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December, 2017

  • Quinsigamond Community College
December, 2017
December, 2017

Quinsigamond Community College has received an $84,100 Performance Incentive Fund (PIF) grant from the state to provide accelerated English classes to students eligible for remediation in English. The college will use the grant to increase its Accelerated Learning Program (ALP), which focuses on improving the success of developmental education students by working to accelerate these students into college-level English...

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Quinsigamond Community College has received an $84,100 Performance Incentive Fund (PIF) grant from the state to provide accelerated English classes to students eligible for remediation in English. The college will use the grant to increase its Accelerated Learning Program (ALP), which focuses on improving the success of developmental education students by working to accelerate these students into college-level English courses.

QCC has already piloted this program with noteworthy results. Between 2014 and 2016, 75 percent of QCC students who completed an accelerated English course by taking both remedial and college level English, received a “C” or higher, compared to 66 percent of QCC students who only completed the traditional college level English course.

“This innovative model is particularly beneficial to those from underserved populations such as low English Language Learners (ELL),” said QCC President Dr. Luis G. Pedraja. “This PIF grant will help us to increase the number of high quality English reading, writing and critical thinking courses we offer to these students to help them succeed in college.”

The funding will be used to train additional QCC faculty in order to scale up its current ALP, in addition to creating a new, integrated reading/writing course; three accelerated writing English workshops, and developing a new bridge English as a Second Language (ESL) course. The new bridge ESL English course will enable ELL students to more rapidly transition from ESL to developmental and college level English.

“This grant will enable us to expand access to educational opportunities for residents of Central Massachusetts, which in turn will lead to increased job opportunities for QCC students,” Dr. Pedraja said. “This is a win for the college and for the community.”

The Performance Incentive Fund is a competitive grant program that supports public campuses in creating or strengthening programs that advance the goals of producing the best educated citizenry and workforce in the nation. 

  • QCC President Dr. Luis J. Pedraja
December, 2017
December, 2017

Dear QCC Community,

As we wind down the fall semester and enter the holiday season, I want to remind our community to remember the spirit of these holidays - one of tolerance, support and understanding for one another and all of earth's creatures.

QCC’s diverse population offers a unique opportunity for people to learn about our similarities and embrace our differences. Please use this time...

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Dear QCC Community,

As we wind down the fall semester and enter the holiday season, I want to remind our community to remember the spirit of these holidays - one of tolerance, support and understanding for one another and all of earth's creatures.

QCC’s diverse population offers a unique opportunity for people to learn about our similarities and embrace our differences. Please use this time to work together to create shared experiences through civil dialogue and engagement so that we may all become better citizens of the world. Show compassion, understanding and respect for those around you at all times. Take time to reflect on your experiences on and off campus, in and outside of the classroom, and how fortunate you are to have this opportunity to learn and grow. Remember that there is no place for prejudice, hate or bigotry at QCC or in the world, nor will QCC tolerate such behavior.

May each of you have a safe and peaceful holiday season. I look forward to seeing and working with you in the New Year.

Best,

Luis

Luis G. Pedraja, Ph.D.

President

QCC President Dr. Luis G. Pedraja speaks at WEC's Annual Meeting.
December, 2017
December, 2017

QCC’s President, Dr. Luis G. Pedraja was the keynote speaker at the Worcester Education Collaborative’s (WEC) annual meeting, held on December 6 at Mechanics Hall. The independent organization is dedicated to ensuring that students in the Worcester Public Schools are given the opportunity to succeed at the highest level possible and to acquire the skills and knowledge to...

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QCC’s President, Dr. Luis G. Pedraja was the keynote speaker at the Worcester Education Collaborative’s (WEC) annual meeting, held on December 6 at Mechanics Hall. The independent organization is dedicated to ensuring that students in the Worcester Public Schools are given the opportunity to succeed at the highest level possible and to acquire the skills and knowledge to master the challenges of the 21st century.

“The Worcester Education Collaborative’s mission is something that resonates with me, given their focus on ensuring student success,”Dr. Pedraja said.

Dr. Pedraja discussed his mission to increase higher education access for all people, particularly those who have historically been underserved. He addressed how the landscape is changing both regionally and nationally, as more immigrants and those of low income comprise a growing number of the population. The shift in these demographics now requires different approaches of learning from K-12 to the college classroom.

“How we do this will define our future success,” he said. “Education is an economic driver and without an educated workforce we cannot attract new business and move to the future. Education is an investment in our future and one that will repay us two and three fold.”

Through advances in technology our society has gone through radical changes making for a globalization both socially and in the workforce today. Learning to adapt to these changes is crucial, he continued.

Additionally, as the country sees lower birth rates, traditional students are decreasing and there is an insurgence of minorities and a growing diversity within our community.

“Our schools will need to address this,” Dr. Pedraja said. “This is no longer ‘our parents’ classroom.’”

Citing the need to devise ways to obtain more creative pathways to college, Dr. Pedraja highlighted a few initiatives that QCC has undertaken such as a pilot mentoring program that enables Burncoat students to be mentored by Phi Theta Kappa honor students, assisting the high school students in transitioning to college. QCC has also been working with different community organizations to help expand wraparound services.

He noted the need for more coordination of resources and wraparound programs to ensure student success, in addition to finding ways to lower college costs.

“You’ve all heard that it takes a village to raise a child. I say it takes a community to educate our children,” Dr. Pedraja said. “We must teach to the future. We must not be reactionary, but bold visionaries to prepare the children for tomorrow. Their success is our success.”

View the attached video to hear Dr. Pedraja’s complete address.

  • From left: Fitchburg State President Richard S. Lapidus and Quinsigamond Community College President Dr. Luis. G. Pedraja
  • From left (front): Fitchburg State President Richard S. Lapidus and Quinsigamond Community College President Dr. Luis. G. Pedraja sign Deaf Studies articulation agreement with faculty and staff from both college's in attendance.
December, 2017
December, 2017

Quinsigamond Community College extended its close partnership with Fitchburg State University when the presidents of both institutions signed a Deaf Studies articulation agreement today. Officials from both institutions were on-hand for the official signing ceremony, held at QCC’s main campus in Worcester.

“This agreement offers QCC students enhanced educational and career opportunities, further...

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Quinsigamond Community College extended its close partnership with Fitchburg State University when the presidents of both institutions signed a Deaf Studies articulation agreement today. Officials from both institutions were on-hand for the official signing ceremony, held at QCC’s main campus in Worcester.

“This agreement offers QCC students enhanced educational and career opportunities, further demonstrating QCC’s continued commitment to students’ success,” said QCC’s President Dr. Luis. G. Pedraja. “Deaf studies is a fast growing career field, with high growth rates and average starting salaries over $44,000.”

The signing of the agreement enables QCC students who graduate from the QCC General Studies – Deaf Studies program to seamlessly continue their education at Fitchburg State. The agreement provides guaranteed acceptance into the deaf studies and American sign language baccalaureate programs at Fitchburg State as long as all criteria are met. Students must meet GPA requirements specified in the agreement, and follow the transfer admissions process for Fitchburg State.

Fitchburg State President Richard S. Lapidus said QCC's Associate Degree aligns with his institution’s expanded deaf studies and American sign language programs.

“This agreement provides a unique opportunity for students to advance their studies and gain valuable career credentials,” President Lapidus said. “Students who complete these two degree programs will have a solid liberal arts foundation and skills that will serve them on a variety of career paths including human services, nursing and exercise and sports science.”

QCC’s deaf studies program prepares students to have the necessary communication skills and cultural knowledge to work with deaf and hard of hearing individuals. Fitchburg State’s deaf studies program builds on the QCC degree program, encouraging students to analyze existing stereotypes and policies relating to deaf and hard-of-hearing people in order to engage and effect change in the community at-large. Some career opportunities for this degree include interpreters, translators, speech pathologists and audiologists.

  • From left: Tony Sanders, QCC President Dr. Luis Pedraja, PTK Advisor Bonnie Coleman and PTK member Kayla Patterson.
  • From left: Jane Shea, Don Hall Anita Bowden, QCC President Dr. Luis Pedraja, Bill Daring, Tara Fitzgerald-Jenkins and Maria Addison.
  • From left (bottom row): Dr. Luis Pedraja and his wife, Leigh Woodruff. From left (top row): Lucinda Costa, Selena Boria and Karen Rucks.
  • QCC's Jazz Ensemble, from left: Tom Hebert, Maura DePasquale (WCCA Station manager), Ricky Ricardi Jose Castillo, Joey D'Angelo and John Solaperto (center).
  • QCC President Dr. Luis Pedraja greets faculty and staff during the recent holiday luncheon.
December, 2017
December, 2017

On December 8, Phi Theta Kappa students held a holiday event for faculty and staff to show their appreciation for the support and encouragement they have received throughout the year from the college. Faculty and staff were treated to holiday music, great food and camaraderie throughout the day.

On December 14, the QCC Annual Holiday Luncheon was held to celebrate the season with QCC faculty and staff....

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On December 8, Phi Theta Kappa students held a holiday event for faculty and staff to show their appreciation for the support and encouragement they have received throughout the year from the college. Faculty and staff were treated to holiday music, great food and camaraderie throughout the day.

On December 14, the QCC Annual Holiday Luncheon was held to celebrate the season with QCC faculty and staff. The event featured great food, as well as the melodious strains from QCC’s Jazz Ensemble.

Visit the QCC Holiday Page for the College's Holiday Greeting.

 A special presentation was held for six retired faculty and staff members who received the illustrious title of Administrative Emeriti for their many years of excellence, leadership, service and dedication to QCC. Those who were awarded this distinction from QCC President Dr. Luis Pedraja include:

  • Bill Daring – 18 years of service
  • Anita Bowden – 22 years of service
  • Don Hall – 21 years of service
  • Jane Shea – 21 years of service
  • Maria Addison – 24 years of service
  • Tara Fitzgerald-Jenkins – 34 years of service
  • Spring Semester - One Stop Registration.
December, 2017
December, 2017

As many people are gearing up for the holidays, the faculty and staff at QCC will be getting ready to welcome its new and current students back to campus shortly after the college’s semester break, which begins on December 22.

In anticipation of the Spring semester, QCC will be holding a One-Stop Registration event designed to ease the burden for new students who are looking to get all their registration...

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As many people are gearing up for the holidays, the faculty and staff at QCC will be getting ready to welcome its new and current students back to campus shortly after the college’s semester break, which begins on December 22.

In anticipation of the Spring semester, QCC will be holding a One-Stop Registration event designed to ease the burden for new students who are looking to get all their registration and admission requirements fulfilled in one central location. The One-Stop event will be held at the Harrington Learning Center (HLC), located on QCC’s main campus, 670 West Boylston Street, Worcester.

Information on financial aid, admissions and placements test will be available at this time and potential students are encouraged to print out registration forms and fill them in prior to the One-Stop Registration event. Apply to QCC.

The One-Stop Registration event for Spring semester is being held on Monday, January 8, 2018 - Friday, January 12, 2018 from 8:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m. Classes for the Spring semester will be begin on January 17.

“Registering early for classes offers students a better chance of getting into the classes they want  without being locked out of a course because it has already filled up,” said Mishawn Davis-Eyene, Director of Admissions.

Learn more about One-Stop Registration.

  • From left: QCC Campus Police Officer Catherine Dixon; Sargent Joseph Cecchi and Tina Wells at the Downtown Healthcare and Workforce Development Center.
  • From left: Sargent Joseph Cecchi, QCC President Dr. Luis Pedraja and Officer Catherine Dixon at the Stuff-A-Cruiser event on the college's main campus.
December, 2017
December, 2017

Stuff-A-Cruiser was once again a huge success at QCC, as students, faculty and staff brought in new unwrapped toys, gift cards and movie tickets for a Feed-A- Family child. The event provided a short respite from the hectic pre-finals days and served as a reminder of the simple joy of giving. 

"The Quinsigamond Police Department turned in the “police sirens” for that of holiday music...

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Stuff-A-Cruiser was once again a huge success at QCC, as students, faculty and staff brought in new unwrapped toys, gift cards and movie tickets for a Feed-A- Family child. The event provided a short respite from the hectic pre-finals days and served as a reminder of the simple joy of giving. 

"The Quinsigamond Police Department turned in the “police sirens” for that of holiday music, while I was dressed as “Sergeant Santa” or “Blue Santa” and ringing my bell out loud for all to hear. I hope it was as enjoyable for you as it was for me. Portraying Santa in a blue suit again was an amazing experience and brought about pure gratification. However the true joy came from the students, parents, faculty and the children that I encountered during the three events," said Sergeant Joseph Cecchi

Stuff-A- Cruiser is in its second year, acting as a program to the college-wide Feed-a-Family Program, that provides holiday meals to families in need within our QCC family.  Feed-A-Family recipients receive food gift certificates to purchase a holiday meal of their choice in addition to toys for their children, provided by the Stuff a Cruiser program.

Stuff-A-Cruiser also paid a visit to QCC Southbridge.
  • From left: Paula "Gagnon" Moore with Christine McNally, Program Specialist, Business Development.
December, 2017
December, 2017

Quinsigamond Community College has been making a difference in people’s lives since it was established in 1963 and no one knows this better than QCC alum, Paula (Gagnon) Moore. Mrs. Moore attended QCC from 1964 -1966 when the college was located at Belmont Street in Worcester (the main campus moved in 1971 to West Boylston Street). She was in one of QCC’s first graduating classes.

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Quinsigamond Community College has been making a difference in people’s lives since it was established in 1963 and no one knows this better than QCC alum, Paula (Gagnon) Moore. Mrs. Moore attended QCC from 1964 -1966 when the college was located at Belmont Street in Worcester (the main campus moved in 1971 to West Boylston Street). She was in one of QCC’s first graduating classes.

Mrs. Moore said she attended QCC because it was accessible by bus and she was able to pay the tuition herself.

“I had three younger siblings who would be following me,” she noted, so the financial savings by attending QCC was important.

At the time she attended QCC, Mrs. Moore said she had no idea what she wanted to do with her future, so she enrolled in a Liberal Arts program at the college.

“The school provided me with an excellent grounding for further education,” she said. “While at QCC, I jumped into school activities, representing my classmates and enjoying the camaraderie.”

In fact that enjoyment and camaraderie translated to lifelong friendships and even a future husband, Doug Moore.

“Doug was at QCC for one year before transferring to Nichols College, “Mrs. Moore continued. “We met in the cafeteria and married in 1968.” 

Mrs. Moore said her husband was also unsure of what he wanted to do with his future and QCC offered him the opportunity to figure out his career path. He attended QCC for one year before transferring to Nichols College and then going on to Suffolk University for his Master’s Degree in Business Administration.

“So you can see that he too benefitted from QCC,” she added.

Mrs. Moore graduated from QCC in 1966 and then transferred to Eastern Nazarene College in Wollaston, Massachusetts, where she earned her Bachelor’s Degree in Elementary Education.  After her marriage, she taught for a year at Woodland Street Elementary School in Worcester, before moving to Texas with her husband who was in the Air Force at that time. She taught first grade to military students in Big Spring, Texas before taking time off from her career to raise her family.

The family eventually moved back to the Worcester area and Mrs. Moore went back to work as a program director for several local non-profit agencies. She also returned to school at Worcester State College and earned a Master’s Degree in Human Services Management.

In semi-retirement, Mrs. Moore became a special needs aide at Algonquin Regional High School in Northborough, where she used her talents and education to assist students. She said she never forgets the educational foundation QCC gave her.

“I would highly recommend QCC to high school students, as I already have done so with several special needs students, who have gone on to successfully begin their own educations,” she added.

Mrs. Moore still stays in touch with two women from her QCC days, Janyce Forhan Sheehan and Donna Nordquist Hagglund, both QCC Liberal Arts graduates.  She met the women when they all attended QCC and the three women get together monthly and reminisce about the “old days.”

Her friends also went on to very productive careers, thanks in part to QCC.

Ms. Sheehan earned her Bachelor’s Degree in Education, English from Fitchburg State University, then went on to Worcester State University and obtained her Masters of Education, English. She was a teacher of English Language Arts and English for the Clinton school system for 32 years and was Clinton High’s English Department Chairperson. She retired from the school in 2013.

Ms. Hagglund went on to Fitchburg State University before graduating cum laude from Worcester State University with her Bachelor’s Degree in English. She was in pharmaceutical sales for 15 years with Bristol Myers-Squibb and Sanofi Aventis.

“We often speak about the school that provided us with our grounding to further our educations,” Mrs. Moore added.

Paula "Gagnon" Moore (right) on the cover of QCC's 1967-68 catalog. QCC Alum from left: Donna Nordquist Hagglund, Janyce Forhan Sheehan and Paula (Gagnon) Moore.
  • QCC President Dr. Luis Pedraja addresses QCC's the inaugural group of Rising Stars of QCC honorees.
  • QCC Rising Star recipient Benjamin Aryel (center) receives his certificate from QCC's Vice President Lillian Ortiz and QCC President Luis Pedraja.
December, 2017
December, 2017

At Quinsigamond Community College, recognizing and honoring those who persevere and make a difference is just one of the many examples of what makes QCC’s community so unique.

Earlier this month the college held its first “Rising Stars of QCC” event to honor the men and women in the QCC community who have persevered in challenging life circumstances. The event was held in the Hebert...

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At Quinsigamond Community College, recognizing and honoring those who persevere and make a difference is just one of the many examples of what makes QCC’s community so unique.

Earlier this month the college held its first “Rising Stars of QCC” event to honor the men and women in the QCC community who have persevered in challenging life circumstances. The event was held in the Hebert Auditorium and 45 QCC students were honored with the distinction of being one of the “Rising Stars of QCC.”

This is a new event, consolidating been two separate recognition events. "You’re a STAR (Someone to be Admired and Respected)" was a program which recognized male students and "Women of Distinction" recognized female students. This newly developed "Rising Stars of QCC" program now enables more inclusion of QCC’s vibrant student population and offers those who identify as non-binary and transgender the ability to be included and recognized.

QCC President Dr. Luis Pedraja and Dr. Lillian Ortiz, Vice President of Enrollment Management, Student Engagement & Community Connections, presented the students with their awards and certificates.

“The Rising Stars of QCC event was a huge success with 45 students nominated. I would like to thank all the faculty and staff who took the time to nominate these more than deserving students,” said Master of Ceremonies, Josh Cole, QCC’s Assistant Manager of Athletics & Fitness. “It’s always great to be able to recognize the perseverance, dedication, and character that QCC students embody.”

The 2017 Rising Stars of QCC are:

  • Benjamin Aryeh
  • Andre Beaudet
  • Dathiel Blake
  • Farhiya Burale
  • Huda Burale
  • Kelsey Cobb
  • Jeanine Daley
  • Ann Davis
  • Nathan Driscoll
  • Agnes Dwumfour
  • Ashley Forhan
  • Thomas French
  • Jessica Gasiewski
  • Emily Guidetti
  • Vanessa Hanger
  • Mark Hogan
  • Amanda Hoxha
  • Mohamed Hussein
  • Mariah Johnson
  • Sonya Lasa
  • Jose Leal Figueredo
  • Vaughn Lee
  • Kathleen Linton
  • Trevor Mackowiak
  • Ian Mahoney
  • Shelby Maiorana
  • Nicholas Martin
  • James Mbugua
  • Kirols Mohareb
  • Kyle Mondino
  • Vu Nguyen
  • Cristina Picozzi
  • Nolan Pond
  • Amy Potenti-Main
  • Edward Reitz
  • Megan Romero
  • Kelsey Rustin
  • Patricia Songo
  • Kaitlyn Stewart
  • Supaporn Thamadilok
  • Jay Turner
  • Eric Wells
  • Kaileen Wheeler
  • SangYun Won
  • Haoyu Zhao

The program is co-sponsored by QCC Counseling Services and the Vice President of Academic Affairs. QCC offers its thanks to the Rising Star Committee: Tina Wells, Josh Cole, Debbie Ryder, Casey Sullivan and Barbara Zabka, as well as Dr. Pedraja, Dr. Ortiz and Nancy Schoenfeld.

  • New Student Orientation is a valuable resource at QCC.
December, 2017
December, 2017

Each semester QCC offers a New Student Orientation to help students learn about the available support services in advising, tutoring and counseling. Each orientation will also have a variety of breakout sessions that address relevant information for new college students. Previous breakout sessions have included how to pay for college and transitioning from high school to college. Two New Student Orientations will be...

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Each semester QCC offers a New Student Orientation to help students learn about the available support services in advising, tutoring and counseling. Each orientation will also have a variety of breakout sessions that address relevant information for new college students. Previous breakout sessions have included how to pay for college and transitioning from high school to college. Two New Student Orientations will be held at the main campus, as well as a New Student Orientation at QCC Southbridge.

A Student Services Fair will also take place at the end of each orientation and allows students a way to connect with departments and resources in order to help them succeed at QCC.

New students are encouraged to attend one of the orientations to learn about student life activities; meet college staff­ and students; receive some valuable tips to make life at QCC more enjoyable; and be entered into raffles for some great prizes.

New Orientation dates for Spring 2018 include:

Worcester Campus:

January 8

  • 4:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m. in the Hebert Auditorium
  • Breakout sessions will be from 5:50 p.m. - 6:25 p.m.
  • Student Services Fair will be from 6:25 p.m. - 7:00 p.m. in the gym 

January 9

  • 11:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m. in the Hebert Auditorium
  • Breakout sessions will be from 12:50 p.m.-1:25 p.m.
  • Student Services Fair will be from 1:25 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. in the gym

QCC Southbridge:

January 10

  • 5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m. at Southbridge
  • Breakout sessions will be from 6:20 p.m. - 6:50 p.m.

Students can register for the New Student Orientations on the Student Life homepage

 

  • QCC President Dr. Luis Pedraja stands behind the counter of the new Welcome Center.
December, 2017
December, 2017

QCC’s new Welcome Center is open for business! Housed on the second floor of the Harrington Learning Center on the college’s main campus, the Center acts as an information hub and first point of contact at QCC. This new addition to QCC offers prospective students a central location to obtain all the information and resources they need in order to take that first step in their academic future.

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QCC’s new Welcome Center is open for business! Housed on the second floor of the Harrington Learning Center on the college’s main campus, the Center acts as an information hub and first point of contact at QCC. This new addition to QCC offers prospective students a central location to obtain all the information and resources they need in order to take that first step in their academic future.

“QCC is dedicated to offering a nurturing and welcome environment from the moment a person steps onto our campus,” said QCC President Dr. Luis G. Pedraja. “We have developed the Welcome Center to better serve our community and to be the gateway to our college.”

Hours of operation for the Welcome Center are Monday – Thursday from 8:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m.; Friday from 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m., and Saturday from 9:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. The college is closes on Sunday.

  • QCC students and faculty engage in lively discussion.
  • QCC President Dr. Luis Pedraja listens to Jazz Jennings read her book, "I Am Jazz," with QCC students, faculty and staff.
December, 2017
December, 2017

On December 7, a powerful message of inclusion was delivered via video as students, faculty and staff listened to author Jazz Jennings read her book, “I Am Jazz” during a recent event held by the college’s Diversity Caucus and Pride Alliance. Both groups worked to facilitate the reading and subsequent discussion that addressed the real life story of Jazz Jennings. This was just one of numerous...

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On December 7, a powerful message of inclusion was delivered via video as students, faculty and staff listened to author Jazz Jennings read her book, “I Am Jazz” during a recent event held by the college’s Diversity Caucus and Pride Alliance. Both groups worked to facilitate the reading and subsequent discussion that addressed the real life story of Jazz Jennings. This was just one of numerous inclusion events held throughout the year at QCC.

The critically acclaimed children’s book tells Jazz Jennings’ story, detailing how from the age of 2 she knew that “she had a girl’s brain in a boy’s body.” Jazz Jennings is a transgender teen who told her life story to the world through the children’s book. In easy to understand language that draws in both young and older readers, she tells the story of her life as transgender child and young adult. The story of Jazz Jennings has garnered national attention and brought about discussions such as the one at QCC, in schools and campuses across the country.

“Gender has taken a whole new fluidity to it and that’s fantastic,” said Tina Wells, QCC Counseling Services Coordinator.

December, 2017
December, 2017

Below is a sampling of some of the articles and press releases published in the local (and sometimes national) media that mention Quinsigamond Community College.

QCC articles for the month of December include: 

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Below is a sampling of some of the articles and press releases published in the local (and sometimes national) media that mention Quinsigamond Community College.

QCC articles for the month of December include: 

  • From left: Vanessa Hanger, Gabrielle Plainte and Brien Marsh.
December, 2017
December, 2017

Students from the Psi Beta and Psychology Club presented their research at a poster session at the annual meeting of the New England Psychological Association Conference held on October 21 at William James College in Newton, MA. Students involved in the project included: Vanessa Hanger, Gabrielle Plainte (now at UMASS Amherst) Brien Marsh, Ethan O’Connell (now at...

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Students from the Psi Beta and Psychology Club presented their research at a poster session at the annual meeting of the New England Psychological Association Conference held on October 21 at William James College in Newton, MA. Students involved in the project included: Vanessa Hanger, Gabrielle Plainte (now at UMASS Amherst) Brien Marsh, Ethan O’Connell (now at Williams College) and Catherine Balboni (now at UMASS Amherst).

The title of the presentation was “Appreciating Difficulty: Appreciation Predicts Self-Efficacy for Self-Regulated Learning and Grit.” A new research project will be launched in the Spring 2018 semester and Psi Beta and Psychology Club students will be recruiting students to take a survey. Stay-tuned for some interesting results in 2018!

  • QCC is a member of the National Junior College Athletic Association and has a tradition of fielding regionally and nationally competitive intercollegiate sports teams in men's and women's basketball and baseball.
  • The women's basketball team is looking for players for the second half of their season.
December, 2017
December, 2017

The Athletic Center is gearing down for the holiday season. The Center will have an abbreviated scheduled between now and the New Year. Boot camp and indoor cycling will be canceled until after the semester break, however, Yoga and full-body toning classes will continue as scheduled during this timeframe.

The Athletic Center will closed from Dec. 23 – January 1, 2018 and will ...

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The Athletic Center is gearing down for the holiday season. The Center will have an abbreviated scheduled between now and the New Year. Boot camp and indoor cycling will be canceled until after the semester break, however, Yoga and full-body toning classes will continue as scheduled during this timeframe.

The Athletic Center will closed from Dec. 23 – January 1, 2018 and will reopen on January 2, 2018 at its regular time and all regularly scheduled classes will resume.

In other sports news, the Wyverns men’s and women’s basketball teams are halfway through their season and are in need of more players. If you are interested in having fun, meeting new people and being part of a team, the Wyvern basketball teams want YOU!

To learn more and sign up, contact men’s basketball coach, Tishaun Jenkins at 508-854-4211  or email him at tjenkins [at] qcc.mass.edu. Women’s basketball coach, Najee Muhammad can be reached at 508-854-4492 or email him at nmuhammad [at] qcc.mass.edu.  You can also call, stop by or email QCC Athletic Director Lisa Gurnick at 508-854-4582 or Assistant Manager Josh Cole at 508-854-4317. You can also email them at lisag [at] qcc.mass.edu orjcole [at] qcc.mass.edu (jcole)jcole [at] qcc.mass.edu (@qcc.mass.edu) .

Spring Sports

Batter up! While it seems like winter has just begun, spring is right around the corner and with it comes baseball season. The Wyvern baseball team will be holding its tryouts shortly after the semester break. Make sure to check the Athletic Center website for updated information on times and locations for tryouts and get ready to swing for the fences this season on QCC’s new baseball field!

 

December, 2017
December, 2017

The Wyverns are running wild in Southbridge! Several were recently spotted celebrating the holidays at QCC Southbridge.

resized_20171205_092848-thumb.jpeg

If you've seen the Wyvern in the wild, please let us know!  Send your photos and descriptions...

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The Wyverns are running wild in Southbridge! Several were recently spotted celebrating the holidays at QCC Southbridge.

resized_20171205_092848-thumb.jpeg

If you've seen the Wyvern in the wild, please let us know!  Send your photos and descriptions through the newsletter submission form.

Winter Wyvern!
December, 2017
December, 2017

We are very pleased to announce the following full-time staff updates:

On December 11, 2017, Administrative Services welcomed Trisha Faubert as IT Service Desk Attendant (Clerk III). Trisha brings to the college over 7 years of customer service experience in the Financial and Technology Sector. Trisha earned an Associate Degree from Quinsigamond Community College.

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We are very pleased to announce the following full-time staff updates:

On December 11, 2017, Administrative Services welcomed Trisha Faubert as IT Service Desk Attendant (Clerk III). Trisha brings to the college over 7 years of customer service experience in the Financial and Technology Sector. Trisha earned an Associate Degree from Quinsigamond Community College.

Please join us in welcoming Trisha to her new role. 

November, 2017

  • Quinsigamond Community College's main campus in Worcester.
November, 2017
November, 2017

The recent national disasters that have displaced so many people has brought the Worcester community together to offer support and services for those in need.

The City of Worcester, Centro, the American Red Cross and other community partners, have been collaborating and finding ways to assist those who have been displaced by the recent hurricanes.

Quinsigamond Community College also stands with its...

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The recent national disasters that have displaced so many people has brought the Worcester community together to offer support and services for those in need.

The City of Worcester, Centro, the American Red Cross and other community partners, have been collaborating and finding ways to assist those who have been displaced by the recent hurricanes.

Quinsigamond Community College also stands with its community partners and is working to find ways to make a difference for those who have been devastated by these natural disasters.

“We have received calls from students from the affected areas and are working to find ways to make it easier for them to attend QCC. I am prepared to take the necessary steps through fee waivers or other measures to ensure affordable access to higher education for these folks until they establish residency,” said President Dr. Luis J. Pedraja.

The City of Worcester has outlined 3 steps for new residents who have been displaced by these disasters to follow, along with a list of programs and services available to them. This will be an ongoing initiative and will evolve as things progress.

“Please try to be mindful of the difficulties these folks may be facing as you encounter them on or off campus,” Dr. Pedraja said. “We as a college need to be able to welcome these students and help to make the transition as painless as possible for them.”

View a Guide to the City of Worcester Services for new residents affected by hurricanes

  • QCC Paramedic students get a refresher course in how to administer Narcan.
  • QCC paramedic students recently renewed took a Narcan refresher course.
November, 2017
November, 2017

The increase of opioid-related deaths has grown to epidemic proportions both locally, regionally and globally. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention cite that six out of 10 drug overdoses are opioid-related. In Worcester, there were 77 opioid-related deaths in 2015 and 56 in 2016.

At Quinsigamond Community College, those statistics are not surprising to the college’s paramedics students, who...

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The increase of opioid-related deaths has grown to epidemic proportions both locally, regionally and globally. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention cite that six out of 10 drug overdoses are opioid-related. In Worcester, there were 77 opioid-related deaths in 2015 and 56 in 2016.

At Quinsigamond Community College, those statistics are not surprising to the college’s paramedics students, who recently took a refresher course on how to administer Narcan (a drug that can reverse the effects of an opioid overdose).

“The students who were there have already been EMT’s for a minimum of one year or longer. Many have already administered Narcan in the field, so this was more of a refresher for the group,” said QCC’s Program Coordinator of the Emergency Medical Services Program, Cheryl Finn.

Administering Narcan is a topic that is covered regularly in both the EMT and paramedics programs at the college, and is a required skill for the national curriculum of both programs.

“Our Paramedic students practice 33 individual skills repetitively during their lab and simulations sessions to meet the higher standards of the National Registry of EMTs Paramedic Psychomotor Competency Portfolio.  Once completed they proceed to clinical and field internships to perfect their skill with live patients. Narcan administration is one of those skills,” Ms. Finn said. “The proper administration of Narcan can save lives. When someone is not breathing, and seconds count, we know that our students are confident in their training and can help give someone a second chance at living a full life. Our students are well trained in the cognitive, psychomotor and affective domains to provide excellent patient care.”

  • From left: QCC student Nick Voyer checks out a FANUC robot with Manufacturing Technology Professor, Damian Kiernan.
  • QCC Manufacturing Technology student, Nick Voyer.
November, 2017
November, 2017

At Quinsigamond Community College, successfully preparing students to enter the workforce is a key component of the college’s manufacturing and engineering programs. From collaborating with companies, staying abreast of the latest trends and technologies, to working with the latest manufacturing equipment, QCC’s manufacturing and engineering programs have advanced the careers of countless students.

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At Quinsigamond Community College, successfully preparing students to enter the workforce is a key component of the college’s manufacturing and engineering programs. From collaborating with companies, staying abreast of the latest trends and technologies, to working with the latest manufacturing equipment, QCC’s manufacturing and engineering programs have advanced the careers of countless students.

One such student is Nick Voyer. Mr. Voyer is a Manufacturing Technology student who has come to QCC as part of a toolmaker apprentice program with Tegra Medical, headquartered in Franklin, MA.

Tegra Medical offers a four-year apprentice program that allows participants to enroll in a local engineering program. The company pays the tuition and participants continue to work at their jobs while attending college.

 Mr. Voyer is a five-year employee at Tegra Medical and was excited to be a part of the first group of employees who took advantage of the apprentice program. He said he saw this as a great way to advance his career both in the short and long-term, adding that had he not joined the apprentice program, he would not have had the motivation to go to college.

“I’m learning things I didn’t know before and I’m looking at things differently,” Mr. Voyer said. “The QCC manufacturing program is more hands-on and helps you figure things out by actually doing them.”

Traveling back and forth from his home in Gardner, to his job in Franklin, to classes at QCC’s main campus in Worcester, means Mr. Voyer logs many, many hours in drive time. While the logistics can sometimes be challenging, he said the practical experience he is getting at QCC is invaluable to him and his future. In May 2018 he will graduate with his associate degree in manufacturing technology.

Tegra Medical’s Director of Manufacturing, Brian Rua, said the company has also benefitted from the education Mr. Voyer is receiving at QCC.

“As an apprentice toolmaker, Nick has to do an extreme amount of math, as he works with metal components from scratch. The math skills he has learned have been very helpful in what he does,” Mr. Rua said. “He also took robotics classes, which directly relates to his work. These classes have also helped give him the ability to talk directly to the engineering and design groups.”

Toolroom Tech Lead Jeff Mercier heartily agrees. Mr. Mercier is Mr. Voyer’s immediate supervisor.

“The Solidworks and AutoCAD classes Nick took gave him the foundational theory of what we do and he applied that knowledge here. This helps both us and the college,” Mr. Mercier said.

“It’s great that even the AutoCAD that we work with at QCC is the same at my job. I work in the R&D side making new things,” Mr Voyer said. “Professors Lee (Duerden) and Damian (Kieran) are very knowledgeable. One of the things they had us do was a lot of presentations, which is something that really helped me in getting comfortable with public speaking. It boosted my confidence.”

In June 2017, Mr. Voyer earned the title of Journeyman Toolmaker and even went one step further by applying his new found confidence in public speaking to his work at Tegra Medical.

“I’m now a safety trainer at Tegra Medical for all the new hires,” he said. “QCC helped fill in the gaps of what I was learning at work with what I am learning at school. “

“It’s great to know that what we are teaching in the classroom is relevant in the real world,” said Professor Kiernan. “It’s also great to have Nick in class. We have real world conversations that everyone learns from.”

The future is bright for Mr. Voyer. He recently bought a house with his wife and is looking to continue his education with the goal of moving into engineering and transferring to Fitchburg State.

“I only have two classes left to take,” he said. “The time management has been tough, but the teachers at QCC have been great and I’ve learned a lot that I can use right away.”

“He’s a rare young man, very aggressive and always bettering himself. He has a high level of motivation and takes a more aggressive schedule than most folks in the apprentice program,” Mr. Rua said.

  • QCC students in the "Women in STEM" group recently toured the Fab Lab with Professors Grimaldo and Sorraco.
November, 2017
November, 2017

Nine female QCC students saw firsthand what amazing opportunities and capabilities QCC’s Fab Lab has to offer through a recent tour of the facility. The tour was arranged by on-campus support group “Women in STEM” (WIS), whose mission is to provide academic, social, and professional mentoring and support to women in STEM programs at QCC.

Located on the first floor in the QuEST building, the...

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Nine female QCC students saw firsthand what amazing opportunities and capabilities QCC’s Fab Lab has to offer through a recent tour of the facility. The tour was arranged by on-campus support group “Women in STEM” (WIS), whose mission is to provide academic, social, and professional mentoring and support to women in STEM programs at QCC.

Located on the first floor in the QuEST building, the Fab Lab contains various types of design and fabrication equipment that students, staff and faculty can learn to use in order to help transform their ideas into reality. Fab Lab Manager Alex Gray and student assistant Elijah Boudreau demonstrated the capabilities of the lab to the students, including the different types of 3-D printers that can make items from various materials; a laser cutter for precision trimming; a vacuum former for making molds; a vinyl printer for creating banners and decals, and an embroidery machine that uses colored thread to personalize items.

Mr. Gray helped the women create a logo for WIS during the tour and the students plan to produce the logo and transfer the design onto shirts using the vinyl printer. Students who participated include Maame Amoah-Dankwah, Narda Bondah, Rose Duchemin, Cathy Evans, Triomphe Kanyeba, Cheryl Ann Letson, Monica McMullan, Savanna Russell, and Emilyrose Sandgren.They were accompanied by Professors Andreana Grimaldo (Mathematics) & Anita Soracco (Environmental / Physical Science), who led the group.

Following the tour, Professor Grimaldo commented, “This incredible lab is located on our campus and it is open to all students.”

Professor Soracco added, “I think the FAB Lab is a unique resource, and typically one that is very male dominated. I think the tour was a wonderful opportunity to expose our female STEM students to this resource, and I encourage them and engage them to get involved. “

Women in STEM is a new organization on campus and membership is open to any QCC woman studying in a STEM field, according to Professor Grimaldo. It is sponsored by QCC’s STEM Starter Academy (SSA) program, which is managed by Darcy Carlson.

 Plans are being finalized for a "Final Exam Good Luck" pizza party and student attendance raffle on Tuesday, December 12 at 12:30 p.m. in room 313 in the QuEST building. An email invitation will be sent to all QCC women who are enrolled in STEM majors.

Any woman wishing to come the group can email either professor or come to an event. For more information reach out to amygrimaldo [at] qcc.mass.edu (Professor Grimaldo) or asoracco [at] qcc.mass.edu (Professor Soracco).

Women in STEM logo
  • Dadbeh Bigonahy, Professor of Engineering & Sciences (right) demonstrates a math concept to a student.
November, 2017
November, 2017

At Quinsigamond Community College, the mathematics department has discovered a way for students to increase their chances for success while completing their degree in a timely manner, through the college’s accelerated math program. Accelerated math classes are longer classes over a shorter period of time. A two year study done by the college showed that students consistently passed the accelerated math classes...

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At Quinsigamond Community College, the mathematics department has discovered a way for students to increase their chances for success while completing their degree in a timely manner, through the college’s accelerated math program. Accelerated math classes are longer classes over a shorter period of time. A two year study done by the college showed that students consistently passed the accelerated math classes at a higher rate than both traditionally scheduled classes and classes taken online. Across all of the courses over that timeframe, all accelerated math courses had a pass rate that was 12 percent better than traditionally scheduled courses (sample size 4,489 students) and 25 percent better than courses taken online (sample size 744 students).

According to Dr. Leslie Bolinger Horton, Dean for the School of Math and Science, the math department looked at the success rate of students taking summer sessions, which are traditionally offered in longer time blocks for a shorter period of time, and found the success rate for these types of classes outpaced traditional and online classes.

“This was data-driven,” Dr. Bolinger Horton said. “We tried the first fall accelerated math classes of Intermediate Algebra (MAT 099) and College Algebra (MAT 100) in 2015 and found that students advanced through the developmental math classes and segued into college math in a shorter period of time, with a high rate of student success.”

The college’s accelerated math classes offer students the ability to take their math classes twice a week in three-hour blocks, as opposed to traditional math classes that meet 50 minutes, three times per week. Students have the same learning requirements as those in traditional face-to-face and online classes, however, with the duration of each class period being longer, students are able to complete their course in just seven and a half weeks as opposed to 15 weeks.

These longer time blocks allow students more time to process content and provide professors with more time to help individual students as needed. The accelerated classes offer a more relaxed atmosphere, due in part to students not being limited to a 50-minute time block. While students are still responsible for mastering the same learning objectives as those in traditional classes, they are able to spend more time on a math concept that may pose a challenge for them before moving on.

While one might normally think accelerated math classes would only be for the student who is drawn to mathematics, it has been shown that a longer period of contact time in class with the professor is what all students seem to need.

“We checked the success rate last spring and in every case students showed a higher success rate than the other more traditional and online methods of learning,” Dr. Bolinger Horton continued. “In all cases the students were more successful. This works with both ends of the spectrum…developmental math classes and advanced math classes.”

Associate Professor of Mathematics, Sheiba Mas-Oud, is one of the professors who has been teaching the accelerated math courses. He noted that his own classes supported these findings.

“The success rates in all the accelerated courses that I taught were at least 40 percent more than my traditional regular semester courses,” Professor Mas-Oud said.

Professors also seem to be drawn to this type of class learning.

“We find the professors love this type of class as well. It allows students a greater amount of time to articulate questions and professors a greater amount of time to explain concepts and clarify student questions,” Dr. Bolinger Horton said.

QCC Liberal Arts major Lizabeth Da Silva said taking an accelerated math course was one of the best academic decisions she’s made.

“My experience taking an accelerated math course was a positive one. I liked the overall curriculum in both accelerated math courses I took, from the interaction with the professor on campus, to the work and assistance MyMathLab™ offered,” Ms. Da Silva said.

“In my opinion, the success rates were higher because students who signed in for the accelerated courses feel more like a team with a sense of urgency to graduation and hence they become more and more motivated by the team,” Professor Mas-Oud said. “I love teaching these courses and I would not hesitate recommending them to any student here at QCC.” 

Dadbeh Bigonahy, Professor of Engineering & Sciences said his engineering students were happy to be able to take the required math classes in a quicker timeframe in order to advance faster in their academic careers.

“I told my students they can get to their dream faster by taking two math courses in one semester,” Professor Bigonahy said, adding that all of his engineering students are required to take a variety of math courses.

This spring, QCC will be offering a variety of accelerated math courses that include intermediate algebra; college algebra; statistics; pre-calculus and trigonometry.

“What students should keep in mind is that even though this is a fast-paced course, the professors at QCC are prepared and equipped in assisting students’ needs while meeting the course's deadlines and syllabus,” Ms. Da Silva added.

To learn more about QCC’s accelerated math courses, visit the Math Department's Web page. 

  • From left: Vice President of the Chess Club, QCC student Michael Imse and Chess Club Advisor Jerry Williams.
  • QCC's Chess Club Advisor and zealous chess player, Jerry Williams.
November, 2017
November, 2017

Stop by Quinsigamond Community College’s cafeteria most mornings and you’ll find a group of students intently playing a game of chess. More often than not you’ll also see their animated and passionate advisor either playing a game with them or quietly offering advice. The students are part of QCC’s Chess Club and QCC Art Professor and avid chess player, Jerry Williams is the...

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Stop by Quinsigamond Community College’s cafeteria most mornings and you’ll find a group of students intently playing a game of chess. More often than not you’ll also see their animated and passionate advisor either playing a game with them or quietly offering advice. The students are part of QCC’s Chess Club and QCC Art Professor and avid chess player, Jerry Williams is the club’s advisor.

QCC has had a chess club for years, averaging between 10-15 players a semester.  Mr. Williams has been a part of the club for as many years, working hard to dispel the stigmas that are sometimes associated with chess, and getting students to understand and appreciate the game.

“The whole idea that you have to be incredibly smart or a nerd to play chess is just ridiculous,” he said. “Chess is for everyone. It’s teachable. Chess teaches you passion, math and problem solving. The U.S. is the only country that doesn’t have chess as a curriculum in school.”

As a devoted chess player himself, Mr. Williams is coached by American chess player, Marc Esserman, who is ranked 40th among active chess players in the U.S. by the U.S. Chess Federation.

Mr. Williams brings the knowledge he gains from Mr. Esserman to the students he advises.

In fact, Mr. Williams has lined up Mr. Esserman to come to QCC for some personal coaching sessions in the near future for anyone who is interested. Additionally, he is working to set up a “simul” chess tournament with Mr. Esserman, where Mr. Esserman will simultaneously play between 20 and 30 people at the same time. Mr. Williams has done these types of “simul” tournaments himself. Most recently at the Octoberfest in Douglas where he simultaneously played multiple people. All proceeds from the tournament went toward the Douglas Library, where his wife is a board member.

In October of this year, QCC sponsored a U.S. Chess Federation official tournament that featured four rounds with prizes given for first, second and third place. The event drew between 30-35 players and included three U.S. masters and one expert, in addition to QCC students, the public, and four fifth and sixth grade elementary school students from Douglas.

The elementary school students were part of a group of Boy Scouts from Douglas. Mr. Williams teaches them about chess once a week and is quick to note that chess is for anyone of any age. In chess, age is not a factor. Young can play old and vice versa. Mr. Williams said his young players have been working hard to learn the game.

“They will get a merit badge for playing chess,” Mr. William said, adding proudly, “Two of my students won two games in the tournament we had at QCC.”

QCC students interested in playing chess or those students who just want to stop by to watch and learn, can visit Room 367A in the Administration Building any Monday, Wednesday or Friday between 3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Mr. Williams has some sage advice for those interested in playing chess.

“Everyone who plays needs to be passionate because when you are not passionate you don’t do the work,” he said. 

  • The Sixth Annual Hat and Mitten Drive is underway.
November, 2017
November, 2017

For the sixth year QCC will be holding its Annual Hat and Mitten Drive to benefit children and adolescents in the Worcester and Southbridge area who are in need.

The Drive is being held from Monday, December 4 - Thursday, December 13. Donations can be dropped off by December 13 at any of the following locations:

  • Harrington Learning Center (HLC), Welcome Center
  • ...
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For the sixth year QCC will be holding its Annual Hat and Mitten Drive to benefit children and adolescents in the Worcester and Southbridge area who are in need.

The Drive is being held from Monday, December 4 - Thursday, December 13. Donations can be dropped off by December 13 at any of the following locations:

  • Harrington Learning Center (HLC), Welcome Center
  • Administration Building, Outside Room 125A
  • QCC Southbridge (Items will be donated to the needy in Southbridge)
  • QCC's Downtown Healthcare and Workforce Development Center

Please consider donating any NEW hat and/or mittens or gloves (any size, color or gender). All donations distributed in the Worcester area will be done by an "army of elves" from the Planting the Seed Foundation, Inc. 

 

Hat and Mitten Drive for Children
  • Last year's Stuff-A-Cruiser was a huge success. Help make this year's even more successful.
November, 2017
November, 2017

QCC’s annual holiday program, Feed-A-Family was developed to help families in need celebrate the holidays. For decades the program has been providing holiday meals to QCC families and bringing good will to all through the simple act of giving. Last year, QCC Campus Police and Counseling Services teamed up with Stuff-A-Cruiser, becoming an important support program to the college’s Feed-A-...

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QCC’s annual holiday program, Feed-A-Family was developed to help families in need celebrate the holidays. For decades the program has been providing holiday meals to QCC families and bringing good will to all through the simple act of giving. Last year, QCC Campus Police and Counseling Services teamed up with Stuff-A-Cruiser, becoming an important support program to the college’s Feed-A-Family Program.This year the college will once again offer both programs to help those in need.

For those looking to nominate someone; fill out the nomination form and provide the name and additional required information of students, faculty or staff who may need assistance during this holiday season. Please keep nominations confidential and submit them in a sealed envelope to QCC mailbox #144. The college community forwards the names and pertinent data to the Feed-A- Family Committee. To date, no one has been turned away.

All cash donations received for the Feed-A-Family program are used to purchase gift cards to a local grocery store. In addition to monetary donations, the QCC Campus Police are asking faculty, staff and students to stop by one of their Stuff-A-Cruiser events where faculty, staff and students can bring a new, unwrapped toy, gift card or movie tickets for a Feed-A-Family child. Please take some time and join the QCC Police and other assisting departments for some hot cocoa and a small token of appreciation. 

Those wishing to make a donation can drop off their donation at:

The Stuff-A-Cruiser Events on:

  • December 5, 2017 10:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. at the Downtown Healthcare and Workforce Development Center, 25 Federal St., Worcester, in the Lobby
  • December 6, 2017 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. at QCC Southbridge, 5 Optical Drive, Southbridge, in the Lobby
  • December 7, 2017 10:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.  at the Main Campus, 670 West Boylston Street, Worcester, at the Flag Poles
  • QCC mailbox #144 donations and nominations accepted until December 7.

Please make all checks out to:  QCC Feed-A-Family.

Recipients will receive a food gift certificate to purchase a holiday meal of their choice, and toys for their children will be provided by the Stuff-A-Cruiser program.

“Thank you for your willingness to make the holidays brighter for our QCC families,” said Tina Wells, Coordinator of Counseling Services. “May all of your holidays be filled with warmth and kindness.”

If you cannot stop by during the scheduled days, please feel free to donate at one of the drop boxes in Room 162A, the Fuller Center, 25 Federal St. or with the QCC Police Department.

Toys & donations will be also be accepted until December 8.

November, 2017
November, 2017

QCC's Fall Student Theater Production, "Struggling to Connect - Exploring Relationships," was preformed in Hebert Auditorium Suprenant Hall on November 30 - December 3. Read below for an opening night review by QCC Professor of English, Margaret Wong.

"QCC Student Theater has come of age. In the production of Struggling to Connect,...

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QCC's Fall Student Theater Production, "Struggling to Connect - Exploring Relationships," was preformed in Hebert Auditorium Suprenant Hall on November 30 - December 3. Read below for an opening night review by QCC Professor of English, Margaret Wong.

"QCC Student Theater has come of age. In the production of Struggling to Connect, there was nothing merely superficially entertaining about what was presented. Rather, the audience experienced the results of thoughtful hard work on the part of a very talented cast, grappling with the full range and depth of what human connecting entails.

The production’s structure was starkly simple. A triad of individuals come on stage, holding hands, physically connected to one another. Then the connection is broken as the center member moves upstage, alone, to tell a story, make a phone call, or deliver a statement. Upon conclusion of the monologue, the lone speaker reconnects to the others, and the triad goes off stage, holding hands again, connected again.

Backgrounded by the disconnected silent witnesses who hang back — to illustrate, emphasize, or shadow — the statements of the monologist emerge exposed and riveting.The raw emotions on display as stories are told of untoward acts, imminent loss, assault, and killing, draw us in, even as they make us aware that we are voyeuristically witnessing something deeply personal and private.

In the final scene, one voice begins to sing Paul Simon’s “The Sound of Silence,” followed by a second, then a third, until the whole cast is on stage singing together, connected in song. The lyrics, which declare the inescapability of aloneness and silence, are countered by the presence of the connected voices, and therefore, the production leaves the audience with the awareness that human connecting is very much possible.

The production celebrated human connection, but it did not shy away from honestly dealing with the emotional damage of lost love or the devastation caused by female battery and institutional racism. If you saw this play, you learned something about yourself and the world, and you came away impressed with the quality of QCC Student Theater."

 

 

QCC's Production of "Struggling to Connect."
  • Students take a break from their classes to visit with a new friend.
  • A QCC student finds a new pal.
  • Paws for Pets service dogs gave a lot of love to students.
November, 2017
November, 2017

For the last three years Quinsigamond Community College has been offering a Winter Wellness Workshop designed to relieve stress from the semester and help students prepare for their final exams. These wellness workshops have been in place for six years and are offered twice a year at the end of each semester.

Activities at these events are designed to help students de-stress. Stress-free activities include...

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For the last three years Quinsigamond Community College has been offering a Winter Wellness Workshop designed to relieve stress from the semester and help students prepare for their final exams. These wellness workshops have been in place for six years and are offered twice a year at the end of each semester.

Activities at these events are designed to help students de-stress. Stress-free activities include anything from massage, reiki, arts and crafts, coloring, Zumba and yoga, to bringing in service animals through the organization, Paws for People. The Paws for People program, affiliated with Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University, is always one of the hits of this biannual event.

On Nov. 29, the organization once again came to the college’s main campus to kick off the two-day event with a few dogs and one cat that offered students a chance to pet the animals and just relax. The animals have been proven stress reducers for the students.

“Students who you haven’t seen on campus will come right in when they see the animals,” said Mike Beane, Director of Student Life and Leadership.

“It’s good for the students to hang out with each other and pet the animals,” said Kristie Proctor, Director of Disability Services, adding that the handlers also engage with the students talking to them about their classes and interacting with them.

Ms. Proctor was the impetus behind bringing the service animals to QCC.

“What inspired me was that I’m a big animal lover. I said we have got to bring these animals to campus and then everyone jumped onboard,” she said.  

In addition to the Worcester campus event, a stress-free wellness event also happened at QCC’s Southbridge location. Tami Strouth, Coordinator of Disability Services in Southborough brought in a cat organization for students to visit with cats and kittens, in addition to offering a mindfulness session, coloring and massage.

Other events scheduled during the two-day event on QCC's main Worcester campus (Nov. 29 & Nov. 30) included mindfulness, coloring, massage and a sounds therapy session led by faculty member Jean Kennedy. In a sounds therapy session the tonalities and vibrations emitted from the bowl are used to help reduce stress and can aid in pain management.

Ms. Proctor said that QCC is extremely supportive of the student experience and offers activities that will get students to interact more and feel part of the community.

Ms. Proctor said that events such as these, “support student success as we move forward toward final exams.”  

  • QCC Veterans Club Members proudly walked in the Worcester Veterans Day parade.
November, 2017
November, 2017

Quinsigamond Community College was selected as a top school in the 2018 Military Advanced Education & Transition Magazine Guide to Colleges & Universities research study. The guide is a comprehensive research tool for service members, education services officers and transition officers.Colleges and universities must fill out an extensive questionnaire that evaluates higher education institutes on military...

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Quinsigamond Community College was selected as a top school in the 2018 Military Advanced Education & Transition Magazine Guide to Colleges & Universities research study. The guide is a comprehensive research tool for service members, education services officers and transition officers.Colleges and universities must fill out an extensive questionnaire that evaluates higher education institutes on military culture, financial aid for veterans, flexibility, on-campus support and online support services.

In other Veteran news, QCC Veterans Club members were part of the annual Worcester Veterans Day parade held each year in Worcester. The parade coincides with Veterans Day, observed every November 11 to honor all American veterans who have served in the military of the U.S.

qcc_wyvern_veterans_club-thumb.png

In celebration of all veterans and to recognize the courage and sacrifices of those who served or are currently serving, Veterans Affairs has also placed a “Military Appreciation Tree” on display in the Veteran Center—Room 258A. 

“Stop by or email your request if you would like a ribbon placed on the tree in honor of a veteran who you have known. Please indicate what color ribbon you would like placed on the tree,” said Paula Ogden, Director of Veterans Affairs.

Bringing Holiday Cheer to Veterans

The Veterans Affairs office will also be sending out holiday care packages cards and letters to service men and women who are currently deployed in Afghanistan and local Veterans hospitals during their annual holiday drive.

“Outside of the registrar’s office is our Veteran Affairs bulletin board where we’ve displayed artwork and messages that were sent to us from a kindergarten class at the AMVET Elementary School in North Attleboro, MA. The school's name stands for 'American veterans' and was named in recognition of veterans,” Ms. Ogden said. "We’ll be sending all of these messages and artwork to the troops in Afghanistan in a couple of weeks."

Those wishing to send an item or card can drop off their items to the Veterans Affairs Office in Room 258A or at the security desk at QCC’s downtown Healthcare and Workforce Development Center. The deadline for dropping off items is December 8. 

Artwork and messages earmarked troops in Afghanistan from a kindergarten class at the AMVET Elementary School in North Attleboro, MA.
  • Taking part in the fun was from left: Director of Student Life and Leadership, Mike Beane; President Dr. Luis Pedraja, Student Senate President, Ed Reitz (after being hit with a pie) and Dean of Students, Terry Vecchio.
  • Preparing to challenge each other are from left: Director of Student Life and Leadership, Mike Beane; QCC student Jack Cuddy and QCC student Daniel Pavone.
  • Students had a great time during Spirit Carnival.
  • Emanuel Gray and Shelitza Ortiz enjoy the festive atmosphere at the Athletic Center.
  •  QCC Student Sabrina Poirier prepares to help Director of Student Life and Leadership, Mike Beane "pie" Student Senate President  Ed Reitz.
  • From left: QCC students Rebecca Owusu and Precious Love are all smiles at QCC's Spirit Carnival.
November, 2017
November, 2017

On November 8, the Athletic Center gymnasium had a carnival-like atmosphere as students, faculty and staff culminated the school’s Spirit Week with a Spirit Carnival.The event was put on by Student Life and featured an obstacle course, games, a nacho bar, air brush beanies and an inflatable wall.

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On November 8, the Athletic Center gymnasium had a carnival-like atmosphere as students, faculty and staff culminated the school’s Spirit Week with a Spirit Carnival.The event was put on by Student Life and featured an obstacle course, games, a nacho bar, air brush beanies and an inflatable wall.

  • Staff Attorney Alexandra Bonazoli, of the Central West Justice Center discussed recent immigration changes with the QCC students, faculty and staff.
November, 2017
November, 2017

Staff Attorney Alexandra Bonazoli of the Central West Justice Center, visited the QCC campus earlier this month to discuss some of the recent changes to immigration and immigration policies. Over 25 students, faculty and staff attended the informal discussion that focused on the current administration’s decision to rescind the DACA program. DACA, which stands for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, was an...

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Staff Attorney Alexandra Bonazoli of the Central West Justice Center, visited the QCC campus earlier this month to discuss some of the recent changes to immigration and immigration policies. Over 25 students, faculty and staff attended the informal discussion that focused on the current administration’s decision to rescind the DACA program. DACA, which stands for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, was an immigration policy that allowed people who entered the U.S. as minors, either illegally or remained in the country illegally, to receive a two-year renewable period of deferred action from deportation and then they could become eligible for a work permit.

Ms. Bonazoli discussed possible options for people who are being impacted by this decision, such as temporary protected status or “TPS.” TPS is a temporary immigration status to the U.S., granted to eligible nationals of designated countries.  However, certain countries that currently have TPS status may also be losing their status, Ms. Bonazoli told those in attendance, adding that it is imperative to stay abreast of current information and be aware of what is going on.

She said there are other options after DACA, which may be available to people on a case-by-case basis.

“We don’t know any sooner than anyone else knows what is going to happen,” Ms. Bonazoli said. “However, if you think one of the programs you are in may be ending, the best thing you can do is seek legal advice.”

Ms. Bonazoli cautioned people to make sure they obtain the correct information about their options.

“You won’t know you have options until you come in and find out,” she said. “Be very careful to not give your money to someone for immigration advice who is not an attorney. There’s lots of scams out there. Be mindful of who you are going to for advice.”

The Central West Justice Center provides free legal services to low-income and elderly families and individuals in central and western Massachusetts.

“The legal services in our office are free and most attorneys speak Spanish. We also have someone in-house who speaks Portuguese and we have access to a language phone service,” Ms. Bonazoli said.

For those who are interested in contacting the Central West Justice Center they can visit www.cwjustice.org and apply for help using the online form or by calling toll-free at 855-252-5342.