Search form

You are here

06/2018

Newsletter Banner

June, 2018

  • PTK student Ashley Forhan is the new food pantry manager
  • Dr. Luis Pedraja visits the food pantry as it begins to get stocked.
June, 2018

Quinsigamond Community College will begin helping to nourish students’ bodies as well as their minds when it starts to roll out its new food pantry on July 10. The new food pantry is the first of its kind at QCC and was developed to proactively address the food insecurities found on the campus.

The QCC food pantry will be stocked with non-perishable items, in addition to a...

More...

Quinsigamond Community College will begin helping to nourish students’ bodies as well as their minds when it starts to roll out its new food pantry on July 10. The new food pantry is the first of its kind at QCC and was developed to proactively address the food insecurities found on the campus.

The QCC food pantry will be stocked with non-perishable items, in addition to a limited amount of fresh produce grown by Phi Theta Kappa (PTK) students in the college’s PTK Live & Learn Greenhouse. QCC students, staff and faculty who are in need can visit the food pantry, located in room 351A on the college’s main campus (670 West Boylston Street, Worcester) on:

  • Monday               1:30 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
  • Tuesday              1:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
  • Wednesday        1:30 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.
  • Thursday            8:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

“Food insecurity is a problem not only on our campus, but also on a national level,” said QCC’s Dean of Students, Terry Vecchio.

An April 2018 national survey by Wisconsin HOPE Lab found that 42 percent of community college students were food insecure in the last 30 days. The Urban Institute released a report in 2017 that stated nearly one in five two-year college students lived in a food-insecure household. At QCC, a 2016 Hunger Survey found that 57 percent of QCC students cut or skipped meals due to budgetary concerns; 49 percent were hungry but didn’t eat, and 64 percent of students ran out of food in a 30-day period and could not purchase more.

“This is something we cannot ignore,” said QCC President Dr. Luis G. Pedraja. “We must all work together to fight against this growing issue.” 

The college’s food pantry is being run completely by donations that come by way of in-kind and monetary donations. A June food drive and some private donations have already helped to get the food pantry started and ongoing fundraisers are also being planned.

PTK Officer-at-Large student Ashley Forhan is overseeing the food pantry as its manager. Ms. Forhan is particularly pleased to be a part of this initaitive, adding that at one point she had similar troubles in her own life and had experienced food insecurities. 

“This is a perfect way to give back to my community. There is such a need for this. I’m really excited that we are able to offer this type of service at QCC,” she said. “We hope to reach as many people as possible in need, as well as provide visitors with nutritional information that can be used in their own grocery shopping.”

Those using the food pantry must be a current student (show a current QCC ID), staff or faculty member. All information will be kept confidential. 

Those who wish to come in confidentially can call Ms. Forhan at 508.854.4411 and schedule an appointment.

For additional questions, to make a donation or to volunteer at the food pantry, call 508.854.4411.

  • From left: Dr. Dilip Patel discusses experiment results with QCC students.
June, 2018

Pre-Pharmacy Students given unique opportunity 

Quinsigamond Community College is paving the way for students to earn their graduate pharmacy degree more efficiently and economically through its new articulation agreement with Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Services (MCPHS).

The new agreement will give eligible QCC students the opportunity to attain a graduate degree...

More...

Pre-Pharmacy Students given unique opportunity 

Quinsigamond Community College is paving the way for students to earn their graduate pharmacy degree more efficiently and economically through its new articulation agreement with Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Services (MCPHS).

The new agreement will give eligible QCC students the opportunity to attain a graduate degree from MCPHS directly after earning an associate degree from QCC. QCC students who are accepted into the graduate degree program are not required to have a bachelor’s degree; saving them substantial money and time. Normally it would take a pharmacy graduate student approximately eight years to complete his or her graduate degree. Eligible QCC students must have an associate degree  from the General Studies - Pre-Pharmacy (GSPH) program and have a minimum grade point average of 3.2 (with no grade less than a “C”; additional requirements apply), in order to be considered for admission into MCPHS’s Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) graduate program.

“Our community college associate degree program is the only one in the state that has been accepted for the doctorate program at MCPHS. This is a testament to our program and our students,” said QCC Chemistry Professor Dr. Dilip Patel. “When you enter MCPHS from QCC, you are 2.5 years ahead of other students.”

QCC’s GSPH program prepares its pre-pharmacy students for success through smaller class sizes and a personal touch from professors, which helps students stay focused and on task. Students who enter into the MCPHS program will be on an accelerated pathway and will take classes year-round, in order to graduate in three years with their PharmD degree. While the program is rigorous, the rewards are vast.

“Students save a great deal of money and are able to enter the workforce as pharmacists a lot sooner; earning as much as $110,000-$120,000 to start,” Professor Patel continued. “The students are dedicated and work hard. We’ve had 10 of our students accepted into MCPHS for this Fall semester 2018. ”

Daniel de la Torre, Coordinator of QCC Transfer Affairs & Articulation, notes that in order to participate in this articulation pathway with MCPHS, students need to formally enroll in the General Studies – Pre-Pharmacy (GSPH) program at QCC. He went on to say that “because the GSPH program is so rigorous, it helps students prepare for the demanding expectations of the MCPHS program. Students are encouraged to talk with Dr. Patel, or see me or Beth Fullerton in Transfer Services for more information about the agreement.”

MCPHS is making up to 10 spots available each Fall semester for qualified QCC General Studies - Pre-Pharmacy program graduates. To learn more, visit the college's Pre-Pharmacy Program.

 

 

  • Tyler Martinelli holds the motorized airboat he created using the 3D printers at the Fab Lab.
  • Vanessa Fournier is all smiles as she displays the dog tag she made during her time in the Fab Lab.
  • Maximillian Duncan tries out the while he made during his time in the Fab Lab.
  • Olivia Howard shows off the projects she made using the Fab Lab's 3D printers and laser cutter.
  • Jenitza Negron hold up the sweatshirt she embroidered at the Fab Lab.
  • Gateway to College Students spent an amazing two weeks making projects at the Fab Lab.
June, 2018

Sometimes it takes doing something to actually understand and appreciate a concept, idea or type of technology. Students from Gateway to College had the opportunity to do just that when they took a two-week class in Quinsigamond Community College’s Fab Lab. The class was developed by Gateway to College Program Manager Marci Skillings and Fab Lab Manager Alex Gray. It ...

More...

Sometimes it takes doing something to actually understand and appreciate a concept, idea or type of technology. Students from Gateway to College had the opportunity to do just that when they took a two-week class in Quinsigamond Community College’s Fab Lab. The class was developed by Gateway to College Program Manager Marci Skillings and Fab Lab Manager Alex Gray. It was designed to introduce Gateway students to the technologies available to them in the Fab Lab. The class will be credited as a high school science course for the students.

Funding for the program is through a grant from the STEM Starter Academy (SSA), which paid for the instructor, materials and lunch each day. Students created projects using the lab’s 3D printers, laser cutter and industrial embroidery machine.

“I really didn’t know what to expect but it over-exceeded my expectations, “Gateway student Olivia Howard said.

Gateway student Maximillian Duncan said that while initially it was a bit confusing, he quickly began to understand how to operate the machines, first downloading designs on the computer then transferring them to his projects. 

"You can make anything that you can imagine," he said.

Gateway students Tyler Martinelli and Tyler Carey created a motorized toy replica of an airboat, fabricating the body using the 3D printers.  

“They went above and beyond with their project,” Senior Gateway Outreach Counselor Jenna Glazer added.

“There’s lots of ways to get students interested in things like biology and technology but by actually engaging and making something, they learn more,” Ms. Skillings said.

  • From left: Dr. Luis Pedraja, Robert Allred, Tony Sanders and Edward Weatherbee, of Grainger.
  • Tony Sanders (left) received a Grainger customized toolkit, presented to him by Edward Weatherbee, of Grainger.
  • Robert Allred (left) is congratulated by Edward Weatherbee, of Grainger.
June, 2018

On June 30, Quinsigamond Community College recent graduates Robert Allred and Tony Sanders were awarded $2,000 scholarships and customized Westward toolkits through Grainger’s Tools for Tomorrow Scholarship program by Edward Weatherbee, of Grainger. 

The scholarship program began in 2006 and was designed to recognize outstanding technical education...

More...

On June 30, Quinsigamond Community College recent graduates Robert Allred and Tony Sanders were awarded $2,000 scholarships and customized Westward toolkits through Grainger’s Tools for Tomorrow Scholarship program by Edward Weatherbee, of Grainger. 

The scholarship program began in 2006 and was designed to recognize outstanding technical education community college students and assist them in realizing their educational goals. Since the fall of 2010, the program offered a limited number of scholarships to students who served in the military.  Both QCC recipients are veterans.

Mr. Allred, who served in the Marines, recently received his associate degree in Electronics Engineering Technology- Photonics Option.
 
Mr. Allred plans to attend Fitchburg State University this fall with an interdisciplinary concentration in Electrical Engineering Technology.  He is currently working at Protonex Technology in Marlborough, a job he has held since interning there.  His Professor, James “Jim” Heffernan, Coordinator of the Electronics Engineering Technology Programs, helped to connect him with the internship.
 
“This toolkit is beyond all expectations and was so much more than I could have imagined,” he said.
 
Mr. Sanders, who is a Navy veteran, earned three Electronics Engineering Technology associate degrees, that each focus on a different discipline: Mechatronics, Photonics and Biomedical Instrumentation. He plans to attend a four year school in the fall with the goal of one day teaching electronics.
 
“This is a great program. It provides valuable resources to our veterans in the trades and gives them a great head start,” said QCC President Dr. Luis Pedraja.

  • There's still time to take a summer class at QCC.
June, 2018

It is not too late to snag that class you’ve been putting off and take one or more than one summer course at Quinsigamond Community College. Classes begin on July 5 and run through August 13.

 As summer gets into full swing, make this the time to take one of those courses you’ve been meaning to take before the fall semester gets here. A summer course is a great time to catch...

More...

It is not too late to snag that class you’ve been putting off and take one or more than one summer course at Quinsigamond Community College. Classes begin on July 5 and run through August 13.

 As summer gets into full swing, make this the time to take one of those courses you’ve been meaning to take before the fall semester gets here. A summer course is a great time to catch up if you’re behind in your program of study. Summer courses tend to be smaller in size and since most students take a smaller course load over the summer, it’s the perfect time to take that one course you need to take, but have been avoiding.

Summer courses offer you the ability to take a course in an accelerated timeframe – five weeks vs. the traditional 15 week semester, allowing you to be that much further ahead when the fall semester begins. In-person and online classes are offered allowing you the convenience of either option.

Already cleared to self-register? Visit The Q and follow the directions for self-registration.

Unsure whether you are cleared to self-register? Not to worry! Currently you can visit QCC’s Academic Advising Office to register on Monday - Thursday: 8:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m. and Friday: 8:00 a.m. – noon until August 17, with no appointment necessary.  

Fall is right around the corner!

Courses fill up fast, particularly in the fall, so while you’re registering for summer classes consider registering for the fall semester to get the professors and classes that fit your schedule. Avoid the lines and the hassles of being locked out of a course and register now. Remember, your future is closer thank you think!

QCC’s Academic Advising is located on the college’s main Worcester campus, 670 West Boylston St., Worcester, in Room 61A. For additional information call 508.854.4308.

  • The tomatoes are getting mighty big!
June, 2018

If you haven’t stopped by the Phi Theta Kappa (PTK) Live and Learn Greenhouse recently you might be in for a surprise.The space now boasts a newly painted floor thanks to QCC’s facilities department, along with new lighting and a reorganized layout.

The greenhouse is busting at the seams with tomato, cucumber and pepper seedlings, in addition to flowers, herbs and succulents. The students have also...

More...

If you haven’t stopped by the Phi Theta Kappa (PTK) Live and Learn Greenhouse recently you might be in for a surprise.The space now boasts a newly painted floor thanks to QCC’s facilities department, along with new lighting and a reorganized layout.

The greenhouse is busting at the seams with tomato, cucumber and pepper seedlings, in addition to flowers, herbs and succulents. The students have also planted seeds donated by the Regional Environmental Council (REC).  REC is an environmental and food justice organization for Worcester and Central Massachusetts, dedicated to building healthy, sustainable and equitable communities. The goal is to work collaboratively with REC to help increase produce and assist in addressing the food insecurities on campus, according to PTK Student and Greenhouse Manager Colin Boisvert.

Other exciting changes include the development of a new hydroponics system that will help to increase produce output and the progression of the greenhouse website project.

PTK student Thomas Rokicki has worked tirelessly the website project, according to PTK Advisor Bonnie Coleman. The website records data that shows current temperature and humidity. Mr. Rokicki is also working to incorporate a live feed camera and templates for all the plants that are growing.  Visit the Greenhouse website to see the latest updates. 

“Anyone is welcome to sign-up for the website and follow us and our journey in providing heathy wholesome produce to food-insecure students on our campus,” Ms. Coleman said.

Stay-tuned for more blooming updates!

 

  • As Officer Dixon looks on as student Caitlin Plant practices R.A.D. techniques on Officer Rogowski.
  • Ms. Plant takes down her aggressor.
  • Professor Jerry Williams tries working with the Fatal Vision Goggles as Gateway student Tyler Martinelli looks on.
June, 2018

Look around Quinsigamond Community College’s campus and on most days you’ll most likely find QCC’s Community Outreach Officer Catherine Dixon teaching a course, discussing safety issues or engaging with the entire QCC community in a hands-on activity.

Recently Officer Dixon held morning sessions for a group of Gateway students, which dealt with Sexual Assault Awareness,...

More...

Look around Quinsigamond Community College’s campus and on most days you’ll most likely find QCC’s Community Outreach Officer Catherine Dixon teaching a course, discussing safety issues or engaging with the entire QCC community in a hands-on activity.

Recently Officer Dixon held morning sessions for a group of Gateway students, which dealt with Sexual Assault Awareness, Domestic Violence Awareness, Risk Reduction, and Alcohol and Drug Awareness.  Safety plans and available resources were also part of the discussions.

“We talked about the actual definitions and perceptions of Assault and Domestic Violence. We talked about the differences. We talked about fondling, touching, cat calls, slang words and consent,” Officer Dixon said. “Liz Woods (Dean of Compliance) did a presentation on Title IX and Tina Wells (Social Worker/Mental Health Counselor) did a presentation on resources and confidentiality. We talked about being a bystander and how to be a good bystander.”

The students discussed judgment and resources during the segment on Alcohol and Drug Awareness.

The students did an activity on mindfulness and judgment using chocolate as the example.

“We talked about how once you get a small regulated amount it becomes all you can think of, want and it overwhelms you. We walked through a day in a life of an addict and a day in the life of a family member and how it affects them and branches out to others and the community they live and work in,” Officer Dixon continued.

To demonstrate what its like to be impaired, students and those walking by were given the chance to try Fatal Vision goggles, a simulation tool used to show the impairment at six distinct BAC (Blood Alcohol Concentration) levels.

Students and faculty tried walking a line, pouring a drink, throwing a ball into a basket and catching a ball wearing the goggles. The goggles simulated the effect of alcohol impairment. Participants wearing the goggles showed impaired targeting skills, slower judgment, diminished focus, delayed reactions, reduced peripheral vision and a loss of balance and equilibrium.      

“The googles deliver a memorable experience about the misuse and abuse of alcohol,” Officer Dixon added.

In addition to the morning sessions, five female students participated in a Rape Aggression Defense (R.A.D.) class that was held in the afternoons. Officer Dixon taught the R.A.D. course with the aid of Becker Police Department Officer Cory Rogowski and Lt. Joe Bonczek.  R.A.D. Systems of Self-Defense is a program of realistic, self-defense tactics and techniques. This is a comprehensive course for women that begins with awareness, prevention, risk education and avoidance, while progressing on to basics of hands-on defense training. The program is taught by R.A.D. certified instructors and is offered at college campuses and universities across the country.

Officer Dixon will be offering another Rape Aggression Defense Class in September. This is a 12-hour class that is broken up into four, three-hour days (Sept. 18, Sept. 20, Sept. 25 and Sept. 27 from 5:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m.). The class is held at QCC’s Athletic Center basketball court and is free to the QCC community. To register email Officer Dixon at cdixon [at] qcc.mass.edu or call 508.854.4221.

  • QCC's flowers exude the spirit of July 4th.
June, 2018

Wednesday, July 4: The college will be closed for the July 4th holiday. HAPPY Fourth! 

Wednesday, July 11: Practical Nursing Day/Eve Pinning will be held at 6:00 p.m. in the Hebert Auditorium. Come support your favorite PN! 

Thursday, July 12: Admissions Information Night will be held from 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. at the...

More...

Wednesday, July 4: The college will be closed for the July 4th holiday. HAPPY Fourth! 

Wednesday, July 11: Practical Nursing Day/Eve Pinning will be held at 6:00 p.m. in the Hebert Auditorium. Come support your favorite PN! 

Thursday, July 12: Admissions Information Night will be held from 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. at the Harrington Learning Center. Learn about QCC's programs, facilities, classes, labs and more. Find out what it takes to apply for admission, financial aid and all of the other things you need to know to get started on the career of your dreams! Register today for this free event.

Ongoing: Student ID Hours are Monday – Thursday from 9:00 a.m.  – 10:00 a.m. and noon – 2:00 p.m. in the Athletic Center. Appointments can be made outside of this schedule if necessary. Please call 508.854.4317 if you need to schedule an appointment.

July Spotlight:  To learn more about QCC's Police Academy there will be an Information Session on Monday, July 23, from 1:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. at QCC’s main campus (670 West Boylston Street Worcester). Visitors should go to the Welcome Center located in the Harrington Learning Center. The class is filling up FAST! 

  • Dr. Luis Pedraja watches students Shawn Reese and Christian Hulett's robotic demonstration.
  • A Fanuc Robot is programmed to do the perfect pick up.
  • QCC students Sarah Dinsmore and Cody Hamilton.
June, 2018

This is the year of the robot. Today's movies, web posts and YouTube videos all show the amazing things that robots can do. To be a part of the robotic world is to be part of the future. 

Students in Professor James Heffernan’s Electronics Engineering Technology class know that first hand. Last month a group of students completed their FANUC CERT (...

More...

This is the year of the robot. Today's movies, web posts and YouTube videos all show the amazing things that robots can do. To be a part of the robotic world is to be part of the future. 

Students in Professor James Heffernan’s Electronics Engineering Technology class know that first hand. Last month a group of students completed their FANUC CERT (Certified Engineering Robot Training) certification. The certification is built into the ELM 260 Industrial Robotics course, which is part of the Electronics Engineering Technology program. In addition to the certification, students are also required to complete extra robot programming assignments, as well as a final capstone project. The capstone project requires students to use their creativity and come up with unique applications for the robots. 

In order to earn the FANUC CERT certification, students must:

  • Complete a series of 24 robot programming exercises, using actual robots and computer-simulated robots
  • Complete three online robot training mini-courses
  • Pass the FANUC CERT test with and 80 percent or better

“The use of robots in manufacturing continues to expand. Fanuc CERT certification is recognized internationally and opens up opportunities for students in automation and robotics,” said Professor Heffernan. “Even though the certification is based on Fanuc robots, the same skills are transferrable to other types of industrial robots.”

The use of industrial-type robots in manufacturing companies is becoming more and more prevalent.

“Norton Saint-Gobain, an abrasives company near QCC, has recently acquired several Fanuc robots to automate part of their grinding wheel manufacturing process,” Professor Heffernan added.

QCC Electrical Engineering Technology student Cody Hamilton was one of the students who received his Fanuc CERT certification. Mr. Hamilton’s project involved programming the FANUC robot to stack blocks in a continuous loop. He had to show that he could run the robot without any issues, controlling the speed and making sure the robot gripped the blocks currently.

Mechatronics students Shawn Reese and Christian Hulett were self-proclaimed hot wheel geeks when they were younger. They chose to incorporate hot wheels into their robotic presentation. They programed the robot to make different hot wheels selections.

“I came to school not knowing what I wanted and selected this course knowing this is what my dad did. I learned a lot and now I’m going to make a career out of it,” Mr. Hulett said.

Visit QCC's Electronics Engineering Technology Program to learn more. 

  • HiSET student speaker Priscilla Portalatin.
June, 2018

On June 4, QCC hosted the HiSET (High School Equivalency Test) graduation, which celebrated this year’s graduates who completed the HiSET and earned their high school equivalency. Director of Testing, Laura Tino said a total of 42 people passed the HiSET in the last year. Those who passed the test were invited to attend a graduation ceremony held in the Harrington Learning Center.

...

More...

On June 4, QCC hosted the HiSET (High School Equivalency Test) graduation, which celebrated this year’s graduates who completed the HiSET and earned their high school equivalency. Director of Testing, Laura Tino said a total of 42 people passed the HiSET in the last year. Those who passed the test were invited to attend a graduation ceremony held in the Harrington Learning Center.

Testing is held at QCC’s Center for Workforce Development and Continuing Education on 25 Federal Street, Worcester and is generally held twice a month, with the exceptions of January or August, and once in September.

HiSET was first introduced in Massachusetts in 2014, as an alternative to the traditional GED (General Education Development) high school equivalency test. 

“We will also be offering the new GED test in the near future, also at 25 Federal Street. Test-takers will have a choice of GED or HiSET at our QCC location,” said Ms. Tino.

For more information visit, QCC Testing, or HiSET, for more information.

  • Gateway to College Class of 2018
  • Gateway Achievers - 2018 Award Recipients
June, 2018

Earlier this summer, QCC’s Gateway to College program held its graduation ceremony for the Class of 2018.  Graduates received their high school diplomas though a partnership with Uxbridge High School in front of friends, family, faculty and staff. Attendees listened to several inspiring keynote addresses from classmates; Hannah Cormier, Sarah Burwick and Rebecca Manzano Howard...

More...

Earlier this summer, QCC’s Gateway to College program held its graduation ceremony for the Class of 2018.  Graduates received their high school diplomas though a partnership with Uxbridge High School in front of friends, family, faculty and staff. Attendees listened to several inspiring keynote addresses from classmates; Hannah Cormier, Sarah Burwick and Rebecca Manzano Howard.

The often poignant ceremony was a celebration of the efforts of the 32 students who completed the program. Gateway to College was built on the premise that all students can succeed in college with the right support and opportunities. The students completed their high school graduation requirements by taking classes at QCC, in addition to earning meaningful college credit. The graduating class earned an average of 15-20 college credits while in the program. Over half of the students plan to matriculate at QCC in the fall of 2018 and four others plan to attend a four-year college/university or enter the military.

At the ceremony, QCC’s Gateway to College Program Director Marci Skillings offered words of advice to the new graduates - the largest graduating class to date. “Always believe in yourself and always realize it’s up to you,” she said. “Think big and go out and make it happen. Always remember, it’s up to you.”

President Dr. Luis G. Pedraja told the graduates of his own challenges growing up, stressing the importance of an education. “What you accomplish here will be with you in your life forever. It will open doors for you that you cannot imagine,” he said.

Three graduates told of their own unique struggles, from having a life-altering illness to sporadic homelessness and food insecurity issues. They said Gateway to College became a haven for them.

“If you have a dream that you are passionate about never let anyone tell you otherwise. Keep it close to you and never let it go because one day you will accomplish it,” Ms. Burwick said.

Ms. Manzano-Howard told her fellow classmates, “We must use our stories not as some kind of ‘pity party,’ but as a sign that we have made it through.”

“Gateway gave us a second chance. Today we break a stigma. Today we rise above others expectations of us,” said Ms. Cormier. “This program has taught me about hard work and has shown me what it means to be independent and self-aware.”

Ms. Cormier told of her struggles in high school, the lack of support from teachers, and her dreams that were bigger than the current life she had. “It’s because of Gateway to College that I fell back in love with learning. My grades were growing as was my confidence. Gateway gave me a gift I’ll never be able to describe, but I’ll always be grateful for it,” she added.

Ms. Burwick plans on attending Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts this fall to study psychology, Ms.Cormier will be studying History at Quinsigamond Community College this fall and Ms. Manzano-Howard plans on entering Clark University this fall as a biochemistry major.

Student Choice awards were also presented at the graduation. Each year these student nominated awards are presented to staff and faculty who have gone above and beyond helping the students.  This year’s award recipients were: Ray Anderson, Mark Bates, Patricia LaFountaine, Glenda Rodriquez, Jenna Glazer, Bill McGovern, Andria Schwortz, Emily Vogel, Lisa Whitcomb, Jerry Williams, Robert Yosca and Randeen Zanca.

President’s Awards were presented to graduates at an earlier ceremony. The awards acknowledge those students who had a cumulative grade point average of 3.7 or higher. Students who earned the President’s Award included:

  • Alexandra J. Kehoe
  • Lindsey M. Lambert
  • Rebecca Manzano-Howard
  • May Elizabeth Therrien

The Linda Huddle Award was awarded to students who earned a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or higher. Student award recipients included:

  • Sarah Nichole Burwick
  • Brittney Gilroy
  • Starla Feldman
  • Ian Mahoney
  • Nicole Nolasco Da Cruz
  • Peter James Oliveira
  • Isabella Piscitelli

Additional Class of 2018 graduates:

  • Jezabel Acevedo
  • Julie Beth Anderson
  • Connor B. Antul
  • Quentin P. Brock
  • Carley A. Burns
  • Hannah Delani Cormier
  • Joshua Dauderis
  • Edwin Elijah Diaz
  • Jeffrey M. Hart
  • Kelsie Jones
  • John P. Kelley
  • Lauren L. Kolonusz
  • Casey Kumpey
  • Brittany Elizabeth Lazo
  • Nelishalis Mercedes
  • Julianna Morin
  • Alexis Persson-Ortiz
  • Abigail Marion Picard
  • Bailey Powers
  • Antonio Sacchiero
  • Ashley Taylor Simones
  • Jacquelyn Snell

QCC’s Gateway to College has become a fundamental part of the support services the college offers.The program is designed for students 16-21 years old. Through this program students who have dropped out of high school or are in danger of not graduating, can obtain their high school diploma and earn college credits at the same time. Many graduates go on complete their associate degrees and transfer to four year colleges. This alternative to high school program is offered in partnership with Uxbridge School District.

Visit Gateway to College to learn more.

  • Chemistry Coordinator Hirul Patel discusses an experiment with her students.
  • Chemistry Professor Dr. Dilip Patel works with his students on an experiment.
  • Chemistry Coordinator Hirul Patel and Professor Dr. Dilip Patel
June, 2018

You many have heard people discuss the special bond that often happens between a father and daughter. For many, the bond is something that cannot accurately be described but is nonetheless unbreakable.

No one knows that better than Chemistry Professor Dr. Dilip Patel and his daughter, Assistant Professor of Chemistry (and Chemistry Coordinator) Hirul Patel. The Patels have been working as...

More...

You many have heard people discuss the special bond that often happens between a father and daughter. For many, the bond is something that cannot accurately be described but is nonetheless unbreakable.

No one knows that better than Chemistry Professor Dr. Dilip Patel and his daughter, Assistant Professor of Chemistry (and Chemistry Coordinator) Hirul Patel. The Patels have been working as QCC’s chemistry dynamic duo in the college’s chemistry department since 2012.

Dr. Patel began teaching at QCC in 2006 and his daughter followed in his footsteps six years later. The younger Professor Patel began her career working in a pharmacy before following her heart and her love for teaching, a profession she had aspired to from a young age.

“For me teaching always was my true passion. Even as a little girl I’d teach to imaginary students,” she said. “My grandfather was always a teacher so I grew up with it.”

While Ms. Patel took a different route initially, the opportunity eventually presented itself for her to apply to teach at QCC- a place that was familiar to her since she had attended QCC and her father also taught there.

The senior Professor Patel removed himself from any decision making process and the younger Patel was interviewed by the college’s search committee. They felt Ms. Patel was the best candidate for the job and she was hired in June, 2012. 

 So just what is it like to work with your dad or your daughter? In a word…GREAT.

Today, both father and daughter say that working together brings an added cohesiveness to their work that transcends a more traditional, non-familiar professional relationship.

“During work time and after work we exchange thoughts and ideas. We discuss the strengths and weaknesses of our students and their individual learning styles, so that there is a cohesiveness between our courses,” Dr. Patel said. “We make changes to a course and add or delete things to meet students’ needs.”

“It’s definitely very convenient and communication is much easier. There are no time constraints. A thought might pop into my head or his head at night and we can discuss it,” Professor Hirul Patel said.

The camaraderie and teamwork is evident in the way Professor Hirul Patel was able to transition into the role of coordinator for the chemistry program.

“Before I became coordinator he did all the work. I was able to step in seamlessly,” she said.

Asked if there are negatives to working with a parent or child, both Patels were quick to say there was none.

“We both understand each other’s boundaries and respect them. We have a professional relationship at work, as well as a personal one that combines the best of both,” Professor Hirul Patel said. “We are a team, there’s no competition.”

“We do sometimes have a healthy argument at the dinner table and then we decide what the best answer is,” Dr. Patel said, adding, “We are free to discuss things and there is no professional rivalry at all.”

The Patels’ feel their students have benefited from the “two for one” professors.

“We’re more open with each other and we really gain a lot of strength from each other and the way we teach is similar, which brings that level of consistency to our students,” Professor Hirul Patel continued. “There’s a consistency in the teaching. There are no huge differences when you go through the (chemistry) program.

 

  • QCC's Athletic Center
June, 2018

A BIG congratulations to four of QCC’ 2018 Baseball team who received recognition by the National Junior College Athletic Association, Region 21. Award winners included:                                                               ...

More...

A BIG congratulations to four of QCC’ 2018 Baseball team who received recognition by the National Junior College Athletic Association, Region 21. Award winners included:                                                                 

  • Nick Martin, Division III, First Team
  • Jordan Weber, Division III, First Team
  • David Roach, Division III, Honorable Mention
  • Ryan Sanderson, Division III, Honorable Mention

baseball_winners.jpg

Classes Are BACK for the Summer!

QCC is offering a 10-week session Yoga Class and Full-Body Toning Class. Classes began on Monday, June 25 and will run until August 31. There is still room for more participants for those who are interested. Summer session cost is $100 for either Yoga or Full-Body Toning. For more information contact Lisa Gurnick, Director of Athletics & Fitness Center at 508.854.4317.

  • YOGA – Tuesdays, 1:00 p.m. and Thursdays at 12:00 p.m.
  • FULL-BODY TONING - Mondays and Wednesdays at 12:30 p.m.

Athletic Center Summer Hours

The Athletic Center new summer hours began on Monday, June 18 and will run through Wednesday, September 5.

SUMMER HOURS:  Monday - Thursday 7:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m.; Friday, 7:00 a.m. - noon.

  • Inspiring words on QCC graduation caps.
June, 2018

Quinsigamond Community College graduates showed their creative side at the college's recent 53rd Commencement Ceremony held at the DCU Center in Worcester The class of over 1,500 graduates took to their mortarboards to send messages of inspiration, fun and pride at their graduation. 

Thanks to all everyone who sent photos! 

More...

Quinsigamond Community College graduates showed their creative side at the college's recent 53rd Commencement Ceremony held at the DCU Center in Worcester The class of over 1,500 graduates took to their mortarboards to send messages of inspiration, fun and pride at their graduation. 

Thanks to all everyone who sent photos! 

  • The Wyvern visited Kaiserpfalz Kaiserswerth, castle ruins found on the Rhine River in the oldest area of Dusseldorf.
  • The Wyvern had a majestic view of the Rhine River.
  • The Wyvern on his Cornish adventure.
June, 2018

In June, the Wyvern had an amazing visit to Germany taking in the sights at Kaiserpfalz Kaiserswerth with QCC's own Deb Fratturelli.The Wyvern, along with Deb and her friends, saw amazing castle ruins located on the Rhine River in the oldest area of Dusseldorf, Germany. According to records the castle dates back to 1016.

They took the Wyvern, fondly nicknamed "...

More...

In June, the Wyvern had an amazing visit to Germany taking in the sights at Kaiserpfalz Kaiserswerth with QCC's own Deb Fratturelli.The Wyvern, along with Deb and her friends, saw amazing castle ruins located on the Rhine River in the oldest area of Dusseldorf, Germany. According to records the castle dates back to 1016.

They took the Wyvern, fondly nicknamed "Puff," across the countryside of Germany, through Belgium, and into Holland to visit a seaside village called Cadzand. Below is a song Deb wrote to commemorate the trip. (Hint: this is sung to the tune of a famous dragon song!)

Puff, the mighty Wyvern flew the mighty sea
To frolic and share laughter with new friends in Germany

Grateful Deb and Uli, they loved that rascal puff
And brought him with them everywhere until he had enough

Together they would travel by foot and car and train
To see the sights and visit friends, through both the sun and rain

Happy folks and family would pose when’er they came
To take a pic and smile with that Wyvern with a name

To frolic and share laughter with new friends in Germany

A Wyvern lives forever, but not so holidays

Real life calls and work awaits, to put an end to play

And one gray morn it happened, Deb had to go back home

But didn’t have the heart to take the Wyvern as her own

Puff was meant to travel; make friend across the sea

And have his picture taken, wherever he might be

Puff is now Cornwall with Uli and her friends

And lives forever in the heart of all those he befriends, oh

Puff, the mighty Wyvern flew the mighty sea
To frolic and share laughter with new friends in Germany