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July, 2018

  • From Left: Karen Ruck, Mishawn Davis-Eyene, Dr. Luis Pedraja and Stephen Marini try out the Community Learning Hub.
  • QCC and Great Brook Valley Adminstration
  • Carlton Watson, Director of Family and Resident Services at GBV (left) shakes hands with QCC President Dr. Luis Pedraja.
  • QCC students try out the new Community Learning Hub at Great Brook Valley.
  • QCC recent graduate and GBV resident Candria Gray stopped by to check out the Community Learning Hub.
  • QCC community Learning Hub Ribbon Cutting at Catholic Charities
  • Dr. Luis Pedraja, Student Trustee Benjamin Aryeh and Dr. Deborah Gonzalez.
July, 2018

A vision has become a reality for Quinsigamond Community College President Dr. Luis G. Pedraja, with the recent openings of two Community Learning Hubs at Great Brook Valley Apartments and Catholic Charities. The new community learning hubs are places where current QCC students can go to study, have access to computers, a Wi-Fi connection and printers.

The openings were met with excitement as...

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A vision has become a reality for Quinsigamond Community College President Dr. Luis G. Pedraja, with the recent openings of two Community Learning Hubs at Great Brook Valley Apartments and Catholic Charities. The new community learning hubs are places where current QCC students can go to study, have access to computers, a Wi-Fi connection and printers.

The openings were met with excitement as residents praised what the college, Worcester Housing Authority, and Catholic Charities have accomplished.

QCC President Dr. Luis G. Pedraja, said the idea of these types of community learning hubs came to him many years ago, long before he was president of a college. As someone who personally grew up in an inner city community with very little resources, Dr. Pedraja recognized that people did not always have a quiet place to study, access to technology, or transportation to and from a college campus.

“I wanted the community college to live up to the idea of community and being in the community. A community college cannot be defined by the walls of its campus,” he said. “This is a partnership with these communities. It brings student success closer and cements the relationship with other services and community groups. We are not just part of a college campus up on a hill, we’re serving the entire community.”

Carlton Watson, director of Family and Resident Services at Great Book Valley said the Worcester Housing Authority was tremendously excited to partner with QCC.

“We know the importance of higher education. Self-sufficiency and being able to move forward is our focus and education is the gateway. We believe the learning hub will be of immense support for our residents to achieve their goals. We’re pleased to contribute with this effort and so happy to partner with QCC,” Carlton Watson, director of Family and Resident Services at Great Book Valley.

Executive Director Tim McMahon, of Catholic Charities Worcester County, said people in need go to the agency for every day necessities such as food, clothing and diapers. The agency’s goal is to help them attain self-sufficiency.

“Part of what we want to do is create wraparound services and support services and there is no better piece to self-sufficiency than education. Quinsigamond (Community College) is a wonderful part of that component. This is a terrific partnership,” Mr. McMahon said.

Transportation to and from campus is often an issue for students and with the learning hubs situated in the communities where hundreds of QCC students live, the locations made perfect sense. Both agencies found rooms they could repurpose and QCC supplied the equipment to make these learning hubs a reality.

Worcester City Councilor Sarai Rivera (District 4) was on hand at the opening of the Community Learning Hub at Catholic Charities and was quick to commend the alliance of QCC and Catholic Charities.

I’m really excited about this partnership and how the collaboration of QCC and Catholic Charities really benefits the community,” she said. “QCC has an amazing reputation and the model of what people are looking for in a community college. I can’t wait to see how this unfolds.”

QCC students said they are looking forward to utilizing the learning hubs.

“I know how it feels when you don’t have a computer or you can’t get back to campus to do your homework. This will ensure QCC students have the best opportunity for success,” said QCC Student Trustee Benjamin Aryeh.

Dr. Pedraja noted that many students are often juggling a family, in addition to working and going to school. He said it’s vital for students to have a quiet place where they can go to study to help them succeed.

Celine Baez, a current QCC student, Great Brook Valley resident and mother of three, said she is thrilled about the learning hubs.

“I do have a lap top at home, but this will be a great place for me to use because it’s quiet and I will be able to study,” she said.

QCC has also scheduled information sessions and other supportive events for prospective students in the next month at the learning hubs. Dr. Pedraja said there are plans to increase the potential of the hubs even further, by hosting community events and community training such as a possible parents’ academy that will offer information to parents about college, as well as financial literacy programs put on by area banks.

“We hope these are the first of many. The idea is to be present in the community and partner with agencies,” he said. “This is the community supporting the mission of higher education. It’s very gratifying to see this part of the vision come to fruition.”

 

  • Worcester Public Schools College Community Connection students stand with their instructor James Kett (center).
July, 2018

For over 15 years Quinsigamond Community College has played a large role in helping Worcester high school students get a taste of college, improve their MCAS score (a Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment system test needed for graduation), and work at QCC in paid internships on campus through the Worcester Public Schools College Community Connection Program.

The program, offers students not only academic...

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For over 15 years Quinsigamond Community College has played a large role in helping Worcester high school students get a taste of college, improve their MCAS score (a Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment system test needed for graduation), and work at QCC in paid internships on campus through the Worcester Public Schools College Community Connection Program.

The program, offers students not only academic support and mentoring, but also paid internship opportunities for two weeks during the summer. Any Worcester high school student entering his or her senior year, who has not passed the MCAS, is eligible to apply. Students are chosen on a first-come, first-serve basis.

“In the summer students are often forced to choose between working and learning.This program combines the two, providing an invaluable resource to our most at-risk students,” said Stephanie Stockwell, Worcester Public Schools Secondary Summer School Coordinator.

All students in the program will be starting their senior year in the fall and will have the opportunity to retake the MCAS in November. Students who do not pass the MCAS will not earn a diploma.

This year, QCC was host to 11 Worcester high school students from five area high schools: Burncoat, Doherty, South High, North High and Worcester Technical high School.  Many of the students are originally from other countries such as Nepal, Liberia, Central African Republic, Haiti and Ghana. 

The program’s instructor, James Kett, has been part of the College Community Connection program at QCC since the college partnered with Worcester Public Schools. A math teacher at Worcester Technical High School, Mr. Kett has seen both large and small groups of students take part in the program, depending on the year.

“We have many students who have a language barrier when it comes to taking the MCAS,” he said. “Very rarely are we dealing with English as a first language.”

Acknowledging this could be part of the reason why students have not passed the MCAS, he spends the mornings working with the students on their math skills  and ESL skills before they go to various departments in the college for their internships.

South High student Alina Tamang said she did not like math before coming to the program, but that has changed. She said the program and teaching style of Mr. Kett has been very helpful.

“It’s good to learn something new and it was fun,” she said.

This has been a positive experience for sure,” said QCC’s Site Coordinator, Donna Harvey. “This is a great partnership for the students and for us. Each department enjoys having the students and they learn a lot.”

The high school students worked in Admissions, the Athletic Center, Media Services, Student Life and the Maintenance Departments.

According to Ms. Harvey and Mr. Kett, a lot of students who went through the program have gone on to higher education, with some attending QCC after they graduate.

“This program gives them a chance to be familiar with QCC,” Mr. Kett said.

“QCC is a wonderful partner in this program. The Worcester Public Schools value this long-standing partnership,” Ms. Stockwell said. “The students love being on a college campus and getting real work experience through the internships.”

  • QCC's 6th President, Dr. Luis G. Pedraja
July, 2018

Quinsigamond Community College’s 6th President, Dr. Luis G. Pedraja recently celebrated his first anniversary at QCC on July 10…and what a year it’s been!

Dr. Pedraja’s mission of student success for all is being felt in virtually every aspect of the College. From the Welcome Center, the upcoming Student Success Center, expansive strategic plan, Pizza with the...

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Quinsigamond Community College’s 6th President, Dr. Luis G. Pedraja recently celebrated his first anniversary at QCC on July 10…and what a year it’s been!

Dr. Pedraja’s mission of student success for all is being felt in virtually every aspect of the College. From the Welcome Center, the upcoming Student Success Center, expansive strategic plan, Pizza with the President events, to his dedicated and visible outreach in the Worcester community, Dr. Pedraja is leading the way to a bright and exciting future for QCC. A future where education is a right not a privilege.

If you haven’t had a chance to congratulate Dr. Pedraja, please do so when you see him. We know there are exciting things in store for QCC in the coming year and we can’t wait to see what they are.

Thank you, Dr. Pedraja for an incredible first year!

  • Register for fall classes at QCC's One-Stop event.
July, 2018

One – Stop Registration begins August 20

Summer II classes are winding down with the last day of exams on August 13, then it’s on to the fall semester. Where did the time go?

Not registered for the fall semester? Did you know it begins on September 5? Not to worry! There’s no better way to get registered for fall classes, whether you’re a new or returning...

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One – Stop Registration begins August 20

Summer II classes are winding down with the last day of exams on August 13, then it’s on to the fall semester. Where did the time go?

Not registered for the fall semester? Did you know it begins on September 5? Not to worry! There’s no better way to get registered for fall classes, whether you’re a new or returning student, than at Quinsigamond Community College’s One-Stop Registration.

Running Monday, August 20 – Friday, August 31 and featuring new Saturday hours on August 25;  new and returning students can register for classes (no appointment necessary) at the Harrington Learning Center, on QCC’s main campus. One-Stop is a great way to register for classes and get everything done, all in the same place with no appointments needed. Imagine financial aid, admissions and placement tests, all in one place at one time. It's that simple!

To be ahead of the curve before coming to One-Stop, students should print and fill out the registration forms located on the QCC website (remember to bring them with you!).

Don’t wait until the last minute to register for classes and run the risk of being locked out of the classes or professors you want. Make the smarter choice and go to a One-Stop event. It’s never been easier!

  •  PTK student Vanessa Hanger works to stock the shelves at QCC's Food Pantry.
July, 2018

A dream of making hunger on campus a thing of the past may be one step closer to reality with the opening of Quinsigamond Community College’s new food pantry. Since July 10, the pantry has begun to serve those who are food insecure on campus.

Food Pantry Manager Ashley Forhan said as the word is getting out, people are starting to trickle in.The food pantry is available to any current...

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A dream of making hunger on campus a thing of the past may be one step closer to reality with the opening of Quinsigamond Community College’s new food pantry. Since July 10, the pantry has begun to serve those who are food insecure on campus.

Food Pantry Manager Ashley Forhan said as the word is getting out, people are starting to trickle in.The food pantry is available to any current QCC student, staff or faculty member.  Hours of operation are:

  • Monday               1:30 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
  • Tuesday              1:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
  • Wednesday        1:30 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.
  • Thursday            8:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

Those who wish to come in confidentially can call Ms. Forhan at 508.854.4411 and schedule an appointment. “Everything is always kept confidential,” she noted. “It’s important for people to know that this is a safe place where they can come and get something to eat.”

Stocked with non-perishables and a limited amount of fresh produce grown by Phi Theta Kappa (PTK) students in the college’s PTK Live & Learn Greenhouse, the food pantry is completely funded through donations. Those looking to make a donation can stop by the food pantry in the Administration building, room 351A.

Items in need include: 

  • Canned beans, vegetables, fruits, soups, chili, tuna, sardines    
  • Rice, quinoa, bulgur
  • Dry cereal
  • Ramen noodle, noodle cups or dry soups
  • Tomato sauces and pasta
  • Baby food
  • Snack foods (crackers, cookies, pretzel and other non-perishables)
  • Peanut butter
  • Powder milk
  • Mac Cheese
  • Dried legumes, such a peas, lentils and beans
  • Dried herbs and spices
  • Microwave popcorn
  • Granola bars
  • Seeds and nuts
  • Oils (olive)
  • Juice boxes
  • International foods – African, Puerto Rican, Haitian, Indian, Middle Eastern, Asian and American

For additional questions, to make a donation or to volunteer at the food pantry, call 508.854.4411.

  • QCC PTK Student Mark Hogan dances with a resident of Oasis at Dodge Park.
  • QCC's PTK Alpha Theta students host a senior prom for the residents of Oasis at Dodge Park.
  • PTK President Jen Brevik (front right) gets to know one of the residents at Oasis at Dodge Park.
  • PTK students share special moments with seniors.
July, 2018

Sometimes it takes a bit of patience, persistence and a kind word to make an impact on someone’s life. A group of Quinsigamond Community College Phi Theta Kappa (PTK) students learned just how true that was when they became involved with some seniors at the Oasis at Dodge Park, a rest home in Worcester. The students recently hosted a senior prom for the seniors, a culmination of over a month’s worth of...

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Sometimes it takes a bit of patience, persistence and a kind word to make an impact on someone’s life. A group of Quinsigamond Community College Phi Theta Kappa (PTK) students learned just how true that was when they became involved with some seniors at the Oasis at Dodge Park, a rest home in Worcester. The students recently hosted a senior prom for the seniors, a culmination of over a month’s worth of events that was part of the students’ Honors and Action project. The Honors in Action project is a yearlong research project that addresses a need within the community.This year  PTK officers chose to do their project on the power of connection.

“The idea with this theme was how easily we can take our connectedness for granted. How ubiquitous it is and often more noticed in its absence,” said PTK President Jen Brevik.

The students chose to do their research on elders in retirement homes and developed a research question: "How does social interaction between volunteers, staff and elderly patients impact elder loneliness?" To find the answer to this question, the students held events with the seniors that included a game day, manicures & pizza, and ended with a senior prom.

“The seniors were standoffish at first,” Ms. Brevik said. However, as the students continued to visit, they started to warm up. “At each event the seniors started out grouchy, grumpy and anti-social then became warm and loving.They shared personal stories with us about their families, and their lives.They also asked us to return again and to write them letters.”

As the events went on, the seniors became closer to the students and friendships began forming.The prom was the highlight for many and the students spent time dancing with the seniors, sharing food and listening to them reminisce.

“The impact to the volunteers and the seniors was immeasurable,” Ms. Brevik said. “By far, this was the best volunteering activity Phi Theta Kappa has completed as far as having the greatest impact on so many members, students, staff, patients, and patients' families and friends.”

Two of the student volunteers made such a strong bond with a senior that they are going to continue to go back and visit.

“Although our events are completed in regard to the Honors in Action project, the consensus among the PTK officers is to continue to return to the Oasis at Dodge Park rest home every six weeks to continue those bonds and friendships,” Ms. Brevik added.

  • From left: Class Salutatorian Elizabeth Enyan Acheampong and Class Valedictorian Albertha Ajiboye
  • The 2018 QCC PN graduating Class
  • Recent graduates shed tears of joy at their pinning ceremony.
  • Nursing faculty and students enjoyed special moments at the pinning ceremony.
  • Pat Schmohl, Dean of the School of Healthcare pins a recent PN graduate.
July, 2018

On July 11, over 50 Quinsigamond Community College Practical Nursing graduates were on-hand for the college’s traditional nursing pinning ceremony, held in the Hebert Auditorium on QCC’s main campus. The students completed the college’s Licensed Practical Nursing program and are now eligible to sit for the National Council Examination for Practical Nurses (NCLEX-PN) nursing boards to earn their...

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On July 11, over 50 Quinsigamond Community College Practical Nursing graduates were on-hand for the college’s traditional nursing pinning ceremony, held in the Hebert Auditorium on QCC’s main campus. The students completed the college’s Licensed Practical Nursing program and are now eligible to sit for the National Council Examination for Practical Nurses (NCLEX-PN) nursing boards to earn their license to practice.

Graduates of the program can work in a variety of settings related to direct patient care such as doctor’s offices, clinics, extended care facilities, home and community health agencies. To learn about how you can become a part of this exciting career path, visit QCC’s PN Program to learn more.

  • Math Learning Specialist Eduardo Rivas
July, 2018

Math Learning Specialist Eduardo Rivas is an adjunct faculty member at Quinsigamond Community College, teaching in both the math and accounting departments. He has become a valuable resource for mathematic students thanks to the STEM Starter Academy, which funded the position. He is also on a career path that he hopes may one day land him a job as a financial officer in the higher education field...

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Math Learning Specialist Eduardo Rivas is an adjunct faculty member at Quinsigamond Community College, teaching in both the math and accounting departments. He has become a valuable resource for mathematic students thanks to the STEM Starter Academy, which funded the position. He is also on a career path that he hopes may one day land him a job as a financial officer in the higher education field, or perhaps even a college president. His journey to that future began, thanks in large part, to QCC’s Future Focus program.

Future Focus Program

QCC’s Future focus Program began in 1999 and is funded by QCC and a grant from the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education. QCC is one of only three community colleges that received $100,000 from the state – the most a college can receive. The program was developed to offer non-traditional students a pathway to higher education.

According to Program Coordinator, Gilmarie Vongphakdy, Future Focus students are non-traditional students who generally fall into one of three categories: students who have either gone through the tradition U.S. education system but did not complete their school requirements and instead earned their GED or HiSET high school equivalency; English as a Second Language (ESOL/ESL) participants who already have their high school diploma; or students who graduated from high school years ago and went directly into the workforce.

Participants receive comprehensive support in order to help them succeed as they transition into higher education. The program covers all tuition and fees, books, school supplies (and bus passes if needed), in addition to career and academic advising. Students must successfully complete four courses (12 credits) within one year from the time they start the program.

“The bulk of Future Focus students are in their 30s or 40s, but there are some that are younger like Eduardo and we’ve even had a few in their 50s and 60s,” Ms. Vongphakdy said.

A family focused on their future

For Mr. Rivas, the program was the perfect fit for him, having taken engineering-focused classes in high school in El Salvador before attending classes at Universidad Católica de El Salvador with an emphasis on Business Administration. Once he was in the U.S. and settled in Worcester, he took English as a Second Language (ESL) classes at a variety of Worcester area programs; working hard to master the language. Through a series of mentors who helped him, Mr. Rivas entered the Future Focus program. He took the Accuplacer tests, and proudly states that he got a perfect score in math and a high score in English. He immediately began taking classes at QCC in the evenings, while also working during the day.

Through hard work, dedication and assistance from his Advisor Kirsten Daigneault, former head of the Future Focus program (she also helped him obtain transfer credits from his college in El Salvador), he excelled in all of his classes, becoming a member of the Phi Theta Kappa Honors Society, Honors Program and recipient of a QCC Honors program scholarship.

During his time at QCC he also became a math tutor after discovering the math tutoring center.

“I’d never had a tutor so I didn’t check out the math tutoring center right away. When I did, I was amazed at all the resources at QCC,” he said. He credits Martha Upton (Learning Manager at the Math Lab) with hiring him as a tutor and supporting him throughout his academic journey.

It’s a true family “Future Focus” affair for the Rivas family. Mr. Rivas’ younger brother, Rodrigo Rivas, also attended the Future Focus program (and was a QCC math tutor), graduating from QCC with an associate degree, before transferring to Worcester Polytechnic Institute where he earned his bachelor’s degree in Engineering. His mother, Irene Rosales, is currently in the Future Focus program and is working in QCC’s general academic tutoring center.

In 2013, Mr. Rivas earned his associate degree in Business Administration then transferred to Assumption College where he earned both his bachelor’s and MBA, as well as a Certificate of Advanced Graduate Studies in Business. Earlier this month he was the graduation speaker at Excelsior College, in Albany, New York, where he also earned his bachelor’s degree in Technology Management.

Throughout his academic odyssey he has made it a point to give back to the Worcester community, donating his time at the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) Program, where he is now the coordinator, along with volunteering at a myriad of other organizations within the community.

He is also a current mentor in QCC’s Brothers & Keepers mentoring program.

“QCC was such a helpful college. I got a great start here thanks to the Future Focus program,” he said.

To learn more about the program, visit Future Focus.

  • Beekeeper Sang Yun “Brandon” Won
  • Student Ambassador Sang Yun “Brandon” Won
  • Sang Yun “Brandon” Won is always on the lookout for bees.
July, 2018

Late summer is the time when the flowers are blooming, the birds are singing and the bees are buzzing. It’s also a time when the campus begins to kick into high gear in anticipation of the upcoming fall semester.

Buzzing about the campus like a true “worker bee” and helping prospective students learn the ins and outs of QCC, is Sophomore Sang Yun “Brandon” Won....

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Late summer is the time when the flowers are blooming, the birds are singing and the bees are buzzing. It’s also a time when the campus begins to kick into high gear in anticipation of the upcoming fall semester.

Buzzing about the campus like a true “worker bee” and helping prospective students learn the ins and outs of QCC, is Sophomore Sang Yun “Brandon” Won. For over two years Mr. Won’s cheerful face has been the first point of contact for many new and perspective QCC students.

Mr. Won, from South Korea, came to QCC to study environmental science with a specific interest in learning all he could about bees. In South Korea, he and his parents practiced bee keeping as a hobby. He said that “hobby” has now expanded to between 30 and 40 hives.

“My mom is really into it and City Hall (Suwon, South Korea) even opened up its roof so she could do her bee keeping,” he said. “Beekeeping has great environmental benefits.”

It was his love for bees and his desire to see what he could do to help fight the bee colony collapse disorder that is killing off the bees, which led him to Massachusetts and QCC.

“I began to do research and found that Massachusetts has a great reputation in science. I also had met a friend in South Korea who had gone to QCC and said it was a good school, which was how I decided to come here,” Mr. Won said.

Once at QCC, he obtained a work study job on the main campus, which afforded him the opportunity to showcase the college to others as a student ambassador… a job he has embraced enthusiastically. He assists students with the application process; especially valuable to those students going through the international application process. His fun-filled campus tours are a big hit, often interspersed with humor to make the tour lively and engaging.  On the tours, students most often ask about transfer programs, what majors are offered, and what they can do with those majors. He is well-versed in his answers, as he aspires to one day transfer to Worcester Polytechnic Institute and major in entomology with a focus on melittology (the study of bees).

This past year he has expanded his duties and become a STEM (Science, Engineering, Technology and Math) ambassador, a natural fit for an environmental science major. The position is funded through the state's STEM Starter Academy (SSA) grant.

“Whenever we have a tour I focus on the Fab Lab, computer science labs, the science and the manufacturing labs and brag about what we have,” he said, adding, “Once in a while I’m even surprised at what we have.”

Visit QCC’s Liberal Arts – Environmental Science Option to learn more.

  • Dr. Roger & Mary LaBonte
July, 2018

Dr. Roger LaBonte and his wife Mary, of Tennessee, consider learning to be a lifelong endeavor. They also recognize the challenges many people may have due to inadequate resources, which is why they’ve established the Roger S. & Mary E. LaBonte Scholarship Fund.

The scholarship, named in memory of Dr. LaBonte’s mother, Anna (Boehnke) LaBonte, was developed to help those who do not have the...

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Dr. Roger LaBonte and his wife Mary, of Tennessee, consider learning to be a lifelong endeavor. They also recognize the challenges many people may have due to inadequate resources, which is why they’ve established the Roger S. & Mary E. LaBonte Scholarship Fund.

The scholarship, named in memory of Dr. LaBonte’s mother, Anna (Boehnke) LaBonte, was developed to help those who do not have the ability or resources to acquire a formal education. Dr. LaBonte remembers stories told of his mother coming from Poland in the early 20th century to begin a life in America at the age of 13. A voracious reader and listener, she was unable to obtain a formal education due to societal limitations, which discriminated against women and immigrants at that time.

“Our educational system still makes it difficult for many of our citizens, especially the less financially well-off and vulnerable among us, to acquire a formal education,” he said.

An avid lifelong learner himself, early in his youth Dr. LaBonte left high school in Manachug (a village in Sutton, Massachusetts) without completing his sophomore year, in order to work in a shoe factory before joining the U.S. Navy. Eventually he married his wife Mary, had two children and decided to complete high school at Hayward Adult & Technical High School in Hayward, California. He went to earn his associate degree, bachelor’s degree and finally his medical degree from the University of Tennessee Health Science Center in Memphis, Tennessee. Dr. LaBonte said the support and encouragement of his family, the Navy, and numerous mentors enabled him to reach his educational goals…something not always accessible to everyone.

“This motivated us to help deserving family members and others who may have inadequate resources to stay in school and complete their formal education,” he continued.

Dr. LaBonte said the scholarship gives preference to students who are in a health care program, who are single parents, or a minority. This preference holds a particularly poignant significance for the LaBontes. Their niece, Megan Romero, tragically lost her husband just before the birth of their second child. Ms. Romero wanted to enter QCC’s Respiratory Therapy program and according to Dr. LaBonte, her entire family wanted to help her.

“Megan worked very hard to get scholarships and financial assistance to achieve her goal on her own and has required minimal financial assistance from her family,” he said, adding that she is an inspiration to the entire family. “In honor of Megan’s efforts, we chose QCC and consider her a partner in our efforts to help others through scholarships from this fund.”

Today, the first Roger S. & Mary E. LaBonte Scholarship has been awarded to Fordley Kernisant, a general health science major. He is working to complete his degree at QCC, with the goal of transferring to Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Services (MCPHS) and one day becoming a pharmacist.

“Receiving this scholarship will help me pay for books and supplies. It means a great deal to me and will help me so much,” Mr. Kernisant said.

“Everybody deserves an education without financial stress. This scholarship will hopefully help a lot of people and if it takes even an ounce of that stress and feeling of despair off someone’s shoulders, than it is most certainly serving its cause,” Ms. Romero added.

Make sure to check out the August issue of the Wyvern Guardian and learn about Megan Romero's amazing story. 

  • Join Phi Theta Kappa, Alpha Zeta Theta Chapter's Relay for life team.
July, 2018

When you’re battling cancer each day can feel like you’re in the fight of your life. In today’s world, it’s highly unlikely you’ll find someone who has not been touched by cancer. In 2018, according to the National Cancer Institute, an estimated 1,735,350 new cases of cancer will be diagnosed in the United States and 609,640 people will die from the disease. For the last three years...

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When you’re battling cancer each day can feel like you’re in the fight of your life. In today’s world, it’s highly unlikely you’ll find someone who has not been touched by cancer. In 2018, according to the National Cancer Institute, an estimated 1,735,350 new cases of cancer will be diagnosed in the United States and 609,640 people will die from the disease. For the last three years Quinsigamond Community College’s Phi Theta Kappa (PTK), Alpha Zeta Theta Chapter has support the effort to help beat cancer by participating in the Relay for Life of Central South County. The annual Relay for Life event raises funds that go toward the American Cancer Society.

Once again PTK is building a team and they’re looking for everyone’s help.

“Anyone is welcome to walk with us or they can give a donation even if they can’t join the walk,” said PTK Advisor Bonnie Coleman. “Each year we raise a bit more money than the previous year. Last year we raised just about $1,100 and our goal this year is to exceed $2,000.”

By taking part in the event, whether walking or giving a donation, you will be helping to make a difference in someone’s life.

This year’s event will be held on Friday, September 7 from 5:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m. at Lemansky Field, 1 Reith Street, Auburn, Mass. Participants will take turns walking around the track, raising money and awareness to help the American Cancer Society in their lifesaving mission.

To join the team, visit PTK Relay For Life or stop by the Phi Theta Kappa Office, Room 349A or the Student Life Office. 

  • Children School Director Evelyn Markham
July, 2018

Working in early childhood education for close to 30 years, as well as being a mom to five sons, you might think Evelyn Markham would be ready to do something non-child related. However, if you thought that you’d be wrong. Ms. Markham recently started her new position as the Director of Quinsigamond Community College’s Children’s School, a role that is a natural fit for the veteran...

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Working in early childhood education for close to 30 years, as well as being a mom to five sons, you might think Evelyn Markham would be ready to do something non-child related. However, if you thought that you’d be wrong. Ms. Markham recently started her new position as the Director of Quinsigamond Community College’s Children’s School, a role that is a natural fit for the veteran child educator and one she is excited to embrace.

For the last 10 years she has been at Springfield College working as the lead toddler teacher at the college’s Child Development Center. Previously she served as the Program Director at Square One YWCA in Springfield, starting pilot programs in both Springfield and in Holyoke. While she said she enjoyed this chapter in her life, her true passion was always being in the classroom working with young children.

“I decided to go back to the classroom and I became the lead toddler teacher. The missing piece for me in my former position was the children,” Ms. Markham said. “I missed watching the toddlers’ developments. It’s so unbelievable how fast they can progress.”

A graduate of Springfield College, where she earned a Bachelor of Science in Human Services and a Master’s of Education and Educational Services, Ms. Markham said she is delighted to be a part of QCC and the Children’s School. She became familiar with QCC when she came to campus for a directors’ meeting when she was at Springfield College.

“Seeing the lab-school connection and how that enhances the early childhood students’ experiences (as well as the children) was impressive. I’m really happy to be able to represent a school that was the first school in Massachusetts to receive a Level 4 status (to date the highest quality rating available),” she said.

As the summer begins to wind down, Ms. Markham is working to become familiar with QCC. Next month she will start transition visits for returning children and is looking forward to meeting the parents and their children.

“Right now I’m getting my feet wet and looking forward to the future,” she added.

  • Attend a QCC new Student Orientation session and be one step ahead this fall.
July, 2018

It might feel a bit warm outside right now but don’t be fooled, fall is right around the corner and with it comes a new group of students beginning their collegiate journey. Are you one of them? Wondering what life is like at Quinsigamond Community College? The best way to be prepared for college is by attending a QCC New Student Orientation session.

These sessions will help you learn about support...

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It might feel a bit warm outside right now but don’t be fooled, fall is right around the corner and with it comes a new group of students beginning their collegiate journey. Are you one of them? Wondering what life is like at Quinsigamond Community College? The best way to be prepared for college is by attending a QCC New Student Orientation session.

These sessions will help you learn about support services (advising, tutoring and counseling), meet your peers and get your student ID and familiarize yourself with the campus before classes begin. Sessions are being held in late August in the Hebert Auditorium, located on QCC’s main campus, 670 West Boylston Street, Worcester. An evening session will also be held at QCC in Southborough (5 Optical Drive, Southbridge).

New Student Orientation sessions are a perfect way for new students to meet staff, faculty and maybe make a friend or two all before the start of the fall semester. Hear tips on ways to make your time at QCC the best it can be, and perhaps you’ll even win a prize from one of the many raffles! 

New Student Orientation 2018 Sessions:

  • Thursday, August 23, 5:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. (QCC Southbridge)
  • Monday, August 27, 4:00 p.m.-7:00 pm (Hebert Auditorium – Main Campus)
  • Tuesday, August 28, 11:00 a.m. -2:00 pm (Hebert Auditorium – Main Campus)
  • Wednesday, August 29, 11:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. (Hebert Auditorium – Main Campus)
  • Thursday, August 30, 11:00 a.m. -2:00 p.m. (Hebert Auditorium – Main Campus)

Those wishing to attend are encouraged to register at QCC Student Life.

  • Dylan Marengo​ is a 2014 Gateway to College graduate and owner of Lucky's Aquarium in Worcester.
July, 2018

“Oh the places they will go,” became, “Oh the places that they went,” for seven Gateway alumni. These graduates are just a sampling of the amazing pathways the former students have traveled thanks to the start they received from QCC’s Gateway to College Program.

Kaitlyn Stewart​ is a 2016 Gateway to College graduate, who also graduated with honors from QCC...

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“Oh the places they will go,” became, “Oh the places that they went,” for seven Gateway alumni. These graduates are just a sampling of the amazing pathways the former students have traveled thanks to the start they received from QCC’s Gateway to College Program.

Kaitlyn Stewart​ is a 2016 Gateway to College graduate, who also graduated with honors from QCC with a degree in Liberal Arts Psychology. She is transferring to Worcester State University to complete her a bachelor’s degree in Psychology.

Dylan Marengo​ is a 2014 Gateway to College graduate and 2016 QCC graduate with a degree in Criminal Justice. Mr. Marengo recently celebrated one year of owning his own business, Lucky’s Aquarium. Lucky’s Aquarium is a tropical fish store located in Worcester.

Kaydi Barber​ is a 2016 Gateway to College graduate and 2017 QCC graduate with a degree in General Studies. Ms. Barber is currently attending Assumption College and is studying Psychology. She is also a member of the Assumption College Dance Team, a Division 2, elite competition team. The team won a national title at the Dance Team Union College Classic in Las Vegas, Nevada!

Samathana Beauchamp​ is a 2017 Gateway to College graduate and is currently attending Fitchburg State University, studying Political Science. She was also recently elected to serve on the Student Senate.  

Konstanza Rolas​ is a 2016 Gateway to College graduate and one very busy person. After moving to Florida, Ms. Rolas became a tax accountant, is the lead sales manager of an insurance office, became a notary, and created a business as a mobile notary. She also officiates marriages!

Noelle Haslam​ is a 2016 Gateway to College graduate and a 2017 graduate from QCC’s Interactive Media/Digital Design program. Ms. Haslam is slated to graduate from Worcester State University with a bachelor’s degree in Communications in the Spring of 2019. This summer she is going to Greece to volunteer for a dog rescue group and will be bringing back stray dogs to give them new homes in the United States.

Joshua Sadri​ is a 2016 Gateway to College graduate. Mr. Sadri is attending Hampshire College and studying a combination of Music, Film, and Environmental Science. He also recently attended a poster competition for the Environmental Science program Houston, TX.

Are you a Gateway to College graduate with a great story? We want to hear from you. Email your story to khutner [at] qcc.mass.edu.

Gateway to College Logo

  • Summer is in full bloom at QCC.
July, 2018

Monday, August 20: QCC’s new Student Success Center officially opens!

Monday, August 20: 19th Annual MLK Golf Tournament at Quail Hollow Golf & Country Club in Oakham, Mass. to raise scholarship funds for local high school students. (9:00 a.m. Shotgun start. Cost is $125 per golfer ($500 per foursome). For more information or to register visit...

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Monday, August 20: QCC’s new Student Success Center officially opens!

Monday, August 20: 19th Annual MLK Golf Tournament at Quail Hollow Golf & Country Club in Oakham, Mass. to raise scholarship funds for local high school students. (9:00 a.m. Shotgun start. Cost is $125 per golfer ($500 per foursome). For more information or to register visit MLK Golf Tournament .

Saturday, August 25: SUPER SATURDAY! QCC is holding a one-stop event on a Saturday morning from 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.! It's the perfect time to register for classes and get everything done, all in the same place with no appointments needed.

Wednesday, August 29: Gateway to College Information Session for Spring 2019 at 2:30 p.m. in room 107A Admissions Building on QCC’s main campus. Register at Gateway to College .

August Spotlight: New Student Orientation will be held on August 23 (Southbridge) and August 27, 28, 29 and 30 on QCC’s Main Campus in the Hebert Auditorium. For times of the sessions and to register for a session, visit Student Life.

 

  • Storms roll in quickly during the summer months.
  • QCC staff prepare to head for shelter.
July, 2018

Does the sound of thunder get you cowering under the table? Is a bolt of lightning something that fills you with awe or dread? Summertime brings weather with a mind of its own… occasional storms of epic proportions that form in the blink of an eye. Ever wonder why?

Amy Berg, a QCC science faculty member teaches a course called: Climate & Weather: Causes & Effects. Ms. Berg's ...

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Does the sound of thunder get you cowering under the table? Is a bolt of lightning something that fills you with awe or dread? Summertime brings weather with a mind of its own… occasional storms of epic proportions that form in the blink of an eye. Ever wonder why?

Amy Berg, a QCC science faculty member teaches a course called: Climate & Weather: Causes & Effects. Ms. Berg's students learn that all storms require energy to generate wind and rain, which is why hurricane season happens during months when the ocean temperatures beneath the storms is the warmest.

More direct summer sunlight brings even more energy to the atmosphere. When the sun warms the earth, the air above the earth also warms and begins to rise. That warm (and usually humid) air meets colder temperatures above, water vapor condenses and storm clouds form. Winds cutting through this rising air can cause rotation, this rotation is what concentrates to form tornadoes.  

“If a large amount of moisture is contained in the rising air, then it quickly condenses into liquid into the clouds, it can fall out as torrential rains causing flash flooding. Often the air above it is cold enough that the rain actually freezes into ice crystals,” Ms. Berg said.

It gets even wilder when those crazy summer thunderheads that pop up may contain ice, which rises and falls between warm and cold air multiple times, leading to hail. Anyone who has been caught in a hailstorm knows they have potential to cause quite a bit of damage.

Additionally, as the ice crystals rise and fall they also rub against each other and exchange electrons.  This makes the top and bottom of the cloud electrically charged. 

“If the excess electrons jump to the top of the cloud that is lacking electrons, you get cloud-to-cloud lightning (followed by the thunder caused by the supersonic expansion of air around the lightning bolt). If excess electrons discharge into the ground you get cloud-to-ground lightning,” she continued.

Cloud-to-ground lightning causes power outages, fires, and injuries. The National Weather Service issues forecast warnings ahead of severe weather to give people time to seek shelter. These warnings are sent out to help prevent needless tragedies and should always be heeded.

Interested in weather? You don’t have to be a full-time student to enroll at QCC. If you want to learn more about the science of weather and other environmental natural, and physical science visit Liberal Arts/Sciences and General Studies.

  • There is now dedicated parking for Purple Heart recipients in Southbridge
July, 2018

Last month a Purple Heart parking sign was installed at QCC Southbridge. Currently the college has over 200 students who are veterans, some of whom are Purple Heart recipients.

“Purple Heart recipients are folks who have served in the armed forces and were wounded in the war by the hands of our enemies. These folks now have a ‘special’ place specifically designated for them to park. It is our...

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Last month a Purple Heart parking sign was installed at QCC Southbridge. Currently the college has over 200 students who are veterans, some of whom are Purple Heart recipients.

“Purple Heart recipients are folks who have served in the armed forces and were wounded in the war by the hands of our enemies. These folks now have a ‘special’ place specifically designated for them to park. It is our way of saying “thank you” to them,” said QCC Director of Veteran Affairs Paula Ogden.

QCC Veterans Affairs provides a one-stop office of support and services for veteran students. To learn more visit Veteran Affairs.

  • 2017 QCC Women's Soccer team.
July, 2018

WOMEN’S SOCCER PRE-SEASON BEGINS SOON!

Have you had secret aspirations to play soccer? Were you recently inspired by the World Cup games? Perhaps you’ve always wanted to play soccer but never had the opportunity. Well now’s your chance! On Monday, August 20 QCC’s Women’s Soccer pre-season will begin (first regular season game is set for  Sept...

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WOMEN’S SOCCER PRE-SEASON BEGINS SOON!

Have you had secret aspirations to play soccer? Were you recently inspired by the World Cup games? Perhaps you’ve always wanted to play soccer but never had the opportunity. Well now’s your chance! On Monday, August 20 QCC’s Women’s Soccer pre-season will begin (first regular season game is set for  Sept. 13). Any student interested in women’s soccer will be required to have a doctor's physical, be cleared for competitive sports, and be enrolled in at least 12 credits to try out for the team.

Anyone who is interested in being a part of the team should email Coach Josh Cole at jcole [at] qcc.mass.edu .

Athletic Center Building Summer Hours

The Athletic Center summer hours will run through Wednesday, September 5. 

Current hours:  Monday - Thursday 7:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m.; Friday, 7:00 a.m. – noon.

July, 2018

Below is a sampling of some of the articles and press releases published in the local (and sometimes national) media that mention Quinsigamond Community College.

QCC articles for the month of July include:

  • Telegram& Gazette: ...
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Below is a sampling of some of the articles and press releases published in the local (and sometimes national) media that mention Quinsigamond Community College.

QCC articles for the month of July include:

July, 2018

We are pleased to announce the addition of the following new full-time staff members to Quinsigamond Community College:

On May 27, 2018, Academic Affairs welcomed Betty Lauer into a new role as Dean of the School of Business, Engineering, and Technology. Betty brings to this position over 28 years of teaching at the college level here at Quinsigamond Community College. Additionally, she...

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We are pleased to announce the addition of the following new full-time staff members to Quinsigamond Community College:

On May 27, 2018, Academic Affairs welcomed Betty Lauer into a new role as Dean of the School of Business, Engineering, and Technology. Betty brings to this position over 28 years of teaching at the college level here at Quinsigamond Community College. Additionally, she was an academic coordinator for the  Computer Systems Engineering Technology and Computer Information Systems Programs. Betty earned an Associate of Arts in Data Processing from Johnson Community College, a Bachelor’s Degree in Management and Human Relations from MidAmerican Nazarene University and a Masters of Liberal Arts in Information Technology with a concentration in Software Engineering from Harvard University.  

On June 3, 2018, Academic Affairs welcomed Jacqueline Kaczowka into a new role as Program Specialist/ Center for Workforce Development & Continuing Education. Jacqueline brings over 8 years of experience working with non-traditional students to this position. Most recently, she was the clerk in the Center for Workforce Development office here at QCC. She also held other roles as a Workplace Education Instructor and an Advisor at the GED program. Jacqueline earned a Bachelor’s of Science degree in Business Management from Westfield State College.

On July 1, 2018 Financial Aid welcomed Caitlin Laurie into her new role as Associate Director of Financial Aid. Caitlin brings over eight years of financial aid experience to this position. Most recently, she was the Associate Director of Operations and Student Service here at QCC. Previous to this role, she served as a Senior Financial Aid Counselor at QCC. Prior to her work at QCC, she was an Assistant Director of Financial Aid at Clark University. Caitlin earned a Bachelor’s of Arts in Communications and Culture and a Master of Science in Professional Communication from Clark University.

On July 2, 2018, Academic Affairs welcomed Dorothy McCormack into a new role as Manager of ESL and Educational Leadership Adult Basic Education Professional Development Center. Dorothy brings over 22 years higher education administration and work with Adult Basic Education experience to this position. Most recently, she was the Director of SABES Professional Development Center for ESOL at Holyoke Community College. Dorothy earned a Bachelor’s of Science degree in Human Nutrition from University of Massachusetts, Amherst and a Master in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Language from University of Massachusetts, Boston.

On July 1, 2018 Financial Aid welcomed Betsy Groves to her new role as Associate Director of Financial Aid Operations and Technology. Previous to this new role, Betsy served as the Associate Director of Technology and Systems in the Financial Aid Office. Betsy brings over 20 years of Financial Aid and higher education experience to this position. Most recently, she was an Implementation Specialist in the private sector assisting schools in implementing academic administrative software. Prior to that experience, she was the Director of Financial Aid at University of Massachusetts Medical School. Betsy earned a Bachelor’s of Science from University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth.

On July 1, 2018 Administrative Services welcomed Patrick Printz to his new role as Interim Director of IT Projects. Patrick's previous role with QCC was as the Associate Director of Network Infrastructure. Patrick brings over 18 years of experience to this role with his many years of administrative work and web design at Worcester State Hospital. Patrick earned an Associated Degree in Computer Information Systems.

On July 15, 2018, Academic Affairs welcomed Evelyn Markham as Director of the Children’s School Early Childhood Program. Evelyn brings over 19 years of early childhood experience to this role. Previous to joining the QCC family, Evelyn served as the Lead Toddler Teacher at the Child Development Center in Springfield, MA.  Preceding that, Evelyn served as the Program Director at the Square One YWCA in Springfield, MA.  Evelyn is a graduate of Springfield College, where she earned her Bachelor of Science in Human Services and a Master’s of Education and Educational Services from Springfield College.

Please join us in welcoming Betty, Jacqueline, Caitlin, Dorothy,Betsy, Patrick and Evelyn into their new roles at QCC.