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10/2017

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October, 2017

  • QCC's current HVAC certificate program at QCC at Assabet.
October, 2017
October, 2017

Quinsigamond Community College has received $431,900 as part of the state’s Skills Capital Grant program. Skills Capital Grants are awarded to educational institutions that demonstrate partnerships with industry and align curriculum to meet businesses’ needs within the state.

QCC will partner with Worcester Technical High School to serve as a site to expand its HVAC certificate program. The...

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Quinsigamond Community College has received $431,900 as part of the state’s Skills Capital Grant program. Skills Capital Grants are awarded to educational institutions that demonstrate partnerships with industry and align curriculum to meet businesses’ needs within the state.

QCC will partner with Worcester Technical High School to serve as a site to expand its HVAC certificate program. The expansion is designed to double the enrollment capacity of the HVAC certificate program and enable a second start date for students during the spring semester. Currently the HVAC program is being offered at QCC at Assabet.

“We are honored to receive this funding, which demonstrates our curriculum’s alignment with businesses’ demands,” said QCC President Dr. Luis G. Pedraja. “We are committed to the future both locally and globally, ensuring that our students are afforded the best possible opportunity for success. The partnerships we are making will have lasting effects on our future workforce.”

“Worcester Technical High School is thrilled to be partnering with QCC to provide high quality competencies in the ever-growing and much needed field of Heating Ventilation Air Conditioning and Refrigeration. The current Administration and Legislative body recognize the need to provide highly skilled individuals to meet these workforce demands through the provision of the Massachusetts Skills Capital Grant Awards,” said Kyle J. Brenner, principal of Worcester Technical High School.

Governor Charlie Baker announced that a total of $9.8 million in grants were awarded to 32 high schools, community colleges and educational institutions. QCC is one of six community colleges to be named a recipient of the competitive grants and received the second highest grant among its peers for its partnership program with Worcester Technical High School.

“These Skills Capital Grants will help boost our economy and equip students with new skills, knowledge and experience with state-of-the-art equipment across the Commonwealth,” said Governor Charlie Baker. “We look forward to continuing our work with these 32 institutions and previous awardees to enhance their programs and develop a skilled workforce ready to meet the needs of the Commonwealth.”

To date more than $36 million in Skills Capital Grants have been awarded in the last two years.

  • From left: Assistant Vice President of Extended Campus Operations & Community Engagement, Victor Somma Jr.; CSET instructor Luis Carmine; QCC student Shawn Coltran; President Dr. Luis Pedraja; QCC student Edris Ebouel; Professor of Computer Systems Engineering Technology, Betty Lauer; CSET Lab Manager, Paul Sluckis; Science Lab Manager, Tracy Levin, and Dean of Business, Engineering and Technology, Kathy Rentsch.
  • From left: QCC President Dr. Luis J. Pedraja and Southbridge High School President Dr. Andrae Townsel.
  • From left: Professor Betty Lauer and Science Lab Manager Tracy Levin
  • QCC student Edris Ebouel explains some of the features of the new CSET land and hideaway desks.
October, 2017
October, 2017

Quinsigamond Community College has had a presence in the Southbridge community for the last 38 years, beginning with a variety of individual course offerings in partnership with Southbridge High School. In 2009, QCC opened a satellite location in Southbridge. On October 25, QCC solidified its investment in South County by officially inaugurating its Computer Systems Engineering Technology (CSET) and enhanced science...

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Quinsigamond Community College has had a presence in the Southbridge community for the last 38 years, beginning with a variety of individual course offerings in partnership with Southbridge High School. In 2009, QCC opened a satellite location in Southbridge. On October 25, QCC solidified its investment in South County by officially inaugurating its Computer Systems Engineering Technology (CSET) and enhanced science labs in a ribbon cutting ceremony and open house. The labs were made possible through a $488,735 Workforce Skills Capital Grant that was awarded to QCC in 2016. The Workforce Skills Capital Grant Program is an initiative of the Governor’s Workforce Skills Cabinet, which seeks to align education, workforce and economic development strategies across the state.

“I believe very strongly that education is a pathway to success. It’s the best way of success for the students and those who are working hard to achieve their dreams and to make something of themselves. It’s up to us to provide the resources they need and the opportunities they need to achieve those dreams,” said QCC’s new President, Dr. Luis G. Pedraja.

Part of that need is to offer services that mirror those required in today’s ever-changing, technology-driven world. Technology is now needed in all industries, from manufacturing, education and healthcare, to large corporations and small businesses. New skillsets have become necessary by students and those already in the workforce, in order to succeed in the business world. The addition of the new CSET lab at QCC Southbridge, will enable the college to meet this demand by bringing additional technical training options to the South County region.

The new CSET lab features 12 state-of-the-art workstations with hideaway, split desks that can bring up the computers when they are needed, or hide them away under the desks when not in use, simply at the touch of a button. The CSET lab is also equipped with servers and cabling, allowing students hands-on learning that replicates a business environment.

“We all require some level of information technology expertise. I believe we need to teach for the jobs of tomorrow. We need to open up these skillsets here in South County,” Dr. Pedraja said. “The opportunities that the CSET lab and the science lab enhancement will bring allows more people in this area to access classes they normally couldn’t access unless they traveled to Worcester.”

Additionally, community partnerships with area industries will continue to be a part of QCC Southbridge, with the new labs offering additional resources to community businesses.

“The Computer Systems Engineering Technology and Enhanced Science Labs strengthen our partnership with Quinsigamond Community College. They give us an opportunity to allow our young people to interact with college professors and utilize the most advanced technological equipment. QCC has been an amazing asset to the academic advancement of our students. We look forward to continued collaboration of preparing young people to compete in our global society,” said Dr. Andrae Townsel, principal of Southbridge High School.

Kathy Rentsch, Dean of Business, Engineering and Technology said workforce development opportunities will now be readily available in Southbridge for companies to have their employees learn new skillsets, in addition to unemployed or under-employed adults, who might want to obtain some quick skills to get back into the workforce.

“I believe in being present in the communities we serve. A community college is about serving the community. It’s not just bringing people to our location, it’s about going to where the needs are and where the people are. The students, the employers and the community need education,” Dr. Pedraja said.

  • Current Student Registration begins November 6.
October, 2017
October, 2017

While it may seem hard to believe, Spring Registration is right around the corner.  Beginning on Monday, November 6 – Monday, November 20, current QCC students can take advantage of the college’s early registration program and register for the classes they need before receiving their final grades.  

By taking advantage of this early registration, current students receive...

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While it may seem hard to believe, Spring Registration is right around the corner.  Beginning on Monday, November 6 – Monday, November 20, current QCC students can take advantage of the college’s early registration program and register for the classes they need before receiving their final grades.  

By taking advantage of this early registration, current students receive “VIP” treatment and are the first students allowed to choose their classes, professors and schedule, ensuring they get the classes they need.

“Too often students have the misconception that they can’t register for classes until after they have received their grades. Unfortunately by putting off registration, they can sometimes get locked out of their first choice of classes,” said QCC Director of Admissions Mishawn Davis-Eyene.

Additionally, studies have shown that late registration correlates with lower grades, lower completion rates and lower re-enrollment the following semester. *

Current students can register for classes by simply visiting advising on QCC’s Main Worcester Campus (Room 62A). It’s that easy!

Advising hours are:

  • Monday - Thursday: 8:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m.
  • Friday: 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

*Ford, G.G., Stahl, K.J., Walker, M.E., & Ford, A.M. (June 2008). Better late than never? The relation of registration data to class performance. College Student Journal, 42(2), 402–407

  • Dr. Luis Pedraja, Senator Harriette Chandler and Worcester Commissioner of Health & Human Services, Dr. Matilde Castiel, joined PTK student leaders to discuss their honors action project.
  • From left: Tony Sanders, Senator Harriette Chandler, PTK President Maia Shalev and PTK Vice President of Leadership, Nicole Bodinizzo.
October, 2017
October, 2017

Earlier this month QCC’s Phi Theta Kappa officers met with Senator Harriette Chandler, Worcester Commissioner of Health & Human Services, Dr. Matilde Castiel, and QCC’s President Dr. Luis G. Pedraja, to discuss the chapter’s Honors Action Project and how they hoped to help make a difference for the homeless in Worcester.

The PTK Honors in Action Project is part of the...

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Earlier this month QCC’s Phi Theta Kappa officers met with Senator Harriette Chandler, Worcester Commissioner of Health & Human Services, Dr. Matilde Castiel, and QCC’s President Dr. Luis G. Pedraja, to discuss the chapter’s Honors Action Project and how they hoped to help make a difference for the homeless in Worcester.

The PTK Honors in Action Project is part of the group’s initiative to become a five star chapter in the international honor society. To become a five star, a charter must demonstrate a global element of engagement outside of its community. A primary component of becoming a five star chapter is through a yearlong Honors Action Project chosen from one of eight themes from the current Honors Action Program Guide. This year’s PTK officers chose the theme: “RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES: What roles do rights and responsibilities play in shaping ways in which the world works?”

In discussing ideas for the project, PTK officers decided to address the issue of whether or not government is responsible for potable water for sanitation and consumption.The group decided they would like to champion the cause of potable water and developed an Honors Action Project proposal that detailed creating a mobile shower bus, which would service the homeless of Worcester.

The PTK officers presented their idea to Senator Chandler and Dr. Castiel and while both felt this was an admirable project, they concluded it would be too difficult to implement. However, the PTK officers were not to be deterred and a collaborative discussion ensued. Dr. Castiel told the students that housing was truly the immediate need of the homeless. Dr. Castiel cited a recent report by the Central Massachusetts Housing Alliance, Inc. that showed a total of 1,111 people who were homeless in the City of Worcester.

PTK officers in attendance agreed that this would be a better avenue to pursue and discussed ways in which they could bring in modular housing for the homeless. The officers left the meeting exciting to share what they learned with other PTK members and revamp their project.

  • From left: Dr. Luis G. Pedraja; Dean Kathy Rentsch; COO Steve Marini and QCC alumni Stephanie Teixteria.
  • Dean Kathy Rentsch and QCC Board President Maurice "Moe" Boisvert.
  • Dr. Pedraja discusses new funding strategies with area legislators.
  • Legislators met with Karen Rucks, QCC's Executive Director of Advancement.
October, 2017
October, 2017

On Friday, Oct. 27, QCC’s Board of Trustees Chair Susan Mailman and QCC Foundation Board President Maurice "Moe" Boisvert, along with President Luis G. Pedraja, hosted the college’s Legislative Breakfast. The breakfast was held to inform and incite local legislators to assist QCC in obtaining fiscal support from the state to invest in education...

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On Friday, Oct. 27, QCC’s Board of Trustees Chair Susan Mailman and QCC Foundation Board President Maurice "Moe" Boisvert, along with President Luis G. Pedraja, hosted the college’s Legislative Breakfast. The breakfast was held to inform and incite local legislators to assist QCC in obtaining fiscal support from the state to invest in education on the community college level, specifically to help support its scholarship program.  According to Mr. Boisvert, the college has embarked on a plan to raise money to make sure every student who comes to QCC and needs a scholarship, is able to obtain one. The Board has made a commitment to work with all donors, especially alumni, to increase the number of Foundation scholarships each year by 20 percent.

“We are a long ways from this,” Mr. Boisvert said. “This fall we had 125 applicants and we gave out 25 from the Foundation. Our goal is to give out $350,000 privately and a total of almost a million dollars for the year, in addition to those funds. We want all students who need a scholarship to get one. Our hope is that this funding initiative will make this goal a reality."

He shared the ways in which funding will be raised and added that they would like to be able to use  include contributions from all Board members and Trustees, which is anticipated to bring in between $10,000-$15,000.  A robust alumni appeal is underway and was initially anticipated to bring in at least $20,000. A recent $80,000 gift from the Worcester City Hospital Nursing Association pushed that number much higher.

“They (the nurses) are closing their association and their generosity is helping us get to our goal sooner,” Mr. Boisvert said, adding that the college has such a strong nursing program there is a waiting list for nursing students.

Other ways of raising funds include donations from QCC employees and the soliciting of family foundations. Dr. Pedraja shared the news that Jim Harrington, of the Harrington Foundation has agreed to disperse all its foundation resources to just three institutions going forward in perpetuity: the Boys and Girls Club; Clark University and Quinsigamond Community College.

“This will double the amount we receive,” Dr. Pedraja added.

Other fundraising endeavors include: raising $100,000 through grants and $30,000-$50,000 in named scholarships.

While all these will get QCC closer to its goal, a state match that would incentivize the private sector (for every two dollars the private sector invested the state put in one dollar) would make QCC’s fundraising goal reality.

Mr. Boisvert appealed to the legislators in attendance to support the two current House and Senate bills that could make this match a reality.

“Help us send more people to Quinsigamond Community College to build their dream, their American dream can came true,” he said.

  • From left" QCC student Alexis Marsh meets with employers from Securitas.
  • QCC students were able to get on the job interview with FedEx.
  • QCC alumi Tommy Moore along with Carreu Kamanda met with Recruiter Jim March of Microtech staffing Group.
  • QCC student Chad Jackson discussed employment opportunities with Kara Blom of At & T.
  • QCC's Job Fair  offered many employment opportunities for students.
October, 2017
October, 2017

QCC students may have met their potential new employers at the college’s Career Services semi-annual Fall Job Fair, held on November 1, in the Harrington Learning Center. QCC students met and mingled with over 25 employers that were in attendance, learning about some of the job opportunities available to them. At many of the booths, students were able to share resumes, fill out job applications, and speak...

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QCC students may have met their potential new employers at the college’s Career Services semi-annual Fall Job Fair, held on November 1, in the Harrington Learning Center. QCC students met and mingled with over 25 employers that were in attendance, learning about some of the job opportunities available to them. At many of the booths, students were able to share resumes, fill out job applications, and speak with prospective employers.

“We have people applying on the spot and being interviewed,” said Sydney Ocran, Talent Acquisition Coordinator for FedEX Ground. “We have 500 seasonal openings.”

Many of the other companies in attendance had immediate openings they were trying to fill.

“We are open to interview anyone to fill our positions as soon as possible,” said, Kara Blom, of AT&T.

“This is a nice place to do this,” said QCC student Alexis March, who was at her first job fair.

Companies in attendance included:

  • Alternatives
  • American Fabrication
  • AT&T
  • Autism Learning Partners
  • Barton Associates
  • Charming Charlies
  • City of Worcester
  • CoWorx Staffing Services
  • Cunningham & Associates
  • Eaton
  • Federal Bureau of Prisons
  • FedEx
  • H&M Hennes & Mauritz
  • Home Depot
  • IPG Photonics
  • Microtech Staffing Group
  • Monroe Staffing
  • QCC Campus Police
  • Remedy Staffing
  • Renewal by Anderson
  • Securitas
  • The Arc
  • UMASS Memorial
  • UPS
  • Valet Park of America
  • Venture Community Services
  • Wakefly

Career Services offers a wide variety of resources to assist students in identifying career opportunities, finding up to date information on the latest job market trends, acquiring work experience in their career field of choice, and developing job search skills for a successful transition from school to work.

Career Placement Representatives are available for assistance and additional web resources including the Wyvern JobNet, co-op, and internship database can be found on The Q.

  • The state-of-the-art kitchen where the meal replacement meals are prepared.
  • QCC students are a big part of the meal preparation during the school year.
October, 2017
October, 2017

Statistics show that food insecurity is growing among older adults. The National Council on Aging noted that in 2014, 10.2 million older Americans faced the threat of hunger, which represents 15.8 percent of adults aged 60 and over in the U.S. At Quinsigamond Community College that information has not gone unnoticed by the college’s Hospitality and Recreation Management (HRM) faculty, staff and students.

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Statistics show that food insecurity is growing among older adults. The National Council on Aging noted that in 2014, 10.2 million older Americans faced the threat of hunger, which represents 15.8 percent of adults aged 60 and over in the U.S. At Quinsigamond Community College that information has not gone unnoticed by the college’s Hospitality and Recreation Management (HRM) faculty, staff and students.

Once a week since March 2017, QCC students, faculty and staff located at QCC in the Worcester Senior Center have been offering healthy, hearty and balanced meals that people can purchase and take home.  The meals are prepared weekly in the state-of-the-art kitchen and are designed to meet the needs of seniors, who often live alone or are homebound.

According to Coordinator of the Hospitality & Recreation Management Program, Pat Hutchinson, this type of learning gives QCC students valuable hands-on training, while teaching them about general healthy eating and the food needs of the public.

“We started to do these meals in order to offer nutritional, reasonably priced meals that may otherwise be out of a person’s reach. These meals have been very well-received,” said HRM Dietary Management Lab Site Supervisor, Rebecca King. “During the school year the students help plan the menu and prep and package the meals during their kitchen lab.”

All meals are targeted to be 500 calories or less total, packaged in eco-friendly durable packaging that is microwave safe, and designed to be served at home over the weekend. A label on the packaging indicates the meal, the ingredients and instructions for re-heating, as well as a use by date (meals are good for 5 days). Meals are based on a cycle menu that includes a rotation of proteins and incorporates seasonal offerings and products. The meals are offered every Friday throughout the year and are available to the public at a cost of $5 per meal. Reservations are due by Wednesday at noon for that Friday’s meal.

The weekly menu choice is posted in the Worcester Senior Center; is available at Bobby M’s Diner (located in the Worcester Senior Center) and is included in the senior newsletter.

“If someone would like a meal, they can simply call our reservation line 508.799.8068, or sign up in person in the diner,” Ms. King said. “We have many people that sign up for the month or several weeks a month.”

Meals are available for pick up at the Bobby M’s Diner, located at 128 Providence Street, Worcester (Inside the Worcester Senior Center) on Friday's until 3:00 p.m., some are available for pick up on Thursdays after 2:00 p.m., if requested and available. Check out the November menu .

For more information, contact Rebecca King at rking [at] qcc.umass.edu.

  • From left: Susan Mellace, Dr. Darshita Shah (MIT) and Jane Joyce.
  • QCC students listen to Dr. Shah explain how Fly-By-Wire works.
October, 2017
October, 2017

Quinsigamond Community College accounting students recently embarked on an online test/pilot program that enables them to test and improve themselves through the use of online assessments.

This technology offers a different way of student learning and teaching, through technology-enabled, competency-based scaffolding. The adaptive, personalized learning tool aids students in reaching high level learning...

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Quinsigamond Community College accounting students recently embarked on an online test/pilot program that enables them to test and improve themselves through the use of online assessments.

This technology offers a different way of student learning and teaching, through technology-enabled, competency-based scaffolding. The adaptive, personalized learning tool aids students in reaching high level learning outcomes through the mastering of lower level learning outcomes.  

“When students get a problem wrong, they get a hinting question that will assist them in mastering and understanding the original question,” said Jane Joyce, associate professor of accounting at QCC. “This is a terrific way for students to actually get the help they need whenever they need it.”

Through a collaboration with Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Cambridge) and Arapahoe Community College (Littleton, CO), the newly developed technology application, Fly-By-Wire was developed to improve student learning outcomes. Modeled after aerospace-inspired digital technology for pilots, the Fly-by-Wire technology was created to assist teachers in the same way as a fly-by-wire system in an aircraft aids a human pilot. The program is designed to serve diverse, non-traditional students from at-risk backgrounds and the faculty of college algebra and accounting. While QCC accounting students are currently testing the program application, Arapahoe Community College has already launched the program full-scale to its students.

QCC was instrumental was instrumental in developing the questions used in the accounting module. Since the summer of 2016, Ms. Joyce has worked developing questions and solutions in collaboration with Arapahoe Community College. Both Ms. Joyce and QCC colleague Susan Mellace visited MIT in the summer of 2017 to proof read the finalized questions and solutions before the application was launched.

“This type of technology will enable us to measure quantitative improvement in student learning outcomes and offer teachers the opportunity to assess an entire classes’ ability to master certain learning objectives,” said QCC’s Dean of Business, Engineering and Technology, Kathy Rentsch. “Many of our students have additional work/life commitments that make traditional ways of learning more difficult. This is something we feel can be a real game changer for our students. We’re excited to be a part of this collegiate collaboration.”

This four-year project is being funded by a $2.9 million U.S. Department of Education grant and has been in development since 2015.

  • QCC Campus Police receiving their Accreditation Award at the Connors Center in Dover, MA.
October, 2017
October, 2017

The Quinsigamond Community College Campus Police Department made history recently, becoming the first community college police department to receive official accreditation from the Massachusetts Police Accreditation Commission (MPAC). This is the Commission’s highest award.

This prestigious accreditation involves a police agency formally evaluating its activities, policies and procedures to determine...

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The Quinsigamond Community College Campus Police Department made history recently, becoming the first community college police department to receive official accreditation from the Massachusetts Police Accreditation Commission (MPAC). This is the Commission’s highest award.

This prestigious accreditation involves a police agency formally evaluating its activities, policies and procedures to determine compliance with defined program standards set by the MPAC.  The MPAC adopts its standards from the National Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies, which was established in 1979. Accreditation is a rigorous two-stop process and is similar to other accreditation processes that encompass Massachusetts and Federal regulations.

While not mandatory, the benefits of being an accredited agency bring a lot to the table for the police department. In addition to complete transparency for the officers and entire QCC community, the accreditation brings a strong message to the court system, demonstrating to the courts that each and every procedure has been followed correctly and accurately.

“There is an added credibility that stands up in the courts,” said QCC Campus Police Chief Kevin Ritacco.

To become an accredited police agency, a police department must first become certified. Certification requires that a police department meet 159 mandatory standards. The standards impact officer and public safety, address high liability/risk management issues, and promote operational efficiency throughout the department. Once a police department is certified they can then work to become state accredited, which involves an additional 98 mandatory standards that must be met, as well as a percentage of 125 optional standards, based on the size of the police department.

The Commission’s standards require that agencies commit their unwritten policies and procedures to writing. The internal self-assessment is initiated by the department’s police chief (agency CEO) and is then reviewed by Commission-appointed assessors. These assessors are typically police chiefs and accreditation managers, who have been specially trained to conduct on-site assessments on behalf of the Commission.

“This has been a goal of mine to do the accreditation process since becoming chief,” Chief Ritacco said. “Our Deputy Chief Reynaldo Rodriguez, said ‘we can do this’ and became our accreditation manager. He helped us reach our goal and deserves a lot of credit. This has given us better communication, better reports, more programs, an honor guard, and most especially full transparency of our policies and procedures.”

Every policy is vetted through the department and reviewed with each officer and by the command staff before being signed off on by the chief. It takes 30 days to approve each process before it is committed to writing.

“This has truly been a coordinated effort of each department at the college, from the emergency management teams, to facilities and our entire police department,” Chief Ritacco continued.

He credits QCC’s Board of Trustees with allocating the funds to enable the department to begin the certification process, as well as several accredited police departments in the area that offered assistance and guidance.

“The department was certified in May 2016 and a year later we became accredited,” Chief Ritacco said. “This has truly been a coordinated effort and I’m appreciative of every single one of our officers for their hard work and commitment.”

While the process to become accredited is an arduous one, the work is far from over. Every three years the department must go through a reaccreditation process to show that it is maintaining the accreditation standards.

“Maintaining this is just as important as the accreditation itself. By doing this reaccreditation every three years, it shows that the officers understood all the policies and procedures. Every policy is reviewed with each officer and checked off a role call training module,” said Chief Ritacco, adding, “We are extremely proud to be the first community college to earn this accreditation.”

QCC Campus Police Accreditation Award.
  • QCC paramedic students simulate medical situations.
  • QCC paramedic students learn how to administer IV medications.
October, 2017
October, 2017

This year marks the 30th anniversary of Quinsigamond Community College’s EMT (Emergency Medical Technician) Paramedic Certificate program. QCC initially began offering its EMT Paramedic Certificate program before adding its associate degree in Paramedic Technology in the late 1990s. Since 1989, the college has graduated a total over 200 students in these programs.

This spring the college will be offering...

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This year marks the 30th anniversary of Quinsigamond Community College’s EMT (Emergency Medical Technician) Paramedic Certificate program. QCC initially began offering its EMT Paramedic Certificate program before adding its associate degree in Paramedic Technology in the late 1990s. Since 1989, the college has graduated a total over 200 students in these programs.

This spring the college will be offering courses for the EMT Paramedic Certificate program, as well as Paramedic Technology degree. According to QCC’s Program Coordinator of the Emergency Medical Services Program, Cheryl Finn, this couldn’t come at a better time.

“We’re in a booming job market. The U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics noted that we’re looking at 24 percent job growth,” Ms. Finn said.

Historically the QCC paramedic program has been a strong one, with programs often filling up in the fall, when these programs are traditionally offered. Due to recent demand, these programs will again be offered during the spring 2018 semester.

While QCC offers both EMT and paramedics programs, the bulk of students are in the paramedics programs. For many people unfamiliar with the medical world, the term EMT and paramedic are NOT interchangeable. In fact, every paramedic must first be an EMT. QCC’s paramedic programs require that students have worked a year as an EMT before entering into either of the college’s paramedic programs.

The key differences between a Paramedic and an EMT are based on the amount of education and training. Paramedics take a more rigorous course load, and are licensed healthcare professionals who provide the most extensive pre-hospital advanced life support. Paramedic’s skills are much more advanced. Paramedics can do everything from starting IVs and administering medication, to performing advanced airway techniques and restoring and stabilizing heart rhythm on pulseless, non-breathing patients, using defibrillator, cardioversion, or external pacemaker.

“Paramedics bring the emergency room to the person,” Ms. Finn said.

Beyond the desire to help others, one of the big incentives for EMTs to move on and become paramedics is an increase in pay.  In September, 2017, the medical paramedic salary in Worcester was $43,120, not including bonus, benefit information and other factors that impact base pay, according to Salary.com. Today there are 248,000 EMT and paramedics jobs nationwide, with an additional 37,400 projected by 2026, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics .

QCC’s EMT-Paramedic certificate program takes between 120-126 hours to complete and is extended into a third semester. The program is split between classroom time, lab time, and simulated training before students embark on clinical and field time. Students who are going for their Paramedic Technology associate degree, take and follow all the same core courses as students in the paramedic certificate program, in addition to general education courses that round out their degree.

“Additionally, all paramedic students need to have field training in all medical areas,’’ Ms. Finn said. “Clinical time is 13 weeks, but can go a bit longer because all areas of medical care need to be covered.”

Medical areas students have clinical in include:

  • Emergency Room
  • Pediatric Emergency Room
  • Intensive Care Unit (ICU)
  • Cardiac Care Unit (CCU)
  • Operating Room
  • Obstetrics
  • Psychiatry

“When they finish they go to field time and work with a team of two paramedics,” Ms. Finn continued. “This takes approximately seven weeks and they must be the team leader on 10 calls.”

At the completion of all coursework, clinical and practical field experience, a paramedic student is adequately prepared to sit for the National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians Psychomotor and Computerized Examinations.

“We’ve had a 100 percent pass rate on our National Psychomotor and computerized exams for our last two Paramedic cohorts,” Ms. Flynn said, adding, “I’ve seen many of our former students working on area ambulances, and a lot of our alumni have also come back to work with us over the years as lab assistants and instructors. It’s great.”

  • H.A.C.E. Youth Recognition Award recipients.
  • From left: Director of Community Bridges Deborah Gonzalez and Coordinator of Future Focus Program, Gilmarie Vongphakdy.
  • Master of Ceremonies Eric Batista.
  • From left:Olga López-Hill, Dolly Vazquez and Deborah Gonzalez.
October, 2017
October, 2017

Mayor Proclaims H.A.C.E. Day

Earlier this month Quinsigamond Community College was host to the 32nd Annual H.A.C.E. Youth Recognition Awards. For the last 32 years the H.A.C.E. (Hispanics Achieving and Celebrating Excellence) awards have been given to graduating Latino high school students in the Worcester area who have excelled in arts, academics, athletics, community service, leadership and...

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Mayor Proclaims H.A.C.E. Day

Earlier this month Quinsigamond Community College was host to the 32nd Annual H.A.C.E. Youth Recognition Awards. For the last 32 years the H.A.C.E. (Hispanics Achieving and Celebrating Excellence) awards have been given to graduating Latino high school students in the Worcester area who have excelled in arts, academics, athletics, community service, leadership and civic/political engagement. To date over 500 students have been recognized and a total of over $33,000 has been awarded.

This year 30 graduating high school students from Worcester and surrounding high schools were honored.

Master of Ceremonies for the evening was Eric Batista, a former H.A.C.E. award recipient, who read a proclamation from Worcester Mayor Joseph M. Petty, declaring October 4, 2017 as H.A.C.E. Day in the City of Worcester. The declaration asked all Worcester to recognize and participate in its observance.

Keynote speaker for the event was QCC’s President, Dr. Luis G. Pedraja, who spoke of his own personal story emigrating from Cuba and becoming the first of his family to attend college.

“With each accomplishment we achieve, with each obstacle we overcome, with each step we take, we pave the road for the future and open a pathway for others,” he said told those assembled. “Together we can make a difference and reach great heights.”

In addition to the 30 high school student awards, three other awards were presented. They included:

The Olga López-Hill Community Leadership Scholarship: QCC student and Phi Theta Kappa member, Dathiel Blake, was awarded the scholarship, which is available to students who plan to continue their education at QCC or plan to transfer to another educational institution. Mr. Blake is president of QCC’s Brothers and Keepers male mentoring program and is also a mentor in the 100 Males to College program.  This scholarship was developed in honor of Olga López-Hill who worked at QCC for over 20 years advocating and inspiring students to further their education.

The Marlyn Reyes Memorial Community Leadership Award: This award is given in memory of Ms. Reyes who dedicated her life to improving her community.  Steven Robles, of Claremont Academy was the recipient.

The Dolly Vazquez Cultural Award: Burncoat High School student Jessenia Caballero was the recipient of this award. Ms. Vazquez is well-known for her tireless cultural involvement in the Worcester community.

The 2017 honorees were:

Academics

  • Kayla Benitez Alvarez – University Park Campus College
  • Jocelyn DePaz – North High School
  • Frances Garcia – Southbridge High School
  • Jori Hiraldo – Doherty Memorial High School
  • Angie Morales – Burncoat High School
  • Soamy Morales – Worcester Technical High School
  • Chris Nieves – South High Community School
  • Isaac Quiles – Worcester Technical High School

Arts

  • Ava Aquilar – North High School
  • Jessenia Caballero – Burncoat High School
  • Clara Dewar – St. Peter Marian High School
  • Katrian Nevarez – University Park Campus School
  • Derek Perry – South High Community School
  • Eury Rosario – Doherty Memorial High School
  • Carmen Zuniga – Claremont Academy

Athletics

  • Juan Adolphe – University Park Campus School
  • Luis Garcia-Nin – Burncoat High School
  • Misael Guzman – South High Community School
  • Kailey Ortiz – Southbridge High School
  • Ashley Peltier-Castilla – north High School
  • Hillary Reyes – Doherty Memorial High School
  • Herlin Rijo – Worcester Technical High School
  • Oscar Rosario – Claremont Academy

Leadership

  • Katya Campos Avalos – South High Community School
  • Dayanna Calderon – Doherty Memorial High School
  • Kenia Carvajal-Bautista – North High School
  • Bryan Grullon – Worcester Technical High School
  • Carlos Hasbun – University Park Campus
  • Steven Robles – Claremont Academy
  • Jamie Miguel Ruiz II – Burncoat High School

H.A.C.E. was created in 1985 by faculty and staff at QCC, along with business and community leaders in the Worcester community, to raise community awareness of Hispanic culture.

Phi Theta Kappa member, Dathiel Blake receiving the Olga López-Hill Community Leadership Scholarship from Olga López-Hill.
  • The Harrington Learning Center will soon include a new Welcome Center.
October, 2017
October, 2017

Quinsigamond Community College’s Harrington Learning Center is getting a bit of a makeover! Over the next few months the HLC will also become the college’s official Welcome Center.

The Welcome Center will serve as a gateway and first point of contact to QCC for all prospective students, current students, and community members.  From getting general information, to scheduling campus tours, the...

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Quinsigamond Community College’s Harrington Learning Center is getting a bit of a makeover! Over the next few months the HLC will also become the college’s official Welcome Center.

The Welcome Center will serve as a gateway and first point of contact to QCC for all prospective students, current students, and community members.  From getting general information, to scheduling campus tours, the Welcome Center will offer “one-stop shopping” for all college resources.

“We want everyone to feel welcomed at QCC from the moment they step onto the campus,” said QCC President, Dr. Luis G. Pedraja. “This is the perfect place to house our Welcome Center, since many of our services are already located in the HLC.”

The Welcome Center is expected to be completed by the end of 2017.

  • Aliens were even see in the Administrative building during the festivities.
  • QCC at Southbridge is always part of the Halloween fun.
  • QCC students Ed Reitz and Veronica Valentin entered the Student Life Costume Contest.
  • The staff in Human Resources were all dressed up and ready for a fun event.
October, 2017
October, 2017

It was a day of frightfully good fun as QCC’s main campus held its annual Trick or Treat event on October 31. Sponsored by the Fuller Student Center, the college-wide event was for developed for QCC students and children of students to have safe place to celebrate the event.  QCC faculty and staff embraced the event, with many people dressing in costumes and decorating their offices.

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It was a day of frightfully good fun as QCC’s main campus held its annual Trick or Treat event on October 31. Sponsored by the Fuller Student Center, the college-wide event was for developed for QCC students and children of students to have safe place to celebrate the event.  QCC faculty and staff embraced the event, with many people dressing in costumes and decorating their offices.

One of the offices had a helper handing out candy.
  • Worcester Technical High School carpentry students and their teacher at the partially constructed new dugouts.
  • The dugouts are close to completion!
  • QCC's 2017 Women's Soccer team.
October, 2017
October, 2017

Another fall sports season is well underway at Quinsigamond Community College. The Women’s Soccer team wrapped up its second season, playing a hard fought game against Springfield Community College. While their season did not end in a win, the newly-formed team is continuing to progress and improve.

“The team stuck together and fought hard to the end,” said Women’s Soccer Coach,...

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Another fall sports season is well underway at Quinsigamond Community College. The Women’s Soccer team wrapped up its second season, playing a hard fought game against Springfield Community College. While their season did not end in a win, the newly-formed team is continuing to progress and improve.

“The team stuck together and fought hard to the end,” said Women’s Soccer Coach, Josh Cole.wyverns logo on qcc basketball court

On November 8, the athletic center will come alive with QCC’s Spirit Carnival, part of the college’s Spirit Week.  From 11 a.m. – 2 p.m. the gymnasium will transform into a true carnival with airbrush beanies, a nacho bar, inflatable velcro wall and obstacle course, games and prizes.

The Men’s and Women’s Basketball teams are gearing up for another exciting season with the first home games of the season on November 9. Show support for the Wyverns by wearing QCC apparel or the school colors during Spirit Day and make sure to come in your school colors to the double-header against Holyoke Community College! Tip-off for the Women Wyverns is 5 p.m. and 7 p.m. for the Men’s tip-off.

On Thursday, November 16, the Wyverns home games against Bristol Community College will feature a special half-time performance (7:20 p.m.) by basketball sensation Ilze Luneau. Ms. Luneau has been featured on the Ellen Degeneres show, the Tonight Show, as well as numerous professional and college half-time shows.  She is the first person (male or female) to ever dribble 5 and 6 basketballs using just hands.  Make sure to stop by and cheer on your Wyvern team and stay for the amazing spins and thrills of Ms. Luneau. Check out a sampling of Ms. Luneau's show.

“Admission is always free so make sure to come down for the game and stay for the half-time show,” said Lisa Gurnick, Director of Athletics & Fitness Center.

Click here for the complete Men’s and Women’s basketball schedules.

Coming this Spring

Big things have been happening on QCC’s baseball field. The infield and outfield are getting a makeover and students from Worcester Technical High School carpentry students and teacher have been hard at work putting together new dugouts for the Wyvern baseball team. The dugouts are close to completion and should be ready for the start of the spring baseball season. Thanks to the Worcester Tech. students for an amazing job!

Basketball sensation Ilze Luneau on the Today Show in 2011.
  • The college’s Center for Workforce Development and Continuing Education is housed in the Carberry Center.
October, 2017
October, 2017

The recent partnership between Quinsigamond Community College and National Grid to offer a Natural Gas Technician Certificate Program was a huge success, culminating with all five students successfully completing the course and getting hired by National Grid.

“It was a great group of students to get this program started,” said Ed Donovan, northeast manager of National Grid.

The program...

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The recent partnership between Quinsigamond Community College and National Grid to offer a Natural Gas Technician Certificate Program was a huge success, culminating with all five students successfully completing the course and getting hired by National Grid.

“It was a great group of students to get this program started,” said Ed Donovan, northeast manager of National Grid.

The program served as an introduction into the gas industry and gave students an opportunity to learn about safe work practices and procedures, the properties of natural gas, the principals of gas construction, in addition to maintenance and customer service.

The 12-week certificate program included 72 hours of classroom time and 18 hours of hands-on training, in state-of-the-art laboratories and outdoor gas training simulation areas. The program was designed for people interested in seeking career opportunities within the natural gas industry.

Students who were hired after the program have an opportunity for a lifetime career, according to Mr. Donovan.

“At the end of three years, as long as they do well, they will automatically receive a higher rate and if they continue to progress, they will ultimately be able to go anywhere they want within the company,” he said.

The demand for new employees continues to rise as the potential for customer growth continues to grow exponentially, according to Northeast Gas Association.

“This was a highly successful program and we are planning to offer this certificate program again in the very near future,” said Kathleen Manning, dean of Center for Workforce Development and Continuing Education.

These types of partnerships with area companies are not unique to QCC. The college’s Center for Workforce Development and Continuing Education offers a variety of high quality training programs that enable individuals to learn new skills, which can be applied immediately to a current job, or utilized for future professional development.

To learn more visit the Workforce Development Website.

  • QCC graduate Kelsey Flynn receiving her Women of Distinction award from former QCC President, Dr. Gail Carberry.
October, 2017
October, 2017

At QCC, helping students reach their goals and attain new avenues of success is an integral part of what makes the college special. One program that has become a staple at QCC is the Gateway to College program, which helps students who have dropped out of high school and may not graduate.

Through QCC’s Gateway to College program, students can obtain their high school diplomas and earn college credit at...

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At QCC, helping students reach their goals and attain new avenues of success is an integral part of what makes the college special. One program that has become a staple at QCC is the Gateway to College program, which helps students who have dropped out of high school and may not graduate.

Through QCC’s Gateway to College program, students can obtain their high school diplomas and earn college credit at the same time. Students complete an in-depth application process with Gateway to College, including essays, testing, and a personal interview. The three most critical pieces of the application process are the ability to read at the appropriate grade level, the genuine desire to finish high school, and a commitment to the change that will be necessary to be successful college students.

Kelsea Flynn is once such success story. Ms. Flynn had dropped out of high school prior to attending QCC’s program. She began the Gateway to College Program in January 2015, having met all the requirements for admission into the program. Through hard work and determination Ms. Flynn graduated from QCC in May 2016 with highest honors with an Associate Degree in General Studies. Ms. Flynn was one of 23 Gateway to College graduates that year, which was QCC’s second largest graduating class to date.

“Kelsea is extremely driven and aspires to be a human rights lawyer,” said Senior Gateway Outreach Counselor, Jenna Glazer. “She took an extremely rigorous course load at QCC to be able to graduate with her college degree in spring 2016. She took up to 6 classes per semester, as well as summer and intersession courses. She was also honored with a Women of Distinction Award in spring 2016.”

Ms. Flynn took the education and skills she learned at QCC and was able to transfer to Vanderbilt University in fall 2016. She has already had the opportunity to study abroad in China and is involved in numerous clubs and organizations at the university, coupled with her academics.

“I find that classes in college are stimulating and genuinely fun. After years of frustration as I struggled to complete high school - I'm sure a lot of Gateway students can relate - truly enjoying schoolwork is a new (and extremely welcome) feeling,” she said. “I love school and am proud to have transferred from QCC.”

Ms. Flynn stressed using the opportunities you are given and not to be afraid to take a chance.

“When I committed to Vanderbilt, I was terrified. Before Vandy, I only ever imagined myself attending school in the Northeast or living close to home. I never anticipated that I would ever live in the South or somewhere so far away from my family. But I also never expected that I would love it here so much,” she said.

  • QCC's President admires the artwork on display.
  • QCC's Jazz Band provided the ambiance at the art show reception.
  • The Employee Art Show drew a great crowd.
October, 2017
October, 2017

On October 26, employees showed off their artistic chops at the QCC Employee Artwork Reception, held at Ahlfors Hall. The Office of Distance Learning & Center for Academic Excellence put on the event, which included displayed artwork by QCC employees and entertainment from QCC’s own Jazz Ensemble.

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On October 26, employees showed off their artistic chops at the QCC Employee Artwork Reception, held at Ahlfors Hall. The Office of Distance Learning & Center for Academic Excellence put on the event, which included displayed artwork by QCC employees and entertainment from QCC’s own Jazz Ensemble.

  • QCC students enjoyed their first Pizza with the President event.
October, 2017
October, 2017

On October 16, President Dr. Luis Pedraja spent his lunch time meeting with students and listening to their comments and concerns at Student Life’s, Pizza with the President. Students met with Dr. Pedraja for some free pizza and conversation at the Fuller Student Center, engaging in informal discussions on issues of interest. One of the hot topics was the new food service in the cafeteria and...

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On October 16, President Dr. Luis Pedraja spent his lunch time meeting with students and listening to their comments and concerns at Student Life’s, Pizza with the President. Students met with Dr. Pedraja for some free pizza and conversation at the Fuller Student Center, engaging in informal discussions on issues of interest. One of the hot topics was the new food service in the cafeteria and the hours of operation.

The next Pizza with the President will be held on Monday, November 27 at the Fuller Student Center.

  • Dr. Pedraja speaks at a recent Strategic Planning session.
  • Strategic Planning sessions are well underway.
October, 2017
October, 2017

Taking a fresh look at all aspects of Quinsigamond Community College is what QCC’s Strategic Planning Team has been undertaking since the beginning of the 2017-2018 school year. The Strategic Planning Core Team is being led by Co-Chairs Dr. Ingrid Skadberg, dean of Institutional Research and Planning and Kathy Rentsch, Dean of Business, Engineering and Technology.This...

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Taking a fresh look at all aspects of Quinsigamond Community College is what QCC’s Strategic Planning Team has been undertaking since the beginning of the 2017-2018 school year. The Strategic Planning Core Team is being led by Co-Chairs Dr. Ingrid Skadberg, dean of Institutional Research and Planning and Kathy Rentsch, Dean of Business, Engineering and Technology.This strategic planning process is a collaborative endeavor that includes students, faculty and staff from every area of QCC.

Team members have been meeting regularly, going to workshops, and engaging QCC stakeholders in focus groups, in order to identify and address key trends that will shape the college in the next three years. Focus groups will discuss experiences at QCC; how to foster student success, as well as trends in Central Massachusetts and how QCC can best meet these opportunities and challenges.

Additionally, the Strategic Planning Core Team is conducting SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats) analyses and recommending goals and strategies to be included in a final plan.

For questions, please contact Dr. Ingrid Skadberg, Dean of Institutional Research and Planning isakberg [at] qcc.mass.edu .

  • Officer Dixon was seen speaking with many students in the cafeteria.
  • Chief Ritacco (far right) along with QCC officers and students enjoy coffee and friendly conversation.
October, 2017
October, 2017

On Wednesday, October, 4 QCC Campus Police held its second annual Coffee with a Cop. The event was designed to offer QCC students the opportunity to meet the QCC officers who protect and serve the QCC community and help break down barriers. The informal social hour gave students a chance to ask questions and voice any concerns to the officers, while partaking in a free cup of coffee.

On Wednesday, October, 4 QCC Campus Police held its second annual Coffee with a Cop. The event was designed to offer QCC students the opportunity to meet the QCC officers who protect and serve the QCC community and help break down barriers. The informal social hour gave students a chance to ask questions and voice any concerns to the officers, while partaking in a free cup of coffee.

  • Dr. Pedraja at the recent Legislative Breakfast.
October, 2017
October, 2017

QCC’s President, Dr. Luis G. Pedraja has quickly becoming immersed in the Worcester landscape since taking the reins of QCC in July. On October 2, Dr. Pedraja was the moderator of the recent Worcester School Committee candidates’ debate held at Mechanics Hall. The seven candidates squared off to discuss the challenges facing the district.The candidates will face off in the November 7...

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QCC’s President, Dr. Luis G. Pedraja has quickly becoming immersed in the Worcester landscape since taking the reins of QCC in July. On October 2, Dr. Pedraja was the moderator of the recent Worcester School Committee candidates’ debate held at Mechanics Hall. The seven candidates squared off to discuss the challenges facing the district.The candidates will face off in the November 7 general election. Read the Telegram & Gazette's complete coverage of the debate.

  • Lee Duerden, Coordinator of the QCC's Manufacturing Technology Program introduces the manufacturing panel to students.
  • A student tries his had at operating a robot.
  • Mike Ciprari, President of SJC Custom Drums.
October, 2017
October, 2017

Quinsigamond Community College’s manufacturing programs were the star of the campus on Friday, October 6, as the college partook in Manufacturing Day, a national public recognition day developed to inspire and motivate the next generation of manufacturers.

QCC hosted its own Manufacturing Day event at its main campus to showcase the college’s manufacturing programs, resources and future...

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Quinsigamond Community College’s manufacturing programs were the star of the campus on Friday, October 6, as the college partook in Manufacturing Day, a national public recognition day developed to inspire and motivate the next generation of manufacturers.

QCC hosted its own Manufacturing Day event at its main campus to showcase the college’s manufacturing programs, resources and future manufacturing career opportunities. Approximately 60 high school and college students from QCC; Spencer’s David Prouty High School; Southbridge High School, in addition to some students from Worcester’s North High School and Worcester Technical High School spent the morning learning about manufacturing through demonstrations and hands-on activities.

“Manufacturing is a broader field than you might have imagined,” said QCC President Dr. Luis G. Pedraja, during the opening presentation at Hebert Auditorium. “It’s not the past, it’s the future. All of you here are part of the future.”

Students were able to choose between a myriad of locations throughout the campus to view manufacturing demonstrations and experience firsthand some of the machines available for use at the college.  

At the Electrical Engineering Lab students viewed demonstrations from employees of Karl Storz Endovision (Charlton) and were able to see firsthand how the education received at QCC can be turned into real world applications. Students visited QCC’s Advanced Manufacturing Lab and watched as Computer numerical control mill and lathe programs, along with laser cutters and Coordinate Measuring Machines (CMMs) that test for accuracy, were demonstrated. In addition, industry representatives from American Fabrication (Clinton); Hyde Tools (Southbridge) and Saint Gobain (Worcester) were stationed in the Advanced Manufacturing Lab, offering students unique insights into their industries and explaining to students how they can take what they learn at QCC and apply it into real world applications.

The Fab Lab also offered students an opportunity to witness 3D printers and laser cutters in action and students were able to try some of the high tech equipment.  Other areas students visited included the Advanced Technologies Lab, where students could view Fanuc robots in action; and the Harrington Learning Center that featured Nao and VEX robots, in addition to representatives from ACUITY Technologies (Auburn).

One of the highlights of the event was speaker President of SJC Custom Drums, Mike Ciprari, of Southbridge, who enthralled the students with the story of his life and business at the start of the event.

Mr. Ciprari began his business as a young teen making custom drums by hand with his brother. Today he told the students his business has taken off in ways he couldn’t have imagined. He works with world renowned artists such as Imagine Dragons, Green Day, Panic at the Disco and Slipknot to name a few, as he told the students to think outside of the box when it comes to manufacturing.

“I was able to turn my passion into a career. I was able to create a dream for myself. You can make a career out of manufacturing.  I never knew I was in a manufacturing company, I thought I was just doing something cool. There’s amazing technology at your disposal. Manufacturing is more than just running programs and operating a robot,” he said. “At SJC we now have CNC machines that create more jobs for more people. We need people to run the machines. I feel like there is a lot more growth in manufacturing.”

Students were also given the opportunity to listen to a panel of current QCC students and graduates who work in the manufacturing industry. Panelists included: Justin Hence, Hyde Tools Joe Abbascia, AKUITY Technologies John Carmody, American Fabrication and Emily Miller from Metso Automation in Shrewsbury.

“You never know what you learn now or try now will help you later. Don’t be afraid to experiment and don’t be afraid to fail,” added Ms. Miller.

Dr. Pedraja takes a moment to discuss the future of manufacturing.
October, 2017
October, 2017

QCC’s Executive Team recently set up an American Red Cross online fundraiser to support relief efforts for those affected by the recent disasters in the United States, Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands.

The executive team asked everyone in the QCC community to help those affected by these major disasters and the QCC community came through, raising over $4,000 in its “Quinsigamond Community...

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QCC’s Executive Team recently set up an American Red Cross online fundraiser to support relief efforts for those affected by the recent disasters in the United States, Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands.

The executive team asked everyone in the QCC community to help those affected by these major disasters and the QCC community came through, raising over $4,000 in its “Quinsigamond Community College Cares” Red Cross fundraiser.

“The Executive Team wants to thank everyone who so graciously donated,”  said Lucinda Costa,Assistant to the President.

The American Red Cross is an agency dedicated to preventing and alleviating human suffering in the face of emergencies by mobilizing the power of volunteers and the generosity of donors. They respond to more than 65,000 disasters every year and 95% of the Red Cross disaster workers are volunteers. The Red Cross turns compassion into action so that all people affected by disasters across the country and around the world receive care, shelter and hope. The Red Cross works to ensure that our communities are ready and prepared for disasters and that everyone in our country has access to safe, lifesaving blood and blood products.

Red Cross fundraiser.
  • Summer-like weather was on tap at the PTK cookout.
  • QCC students got a chance to mingle with friends at the PTK cookout.
  • Music was a bit part of the festivities.
  • It was all hands on deck at the PTK cookout.
  • A few QCC students took a quick break between their classes to enjoy the day.
October, 2017
October, 2017

Food, festivities and fair weather were on tap at the annual Phi Theta Kappa Fall cook out. Students, faculty and staff were treated to great food and entertainment that featured QCC’s Jazz Ensemble, DJ James Gangemi JG Entertainment ,and Scott Olson on the keyboard.

An extensive raffle with 50 prizes was held during the cookout, with all proceeds of the day’s event going to benefit PTK’s...

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Food, festivities and fair weather were on tap at the annual Phi Theta Kappa Fall cook out. Students, faculty and staff were treated to great food and entertainment that featured QCC’s Jazz Ensemble, DJ James Gangemi JG Entertainment ,and Scott Olson on the keyboard.

An extensive raffle with 50 prizes was held during the cookout, with all proceeds of the day’s event going to benefit PTK’s Live & Learn Greenhouse.  The Live & Learn Greenhouse has become a staple to the QCC Community. Located in the back of the Administration Building, the greenhouse was designed to provide a resource for healthy, nutrient-rich food for the QCC community and help to address food insecurities on campus. It also provides an educational resource for QCC students, faculty, staff and children of the QCC Children’s School.

“The members of Phi Theta Kappa, Alpha Zeta Theta chapter, would like to thank all who came out and supported their annual Fall Charity Cookout; it was just a beautiful day,” said PTK Advisor Bonnie Coleman.

October, 2017
October, 2017

QCC Professor Named a Lifetime Achiever by Marquis Who’s Who

Quinsigamond Community College Professor and Program Coordinator of Human Services, Dr. Doe West, has been named a lifetime achiever by American publisher, Marquis Who’s Who. The publisher has endorsed Dr. West as a leader in psychotherapy and disability studies.

To learn...

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QCC Professor Named a Lifetime Achiever by Marquis Who’s Who

Quinsigamond Community College Professor and Program Coordinator of Human Services, Dr. Doe West, has been named a lifetime achiever by American publisher, Marquis Who’s Who. The publisher has endorsed Dr. West as a leader in psychotherapy and disability studies.

To learn more about Dr. West and her accomplishments, visit Marquis Who's Who .

QCC Professor Accepted into Community Leadership Institute

QCC Associate Professor of English, Jasmine Ortiz, has been accepted into the Community Leadership Institute‘s 2017-2018 program. Developed in 1989 by the North Central Chamber of Commerce, the institute was created to support a need for well-rounded leaders within the region. Participants are nominated by their employers for this nine-month program, and will learn about the area’s history, education, government, healthcare, social services, the justice system, media, arts and culture, and the environment, in addition to personal leadership development training.

The 2017-2018 class consists of 21 participants from all types of businesses and organizations in the North Central Chamber region.

Dr. Doe West
  • From left: Priscilla Witherspoon, Clerk III and the Assistant VP of Extended Campuses Operations, Victor Somma, Jr.
  • The Wyvern was trying to cool off recently in sunny Costa Mesa.
October, 2017
October, 2017

The Wyvern has been mighty busy lately crisscrossing the globe! It was spotted in some pretty crazy wheels in Southbridge earlier this month with fearless Priscilla Witherspoon,Clerk III, and the Assistant VP of Extended Campuses Operations,Victor Somma, Jr.

Its next stop was Costa Mesa,California where It spent time with Kristie Proctor, Director of Disability Services and Terri...

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The Wyvern has been mighty busy lately crisscrossing the globe! It was spotted in some pretty crazy wheels in Southbridge earlier this month with fearless Priscilla Witherspoon,Clerk III, and the Assistant VP of Extended Campuses Operations,Victor Somma, Jr.

Its next stop was Costa Mesa,California where It spent time with Kristie Proctor, Director of Disability Services and Terri Rodriguez, Associate Director of Disability Services, at the 24th Annual Students In Transition Conference. Where will It show up next? 

If you've seen the Wyvern, please let us know!  Send your photos and descriptions through the newsletter submission form.

October, 2017
October, 2017

Below is a sampling of some of the articles and press releases discussing Quinsigamond Community College that have made it into the local (and sometimes national) media.

QCC articles for the month of October include: 

More...

Below is a sampling of some of the articles and press releases discussing Quinsigamond Community College that have made it into the local (and sometimes national) media.

QCC articles for the month of October include: 

October, 2017
October, 2017

We are very pleased to announce the following full-time staff updates:

On October 30, 2017, Academic Affairs welcomes Tracy Foster as Clerk III – Adult Community Learning Center. Tracy brings to this position over 13 years of administrative experience. Most recently, she was a Testing Administrator and Proctor for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Tracy earned an...

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We are very pleased to announce the following full-time staff updates:

On October 30, 2017, Academic Affairs welcomes Tracy Foster as Clerk III – Adult Community Learning Center. Tracy brings to this position over 13 years of administrative experience. Most recently, she was a Testing Administrator and Proctor for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Tracy earned an Associate in Science from Mount Wachusett Community College and a Bachelor’s Degree from Fitchburg State University.

On October 30, 2017, Enrollment Management, Student Engagement and Community Connections, welcomed John Monterroso as Clerk III – Financial Aid. John brings to this position one year as a student employee in the Financial Aid office. Most recently, he was a part-time Central Receiving Assistant at Quinsigamond Community College. John earned an Associate Degree from Quinsigamond Community College.

On October 16, 2017, Enrollment Management, Student Engagement and Community Connections welcomed Buffie Whittaker as Recruitment Counselor.  Buffie brings over 24 years of experience to this position, working with high school students to help them prepare for higher education. Most recently, she was an Education Advisor for Gear UP at Worcester North High School. She also was a Program Director at the Latino Education Institute. Buffie earned an Associate Degree from Quinsigamond Community College, a Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice from Northeastern University, and a Master of Urban Studies from Boston University.

On October 10, 2017, Enrollment Management, Student Engagement and Community Connections welcomed Nichole Etcheverry as Grants Manager. Nichole brings to this position over 17 years of grant management. Most recently, she was a Grants Manager at a local non-profit. Nichole earned a Bachelor of Science in Political Science from Northeastern University.

On October 10, 2017, Enrollment Management, Student Engagement and Community Connections welcomed Rose D’Errico as Clerk III – Enrollment Management Division. Rose brings to this position over 15 years of office management and customer service experience. Most recently, she worked as an Office Manager and Customer Service Representative in the private sector. Rose earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts from New Mexico State University.  

On October 8, 2017, Enrollment Management, Student Engagement and Community Connections welcomed Jacqueline Guittar as Director of Records and Registration.  Jacqueline brings to this position over 10 years of customer service experience and 8 years of experience in a registrar’s office. Most recently, she was the Coordinator of Records and Registration here at Quinsigamond Community College. Jacqueline earned a Bachelor of Science in Psychology from Worcester State University and a Master of Business Administration from Fitchburg State University.

On October 2, 2017, Academic Affairs welcomed Amy Pietrewicz as Assistant Manager of the Adult Community Learning Center. Amy brings to this position over 25 years of teaching and academic experience. Most recently, she was an adjunct faculty member here at QCC. Also she has worked in the Oxford Public Schools in several administrative roles. Amy earned a Bachelor of Arts in English; Secondary Education from Fitchburg State University, a Master of Education from Arizona State University, a Project Management Certificate from Worcester Polytechnic Institute and a Master of Education in Educational Leadership and Administration from Worcester State University.   

Please join us in welcoming Tracy, John, Buffie, Nichole, Rose, Jacqueline and Amy into their new roles.