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October, 2018

  • QCC's new Student Success Center is housed in the Harrington Learning Center.
October, 2018

Quinsigamond Community College’s President Dr. Luis G. Pedraja is seeing his vision for 100 percent student success get one step closer to reality, with the awarding of a $2.25 million five-year Title III grant from the U.S. Department of Education. The grant recognizes the work QCC is doing to increase student persistence and completion from the point of entry to graduation.

“Our...

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Quinsigamond Community College’s President Dr. Luis G. Pedraja is seeing his vision for 100 percent student success get one step closer to reality, with the awarding of a $2.25 million five-year Title III grant from the U.S. Department of Education. The grant recognizes the work QCC is doing to increase student persistence and completion from the point of entry to graduation.

“Our mission as a higher education institution is to foster an environment that provides optimum learning experiences for all of our students. We have extensively improved our student experience support structure and become more embedded in the communities we serve. This funding will enable us to turbo-charge our initiatives to get to our ultimate goal,” he said.

An estimated 78 percent of QCC graduates stay within the region, making QCC a key player in supporting economic development in its service area. For over 50 years, QCC has worked to align its programs and services with the needs of a large, industrial community that has a substantial population of lower income, at-risk students. QCC recognized that in order to help students complete college, it must develop a number of interventions and initiatives at key junctures.

Those initiatives include a comprehensive orientation and first year experience program, which the college rolled out this fall. Studies have shown students to be more successful through early identification of academic and career goals, assessment of student needs, creation of realistic educational plans and close monitoring and intervention throughout a student’s first-year experience.  

QCC has bolstered its wrap-around support services, streamlining them into one central location, the Student Success Center. In addition, the college has improved upon its digital assets, building upon technology-driven initiatives in teaching and learning. An advising and retention software program was implemented that provides innovative solutions for student success, including personalized advising options, a student tracking module and communication system. QCC has also worked to become more embedded within the communities it serves through the implementation of Community Learning Hubs. To date three learning hubs have been opened in the City of Worcester. This fall a redesigned mentoring program has brought in mentors from area communities to assist students through decisions and situations they may encounter in their collegiate and life journeys.

“Our goal is to attain 100 percent student success and we will not rest until we have reached that goal,” President Pedraja said.

  • Gabe Santner Director of Mentoring for Perkins Programs
  • QCC President Dr. Luis Pedraja discusses the merits of mentoring.
  • Abbvie BioresearchTraining Manager John Sauers
  • Former mentee turned mentor Geovanni Cruz
October, 2018

Giovanni Cruz stated it best when he described QCC’s mentoring program as, “people change people.” A former QCC mentee, Mr. Cruz said it was through mentors both past and present that have helped him on his journey; a journey that led him to his current job as the AmeriCorps vista for the QCC mentoring program.

A total of 115 mentors that included community partners,...

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Giovanni Cruz stated it best when he described QCC’s mentoring program as, “people change people.” A former QCC mentee, Mr. Cruz said it was through mentors both past and present that have helped him on his journey; a journey that led him to his current job as the AmeriCorps vista for the QCC mentoring program.

A total of 115 mentors that included community partners, faculty staff and alumni and 190 mentees were part of the inaugural mentoring program's kick-off event on October 11 at QCC’s Hebert Auditorium. Mentors and mentees listened to former mentors and mentees before a breakout session to meet their new mentor/mentee.

“You, the mentors, made a commitment to assist our students in achieving their academic and professional goals,” said QCC Dean of Students Theresa Vecchio. “Mentees made a commitment to themselves to achieve their goals.”

QCC President Dr. Luis Pedraja told of his own personal experiences both as a mentee and mentor and how powerful they were for him.

“I believe in the power of mentorship. I believe that mentors are essential,” he said. “It takes a community to help a college student succeed, especially a first-generation college student.”

One such community partner that has made a big impact on the new mentoring program is Abbvie Bioresearch Center in Worcester. Training Manager John Sauers expounded on the company’s relationship with QCC over the years, from assisting in the development of a successful course to helping with the college’s current mentoring program.

“I presented a poster on QCC’s mentoring program at our networking open house and 35 people were interested,” he said, adding that currently 17 from the company have signed up to be mentors.

He said this was the power of mentoring.

“This illustrated people who love what they do and are willing to share that with others. I really feel mentoring is connecting the dots forward,” Mr. Sauers said.

QCC Dean of Compliance Liz Woods said mentoring brings as much to the mentors as it does the mentees.

“For me I know I’ve shared in the success of an exam; joy of a job search; the birth of a child…even a winning soccer season,” she said. “We rise by lifting others, assisting that other person in meeting their goals no matter what they are.”

The new QCC mentoring program is so successful already there is a waiting list of 50 students.

“We’re just starting and my hope is one day everyone who wants a mentor has one,” Dr. Pedraja said. “Tell people at your work, in your community, alums and at churches. It does take a community to help our students and by working together as a community you are all part of the QCC family and family sticks together and supports each other.”

Visit QCC mentoring to learn more about the program.

  • Visit GiveCampus.com on November 13
October, 2018

Feeding those in need within the QCC community is the premise and mission of Quinsigamond Community College’s food pantry. An April 2018 study by the Wisconsin HOPE Lab found that 49 percent of QCC students had low to very low food security, prompting QCC to establish a food pantry to help combat hunger on campus. What began as a small operation in the summer, has ramped up this Fall. Today the food...

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Feeding those in need within the QCC community is the premise and mission of Quinsigamond Community College’s food pantry. An April 2018 study by the Wisconsin HOPE Lab found that 49 percent of QCC students had low to very low food security, prompting QCC to establish a food pantry to help combat hunger on campus. What began as a small operation in the summer, has ramped up this Fall. Today the food pantry is consistently feeding well over 150 students and the need to keep the pantry up and running is greater than ever.

Already the food pantry has become a staple at the college; however, the ability to keep it running effectively requires funding and staffing. To that end, the college is holding a fundraising crowdsourcing event beginning on November 13, geared to raising funds to help sustain the food pantry in the months to come.

“We found there is a real need for this food pantry and we want to ensure that we can fill this need now and in the future,” said QCC President Luis Pedraja. “We never want to turn away anyone in our QCC family who is hungry because we don’t have enough food. On November 13, we ask you to visit GiveCampus.com and help us reach our goal of $10,000, to help in our battle against food insecurity."

The food pantry has already outgrown its current location (Room 351A in the Administration Building on the college’s main campus at 670 West Boylston Street, Worcester) due to its growing demand. In the next couple of weeks the pantry will be moving to a new location in Room B63 of the Administration Building. The new location will house the food pantry, as well as an area where there will be additional resources available for students.

While the college is looking for monetary donations in its upcoming drive, food donations of non-perishable food items are also always welcomed and accepted. Donations may be dropped off in the donation box outside of the food pantry (Room351A).

Items in high demand include:

  • Cans of tuna
  • Cans of chicken
  • Spaghetti sauce
  • Peanut Butter
  • Rice
  • Pasta
  • Macaroni and cheese
  • Cans of ravioli/ spaghettios
  • Boxes of cereal
  • Instant oatmeal (individual packets)

The Food Pantry is open during the Fall 2018 semester on: Monday 2:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m., Tuesday 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m., Wednesday 4:00 p.m.-7:00 p.m., Thursday 12:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m., and Fridays 8:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m. For questions, email foodpantry [at] qcc.mass.edu  .

 

  • Officials at Early College roundtable discussion.
  • Worcester high school students discuss the Early College program.
  • Participants in the Early College Roundtable discussion.
October, 2018

Three Worcester area high school students discussed the state’s early college program in a no-holds barred roundtable discussion with state and local officials at Quinsigamond Community College (QCC) on October 9. Senator Michael O. Moore, Massachusetts Commissioner of Higher Carlos E. Santiago, QCC President Luis G. Pedraja, Worcester State University (WSU) President Barry M. Maloney, and...

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Three Worcester area high school students discussed the state’s early college program in a no-holds barred roundtable discussion with state and local officials at Quinsigamond Community College (QCC) on October 9. Senator Michael O. Moore, Massachusetts Commissioner of Higher Carlos E. Santiago, QCC President Luis G. Pedraja, Worcester State University (WSU) President Barry M. Maloney, and Superintendent of Worcester Public Schools Maureen F. Binienda discussed the new early college program with three students, who are all part of Worcester’s early college pilot program.

“I see this program as a philosophy of change where every student has access to college,” Senator Moore said. “In fifteen to 20 years we’ll look back and see that Worcester started and changed our education system.”

The Early College Program, a collaborative effort with QCC, WSU and the WPS is designed to establish college pathways for high school students in all seven Worcester high schools. It offers high school students the opportunity to earn college credits while still in high school, with a myriad of wraparound services available to them. The program focuses on underrepresented, under-served and first generation-to-college students. The Worcester Early College Program is one of four early college programs statewide that received part of $420,000 in implementation grant funding in July 2018. Senator Moore noted that by the year 2020, 70 percent of jobs will require some sort of college or certificate, making programs such as these so vital.

President Pedraja said he hopes to see a clear pathway that goes through the entire education system, adding that if we do not create this pathway there is going to be a gap in the workforce.

“This is a very unique partnership in the state to create pathways for students to be able to succeed and enter into college with less debt,” President Pedraja said. “I tell students at QCC, ‘you belong here.’ We need to start creating a college mindset with everyone. I think that’s going to be critical and we can grow this program through multiple partnerships.”

All of the students at the roundtable discussion are currently enrolled in a First Year Experience class at QCC. Each of the students told officials of their initial fear and misconception with taking college courses.

“I thought it would be a lot scarier, but it is a lot better than I thought it would be. The professors understand we are high school students and are very accommodating,” said Doherty Memorial High School junior Kwaku Nyarko. “When I actually do start college I’m going to have a head start. I’m not going to flop or have that freshman misstep because I’m already acclimated to what it’s like there.”

The students said one of the key factors of the program was the wrap-around support services they received.

“They provide us with transportation, advisors and mentors to help us be in the program,” said Worcester Technical High School junior Besma Nurhussien.

“The transportation is the best. I couldn’t come here otherwise,” added Worcester Technical High School senior Zachary Le.

At QCC, mentoring plays a very beneficial role in the program. This year the college has expanded its existing mentoring program to include more community mentors, increasing its mentor base for students. This provides a way for QCC students to connect with mentors and build positive relationships that support their college experience.

“Every step of the way they are guiding us so we can focus on the college experience. The mentors are amazing. Everyone wants to see all of us succeed,” Mr. Nyarko said.

Currently there are 120 spots for students in the Early College Program with the goal to increase the number of students in the coming years. WSU President Maloney asked the students how they thought they could increase student interest the program. The resounding answer from the students was more class variety. Mr. Nyarko said that adding more classes will enable students to explore diverse pathway options so they can get a better idea and understanding of what they want to do, without spending thousands.

Senator Moore said the best way for this program to be successful is for the students who are in the pilot program to help promote it.

“We’re looking to you to be the role models and get the word out,” Commissioner Santiago added. “This partnership is really remarkable and just what we need in higher education.”

Families who are interested in learning more about the program should contact Dr. Mary E. Meade-Montaque, WPS Manager for Instruction & School Leadership at MontaqueM [at] worc.k12.ma.us

  • QCC students identify the countries that they came from on a map of the world.
  • From left: QCC students Maria Puello, Thi Thanh Hang Huynh, Roanlis Toribio, Luceily Ortiz and Noor Altahafee.
  • Coordinator of Future Focus Program Gilmarie Vongphakdy locates her country of origin
  • A world map denotes QCC students, faculty and staff countries of origin.
  • QCC President Dr. Luis Pedraja stands with Immigrants.
  • Ethic foods were a part of the "I Stand with Immigrants" event.
  • QCC President Dr. Luis Pedraja discusses his journey as an immigrant in an interview for Worcester News Tonight.
October, 2018

Quinsigamond Community College joined with over 170 colleges and universities nationwide in the third annual I Stand With Immigrants Day of Action, held on October 24. Close to 100 students attended the event, which featured ethnic food and impassioned stories from QCC students, faculty and staff who discussed their own personal experiences as immigrants. Immigrants play an important role in...

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Quinsigamond Community College joined with over 170 colleges and universities nationwide in the third annual I Stand With Immigrants Day of Action, held on October 24. Close to 100 students attended the event, which featured ethnic food and impassioned stories from QCC students, faculty and staff who discussed their own personal experiences as immigrants. Immigrants play an important role in supporting our higher education system and are a part of the rich culture that makes up the student body at QCC.

QCC President Dr. Luis G. Pedraja, who emigrated from Cuba as a young child, told his story of growing up in a low-income Miami neighborhood and the challenges that he faced as an immigrant and first-generation college student. He told of the many restrictive policies in Cuba that drove his family to the U.S. seeking a better life.

“Immigrants have been a strong part of this community. We need to look at the human face of people and our common humanities,” Dr. Pedraja said. “Our diverse stories and history make up the unique and special fabric of the country that we all call ‘home’ today.”

Gilmarie Vongphakdy, QCC’s Coordinator of the Future Focus Program and Director of Community Bridges Deborah Gonzalez, both originally from Puerto Rico, described the challenges and similar prejudices other immigrants faced when coming to the U.S. even though they were also U.S. citizens.

QCC Student Trustee Benjamin Aryeh shared a powerful narrative of his journey to the U.S. from Ghana, telling of his trials of immediately going to work after high school until he found a way to the U.S. and eventually to QCC.

“People need to look at us for the value we bring onboard. We may be different colors but we’re all beautiful people. This is why I stand for immigrants,” Mr. Aryeh said.

Noella Penn, a QCC nursing student from Cameroon, said she faced a lot of challenges as an immigrant, from people not understanding her accent, to not knowing anything about her homeland country. She said she has appreciated being at QCC, where she feels part of a community.

“This country has opened a lot of opportunities and given me a lot of chances,”  added student Mustafa Boweden, vice president of the college’s Student Senate.

Originally from Libya, Mr. Boweden said he has also found QCC to be a welcoming place for immigrants.

The final story of the day was from Professor of Human Services Doe West. She told of her Native American heritage and her grandmother’s harrowing story of being forced into slavery as a very young child, simply because she was Native American.

“We need to respect and learn about one another’s culture. It’s imperative that we always see the person in one another,” Ms. West said.

  • QCC alumnus Juan Poma
October, 2018

Juan Poma has rocketed himself into Quinsigamond Community College alumni lore. The 2013 QCC Engineering alumnus has taken the foundation he received at the college and jettisoned himself into a career at Boeing Aircraft Manufacturing Company.  Today he is an Information Technology (IT) Engineer and an Assistant Business Manager, acting as the bridge between business and IT.

Recently...

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Juan Poma has rocketed himself into Quinsigamond Community College alumni lore. The 2013 QCC Engineering alumnus has taken the foundation he received at the college and jettisoned himself into a career at Boeing Aircraft Manufacturing Company.  Today he is an Information Technology (IT) Engineer and an Assistant Business Manager, acting as the bridge between business and IT.

Recently Mr. Poma came back for a quick visit to QCC, reminiscing about his time at the college where he said his future began.

“I was at QCC seeing all the students eager to learn, experience college and also being just a little bit scared. I used to be one of them,” he said.

Mr. Poma said his journey to QCC came by way of a circuitous route. In 2010 after graduating from a high school in Bolivia, he moved with his mother to Queens, New York in a quest for a better life than the one he had left. He eventually settling in Worcester with a family member who was living there at the time. Through this relative's wife, he learned about QCC. as she was attending classes at the college. Having come to the U.S. not knowing any English, Mr. Poma knew that while he wanted to further his education, he must first learn the language of his new country. He spent the next six months at a private school immersed in learning English. At the end of 2011 he felt ready and applied to QCC.

“I took my placement test and started from the bottom with the basic English and math classes,” he said.

While taking classes at QCC, Mr. Poma also worked in jobs that included busing tables, making salads, to working full-time at a pizza place from 7:00 p.m. at night until 4:00 in the morning, before attending class full-time during the day. He took the bus to the college every morning and was there by 6:15 a.m.

“You want to do better to help your family. It’s a great motivation,” he said. “My mother couldn’t have an education (in Bolivia). She’s a housekeeper. She fought hard to bring me to this country to have better opportunities. She led by example.”

Eventually, Mr. Poma was able to quit his full-time night job by becoming both a math tutor and student ambassador, which allowed him to practice his English while also taking classes and studying.

“I had a plethora of resources at QCC that I took full advantage of,” he said, adding with a laugh that he was able to “convince” one of his mentors, Mishawn Davis-Eyene (Director of Admissions), to hire him as a student ambassador.

“The goal (of being hired as a student ambassador) was to force myself to keep learning English,” he said. That opportunity led him to a lot of on-campus connections, which included mentoring other classmates.

Mentors have played a huge role in Mr. Poma’s life, from family and friends to the ones he had at QCC.

“Mishawn guided me through the four-year college application process, helping me on where to apply. I had an almost perfect grade point average and she said, ‘we’re going to apply to an ivy league school.’ At that time I didn’t even know what an ivy league school was,” he said.

He also credits Martha Upton, the Learning Manager at the Math Lab; Michelle Tufau Afriyie (former Director of Admissions and current Interim Assistant Vice President of Student Success), and Professor of Engineering Dadbeh Bigonahy, as the mentors who helped to guide him.

After graduating from QCC, Mr. Poma attended Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI), earning his bachelor degree in Computer Science. It was at an RPI Job Fair that fate gave him the chance to speak with a Boeing representative, after a friend gave him his spot in line enabling him to talk to the Boeing recruiter. An hour after handing over his resume he received a call for an interview the following day.

“They liked my honesty and technical experience and I got the offer. I never planned to work for such a great company,” he said. “QCC provided me with the foundation to succeed. It provided me with everything I needed.”

Today, Mr. Poma lives in St. Louis, Missouri working at one of Boeing’s sites. In addition to his current position, he is also a NASA Boeing SLS (Space Launch System) Ambassador, which gives him official permission and training from Boeing to go to schools and talk about the SLS program.

“We motivate the student base on the importance that this program has for the future. The people who are in high school and college will play a role in the continued development of SLS that will pave the wave for deep space exploration,” he said. "Some of my presentations have included the Bolivian Embassy in D.C., other Boeing sites, and colleges."

In his “spare time,” Mr. Poma has started a non-profit with a couple of family members to help promote STEM to Bolivian students and will be going to Bolivia soon.

He reiterated that it was QCC, which gave him the foundation to be successful and encourages current students to make the most of their time at the college.

 “If you are able to take advantage of all the resources at QCC it will help you in your career and everywhere you go,” he said.

  • Paper Planes cast members: Tris Sackman as Stella and Xavier Franceschi as Chandler.
  • Fair Play cast members: Spencer Edwards as Kevin and Diana Alacon as Marlene
  • Occupy Hallmark cast members: Nate Wilson as Moose and Lola Balogun as Salty
  • Color Me Complete cast members from left: David Rodriguez as Red and George Baraklilis as Gray.
  • Legs cast members from left: David Rodriguez as Man 1, Liam Doherty as Man 2, Xavier Franceschi as Man 3; Maya Bastien as Maya,
October, 2018

Quinsigamond Community College’s upcoming play, “SLICES OF LIFE - An Evening of Original Works,” is an innovative theatrical performance that incorporates five original short plays into one captivating performance. While each play is completely different, there is an overarching theme about relationships that ties all of the plays together. QCC Play Director Kelly Stowell, said...

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Quinsigamond Community College’s upcoming play, “SLICES OF LIFE - An Evening of Original Works,” is an innovative theatrical performance that incorporates five original short plays into one captivating performance. While each play is completely different, there is an overarching theme about relationships that ties all of the plays together. QCC Play Director Kelly Stowell, said the plays were written by student playwrights, whose plays were submitted to the regional Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival (KCACTF), a national theater program.

Ms. Stowell reached out to the National Playwright Program Chair of the regionals to ask to review a variety of student submitted plays to consider for QCC's fall production. From there she chose five diverse plays that were geared for “young people,” she said.

The plays chosen include: “Paper Planes,” by Michael Pisaturo; “Occupy Hallmark,” by Casey M. Senuik; “Fair Play,” by Shaquielle Edwads; “Legs,” by Hanna Byrmen, and “Color Me Complete,” by Rose-Emma Lambridis.  Each of the student playwrights have also been invited to attend the show.

“All of these plays have been written within the last three years and have either won or been a runner up,” Ms. Stowell said. “I like for theater to be socially relevant and make people think.”

Once the plays were chosen, a casting call was held and students were chosen for the roles, with an additional two students as understudies.The entire cast is made up of QCC students and Ms. Stowell said  not only was no one was double-cast, but also almost all of the actors are new to QCC theater productions.

Collaboration with the Fab Lab

This will also be the first time the theater group will be collaborating with another department on campus - QCC’s Fab Lab. The staff at the lab will be assisting several students in helping to build rehearsal/ theater blocks for the play that are used as props to help performers act out their scenes.

While this play does not require much in the way of set design, Ms. Stowell said these blocks will be a tremendous help for this play, and the connection they have made with the Fab Lab will be terrific for future props they might need to have made.

She noted that the relationship they have made with the Fab Lab is the perfect tie-in to what the actors are demonstrating in the play – relationships and interpersonal communication.

Another first will be a collaboration with the Media Services. Ms. Stowell said a few students who are interested in lighting and sound will be allowed to shadow and watch media services, offering their input and learning about light design and sound.

The play will take place in the Hebert Auditorium (670 West Boylston Street, Worcester) on November 28, 29, 30 and December 1 at 7:00 p.m. and December 2 at 2:00 p.m. Tickets are $5.

QCC student Veronica Wiley is the stage manager and student Hailey Shea is the assistant stage manager.  Assistant Director Amber Charest is a QCC alumnus.

 Cast members include:

OCCUPY HALLMARK

  • Moose:  Nate Wilson
  • Salty:  Lola Balogun

COLOR ME COMPLETE

  • Red:  David Rodriguez
  • Gray:  George Baraklilis

PAPER PLANES

  • Chandler:  Xavier Franceschi
  • Stella:  Tris Sackman

LEGS

Maya:  Maya Bastian

Vicky:  Melesia Swanston Alonzo

Man 1:  David Rodriguez

Man 2: Liam Doherty

Man 3:  Xavier Franseschi

FAIR PLAY

Kevin:  Spencer Edwards

Marlene:  Diana Alarcon

Understudies:

Margarita Fabre

John Bacellis

  •  Members of the Women in STEM Club: (from left) President Rose Duchemin, Amanda Hughes and Kacie Senna.
  • Professor of Astronomy & Physics Andria Schwortz
October, 2018

The world of science engineering, technology and mathematics (STEM) has grown exponentially in the last decade and with it has come an increased awareness of STEM education. Recognizing this shift in innovation, the Baker-Polito administration announced the first statewide STEM week from October 22 – 26 to help raise students’ interest and awareness in STEM initiatives. According to a recent report by the...

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The world of science engineering, technology and mathematics (STEM) has grown exponentially in the last decade and with it has come an increased awareness of STEM education. Recognizing this shift in innovation, the Baker-Polito administration announced the first statewide STEM week from October 22 – 26 to help raise students’ interest and awareness in STEM initiatives. According to a recent report by the Commonwealth Corporation 600,000 people work in STEM occupations in Massachusetts, making up 17 percent of the total state workforce. The study further showed that by 2026 STEM jobs will be expected to increase by 11.2 percent compared to overall expected job growth of only 7.4 percent.

Quinsigamond Community College has stayed on the forefront of this technology offering programs, technologically-advanced equipment and resources to its students in order to give them a head start when they enter the workforce. During the statewide STEM week event, informational tables were set up inside the Harrington Learning Center, informing students of the exciting STEM programs available to them at QCC. Throughout the week STEM professors took turns highlighting their programs, such as Professor of Astronomy & Physics Andria Schwortz, who did an astronomy demonstration and Professor Jacob Longacre who did some demonstrations of optics/ photonics.

Three students from the Women In STEM (WIS) Club were also on-hand to explain the WIS Club, which was designed for women interested in pursuing science technology, engineering or mathematics at QCC.

WIS President Rose Duchemin, an engineering major at the college, said this is the first time the Women In STEM has been run by the students.

“We’re trying to support women in STEM by socializing with other women who love STEM,” she said, adding that students don’t need to currently be a part of a STEM program to be in the club, they just need to have an interest in STEM. For more information email Ms. Duchemin at rduchemin [at] qmail.qcc.edu.

Some of the activities the group will be involved in include tours of other schools and businesses, attending panel discussions and working in the QCC Fab Lab.

Culminating STEM week, the college hosted students from 27 students and three teachers from Southbridge High School on October 26. The students spent the morning participating in STEM workshops in the biology, chemistry and Fab Labs.

Visit QCC STEM to learn more.

  • Professor of Computer Science Hao Loi shows off the capabilities of a robot.
  • High school students get to try their hand at gaming.
  • Assistant Professor of Manufacturing Technology Lee Duerden
October, 2018

Students from area high schools joined faculty and staff at Quinsigamond Community College during the school’s informational Manufacturing Day on October 19. The day was designed to offer high school students a chance to learn more about manufacturing and technology and the careers in this extensively growing field.

The high school students began their day at the Hebert Auditorium on the college’s...

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Students from area high schools joined faculty and staff at Quinsigamond Community College during the school’s informational Manufacturing Day on October 19. The day was designed to offer high school students a chance to learn more about manufacturing and technology and the careers in this extensively growing field.

The high school students began their day at the Hebert Auditorium on the college’s main campus where QCC President Dr. Luis Pedraja told the students of all the new and amazing things that are happening in lasers and photonics.

“There are things that we can do that we never imagined. I look forward to what the future will being and the things that some of you will produce,” he said.

Students also had the opportunity to hear from James Cunningham, Vice President of Cunningham and Associates, a company that has employed several co-op students from QCC.

“When I was in high school no one told to me about STEM. If they did I might have gotten involved in manufacturing sooner,” he said.

Mr. Cunningham discussed the stigma that used to plague the manufacturing industry and how that has all changed. He noted that amazing technological advances are happening right in New England’s backyard, from 3D organs being printed on a massive scale, to automated grocery stores and military sutures that are strong enough to tow a tractor trailer.

“Massachusetts is the number one hub in the nation for innovation,” he said, telling the students, “I can’t find enough talented, qualified people to hire.The demand for STEM jobs is astronomical.”

He encouraged the students to use the day at QCC to spark their inspiration and get introduced to STEM as they walked through the lab spaces, Fab Lab and learned of the opportunities available to them.

“Don’t waste today! Ask questions and get involved,” he added.

Visit QCC’s Manufacturing Technology to learn more.

  • QCC students had the opportunity to meet with over 25 companies at the recent Job Fair.
  • The QCC Job Fair drew many students looking for employment opportunities
  • Representatives from Autism Learning Partners were on hand at the QCC Job Fair.
  • Representatives from the Learning Experience
  • Wegman's Recruiter Amanda Allen
October, 2018

Quinsigamond Community College’s recent Job Fair was once again a happening place as students came out in droves to meet with area companies and learn about the job opportunities available to them.

Professional Services Recruiter Meg Terry, of Areoteck, a recruiting and staffing agency, said the company represents a variety of companies that are looking for employees.

“We have a really...

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Quinsigamond Community College’s recent Job Fair was once again a happening place as students came out in droves to meet with area companies and learn about the job opportunities available to them.

Professional Services Recruiter Meg Terry, of Areoteck, a recruiting and staffing agency, said the company represents a variety of companies that are looking for employees.

“We have a really established Westborough client that has entry-level positions. We are doing screenings here at the job fair, gathering information. We’ll then follow up with an email,” Ms. Terry said, adding that she already had 11 applicants.

Marcia Bowles, of UMass Memorial Medical and Justin Lubecki, of the Justice Resource Institute said they had given out a lot of information to students and were pleased with the turnout.

“We have both full and part-time positions. We got the names and emails from a lot of students,” Mr. Lubecki said, adding that he will also be at QCC’s next Human Services Practicum Fair in April, 2019.

Companies that participated in the Fall Job Fair included:

  • Aerotek
  • Apex Entertainment
  • Atlas Distributing
  • Autism Learning Partners
  • Bob's Store
  • Citizen's bank
  • Chugach Training and Education center
  • Coworx Staffing
  • Federal Bureau of Prisons
  • Fedex
  • H&M HENNES & MAURITZ
  • Home Depot
  • IPG Photonics
  • Justice Resource Institute
  • MAPFRE Insurance
  • Micro Tech Staffing
  • Open Sky
  • Scribe America
  • ScrubaDub
  • Securitas
  • Spectrum
  • The Learning Experience
  • UMASS Memorial
  • Wegmans Food markets
  • Valet Park

“I was very excited with the attendance of the fair. We had 204 students who attended in search of part-time and full-time positions, or simply for the networking experience,” said Career Development Counselor Nichole Wheeler. “Our employers had only positive things to say about the fair and our students. This turn out is partly due to the faculty who brought their students to the fair in place of class, which gives students a valuable experience for future job search.”

  • WPI Vice Provost for Research Bogdan Vernescu (L)and QCC President Dr. Luis Pedraja at the fist Integrated Photonics Symposium
  • QCC President Luis Pedraja, QCC Assistant Vice President for Workforce Readiness and Innovation Kathy Rentsch, and Michael Watts
  • Associate Professor of Electronics Engineering Technology Jacob Longacre and QCC Assistant Vice President Kathy Rentsch
  • QCC Professor of Engineering & Sciences Dadbeh Bigonahy
October, 2018

On October 3, Quinsigamond Community College (QCC) and Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) held an Integrated Photonics Symposium at WPI, designed to inform and enlighten the region on the advancements of integrated photonics and discuss its new collaborative AIM Photonics Academy Lab for Education & Application Prototypes (LEAP). Speakers included those from academia, as well as industry and government.

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On October 3, Quinsigamond Community College (QCC) and Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) held an Integrated Photonics Symposium at WPI, designed to inform and enlighten the region on the advancements of integrated photonics and discuss its new collaborative AIM Photonics Academy Lab for Education & Application Prototypes (LEAP). Speakers included those from academia, as well as industry and government.

Photonics is an area of technology that involves transmitting and processing information with light (photons) instead of electricity (electrons) and is a shining light to the future of advanced technologies. Integrated photonics applications in communications, computing, healthcare, and other industries are becoming more commonplace.

The day-long symposium, which featured speakers, panel discussions and breakout sessions gave the first comprehensive insight into the LEAP, which is being housed on WPI’s campus. The facility will serve as a hub in Central Massachusetts for training in integrated photonics. In early January 2018, a $4 million Massachusetts Manufacturing Innovation Initiative (M2I2) grant was awarded to the QCC and WPI partnership by Lt. Governor Karyn Polito to support the emerging and future technology of integrated photonics through the launch LEAP. To date the Central Massachusetts LEAP is only the second one in the Commonwealth.

“What excites me about this collaboration and partnership with community colleges in particular, is that students who might not have access to the benefits of this technology are now given this opportunity,” QCC President Dr. Luis G. Pedraja said.

QCC and WPI will be offering students a strong educational foundation in integrated photonics (from certificate programs through PhD), expanding workforce training opportunities. President Pedraja noted that it is imperative to train jobs for the future not the jobs of yesteryear or even today.

“We need to teach them the skills that will benefit them two to three years into the future when they graduate and continue to keep them trained to keep up with the sciences,” Dr. Pedraja said, adding, “It’s good to be one of the steps on the highway to the future.”

Kathy Rentsch, QCC Assistant Vice President for Workforce Readiness and Innovation noted that the bulk of QCC students live, work and intend to stay in the region.

“They are your regional workforce asset. We are an important part of this pipeline,” she said. “We are looking to secure the future of manufacturing in this region, in this state and across the country through innovation, education and collaboration.” 

  • Worcester Mayor Joseph Petty
  • Senator Harriette Chandler receives a painting in recognition for her dedication and commitment to H.A.C.E.
  • Master of Ceremonies Future Focus Program Gilmarie Vongphakdy with Director of Community Bridges Deborah Gonzales
  • 2018 H.A.C.E. Award winners
  • From left: Eric Batista, Deborah Gonzalez, Hilda Ramirez, Iris Delgado, lga Lopez-hill, Maria Addison, Gilmarie Vongphakdy and M
October, 2018

Honoring those high school students in the Latino community who have excelled in arts, academics, athletics, community service, leadership and civic/political engagement is the premise behind the Annual H.A.C.E. (Hispanics Achieving and Celebrating Excellence) Youth Awards. Created in 1985 by faculty and staff at QCC, along with business and community leaders in the Worcester community, the H.A.C.E. Awards were...

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Honoring those high school students in the Latino community who have excelled in arts, academics, athletics, community service, leadership and civic/political engagement is the premise behind the Annual H.A.C.E. (Hispanics Achieving and Celebrating Excellence) Youth Awards. Created in 1985 by faculty and staff at QCC, along with business and community leaders in the Worcester community, the H.A.C.E. Awards were developed to raise community awareness of Hispanic culture. This year’s event was dedicated in memory of Liz Ortiz, a longtime QCC employee who was instrumental in making the annual H.A.C.E. event so successful. Celebrating its 33rd award ceremony, this year’s H.A.C.E. awards honored 30 Latino students from Worcester schools. Since its inception, H.A.C.E. awards have been bestowed on 611 students with monetary awards totaling $43,050. 

At this year's awards ceremony, special recognition in the form of a painting by former H.A.C.E award recipient Edmy Ortiz, was given to Senator Harriette Chandler for her dedication and commitment to H.A.C.E. Senator Chandler has been a H.A.C.E. committee member for 25 years. Mayor Joseph Petty once again proclaimed October 3, 2018 as H.A.C.E. Day in the City of Worcester and encouraged each student honoree to come back to Worcester once they were successful in the workforce.

“Make Worcester a better place for the next generation,” he said.

Master of Ceremony was QCC’s Coordinator of the Future Focus Program Gilmarie Vongphakdy and keynote speaker for the event was Eric Batista, Chief of Operations and Project Management, for the City of Worcester. Mr. Batista discussed what it meant to be successful, noting that success is an accomplishment of your purpose.

QCC President Dr. Luis G. Pedraja also spoke at the awards event, telling students, “It’s not the destination that defines you, but sometimes it’s the journey that shapes you and makes you who you are. Cherish that journey every moment.”

Three special awards were given during the award ceremony presentation and included:

Sofia Vallejo  - a Burncoat High School student, class officer and senior leader, who received the Marlyn Reyes Memorial Community Leadership Award. This award is given in memory of Maryln Reyes, a woman who was a member of one of the first Hispanic families to migrate to Worcester in the early 1960s. She dedicated her life to the improvement of her community and made an indelible and lasting impression on the Latino community. Among Ms. Vallejo's future goals are to attend college where she hopes to either be a psychology major or a pediatric surgeon.

“I’ll always live my life to the fullest helping ones in need along the way to benefit and impact lives,” Ms. Vallejo said.

Luz Mejia, a mother of three (now four as of this event) and full-time student at QCC majoring in the human services program received the Olga López-Hill Community Leadership Scholarship. This award is given to a student who works hard at his or her life and the lives of others, and exhibits the attributes and characteristics associated with community leadership and who recognize the importance of education.

“I am surrounded by a melting pot of cultures. My dream is to be part of our community, share my knowledge and skills with others, hopefully through the human services community,” Ms. Mejia said.

Maria-Simone Sarmiento, a Burncoat High School student received the Dolly Vazquez Cultural Award. It is given to a student who exemplifies the attributes of Ms. Dolly Vasquez, known as a passionate advocate for her cultural involvement within the City of Worcester. Ms. Sarmiento has had a passion for arts since she witnessed her mom connect academics with the arts in an afterschool program. She attends the Burncoat Arts Magnet where she said she is exposed to a “loving and creative environment.” She plans to attend college and major in acting, theater and creative writing and minor in film.

The 2018 H.A.C.E.  Award winners:

Academics

  • Diego Alonso – South High Community School
  • Oscar Amparo – Claremont Academy
  • Bryan Escobar – Worcester Technical High School
  • Marlene Nunez - Worcester Technical High School
  • John Pena – North High School
  • Ricardo Reyes – St. Peter Marian High School
  • Jeselyn Rodriguez – Southbridge High School
  • Janely Rosario – University Park Campus School
  • Ana-Sofia Sarmiento – Burncoat High School
  • Daria Soto – Doherty Memorial High School

Arts

  • Darylis Alvarez-Figueroa - University Park Campus School
  • Jessica Bigio Morales - North High School
  • Antonio Calderon – Claremont Academy
  • Andy Jimenez - South High Community School
  • Angel Ortiz - Southbridge High School
  • Maria-Simone Sarmiento - Burncoat High School
  • Fatima Sinecio – Doherty Memorial High School

Athletics

  • Benjamin Alvarado - South High Community School
  • Alexis Batista - North High School
  • Paolo Bustos - Burncoat High School
  • Edrian Mendez - Claremont Academy
  • Erick Orellana - Doherty Memorial High School

Leadership

  • Melanie Aguilar - Claremont Academy
  • Net Andino - South High Community School
  • Itzelanie Chacon - Worcester Technical High School
  • Bruna Matias - Doherty Memorial High School
  • Jaquelyn Morales - University Park Campus School
  • Joanelys Pabon – North High School
  • Ricardo Ponce - University Park Campus School
  • Sofia Vallejo - Burncoat High School
  • Doris Vasquez - Worcester Technical High School
  • QCC staff Brenda Kuchnicki and Giovanni Cruz with QCC student Darcie Peters.
  • Jim Marsh, Technical Recruiter at Micro Tech Staffing and Nicole Zea, Plant Manager at Saint-Gobain Abrasives
October, 2018

Supporting Quinsigamond Community College students in their academic endeavors today, also means preparing them for their future. At QCC, that future support is in the form of many programs that give students the tools they need to help them successfully enter the workforce.

The college recently put on a Workplace Etiquette luncheon for QCC students, which featured a panel of industry professionals who...

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Supporting Quinsigamond Community College students in their academic endeavors today, also means preparing them for their future. At QCC, that future support is in the form of many programs that give students the tools they need to help them successfully enter the workforce.

The college recently put on a Workplace Etiquette luncheon for QCC students, which featured a panel of industry professionals who highlighted the skills and qualities they look for in a job candidate. This valuable program is held periodically each year.

Panelists included Darlene Heywosz, Director of Human Resources at the YWCA of Central Massachusetts; Jim Marsh, Technical Recruiter at Micro Tech Staffing; Lisa Pontbriand, Program Director at Salmon Adult Health; Joe Tomaski, Director of Human Resources at Wakefly, Inc. and Nicole Zea, Plant Manager at Saint-Gobain Abrasives.

Panelists discussed how important it was for job candidates to do their homework and learn about the companies they are hoping to work at and to make sure they can explain how they would be valuable to that company.

“Remember you’re there to help them not the other way around,” Mr. Marsh said.

One of the items discussed was gaps in work history. All the panelists agreed that gaps should always be addressed and explained.

“There’s no problem having those gaps. I think everyone has life that gets in the way of work, but it’s important to explain your reason for getting back into or getting into the workforce,” Ms. Zea said.

While all the panelists acknowledged the stress of a job interview, they said great communications skills were vital, as well as being specific and not vague during questioning in an interview.  They added that it was important to try and be relaxed, making good eye contact and having positive body language

 “Remember every ‘no’ brings you closer to a ‘yes’,” said Ms. Pontbriand. “Enjoy the interview. Be yourself.”

“Interviewing is not always the most natural things to do. Do your research, have a couple of questions and practice,” Mr. March said.

One student raised the question of what is the acceptable length of time before changing jobs. The panelists agreed one year was an acceptable amount of time, otherwise you could risk being looked at as a job hopper.

  • From left: Veterans Inc. RA Supervisor Craig Makynen, Army Veterans and QCC students Heath Tisdale Jr. and Emmanuel Antwi (Veter
October, 2018

Quinsigamond Community College’s Veterans Club recently donated over 1,000 items to Veterans Inc. in Worcester, through its annual community-wide Hygiene Drive. The drive, in its fifth year at QCC, collects hygiene products for men and women that include bigger items such as towels and washcloths to hygiene staples for men and women. Veterans Inc. has various shelters for male and female veterans. All the...

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Quinsigamond Community College’s Veterans Club recently donated over 1,000 items to Veterans Inc. in Worcester, through its annual community-wide Hygiene Drive. The drive, in its fifth year at QCC, collects hygiene products for men and women that include bigger items such as towels and washcloths to hygiene staples for men and women. Veterans Inc. has various shelters for male and female veterans. All the shelters are located in the Worcester/Shrewsbury area.

QCC’s Director of Veteran Affairs, Paula Ogden, said the month-long event is something that the college’s staff and faculty have really gotten behind.

“The dental program donated toothpaste and toothbrushes,” Ms. Ogden said. “This was so successful because of everyone’s effort in the QCC community.”

 Visit QCC’s Veteran Affairs or the QCC Veterans Club to learn more. 

  • Dr. Chad Williams Lectures on WWI and Its Effects on African Americans
  • Dr. Chad Williams
October, 2018

On October 26, the Sankofa Lecture Series hosted Dr. Chad Williams, Spector Professor of History and African American Studies at Brandeis University in his presentation, “The Wounded World: W.E.B. Du Bois, African Americans and World War I.” 

Students, faculty and staff listened as Dr. Williams told of W.E.B. Du Bois’s effort to write the history of the black experience in the...

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On October 26, the Sankofa Lecture Series hosted Dr. Chad Williams, Spector Professor of History and African American Studies at Brandeis University in his presentation, “The Wounded World: W.E.B. Du Bois, African Americans and World War I.” 

Students, faculty and staff listened as Dr. Williams told of W.E.B. Du Bois’s effort to write the history of the black experience in the war and the lessons of the war for our present world. He described how Du Bois's credibility was in tatters at the end of the war and how an opportunity to write a book on the black experience and the war presented itself to him.

Dr. Williams is the author of the award-winning book, “Torchbearers of Democracy: African American Soldiers in the World War I ERA.”

  • Assistant Manager of Athletics and Fitness Center Josh Cole helps with the cooking.
  • It was a perfect day for the PTK cookout.
  • Database Administrator Tom Hebert shows off his chops with the QCC Jazz Ensemble.
October, 2018

Last month we began featuring a student written article, A Student Perspective.This is a way for the QCC community to experience the amazing talent of our students and a perfect way for our students to gain exposure in writing for a broader audience.

This month’s article is from QCC student Ashley Forhan. Ms. Forhan is a Phi Theta Kappa (PTK)...

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Last month we began featuring a student written article, A Student Perspective.This is a way for the QCC community to experience the amazing talent of our students and a perfect way for our students to gain exposure in writing for a broader audience.

This month’s article is from QCC student Ashley Forhan. Ms. Forhan is a Phi Theta Kappa (PTK) student and the current QCC Food Pantry Manager. Ms. Forhan wrote about the recent PTK Annual Cookout. 

On October 10, I had the pleasure of attending Phi Theta Kappa’s Annual Fall Cookout. The weather was absolutely perfect and we could not have asked for a better day to have a cookout. The cookout was such a great way to get involved on campus and to meet new students. The food cooked on the grill was a great alternative to the cafeteria and this year PTK added fried dough to the cookout menu, which was a great, delicious, sweet treat! I couldn’t believe all of the raffle prizes that were offered. I put in so many raffle tickets because there was just no way to choose between all of them! I was lucky enough to win a gift certificate to the pet store where I buy my dog food. It was also very enjoyable to listen to the music provided by the DJ and members of the QCC Jazz Ensemble. It is always a treat to see the talents of those whose faces have become so familiar in the halls of this college.

As a member of Phi Theta Kappa, I had the distinct opportunity of not only attending the event, but also watching and being a part of the hard work that went into making the event happen. Bonnie Coleman (PTK Advisor), Maryanne Ouma (PTK Greenhouse Treasurer), and other members of PTK had been working tirelessly for months seeking out items to be raffled off, getting food donations, and recruiting volunteers for the event. Without all of their dedication, we would have missed out on an incredible day.

I was truly inspired to watch the PTK office come together to make this such a successful event. Being a part of PTK and being involved in activities such as the cookout, has made my experience at QCC so much more than a place where I take classes. I have gained a family through PTK and have been given so many incredible opportunities through this organization. I truly believe that being involved on campus has evolved me into the student I am today. 

Interested in writing an article for the newsletter? Pitch your story idea to Karen Hutner at khutner [at] qcc.mass.edu and maybe you’ll be featured in the next Wyvern newsletter!

  • QCC senior nursing students worked to train as many people as possible on "Hands Only CPR.
October, 2018

The leading cause of death today is sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) and with nearly 400,000 out of hospital cardiac arrests occurring annually in the United States, survival depends on getting immediate Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR). Staying alive by staying informed was the theme at Quinsigamond Community College recently as the college’s senior nursing students in the Advanced Placement Nurse...

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The leading cause of death today is sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) and with nearly 400,000 out of hospital cardiac arrests occurring annually in the United States, survival depends on getting immediate Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR). Staying alive by staying informed was the theme at Quinsigamond Community College recently as the college’s senior nursing students in the Advanced Placement Nurse Education Program completed their marathon “Hands Only CPR” training during the months of September and October. A total of 867 students (including 45 nursing students), faculty and staff, were trained in this lifesaving technique. The students also trained people on what to do in the event of life-threatening bleeding. 

Blair Young, Senior Regional Director of the American Heart Association, send a heartfelt email directed to the nursing students. "Please congratulate the students for me on leading such an impactful event. Thanks for all that you and your team are doing to make our community a safer and healthier place to live."

“I am so very proud of our students for having such a positive impact on our community. Susan Johnson and Peg McGrath (Professors of Nursing Education) did an absolutely fantastic job of organizing this ambitious endeavor,” said Professor of Nurse Education Meredith Weston.

Visit QCC Nursing to learn more.

  • Student Senate
October, 2018

At Quinsigamond Community College, students play a vital role in the overall success of the college by having an active voice through QCC’s Student Senate.There may be times when students feel their voices are not being heard, or perhaps they want to learn more about the college; or maybe they have a great idea for the college that they’d like to share, but aren’t sure where to go...

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At Quinsigamond Community College, students play a vital role in the overall success of the college by having an active voice through QCC’s Student Senate.There may be times when students feel their voices are not being heard, or perhaps they want to learn more about the college; or maybe they have a great idea for the college that they’d like to share, but aren’t sure where to go to have their voices heard. The Student Senate offers a place where all students are heard and acknowledged and is a important asset to the college.

According to current Student Senate President Stephanie Teixeira, anyone can join the Student Senate at any time during the year. Meetings are held every Thursday at 2:00 p.m. in the Student Fuller Center, located on QCC’s main campus in Worcester. To be a voting member, a student must attend at least two consecutive meetings; however, any student is welcome to attend any meeting at any time. 

“You can come anytime and be heard,” Ms. Teixeira said.

Student Senators sit on the boards of virtually every board on campus, making sure there is always a student voice.

“This allows us to know what’s going on and we can advocate for changes,” Ms. Teixeira continued.

The Student Senate is led by an Executive Board of that changes each fall. Elections are held to decide who the new officers are for the coming year.

This year’s 2018/2019 Student Senate Executive Board of Student Senators includes:

  • President – Stephanie Teixeira
  • Mustafa Boweden – Vice President
  • Jorgo Gushi – Secretary
  • Devon Arthur – Parliamentarian
  • Mohamed Boweden – Public Relations/Marketing

According to Ms. Teixeira, two members of the Student Senate are part of the Student Advisory Council, a group of student leaders from every public college and university in Massachusetts and the Massachusetts Board of Higher Education. As president of the Student Senate she is a voting member along with QCC student Paul Saul. Ms. Teixeira was also elected Chair of the Student Advisory Council this year.

“At the Student Advisory Council we advocate for what QCC’s needs are,” she said.

  • November ushers in colder weather - remember to check QCC weather alerts for school cancellations or delays.
October, 2018

Thursday, November 1: Attend the Liberal Arts Distinguished Lecture - "Shakespeare in the London Theater Scene:  An Upstart Crow Makes it Big," from 2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. in 109 Harrington Learning Center. Michelle Ephraim, Ph.D. from Worcester Polytechnic Institute, will examine Shakespeare's plays and the world of the public theater.

Saturday,...

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Thursday, November 1: Attend the Liberal Arts Distinguished Lecture - "Shakespeare in the London Theater Scene:  An Upstart Crow Makes it Big," from 2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. in 109 Harrington Learning Center. Michelle Ephraim, Ph.D. from Worcester Polytechnic Institute, will examine Shakespeare's plays and the world of the public theater.

Saturday, November 3: National Mathematics Competition for Community College students from noon – 1:00 p.m. in 355A in the college’s Administration building (670 West Boylston Street Worcester) Stop by and support the QCC team!

Monday, November 5: Pizza with the President! Have a slice of pie and get a chance to meet and chat with Dr. Pedraja from 4:50 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.at the Student Fuller Center on QCC's 670 West Boylston Street Worcester campus. 

Tuesday, November 6: Mid-Term Elections – vote and make your voice heard! Would you like to research a specific election issue?  As always, the Library home page is a great place to start and QCC reference librarians are always ready to help. 

Thursday, November 8: QCC Open House from 5:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m. at 670 West Boylston Street, Worcester. Stop by and learn about all the amazing program and courses available.

Thursday, November 8Pizza with the President comes to QCC Southbridge! Have lunch and a chance to meet and chat with Dr. Pedraja from noon - 1:00 p.m.

Wednesday, November 14: Diversity Dialogues allows you to speak openly and honestly about race, racism, gender, sexism or about your own experience at QCC. The event will be held from noon - 1:00 p.m. in room 109B of the Harrington Learning Center. This event is presented by the QCC Diversity Caucus and is open to all QCC students.

Friday, November 16: Attend a lecture, Racial & Ethnic Disparities in Access to Mental Health Services: Cultural & Contextual Factors, by Dr. Esteban Cardemil from noon to 1:00 p.m. in Room 109B in the Harrington Learning Center. This event is part of the ongoing PSI BETA and Psychology Club Guest Lecture Series. For questions, contact Professor of Psychology Valerie Clemente at vclemente [at] qcc.mass.edu .

Wednesday, November 28 - 30: QCC's Theater will host  play, “SLICES OF LIFE - An Evening of Original Works,” in the Hebert Auditorium (670 West Boylston Street, Worcester) Tickets are $5 at the door. The show will also be presented on Saturday, December, 1 at 7:00 p.m. and Sunday, December 2 at 2:00 p.m

November Spotlight: Sunday, November 11 – Happy Veterans’ Day. QCC Veteran Affairs invites everyone to show their support for all veterans and active duty personal by marching with them in the Worcester Veterans’ Day Parade. All those interested in marching should meet at Veteran’s Inc., 63 Grove Street Worcester at 10:00 a.m. The parade begins at 11:00 a.m.

November 1 – 16: Veteran Affairs and the Veteran’s Club are collecting cans of gravy and cans of cranberry sauce for the Grove Street Veterans’ Shelter. Please drop-off your donations at The Veterans Center in room 258A on the college’s main campus (670 West Boylston Street, Worcester) or QCC Healthcare and Workforce Development Center 25 Federal Street, Worcester.

November 1 – 16: Winter Coat Drive - QCC’s Early Childhood Education Club (in conjunction with the Athletic Center) will be collecting donations of new or gently used winter coats and accessories for QCC students and their children in preparation for the cold weather. donation boxes are located in The Child Study Center, the Second floor of the Harrington Learning Center, and in room 348 of the Administration Building. Donations are also being accepted at the Athletic Center and the President’s Office, room 132A. Please make sure garments are clean and in good condition before dropping them off. Suggested sizes include:

  • Children/Youth sizes 4-8
  • Adult sizes
  • Suggested boot sizes:
  • Children/Youth sizes 10-4
  • Adult sizes
  • Rick and Morty was seen in the hallways of the Administration building.
  • Olivia Astorga as the stuffed doll
  • The Human Resource Department gets into the action.
  • The Disability Services folks.
October, 2018

This Halloween there were a lot of treats and not a lot of tricks as students, faculty and staff enjoyed a fun-filled day of costumes, candy and merriment.  Student Life sponsored a college-wide Trick or Treat event for students and their children, who visited offices throughout the college’s main campus. They also hosted a costume contest, which brought out some scary, funny and downright creative costumes...

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This Halloween there were a lot of treats and not a lot of tricks as students, faculty and staff enjoyed a fun-filled day of costumes, candy and merriment.  Student Life sponsored a college-wide Trick or Treat event for students and their children, who visited offices throughout the college’s main campus. They also hosted a costume contest, which brought out some scary, funny and downright creative costumes.

Winners of the costume contest included:

  • First Place: Olivia Astorga as the stuffed doll
  • Second Place: Robin Zubee as Jack Skeleton
  • Third Place: Megan Richardson as Wednesday Addam

Visit the QCC Halloween album to view more Halloween fun. 

  • QCC's Women's Soccer team bags their first win against Bunker Hill Community College.
October, 2018

QCC Women's Soccer 

The QCC Lady Wyverns Soccer team notched their first win in program history, soundly beating Bunker Hill Community College 6-4. The Women's Soccer team, under the leadership of Assistant Manager of Athletics and Fitness Center Josh Cole, helped to build the program from the ground up three years ago. 

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QCC Women's Soccer 

The QCC Lady Wyverns Soccer team notched their first win in program history, soundly beating Bunker Hill Community College 6-4. The Women's Soccer team, under the leadership of Assistant Manager of Athletics and Fitness Center Josh Cole, helped to build the program from the ground up three years ago. 

Fall Baseball Recap:

The QCC Baseball team hosted a successful fundraising golf tournament at Leicester Country Club earlier this month and thank all who participated and/or donated. The team also hosted a competitive alumni game on October 20, which brought out some of QCC baseball's former players for a lively game.

Bouncing Back to Basketball Season

Men’s Basketball season opening home game will be held on Tuesday, November 6 at 5:00 p.m. against Mass Bay Community College. There will be giveaways and a half time, half court shot contest for a gift basket. Best of all, admission to games is always free! Come and show your school support!  

Other November Men's Basketball Games include:

  • Thursday, November 8  7:00 p.m. (Away-  Holyoke Community College)
  • Saturday, November 10: Noon (Home - Quinicy College)
  • Tuesday, November 13: 7:00 p.m. (Home - UConn at Avery Point)
  • Thursday, November 15: 8:00 p.m. (Away - Bristol Community College)
  • Saturday, November 17: 2:00 p.m. (Away - Roxbury Community College)
  • Tuesday, November 20: 5:00 p.m. (Home - Ben Franklin)
  • Tuesday, November 27: 7:30 p.m. (Away - Bunker Hill Community College) 
  • Thursday, November 29: 7:00 p.m. (Home - Springfield Technical Community College) 

Women's Basketball season opening game is away on Thursday, November 8 at 5:00 p.m. against Holyoke Community College. 

Other November Women's Basketball Games include:

  • Tuesday, November 13: 5:00 p.m. (Home - UConn at Avery Point)
  • Thursday, November 15: 6:00 p.m. (Away - Bristol Community College)
  • Saturday, November 17: Noon (Away - Roxbury Community College) 
  • Tuesday, November 27: 5:00 p.m. (Away - Bunker Hill Community College)
  • Thursday, November 29: 5:00 p.m. (Home - Springfield Technical Community College) 
  • From Left: Officer Dixon,Twaney Mitchell, Corissa Walls, Christopher Lam and Officer LaBranche.
  • Officer Dixon with Paige Walton.
  • Student Raymond Rodraes shares a coffee with a few QCC Cops.
  • Students enjoy Coffee with a Cop event.
October, 2018

Coffee, hot chocolate and a lot of smiles were the order of the day at the Coffee with A Cop event, held on October 3 in QCC’s cafeteria. According to QCC Campus Police Officer Catherine Dixon many students stopped by to briefly chat and ask questions, while enjoying a hot drink and some QCC police swag.

Many students asked about the new Police Academy, parking permits and...

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Coffee, hot chocolate and a lot of smiles were the order of the day at the Coffee with A Cop event, held on October 3 in QCC’s cafeteria. According to QCC Campus Police Officer Catherine Dixon many students stopped by to briefly chat and ask questions, while enjoying a hot drink and some QCC police swag.

Many students asked about the new Police Academy, parking permits and asked what the Coffee with A Cop event was all about.

This is the third year that QCC Police have participated in this nation-wide event, which started in Hawthorne, California in 2011. Officers from the Hawthorne Police Department were looking for ways to break down barriers and interact more productively with the citizens they served each day. Today, all 50 states participate in the program.

  • QCC Honor Guard: DC Stephen DiGiovanni, Wally, DC Rodriguez , Off. LaBranche
October, 2018

The QCC Police Color Guard presented the Nation’s Colors during Community College Night at Fenway Park in late September. The yearly event recognized outstanding students from each of the 15 community colleges.

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The QCC Police Color Guard presented the Nation’s Colors during Community College Night at Fenway Park in late September. The yearly event recognized outstanding students from each of the 15 community colleges.

October, 2018

We are very pleased to announce the addition of the following new full-time staff member to Quinsigamond Community College:

On October 22, 2018, Admissions welcomed Marie Telemaque into her new role as Clerk III –Admissions.  Marie brings over 7 years of experience to this position. Most recently, she was a part time Clerk in the Admissions department here at QCC. Previous to...

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We are very pleased to announce the addition of the following new full-time staff member to Quinsigamond Community College:

On October 22, 2018, Admissions welcomed Marie Telemaque into her new role as Clerk III –Admissions.  Marie brings over 7 years of experience to this position. Most recently, she was a part time Clerk in the Admissions department here at QCC. Previous to this role, she served as a part time Clerk in Academic Advising at QCC. Prior to her work at QCC, she was a Medical Assistant for Dr. Elise Jakes. Marie earned an Associate’s  Degree as a Medical Assistant from Mount Wachusett Community College.

October 28, 2018, Public Safety welcomed Randi Fisher into his new role as Communications Dispatcher I (Second Shift). Randi brings over 15 years of experience to this position. Most recently, he was the Public Safety Officer at U.S. Security and Associates. In addition, he recently has served as the Recreation Specialists Coordinator for Grafton Job Corps Center and had a role in the International Protective Services. Randi earned his degree in Criminal Justice from Quinsigamond Community College.

Please join us in welcoming Marie and Randi to their new roles at QCC.