at Mass Bay and QCC. What I really liked was the QCC campus and how open it was, so I came to QCC,” he said.

Mustafa began taking his general studies classes at QCC in the fall of 2017. He plans to continue his education in the law field, possibly focusing on international law after he graduates from QCC. His brother Mohamed also started at QCC at the same time, focusing on healthcare. His goal is to continue his education after QCC and one day become a dentist. Each said the financial savings they’ve obtained by attending QCC was very important to them, as well as the educational and emotional support they’ve received. 

“When we came to QCC we had a lot of people here who were helpful to us,” Mohamad said.

“There are people here at QCC who opened my eyes to the many activities that are here,” Mustafa added.

In fact, the brothers have been so involved with the college that this year Mustafa became vice president of QCC’s student Senate, Mohamed is in charge of public relations and youngest brother Mahmoud, who began QCC in fall 2018, is a senate member.

“It’s really nice that the three of us are together,” Mahmoud said. “QCC is a very nice school.The people and professors are so friendly. I’ve made friends here.”

According to Mustafa, trying to help enhance the student experience is something he and his brothers feel is very important in paying it forward. They have been working to start up a men’s soccer team and circulated a petition to help get it off the ground.

Soccer been very important to all the brothers and has helped them acclimate them to the U.S. They all played soccer recreationally. Mahmoud was even on the Hopedale High School’s winning soccer team his senior year. It was the first time in the school’s history the team reached the district finals.

Currently they hold impromptu pick-up games at the Athletic Center two times a week, with the hope of getting a more formal team organized this spring.

“It’s welcoming here.There’s a lot of diversity and immigrants who are here too and that makes you feel more comfortable to have people who have the same issues that you do,” Mustafa said. “If you know someone who is undecided they should come to QCC. It’s a great school. It’s very convenient; it will save you money, plus you’ll get a quality education and there’s so many activities. There’s just lots of options and as more students become involved here the sky’s the limit.”

 

 

  • Polar Beverages fieldd trip
  • Professor Anita Soracco’s environmental science class learned about the Asian longhorn beetle.
  • The Asian longhorn beetle
  • Student Assas Haraj learns about the Asian longhorn beetle from a member of the ALB team.
December, 2018

Experiencing something first-hand can sometimes mean the difference between basic understanding to truly grasping a concept or skill. No one know this better than the students in Professor Anita Soracco’s environmental science class.

Throughout the year the students have been taking what they’ve learned in their class and seen it applied in “real life.” This past...

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Experiencing something first-hand can sometimes mean the difference between basic understanding to truly grasping a concept or skill. No one know this better than the students in Professor Anita Soracco’s environmental science class.

Throughout the year the students have been taking what they’ve learned in their class and seen it applied in “real life.” This past semester students had the opportunity to visit a water treatment plant in Holden, Polar Beverages and the Department of Agricultural Resources.

At the water treatment plant, which serves greater Worcester, students learned how water is filtered and how water is transferred to each town.

“I bring the students there so that they can see the hard work that goes into making our tap water potable, safe, reliable and very regulated,” said Professor Soracco.

The students said they were surprised to learn that while public/tap water is highly regulated, the bottled water industry is virtually un-regulated and contributes to a lot of environmental contamination.

“There’s a lot of stigma attached to town water, but it’s actually better,” said student Elisabeth Morgan.

“I didn’t expect it to be so big and massive,” added student Assas Haraj.

The students also visited Polar Beverages in Worcester, where they got a real insight into energy efficiency and green initiatives. They discussed the environment and the economy with Polar Beverage Owner Chris Crowley and learned how each go hand-in-hand. 

Ms. Morgan said what really stood out for her was the fact that the company does so much to lessen its ecological foot print.

“It was more about reuse and staying out of the waste steam,” she noted.

“The Polar Beverage field trip was beneficial for many reasons. First it shows the students the magnitude on the environment of just one business in one town. Second, Chris Crowley, has taken many initiatives to “green” his business such as LED lights, which are on motion detectors and reducing the thickness of the plastic on the bottle caps.”

Mr. Crowley explained to the students that by reducing the thickness of the plastic on the cap, by just a tiny amount, it will save thousands of pounds of plastic, as well as generate revenue. 

“So it hits home for them that a successful business plan takes into account the environment, whether that means reducing, reusing or efficiency in the manufacturing process,” Professor Soracco added.

 At the Department of Agricultural Resources in Worcester, students met with the Asian Longhorn Beetle (ALB) team and learned more about the beetles’ local impact and what is being done to eradicate it. Outreach Coordinator Joshua Bruckner, spoke with the class about the history of the problem and the eradication program.

“They gave us a tour of the office, which is the headquarters for the ALB team. One of the team members then hopped on our tour bus and gave us a driving tour of the neighborhoods most affected by the infestation and took us to the grounds where they grind tree stumps from the infested trees,” Professor Soracco said, adding it was the STEM Starter Academy that sponsored the trip.

Student Dominic Parretti said the field trip was particularly interesting, as ALB directly impacted him.

“I saw the effects of the Asian longhorn beetle in my own neighborhood. They had to take a lot of trees down,” he said.

Every student said they felt the field trips enhanced what they were learning in class.

 “I’m a visual learner, and seeing is believing. It was all pretty cool,” Mr. Haraji added.

Other field trips on the students’ wish list include visiting other colleges to see how the schools’ reduce their waste; visiting the Fresh Kills landfill in Staten Island, to more grand plans of visiting  the City of Curitiba, Brazil, a place considered to be the most sustainable in the world.

“This is an awesome class. This should be a core class for everyone,” said student Julia McElroy.

  • Quinsigamond Community College’s Surgical Technology program
December, 2018

Quinsigamond Community College’s Surgical Technology program received notification from the National Board of Surgical Technology and Surgical Assisting that 100 percent of the college’s program graduates who attempted the National Certification Examination (August 2017 – July 2018) passed the exam. These graduates will now hold the title of Certified Surgical Technologist. QCC is one of seven...

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Quinsigamond Community College’s Surgical Technology program received notification from the National Board of Surgical Technology and Surgical Assisting that 100 percent of the college’s program graduates who attempted the National Certification Examination (August 2017 – July 2018) passed the exam. These graduates will now hold the title of Certified Surgical Technologist. QCC is one of seven schools in Massachusetts that offers surgical technology programs and is the only one to have a 100 percent pass rate this year. For the last two years the college has attained a 100 percent pass rate. Since the end of 2012, surgical technologists have had to be certified in Massachusetts in order to perform surgical technology tasks. QCC’s program has been in existence since 1999.

“This is something we are immensely proud of at the college. Our students will now be able to enter the workforce and make a positive impact on the lives of others,” said QCC President Dr. Luis G. Pedraja.

QCC’s Surgical Technology Certificate prepares students with the knowledge, skills, and abilities necessary to provide services in the operating room in the role of surgical technologist, as part of a surgical team. Students learn the basic sciences, operating room policies and procedures, safe patient care, operating room techniques, surgical procedures, and have direct clinical experience in their last semester.

QCC Professor of Surgical Technology, Deborah Coleman, said the students have in-class practice exams, which help prepare them to take the national exam. She said the clinical work they do is also beneficial to their success on the exam.

“It was great to congratulate the surgical tech graduates at their pinning ceremony and hear that they all had been offered jobs before they even had taken the certification exam. The operating room managers know that our students are prepared for the workforce and they are hiring them before graduation,” said QCC Dean of Healthcare C. Pat Schmohl, Jr.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, in 2017 the median annual wage for surgical technologists was $46,310, with employment for surgical technologist expected to grow 12 percent from 2016 to 2026.

 

  • QCC student George Baraklilis and Blue Santa
  • Donations abounded during the Stuff-A-Cruiser event at QCC's main campus.
  • QCC President Dr. Luis Pedraja drops off a toy for the Stuff-A-Cruiser event.
  • From left: Reynaldo Rodriguez and Stephen DiGiovanni
  • Blue Santa at QCC Southbridge
December, 2018

QCC’s annual Stuff-A-Cruiser event was once again a huge success, with this year's event raising more than $400 in cash donations and over 300 toys. The cash donations were allocated to the "Feed-A-Family" portion of the event and distributed to families in the form of grocery store gift cards. According to QCC Social Worker/Mental Health Counselor Tina Wells, over $1,000 was...

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QCC’s annual Stuff-A-Cruiser event was once again a huge success, with this year's event raising more than $400 in cash donations and over 300 toys. The cash donations were allocated to the "Feed-A-Family" portion of the event and distributed to families in the form of grocery store gift cards. According to QCC Social Worker/Mental Health Counselor Tina Wells, over $1,000 was raised this year which will help over 40 families.

The three-day event was held at QCC’s main campus, Southbridge Campus and Healthcare and Workforce Development Center in downtown Worcester, with "Blue Santa" helping to collect donations and bringing cheer to everyone.       

"The students who I spoke with during the distribution were grateful, often tearful, that they were given this gift; for many it was the only opportunity to have a gift for their children/families or the difference between a holiday celebration or a standard meal," Ms. Wells said.                     

"Portraying Santa in a blue suit again for the third year in a row was an amazing experience and brought about pure gratification. However the true joy came from all the students, parents, faculty and the children who I encountered during the three events," said  Detective Sergeant Joseph P. Cecchi. " Once again thank you to everyone who made this possible. Your gracious giving and community support has sustained and enhanced this wonderful QCC tradition of Feed-a-Family for over 30 years."

 

  • QCC Honors Colloquium students
December, 2018

Commonwealth Honors Program (CHP) students presented their final projects at the Honors Colloquium in early December. The students each read a dystopian novel then wrote about a real-world topic reflected in their literary selection, describing the potential consequences of modern society.  The fall the 2018 section of IDS 200 was titled: Dystopian/Utopian Worlds in Literature and Contemporary Society, and is...

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Commonwealth Honors Program (CHP) students presented their final projects at the Honors Colloquium in early December. The students each read a dystopian novel then wrote about a real-world topic reflected in their literary selection, describing the potential consequences of modern society.  The fall the 2018 section of IDS 200 was titled: Dystopian/Utopian Worlds in Literature and Contemporary Society, and is facilitated by Professors Amy Beaudry (English) and Dr. Gaelan Benway (Sociology).

IDS 200 is the capstone course for students enrolled in the Commonwealth Honors Program. The program is accredited by the Department of Higher Education. All of the Massachusetts community colleges, state universities, and UMass campuses are part of one program, with each school determining their curriculum based on the accreditation criteria that has been established by the DHE.

At QCC, the program involves students successfully completing four courses at an honors level with a “B” or higher. IDS 200 is the culminating course. In the fall section of IDS 200, students participate in a Conference Panel, and the spring section of IDS 200, students participate in a poster presentation. All IDS 200 students also have the option of presenting at UMass Amherst’s annual Undergraduate Research Conference, held each May.

In order to assist students in composing the best piece of scholarly writing during their time at QCC, IDS 200 has established a library mentoring program whereby each student enrolled in the class is matched with one of QCC’s four reference librarians for the semester. Working with the two faculty, as well as the reference librarians, is integral to the students’ success.

Presenting Honors Colloquium students included:

  • Brianna Canavan
  • Elvin Kaninjing
  • Santana Wright
  • Sam Brown
  • Tom Coley
  • Ashley Forhan
  • John Beane
  • Emma O’Brien
  • Andrew Leger
  • Outgoing Food Pantry Manager Ashley Forhan works with incoming Food Pantry Manager Max German.
December, 2018

QCC’s food pantry will start the year off right in its new location on the ground floor in Room B63 of the Administration Building on the college’s main campus. The pantry will also see a passing of the baton as Food Pantry Manager Ashley Forhan, who graduates this month, will turn over her duties to PTK student Max German.

The food pantry will be closed over the...

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QCC’s food pantry will start the year off right in its new location on the ground floor in Room B63 of the Administration Building on the college’s main campus. The pantry will also see a passing of the baton as Food Pantry Manager Ashley Forhan, who graduates this month, will turn over her duties to PTK student Max German.

The food pantry will be closed over the winter break beginning on December 24 – January 2.

The food pantry will reopen the week of January 2 - January 14 with an abbreviated schedule. The hours for these weeks will be: 

  • Wednesday, January 2: 2:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
  • Thursday, January 3:1:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
  • Friday, January 4: 2:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

The weeks of January 7 and January 14:

  • Monday, January 7 & 14:  2:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
  • Tuesday, January 8 & 15: 8:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.
  • Wednesday, January 9 & 16: 2:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
  • Thursday, January 10 & 17: 1:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.
  • Friday: closed

After the week of January 14, the new hours for 2019 will be:

  •  Mondays: 3:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
  •  Tuesdays: 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
  • Wednesdays: 3:00 p.m.-7:00 p.m.
  • Thursdays: 1:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
  •  Fridays: 2:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Remember: if you are (or know of) a student, faculty or staff member in need, please come to the food pantry help. All information is kept confidential.

For questions, please call the food pantry at 508-854-7403 or email foodpantry [at] qcc.mass.edu

 

  • Veterans Manny Antwi, Heath Tisdale, Jose Figueroa, and Gary Charron all from Veteran Affairs fill up their trucks to drop off t
  • Recruitment Counselor Sabine Dupoux
  • There was a lot of merriment at the annual QCC Holiday Luncheon.
  • Coordinator of Future Focus Program Gilmarie Vongphakdy enjoys the holiday luncheon.
  • QCC President Dr. Luis Pedraja and his table mates at the annual holiday luncheon.
  •  Phi Theta Kappa (PTK) Faculty and Staff Appreciation Social
December, 2018

The holiday season is often a time to reflect on the year and show appreciation for others. At Quinsigamond Community College, two annual events are held at the college’s main campus to show appreciation for the faculty and staff.

On December 7, holiday food, music and camaraderie were on tap at the Phi Theta Kappa (PTK) Faculty and Staff Appreciation Social. Each year the PTK Alpha Zeta Theta Chapter...

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The holiday season is often a time to reflect on the year and show appreciation for others. At Quinsigamond Community College, two annual events are held at the college’s main campus to show appreciation for the faculty and staff.

On December 7, holiday food, music and camaraderie were on tap at the Phi Theta Kappa (PTK) Faculty and Staff Appreciation Social. Each year the PTK Alpha Zeta Theta Chapter hosts this event to show its appreciation to the faculty and staff who supported PTK. Music for the event was provided by PTK Alumni Scott Olsen.

On December 13, the college held its annual holiday luncheon at the Harrington Learning Center. This is a way to thank the employees of QCC for their service and dedication year round. 

"Our faculty and staff have been there for our students every step of the way, going above and beyond to ensure that all our students have the support they need in order to succeed. This luncheon is one small way to show our appreciation for their work." said QCC President Dr. Luis Pedraja

  • QCC's Winter Clothing Drive
December, 2018

As the winter kicks into high gear, items from QCC’s Winter Clothing Drive are being utilized more than ever before.

According to Athletic Director Lisa Gurnick, QCC students and their families have been thrilled to receive the generous donations of jackets, hats, scarves and gloves that so many have donated. While the formal Winter Clothing Drive is over, the Athletic Center and...

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As the winter kicks into high gear, items from QCC’s Winter Clothing Drive are being utilized more than ever before.

According to Athletic Director Lisa Gurnick, QCC students and their families have been thrilled to receive the generous donations of jackets, hats, scarves and gloves that so many have donated. While the formal Winter Clothing Drive is over, the Athletic Center and President’s Office will continue to accept donations throughout the winter due to the tremendous need. Requested jacket sizes include children/youth sizes 4-8 and all adult sizes and suggested boot sizes include children/youth sizes 10-4 and all adult sizes. 

If you haven’t made a donation, please take a moment and consider making one today. For questions, contact Ms. Gurnick at 508.854. 4582 or email lgurnick [at] qcc.mass.edu.

 

  • QCC Cheerleaders from left: Regina Slootsky, Tamara Charles and Amerlin Vasquez
  • Amerlin Vasquez
December, 2018

Wyvern Cheerleaders Gearing Up For First Half-Time Performance

Wyvern power is alive and well at Quinsigamond Community College. Just ask Amerlin Vasquez, Tamara Charles and Regina Slootsky, three QCC students who also happen to be members of the Wyvern cheerleading club.

 The students are part of the cheering club, a group of six students who make up the Wyvern cheering team....

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Wyvern Cheerleaders Gearing Up For First Half-Time Performance

Wyvern power is alive and well at Quinsigamond Community College. Just ask Amerlin Vasquez, Tamara Charles and Regina Slootsky, three QCC students who also happen to be members of the Wyvern cheerleading club.

 The students are part of the cheering club, a group of six students who make up the Wyvern cheering team. The student cheer at home and away QCC men’s basketball games, and on January 17 at QCC’s home game against Holyoke Community College, they will perform a half-time show. This will be their first half-time show, as they have previously only cheered from courtside.

Ms. Vasquez, who is the club president, is a seasoned cheerleader. She moved to Massachusetts in March of this year from New Jersey, registering for the Criminal Justice Program. It was during the college’s annual Club Rush that she found out about the Cheerleading Club. Ms. Slootsky had approached her to see if she was interested in cheering for QCC after she noticed the cheerleading jacket she was wearing.

“I was a cheerleader all four years in my high school (Bagota High School in New Jersey),” Ms. Vasquez said, adding that her high school team was in many competitions and had even won the Liberty Lion Cheer competition.  

Ms. Slootsky said this was her second year in the cheerleading club and while she had no real experience cheering, has embraced being a cheerleader, after a devastating and debilitating accident in high school left her unable earn a spot on her high school cheerleading team.

“I came to QCC in 2017 and was cleared for sports by my doctor. I found out there was not a cheerleading team but we could do a club team,” she said, noting this was a way for her to do the cheering she was unable to do in high school.

According to Tamara Charles, secretary of the club, QCC is the only community college that has a cheerleading team.

“We practice Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday,” she said, noting the other cheerleading club members: Precious Love Devine, Geiselyn Deleon-Sanchez and Lizabeth Felize.

This year, the club members worked with the college’s Fab Lab to design impromptu uniforms, which they have been wearing to games.

 “We are honestly so very grateful for all the work and help that Alex Gray in the Fab Lab gave us,” Ms. Charles said.

While the students are thrilled to have these uniforms, they are working to raise funds in order to buy official cheerleading uniforms and shoes. They are currently holding a fundraising raffle for a variety of gift baskets. Tickets are $2 each and the winners will be drawn at the Jan. 17 game.

Tickets are available through any club member, at the Athletic Center (In Assistant Manager Josh Cole’s office), or email qccwyverncheerleaders [at] gmail.com. Tickets will also be available before half-time at the January 17 game.

“Anyone who is interested in being in the cheerleading club can also email us,” Ms. Vasquez said.

Athletic Center Winter Break Hours

 

Friday, December 21: 8:00 a.m.- 4:00 p.m.

Saturday, December 22:  10:00 a.m.- 2:00 p.m.

Monday, December 24:  8:00 a.m. - 4:00 .pm.

The Athletic Center will be closed December 25 through January 1

Reopen Wednesday, January 2. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Drone Staff Development
December, 2018

Is it a bird? A plane? A motorized toy? Many people are still a bit perplexed when they first see a unmanned aircraft, commonly called a drone. QCC Senior Technical Specialist John Solaperto gave a recent talk to faculty and staff interested in learning about what a drone is all about and enlightening them to the recent phenomenon. Mr. Solaperto discussed the basics on drones and drone piloting in a...

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Is it a bird? A plane? A motorized toy? Many people are still a bit perplexed when they first see a unmanned aircraft, commonly called a drone. QCC Senior Technical Specialist John Solaperto gave a recent talk to faculty and staff interested in learning about what a drone is all about and enlightening them to the recent phenomenon. Mr. Solaperto discussed the basics on drones and drone piloting in a staff development meeting, after attending a two-day workforce development course where he then took it upon himself to become a licensed drone pilot.

“I showed everyone the drone kit and explained that these are not toys,” he said, demonstrating the Maverick Pro Platinum drone. “I got this because it was quieter than earlier drone models.”

He explained that to fly a drone you must be aware of many conditions such as weather, what airspace is and where you are when you are flying a drone in that airspace.

“The rules are very specific. Whether or not you fly commercially, you must adhere to the rules such as not flying more than 400 feet off the ground and always maintaining visual sight of the drone,” he noted. “You also need to be careful around metal as they are magnetic and make sure the GPS is on, or they have the potential to drift away.”

 Airspace is similar to an “upside down wedding cake,” with aircraft flying at different altitudes, Mr. Solaperto said.

“It’s up to the drone pilot to be aware and get out of the way of everyone else,” he added. “You should always fly with a team.”

To find out more about QCC's drone program, visit the Center for Workforce Development and Continuing Education

 

  • Happy New Year from Quinsigamond Community College
December, 2018

Tuesday, December 25 – Tuesday, January 1: The college is closed for its annual winter break and will reopen on Tuesday, January 2.

Wednesday, January 2 – Monday, January, 14: Intersession classes begin.

Monday, January 21: The 34th Annual Community Breakfast honoring the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Doors open at 7:00 a.m. and...

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Tuesday, December 25 – Tuesday, January 1: The college is closed for its annual winter break and will reopen on Tuesday, January 2.

Wednesday, January 2 – Monday, January, 14: Intersession classes begin.

Monday, January 21: The 34th Annual Community Breakfast honoring the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Doors open at 7:00 a.m. and the program begins promptly at 8:00 a.m. This will be held in the QCC Athletic Center; 670 West Boylston Street, Worcester. Guest Speaker is President of Clinton College, Rev. Dr. Lester A. McCorn

Wednesday, January 23: Spring classes begin.

January Spotlight: New Student Orientation Sessions allow students to connect with departments and all the resources they need in order to succeed at QCC. Sessions include:

Thursday, January 10: QCC Southbridge Session from 5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m. - Register Now

Tuesday, January 15: Worcester Campus Session from 4:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m. - Register Now

Wednesday, January 16: Worcester Campus Session from 10:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m. - Register Now

These Orientation Sessions will last approximately three hours and will provide:

  • an introduction to campus resources and support services
  • an opportunity to connect with fellow students and QCC support services
  • an in-depth campus tour to where all the QCC resources are located and where classes will be held
  • the opportunity to receive student ID and parking sticker
  • a chance to win raffle prizes
December, 2018

We are very pleased to announce the addition of the following new full-time staff and faculty members to Quinsigamond Community College:

On 12/3/2018, Corey Coleman, Maintainer I - Corey is moving from a part-tme Maintainer position to a full-time Maintainer I position at Quinsigamond Community College. Corey brings to this position over 8 years of experience.

On 12/3/2018, ...

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We are very pleased to announce the addition of the following new full-time staff and faculty members to Quinsigamond Community College:

On 12/3/2018, Corey Coleman, Maintainer I - Corey is moving from a part-tme Maintainer position to a full-time Maintainer I position at Quinsigamond Community College. Corey brings to this position over 8 years of experience.

On 12/3/2018, Jessica Giumentaro, Teacher Children’s School– Jessica brings to this position over 10 years of teaching experience. Most recently, she was a substitute teacher for Quinsigamond Community College Children’s School. Jessica earned an Associate Degree in Early Childhood Education from Quinsigamond Community College.

On 12/3/2018, Kristen Michaud, Assistant Professor of Associate Nursing Degree, PN Program- Kristen brings to this position over 20 years of teaching and clinical experience. Most recently, she was the Professor of Nursing at Northern Essex Community College, Middlesex Community College and Northeastern University. Kristen earned her Bachelor’s in Science in Nursing from Fitchburg State College and a Master of Science in Nursing from Rivier College, St. Joseph’s School of Nursing.

On 12/3/2018, Ryan Robinson, Maintainer III – Ryan brings over 11 years of experience to this position. Most recently, Ryan served as temporary Maintainer III for Quinsigamond Community College. Previous to that, Ryan worked as a part time Maintainer, also here at QCC.

On 12/10/2018, Deborah Martin, DESE Instructor and Curriculum Developer for ESOL-Adult Community Learning Center - Deborah brings to this position over 20 years of teaching experience. Most recently, she was an ESOL Teacher at Quinsigamond Community College. Deborah earned her Bachelor’s in Science from Organizacao Santamarense de Educacao e Cultura and a Master’s in Education from Framingham State University.

Please join me in welcoming Corey, Jessica, Kristen, Ryan and Deborah into their new roles at QCC.