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01/2017

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January, 2017

January, 2017
January, 2017

On January 16, Quinsigamond Community College hosted the 32nd annual Martin Luther King, Jr. Community Breakfast.

More than 700 people attended the breakfast celebration, which included performances by the QCC Jazz Ensemble and several Worcester-based choirs, who sang a celebration of gospel music throughout the morning program.

QCC President Gail Carberry, Ed.D., was...

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On January 16, Quinsigamond Community College hosted the 32nd annual Martin Luther King, Jr. Community Breakfast.

More than 700 people attended the breakfast celebration, which included performances by the QCC Jazz Ensemble and several Worcester-based choirs, who sang a celebration of gospel music throughout the morning program.

QCC President Gail Carberry, Ed.D., was awarded a key to the city and the Eleanor Hawley Community Service Award, for promoting diversity. Dr. Carberry spoke about dealing with dyslexia and handling the death of her adult daughter, Amy.

“I have difficulty reading sometimes, it is better if I speak from the heart. I am deeply honored and humbled by this award. It has been a labor of love for me,” she said. “Quinsigamond Community College is a beacon of hope, that is what attracted me here … This college represents so much for so many, and it has meant a great deal to me as well. In the time I have been president, and served community college system in this state, the angels have pulled with us in every bold move we have endeavored to do.”

During her introduction, event host Stacey DeBoise Luster said Dr. Carberry has increased enrollment by 40 percent, minority student enrollment by 12 percent, and minority employment at the college by 7 percent.

Dr. Carberry is retiring this spring after serving as president of QCC for 10 years.

Speakers, including Lt. Gov. Karyn Polito, Worcester Mayor Joseph Petty and QCC Board of Trustees Chairwoman Susan Mailman, spoke about the current contentious atmosphere in the country.

The event focused overall on the theme of coming together, ending the program with those gathered singing “We Shall Overcome.”

January, 2017
January, 2017

On All College Day, part of the celebration of the new semester was the dedication of the Pat Toney Center for Academic Excellence. Vice President of Academic Affairs Patricia A. Toney is retiring after 35 years of service at QCC.

During her time at the college, she served as Dean of Instruction, professor of English as a Second Language, Coordinator of the English as a Second Language Program...

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On All College Day, part of the celebration of the new semester was the dedication of the Pat Toney Center for Academic Excellence. Vice President of Academic Affairs Patricia A. Toney is retiring after 35 years of service at QCC.

During her time at the college, she served as Dean of Instruction, professor of English as a Second Language, Coordinator of the English as a Second Language Program, High Risk Advisor and previously as an adjunct faculty member in ESL, English and Workforce Development.

“She has been a forthright individual in everything she has done,” said QCC President Dr. Gail Carberry. “She has been strong, she has been passionate, and has had the best interests of the faculty and staff of this institution at heart.”

Dr. Carberry said Ms. Toney was involved in faculty professional development, diversity responsiveness in faculty, curriculum development, online degree development and many more important initiatives during her time at the college.

“As I retire I want to thank you for the enjoyable working relationship over the past 35 years. While I’m happy and excited to be moving on to the next phase of my life, I will miss QCC,” Ms. Toney said.

“I am deeply honored by the dedication of the Center for Academic Excellence. I was very moved by the outpouring of support on All College Day,” she said. “I appreciate all the lovely retirement expressions of kindness, support and well wishes. QCC has been a wonderful place to work because of people like you! I wish you all the best!”

January, 2017
January, 2017

The U.S. Department of Labor recently recognized Quinsigamond Community College for the curricula created for mechatronics and manufacturing certificates and degrees.

The department recognized the college for creating curricula that is stackable and competency-based. The department said the curricula:

  • Responds to the identified skill need of manufacturing employers.
  • Uses a competency-...
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The U.S. Department of Labor recently recognized Quinsigamond Community College for the curricula created for mechatronics and manufacturing certificates and degrees.

The department recognized the college for creating curricula that is stackable and competency-based. The department said the curricula:

  • Responds to the identified skill need of manufacturing employers.
  • Uses a competency-based approach to develop curricula.
  • Prepares student to acquire credentials approved by the manufacturing industry.

“Massachusetts employers need skilled workers to fill their job openings in many technical fields, including advanced manufacturing and mechatronics occupations. Students and incumbent workers need to acquire employer-recognized competencies, as well as postsecondary credentials to meet this demand,” stated a press release from the U.S. Department of Labor. “Quinsigamond Community College has developed an innovative approach to address these complementary needs. The college has embedded preparation for critical industry credentials within many of their technical degree and certificate programs, such as manufacturing technology and electronics engineering technology/mechatronics curricula. Students emerge with both a degree or certificate and one or more industry-recognized credentials upon successful completion of their coursework.”

From a national perspective, the outlook for manufacturing-related occupations is strong, particularly as workers obtain industry-recognized credentials. National employment projections from the Bureau of Labor Statistics indicate that employment opportunities for machinists will rise by 9.8 percent between 2014 and 2024, greater than the average 6.5 percent increase for all occupations. The data also indicate that employment opportunities for computer-controlled machine tool operators will increase by 17.5 percent from 2014 to 2024, significantly more than the national average for all occupations.

“Our faculty works closely with employer advisory committees, affinity groups at other community colleges, as well as statewide industry groups like the MA Manufacturing Extension Partnership to develop curricula that are competency-based and industry credential focused,” said Kathy Rentsch, Dean of the School of Business, Engineering and Technology at QCC. “We started focusing on a tiered competency-based approach back in 2013, when we worked with the Manufacturing Advancement Center Workforce Innovation Collaborative (MACWIC) in the development of the Applied Manufacturing Technology Certification model. QCC now serves as the chief education partner for MACWIC.”

“Our current manufacturing curriculum takes the competency-tiered approach to the next level,” said Damian Kieran, Associate Professor of Manufacturing Technology at QCC. “Industry-recognized credentials are embedded in competency-based manufacturing curricula.”

Students can start with courses about manufacturing safety, LEAN certification courses, and then continue to advance with courses with CAD/CAM training, career prep, and applied manufacturing technology. These courses prepare students for different levels, whether it is entry level, middle skills for machine operators, machinists and supervisors, up to continuing management skills with an associate’s degree in manufacturing technology. Students also can choose to continue their education and earn a bachelor’s degree at a four-year college, all while working in the industry.

“The U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration’s Mechatronics Competency Model is the foundation for our curriculum,” said Jim Heffernan, Professor of Electronics Engineering Technology at QCC. “We offer one industry-recognized credential in our curricula, FANUC’s Certified Education Robot Training. It has been our observation that most of the national industry-recognized credentials are on the production and process side of manufacturing. We would like to offer more mechatronics-specific certifications that are relevant to our local labor market. QCC undertook a survey of local job opportunities for mechatronics technicians. One result is the development of a local certification based on the inclusion of a subset of the skills in certain of our electronics courses required for a national certification in hand soldering from the IPC--Association Connecting Electronics Industries.”

“QCC was one of the first seven Massachusetts community colleges to begin implementing the ‘Complete College America’s Guided Pathways to Success’ model to successfully achieve the goal of having more students complete their programs of study as well as reduce the time to completion for a degree or certificate,” said Carol King, Director of College and Career Pathways, QCC.

“The reduction in time gets students out into the workforce sooner. Regional partners work with us to provide students with the work experience and job openings necessary to begin successful careers once they successfully complete coursework and attain industry-recognized credentials,” Dean Rentsch said. “We have already embedded industry credentials in a number of QCC technical programs of study, including automotive technology, HVAC, energy technology utility and more. We plan to continue our focus on developing competency-based curricula for other disciplines as well.”

 

January, 2017
January, 2017

QCC is honored to be chosen for the third year to receive a $10,000 grant through MassDevelopment’s AMP it up! program.

“We are excited for the next round of AMP it up! This initiative has been an integral part of our collective strategy in central Massachusetts goal to address misconceptions regarding career opportunities in advanced manufacturing,” said Kathy Rentsch, Dean...

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QCC is honored to be chosen for the third year to receive a $10,000 grant through MassDevelopment’s AMP it up! program.

“We are excited for the next round of AMP it up! This initiative has been an integral part of our collective strategy in central Massachusetts goal to address misconceptions regarding career opportunities in advanced manufacturing,” said Kathy Rentsch, Dean for the QCC School for Business, Engineering and Technology. “QCC and its partners will continue to outreach to parents, teachers, and career counselors. These individuals have the greatest influence over young adults and adults in career transition and their career pathways. We hope to stimulate creativity, innovation and interest in all aspects of this exciting career field from design to manufacture.”

The grant will be used to build on previous years' programs, including a Manufacturing Day for regional students, research on manufacturing resources for regional high schools, a social media campaign to directly connect students with employers and professional development activities for teachers and guidance counselors.

The goal of the the AMP it up! program is to increase awareness of advanced manufacturing careers.

MassDevelopment recently announced 10 partnerships will receive AMP it up! matching grants to conduct outreach and other innovative programs that will educate young people and adults about career options in advanced manufacturing. In the fourth consecutive year of the program, MassDevelopment will provide awards totaling $98,363.40 to the 10 partnerships — consisting of regional employment and workforce investment boards, manufacturers, chambers of commerce and development councils, community colleges, vocational schools, and other organizations throughout the Commonwealth.

“These 10 partnerships have developed creative, thoughtful proposals — in conjunction with industry — to reach students, guidance counselors, and veterans about the great potential of manufacturing careers,” said MassDevelopment President and CEO Marty Jones. “This grant round and the AMP it up! Video Challenge will build on previous AMP it up! efforts to educate everyone about the opportunities in the Massachusetts advanced manufacturing industry and the increasing need for skilled workers to fill these high-paying jobs.”

The community-based programs that are receiving the awards include student internships, tours of advanced manufacturing companies, career awareness workshops, teacher and guidance counselor information sessions and externships with manufacturers, and other planned activities. The AMP it up! campaign highlights the exciting, technology-driven, high-paying career options in manufacturing, dispels outdated misconceptions about the industry, and bolsters the prospective employee base for these quality jobs with Massachusetts companies. The fourth round of grants builds on the successes of the campaign’s previous years.

The other Worcester organization that received a grant is Girls Inc., which will get $5,000 to expose 90 girls ages 10-12 to manufacturing jobs through field trips, internships and training sessions through partnering with manufacturing companies.

In a complementary effort to promote the attractiveness of careers in advanced manufacturing, MassDevelopment is also holding a second edition of the AMP it up! Video Challenge, which invites students to research the inner workings of an advanced manufacturing innovation and show in a three-minute video how it impacts the world around them. An online balloting tool will allow the public to help determine the winning videos, which will earn cash prizes donated to their schools. One middle school, one high school, and one community college will each win $5,000 in funding for a total of $15,000 in prize money.

For more information, visit the Amp It Up website.

January, 2017
January, 2017

On the first day of the semester, January 17, all faculty and staff are invited to and encouraged to attend All College Day, an event to discuss and celebrate Quinsigamond Community College’s programs and initiatives.

The keynote address was given by Carlos Santiago, Commissioner of Higher Education for Massachusetts. Introduced by QCC President Gail Carberry, she said Dr. Santiago...

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On the first day of the semester, January 17, all faculty and staff are invited to and encouraged to attend All College Day, an event to discuss and celebrate Quinsigamond Community College’s programs and initiatives.

The keynote address was given by Carlos Santiago, Commissioner of Higher Education for Massachusetts. Introduced by QCC President Gail Carberry, she said Dr. Santiago has helped shape transfer opportunities from QCC to four-year colleges in the state.

When he arrived in Massachusetts three-and-a-half years ago, one of the first colleges he visited was Quinsigamond Community College. “I am delighted to come back to discuss public higher education and how it has grown and expanded over the years,” he said.

A gap in lifetime earnings of those with college degrees and certificates compared to those without was shown starting in the 1980s, but Mr. Santiago said changed policies, and grants and funding were decreased, and so now more students need loans to cover college costs.

“These challenges we face today… in the economy in this state, means we need to step up to support public higher education,” he said. Massachusetts is one of the most educated states in the union, more than 50 percent of the population have a certificate or degree in higher education. He said the majority of Massachusetts residents are attending public colleges, and the college needs to encourage the enrollment of non-traditional age students and minority students to help continue to grow the innovation economy.

Dr. Carberry was presented with an award for her 10 years of service to QCC. She is retiring this spring.

Other faculty and staff also were recognized for their service to the college:

  • Anthony Bernardi, 10 years
  • Elizabeth Blaue, 10 years
  • Amy Booth, 10 years
  • Hadley Camilus, 10 years
  • Gail Carberry, 10 years
  • Kazimierz Chojnowski, 10 years
  • Lucinda Costa, 10 years
  • Margaret Gniadek, 10 years
  • Deborah Gonzalez, 10 years
  • Todd LaBranche, 10 years
  • Timothy LaFountaine, 10 years
  • Wayne Lilyestrom, 10 years
  • Daniel Litchfield, 10 years
  • Amy MacArthur, 10 years
  • Erica Merrill, 10 years
  • Patrick Printz, 10 years
  • Henry Ritter, 10 years
  • Reynaldo Rodriguez, 10 years
  • Ingrid Skadberg, 10 years
  • Elaine Trottier, 10 years
  • Denise Urella, 10 years
  • Mark Webber, 10 years
  • Edward Crotty, 20 years
  • Shirley Dempsey, 20 years
  • Luis Fontanez, Jr., 20 years
  • Krystyna Gawrych, 20 years
  • Donny Hall, 20 years
  • Jane Shea, 20 years
  • John Solaperto, 20 years
  • Linda Chaput, 30 years
  • Bonnie Coleman, 30 years
  • George Fitch, 30 years
  • Sharron Gillies, 30 years
  • Pamela Riendeau, 30 years

Board of Trustees Chairperson Susan Mailman updated the students on the Presidential Search. Resumes will be accepted through the end of January, and at the end of February, the search committee will get together to interview six to 10 semi-finalists and then the search will transfer to the Board of Trustees. They hope to announce a new president by the end of the spring semester, she said.

The event also included presentations on Student Success Initiatives, such as the growth of Phi Theta Kappa; SHE, Support Help and Encouragement, a mentor program for women at the college that includes workshops for all students; Brothers & Keepers Programs, a mentor program for men at the college; and the new QCC Veterans’ Center and Veterans Club.

The event concluded with the dedication of the Patricia A. Toney Center for Academic Excellence.

January, 2017
January, 2017

A retirement reception was held for Louise Hamelin, Coordinator of Instructional Technology & Assessment for the Office of Distance Learning & Professional Development in January. She had been at QCC since 2007 and we thank her for her service to the college.

A retirement reception was held for Louise Hamelin, Coordinator of Instructional Technology & Assessment for the Office of Distance Learning & Professional Development in January. She had been at QCC since 2007 and we thank her for her service to the college.

January, 2017
January, 2017

During the winter season, it is important to remember if there is inclement weather you should check if there is a delay or cancellation before heading out for class. There are multiple ways to check for a snow day or delay through the QCC system:

  • Get the QCC app and receive alerts – The QCC app is available for Windows, Apple and Andriod ...
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During the winter season, it is important to remember if there is inclement weather you should check if there is a delay or cancellation before heading out for class. There are multiple ways to check for a snow day or delay through the QCC system:

  • Get the QCC app and receive alerts – The QCC app is available for Windows, Apple and Andriod devices. See a video on how to install the app and find out more on the QCC App website. The app also has course information, online resources, campus maps and more.
  • Go to www.QCC.edu/alerts for specific announcements, information will be provided on what time classes will start or if the campus is closed.
  • Sign up for text alerts on The Q.
  • Watch local news channels or call 508.854.4545.
January, 2017
January, 2017

New student orientation was held January 9 and 10 at the main campus and January 17 at QCC Southbridge.

Orientation is required for all new students. This event helps students learn where their classes will be held; learn about support services, such as advising, tutoring and counseling; find out about student life activities; meet college staff and other students; speak with financial aid counselors...

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New student orientation was held January 9 and 10 at the main campus and January 17 at QCC Southbridge.

Orientation is required for all new students. This event helps students learn where their classes will be held; learn about support services, such as advising, tutoring and counseling; find out about student life activities; meet college staff and other students; speak with financial aid counselors; and hear tips and tricks to make life at QCC more enjoyable.

Orientation Day helps students prepare for the semester and sets them up with support for success. For more information about student services, sign into The Q Student Portal, and go to the Student Services tab.

Classes started January 18 and run through May 9. Commencement is scheduled for May 18, 2017.

January, 2017
January, 2017

One Stop Registration was held January 9 through 13, allowing new and returning students to receive assistance with registration and enrollment. Students can gather more information about financial aid, admissions, and placement tests all in one place.

Potential students could print out forms ahead of time to fill out and bring to one-stop registration. Information was made available on the One Stop...

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One Stop Registration was held January 9 through 13, allowing new and returning students to receive assistance with registration and enrollment. Students can gather more information about financial aid, admissions, and placement tests all in one place.

Potential students could print out forms ahead of time to fill out and bring to one-stop registration. Information was made available on the One Stop Registration website with what forms and information was required.

Usually most of these departments require appointments, so this event gives students a chance to get everything done at once and simplifies application process. Registering early also gives students a better chance to get the classes they want, as classes fill up as the first day of classes gets closer.

"Applying is a two-tier process," said Mishawn Davis-Eyene, Director of Admissions. "The first [tier] includes applying at QCC, completing placement testing and registering; and the second part is applying for financial aid."

  • Malachy Jackson and Joseph Agwanda
January, 2017
January, 2017

Even if you have heard of the STEM Starter Academy, you may not realize how many different programs the initiative is involved in.

The program funds summer programs to encourage college readiness and expose students to STEM fields, hosts a STEM exploration workshop day for high school students, as well as funding projects and attendance at certain conferences.

STEM Starter Academy (SSA) is a is a state...

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Even if you have heard of the STEM Starter Academy, you may not realize how many different programs the initiative is involved in.

The program funds summer programs to encourage college readiness and expose students to STEM fields, hosts a STEM exploration workshop day for high school students, as well as funding projects and attendance at certain conferences.

STEM Starter Academy (SSA) is a is a state-funded initiative to support community college efforts at all 15 campuses to inform, engage, recruit, retain, and graduate significantly more students in STEM. The primary goal is to graduate more community students with STEM degrees and certificates so they can either enter the work force or transfer to a four-year institution. The secondary goal is to recruit more students into the STEM pipeline at the community colleges.

Malachy Jackson, 18, first attended an exploration day when he was a senior at North High School. He said his guidance counselor recommended the program. The workshop included programs exposing Worcester area students to robotics, biochemistry, photonics and more.

“After the workshop, I was encouraged to attend the STEAM Summer Bridge program, which was an awesome opportunity, it was really great,” he said. “I have wanted to be an engineer all my life, but I was able to learn more about STEM programs, what classes I would need and how to work towards my major.”

Now a freshman at QCC, Mr. Jackson said the math boot camp and English programs he took during the summer, also funded by SSA, helped him know what to expect from his classes, as well improving his placement test scores.

“Coming out of high school I wasn’t the best student, but I knew I needed to go to college and take it seriously to be an engineer,” he said.

The STEAM Summer Bridge program includes hands-on lab exploration, college-readiness programs and campus tours. Through the program, he received his student id, took tours of the facilities, and said he was better prepared to hit the ground running when classes started.

“STEM Starter Academy was a chance for me to be better than I was in high school,” he said.

He said his first semester is going well, he is hoping to hear from PTK, the community college honor society, so he can join that as well.

He has discussed different transfer agreements with other colleges with his advisor, so he is taking classes he knows will transfer as credits for a four-year degree.

“I would definitely recommend it,” he said of the STEM Exploration Workshop. “It really changed my life.”

The SSA initiative also funds STEM research programs, which not only expose students to different programs, but also can help create programs that help future students.

QCC student Joseph Agwanda was able to attend a statewide undergraduate research conference at UMass Amherst last April. The STEM Starter Academy supported the research project and funded students attending the conference, where they presented their project about learning Java Script, in which they created a template to help other students learn computer programming.

“That experience helped me become more interested in STEM,” said Mr. Agwanda. He worked with another QCC student, Ozias Gonet, who has since transferred to WPI, and Professor Hao Loi, to develop the program.

He is now taking Calculus III and chemistry and plans to take courses at QCC through next fall semester before transferring to a four-year program.

Doing research for the project and writing the presentation helped with his research, presentation and public speaking skills, Mr. Agwanda said. “We nailed it,” he said proudly. “Creating this to help others learn programming skills was a fun and exciting project to be involved in.”

The Worcester resident, 22, originally attended a four-year college, but had dropped out because he wasn’t sure what to declare for a major. “I took a year off, and I was interested in programming and science, so I decided to attend QCC because it was more affordable and had different articulation agreements.”

He said he has made sure to take classes that are required for the WPI transfer program, which he said could be used as credits to transfer to either Fitchburg State University or the University of Massachusetts.

To learn more about STEM Starter Academy, contact Darcy Carlson, STEM Starter Academy project coordinator at dcarlson [at] qcc.mass.edu or 508.854.4441 or visit the STEM Starter Academy website.

January, 2017
January, 2017

artsworcester.jpg
“Willing Spirit”, photograph, 16x20 inches by Kevail Cole and "Water Sports”, photograph on high quality matte paper, 
1​8x24 inches by Michael Hughes

Two Quinsigamond Community College students...

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artsworcester.jpg
“Willing Spirit”, photograph, 16x20 inches by Kevail Cole and "Water Sports”, photograph on high quality matte paper, 
1​8x24 inches by Michael Hughes

Two Quinsigamond Community College students were chosen to be part of the 13th Annual College Show at ArtsWorcester in February.

This annual juried exhibition is a highlight of ArtsWorcester’s gallery schedule and the competition was tough this year. Scarlett Hoey, Program Manager, said the juror selected two artists from QCC:

Kevail Cole, Interactive Media and Design
Michael Hughes, Associate of Art

For this show, pieces were juried by Eva Fierst, of the University Museum of Contemporary Art at UMass Amherst. The artwork is created by students at Worcester-area colleges and universities. Students study programs ranging from international development, math, and of course, studio art.

A full list of participating artists can be found on the ArtsWorcester website.

The opening is on February 3, at 6:00 p.m. The opening and gallery hours are free and open to all. The show will be open through March 3.

The opening will celebrate four exhibitions: The 13th Annual College Show, Faces All Around by Tim Evans, Monday Monster Mosh by Adam Cutler and Dresses: Fight or Flight by Alicia Dwyer across the street at the Hadley Building). There will be music from DJ Andy Morris and refreshments from Ed Hyder’s Mediterranean Marketplace.

Free parking is offered in the lots belonging to the Masons, at Ionic and Beacon. If needed, a snow date scheduled one week later, Friday, February 19.

January, 2017
January, 2017

jeanine-skorinko.jpg
Catherine A. Roberts, Ph.D. and Jeanine Skorinko, Ph.D.

The Liberal Arts Distinguished Lecturer Series welcomes two speakers this semester.

“How Math Can Help You in Unexpected Ways” by Catherine A. Roberts, Ph.D., Executive Director of the...

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jeanine-skorinko.jpg
Catherine A. Roberts, Ph.D. and Jeanine Skorinko, Ph.D.

The Liberal Arts Distinguished Lecturer Series welcomes two speakers this semester.

“How Math Can Help You in Unexpected Ways” by Catherine A. Roberts, Ph.D., Executive Director of the American Mathematical Society, will explore how math can be used to understand important environmental challenges. She also will discuss how her liberal arts education led to a project involving white-water rafting through the Grand Canyon. Dr. Roberts will talk about how math is being used to help our planet on February 13, from 2:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m., in the Harrington Learning Center, Room 109. The program is free and open to the public.

Ms. Roberts has a doctorate in applied math from Northwestern University. She spent 24 years as a college math professor, most recently at Holy Cross here in Worcester.

The second lecture, which is co-sponsored with Psi Beta and the Psychology Club, is “Seeing Yourself Through the Eyes of Others,” by Jeanine Skorinko, Ph.D., associate professor of psychology at Worcester Polytechnic Institute. Dr. Skorinko’s talk examines the stability of the self and whether people we interact with influence how we see ourselves. She will discuss several experiments that investigate whether our self-views vary based on our interaction partner.

Dr. Skorinko is the Director of the Psychological Science undergraduate program at WPI. She received her bachelor’s in psychology from Rice University and a master’s and doctorate in Social Psychology at the University of Virginia. Her research investigates how factors in our social environments influence our interpersonal interactions and decisions we make. Ultimately her research aims to enhance equality, diversity, and cultural understanding.

Dr. Skorinko's lecture is Monday, April 10, from 2:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. at the Harrington Learning Center in Room 109. It is free and open to the public.

January, 2017
January, 2017

QCC is proud to announce new appointments in Academic Affairs:

Dr. Nancy Shoenfeld, new Interim VP of Academic Affairs, has been at QCC for 15 years, most recently as assistant VP of Academic Affairs. She was previously Dean of Human Services and Science, Biotechnology Program Coordinator and Coordinator of the Department of Natural Sciences. She began her career as a professor of...

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QCC is proud to announce new appointments in Academic Affairs:

Dr. Nancy Shoenfeld, new Interim VP of Academic Affairs, has been at QCC for 15 years, most recently as assistant VP of Academic Affairs. She was previously Dean of Human Services and Science, Biotechnology Program Coordinator and Coordinator of the Department of Natural Sciences. She began her career as a professor of biology at Bunker Hill Community College, before joining  QCC. She has taught in the community college system for approximately 25 years. She has been active in overseeing curriculum revisions, new program and course development, program, program planning for the Southbridge campus. She earned a bachelor’s in biology and chemistry from Wheaton College and a doctorate degree in physiology from Rutgers University.

Dr. Linda Esper, new Interim Dean of Healthcare, came to QCC in July 2016, as Director of Nurse Education. Dr. Esper has more than 34 years of academic and administrative experience, most recently as the Director of the Nursing Department and a Professor of Nursing at Becker College. She was also the Dean of Health Sciences at Becker College. Additionally, she has worked in clinical and educational roles in the private sector throughout Worcester County. Dr. Esper earned a bachelor’s degree of science in Urban Studies from Worcester State University, a Registered Nurse degree from Worcester City Hospital School of Nursing, a master’s degree of science in nursing from Anna Maria College, a master’s degree in Business Administration from Anna Maria College and an Ed.D. in Educational Leadership from University of Hartford.

Dr. Jen Arner Welsh, new Interim Dean of the School of Public Service and Social Sciences, has been with Quinsigamond Community College since 2009. She brings into this role her experience as a tenured professor of Psychology and Coordinator of the General Studies program, as well as many years of service to the college on committees addressing NEASC Standards, Curriculum Review, Learning Council, and Transfer Advising. In addition, she has provided instruction at Fitchburg State University, Clark University and DePauw University on courses involving Psychology, Gender Issues and Sexual Assault; has prior higher education work experience in Residence Life and Financial Aid; and is a recipient of several honors and awards including the NISOD Excellence Award. Ms. Welsh earned a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Earlham College, Indiana, and both a master’s degree and doctorate degree in developmental psychology from Clark University.

January, 2017
January, 2017

We are very pleased to announce the addition of the following new staff members to Quinsigamond Community College:

On January 3, 2017, Enrollment Management, Student Engagement and Community Connections welcomed Caitlin Laurie as Associate Director of Operations and Student Service (Financial Aid Office). Ms. Laurie brings over 7 years of financial Aid experience to...

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We are very pleased to announce the addition of the following new staff members to Quinsigamond Community College:

On January 3, 2017, Enrollment Management, Student Engagement and Community Connections welcomed Caitlin Laurie as Associate Director of Operations and Student Service (Financial Aid Office). Ms. Laurie brings over 7 years of financial Aid experience to this position. Most recently, she was a Senior Financial Aid Counselor here at QCC. Prior to her work at QCC, she was an Assistant Director of Financial Aid at Clark University. Ms. Laurie earned a Bachelor’s of Arts in Communications and Culture and a Master of Science in Professional Communication from Clark University.

On January 3, 2017, Administrative Services welcomed Kellie VanCott as Accountant I (Business Office). Ms. VanCott brings to this position over 5 years of experience in accounting. Most recently, she was an Accounting Assistant at Hanover Insurance Company.  Ms. VanCott earned an Associate of Science in Business Administration from Quinsigamond Community College. 

On January 3, 2017, Academic Affairs welcomed Christine McNally into a new role as Program Specialist, Business Development (Center for Workforce Development & Continuing Education). Ms. McNally brings over 15 years of non-traditional student training, non-profit and higher education experience to this position. Ms. McNally earned a Bachelor’s of Science in Liberal Studies and a Certificate in Professional Management from Assumption College.  

On January 9, 2017, Academic Affairs welcomed Kathleen O’Connor into a new role as Program Manager, Center for Workforce Development & Continuing Education. Ms. O’Connor brings over 18 years of non-traditional student training and higher education experience to this position. Most recently, she was the Corporate Training Specialist here at Quinsigamond Community College. Ms. O’Connor earned a Bachelor’s of Science in Special Education from Fitchburg State University.  

On January 9, 2017, Academic Affairs welcomed Jeremy Jungbluth into a new role as Program Manager of Adult Learning Community. Mr. Jungbluth brings over 9 years of teaching, program management, non-profit and higher education experience to this position. Most recently, he is a Literacy Specialist at Holyoke Community College. Mr. Jungbluth earned a Master of Education in Curriculum and Instruction from University of Illinois at Chicago.

On January 17, 2017, Academic Affairs welcomed Tenisha Perez into a new role as Clerk III-Career & Academic Advisement Offices (Advising & SETC). Ms. Perez brings over four years of administrative and customer service experience to this position and has earned an Associates in Executive Administration from Salter College.  

On January 23, 2017, Administrative Services welcomed Vanessa Landyn as Events and Office Manager. Ms. Landyn has been working at Quinsigamond Community College since 2006. Most recently as an Administrator for Healthcare and Workforce Development Center. Ms. Landyn also brings to this position experience in the private sector as an office manager and project manager. Ms. Landyn earned a Bachelor’s of Arts in Psychology and a Master in Business Administration from St. John’s University. 

On January 23, 2017, Academic Affairs welcomed Nicole Dellasanta as Learning Manager, General Academic Areas (Coordinator, Learning Resources). Ms. Dellasanta has been working at Quinsigamond Community College since 2009, most recently, as the substitute learning manager, GAA. She is also an adjunct faculty member in the English department. Ms. Dellasanta earned a Bachelor of Arts in English from Assumption College and a Master of Arts in English from Clark University.   

On January 30, 2017, Enrollment Management, Student Engagement and Community Connections welcomed Betsy Groves as Associate Director of Technology and Systems (Financial Aid Office). Ms. Groves brings over 20 years of Financial Aid and higher education experience to this position. Most recently, she was an Implementation Specialist in the private sector assisting schools implement academic administrative software. Prior to that experience, she was the Director of Financial Aid  at University of Massachusetts Medical School. Ms. Groves earned a Bachelor’s of Science from University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth. 

Please join us in welcoming our new staff into their new roles.